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ISSUE: Volume 45, Number 32: April 02, 2008

Contents
Top Stories
Higher Learning Commission visits UND April 7
Higher Learning Commission may conduct drop-in visits next week
Center of Excellence proposals are due June 9
Events to Note
Hands-On Learning Fair is April 19
Open house for newly-remodeled pharmacy is through April 11
Author of "Generation Me" to give lecture April 2
Digital sound recital/demonstration is April 2
Theology for Lunch begins April 2
Apartment community hosts Kupchella performance, acrobatics demonstration
Doctoral examination set for Jana C. McCormick
James Moliterno to discuss exporting American legal ethics
Bill Ayers speaks April 3
Sustainable agriculture, land use change in the Northern Plains
Cooperstown Medical Center to host community forum
Bangladesh Night is April 3
Doctoral examination set for Sofokli Garo
Primary care expert presents Dean's Hour address Friday
Using GIS to study evolution of invasive species
Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics seminar is Friday
Pancakes for awareness set for April 5
Kids fly for free at Crookston fly-in
Experience art collections at Afternoon of the Arts
Scott Wolter lectures on Kensington Rune Stone
Global Visions film series features "The Clay Bird" April 8
Check out these classes at Wellness Center's Burnt Toast Kitchen
Doctoral examination set for Dan Thomas Jensen
Post-traumatic stress talk is April 9
University sponsors 2008 Diversity Conference April 9-10
Note men's hockey pre-game fan gathering
Essential Studies transition summit set for April 11
Doctoral examination set for Pauline Stonehouse
PAC-W presents "A Glimpse Through the Glass Ceiling"
Doctoral examination set for Brandon J. Semler
Doctoral examination set for Michael Adam Bitz
Doctoral examination set for Rebecca Anhorn
Astronomy public talk is April 15
Theatre Arts presents "Bus Stop"
Doctoral examination set for Adonica Schultz Aune
Doctoral examination set for Anne M. Haskins
Extended Writing Across the Curriculum faculty workshop set for May
Register now for R&D Showcase
American Indian Health Research Conference is April 18
Museum seeking jewelry donations for children's fundraiser.
Conflict Resolution Center lists mediation training events
Awards banquet set for May 13; nominations sought
Announcements
Gregory Patton, Robert Boyd honored by Mortar Board
Grants and Contracts office closes for PeopleSoft review, testing
Researchers with NIH funding may be subject to new mandate
Valid photo ID required for personal check payments
Funding available for curriculum development retreat
Call for models of innovation, best practices in teaching and learning
Rural health coalition forms
Submissions sought for Merrifield competition
Nominations sought for Memorial Union Leadership Awards
Large passenger van training offered
Note University printing procedures
Need help in choosing a new text for your class?
Spots available for Kids Summer Arts Day Camp
Studio One features exercising at work, new home for church
U2 lists workshops
Get free publicity for your UND summer events
UND Aerospace receives Cessna Citation Mustang
International Programs newsletter available online
Shuttle bus service highly recommended to Democratic Convention
Museum Cafe lists soups, specials
Work Well and Wellness Center sponsors "But I'm Just Too Busy...!"
Note health club membership reimbursements
Frozen Four hockey T-shirts available
Alumni says thanks for making UND in Minneapolis successful
Ray Richards golf course 2008 season passes now available
Internal job openings listed
In the News
Kenneth Ruit appointed to NCACS
Awards honor rural and public health
Nursing student named 2008 North Dakota Student Nurse of the Year
In Remembrance
Remembering Lee Nybo
Higher Learning Commission visits UND April 7

On April 7-8, UND will host two site visitors from the Higher Learning Commission, our institutional accrediting association. They will be specifically examining progress made on assessment of student learning, an area of deficiency identified during our comprehensive visit in 2003. Some faculty have been asked to attend particular events at the request of the visiting team. All interested faculty, however, are invited to attend an "open session with faculty" scheduled for 3 p.m. Monday, April 7. This session will be held in the Memorial Room, Memorial Union, and it is important to have a good turnout.

You may also want to notify students that an open session with students will be held at 4 p.m. Monday, April 7, also in the Memorial Room.
-- Joan Hawthorne, Assistant Provost, VPAA/Provost, joan_hawthorne@und.nodak.edu, 7-4684

Higher Learning Commission may conduct drop-in visits next week

The Higher Learning Commission will conduct an accreditation site visit Monday and Tuesday, April 7 and 8. Following is some information about the visit.

Institutional Accreditation: Why it matters, how we're doing, and what to expect in preparation for the accreditation site visit to UND.

Colleges and universities across the United States are expected to maintain accreditation by one of the regional accrediting agencies sanctioned by Congress. In our geographic area, the accrediting agency for higher education is the Higher Learning Commission (HLC) of the North Central Association (NCA) of Colleges and Schools.

Why does this matter to us? As a major state university, why should we be subject to a "voluntary" accrediting association?

The fact is that institutional accreditation is voluntary only in the loosest possible sense of that term. No institution is eligible for any federal dollars unless it's accredited. That means no Pell grants or federally guaranteed loans for students (and hence, realistically, no students). It means faculty and researchers become ineligible for funding from federal agencies like NSF or NIH. It means federally funded student support programs like Trio or McNair Scholars disappear. In short, no mainstream institution, including UND, can survive without institutional accreditation.

The HLC made its last comprehensive visit to UND in 2003-2004. But UND did not fully satisfy site visitors at that time. As a result, the HLC required UND to prepare for a special "focused visit" in 2007-08. During the visit, we are expected to demonstrate to our site visitors that we have made significant progress on assessment of student learning, an area singled out as a significant weakness in 2003-04.

What exactly did the HLC say was wrong?

UND needs to "provide evidence that UND is moving toward maturing levels of continuous improvement and that faculty, students, and administrators across the University are involved in the assessment process."

More specifically, all programs should have:
1. identified measurable learning goals;
2. established more than one direct measure of student learning as well as indirect measures;
3. reviewed outcomes of such measures;
4. taken actions indicated by the outcomes (e.g., changes to program requirements, courses, levels of expectations, etc.).

The institution should be able to:
1. document its attention to the process;
2. cite examples of actions taken at the department, college, and institutional levels (a) both in implementation of assessment of student academic achievement, and (b) in response to outcomes obtained from such assessment.

Please translate. What will the HLC be looking for when they return to UND on April 7 and 8?

The following will certainly be at the top of their list:

1. When HLC visitors drop by faculty meetings or chat with faculty in their offices, do those faculty understand what assessment of student learning is? Are they engaged in it, in their courses or through their departments?

2. Does every department have a plan for assessment of student learning? Are they working on those plans, or are they just paperwork (while the department continues with business as usual)?

3. Is UND actively engaged in assessment of general education? Are we looking at outcomes of general education courses, and outcomes of the program as a whole?

4. Are faculty and staff at UND using the data they collect to make changes with the goal of improved student learning outcomes? Have we developed a culture of assessment, so that discussion of a curricular change, for example, includes conversation about how we know, based on the evidence that's been collected, the change is needed?

What will be expected of me?
Everyone on campus should be familiar with the Executive Summary (find it online at
< www.und.edu/org/hlc/hlc_executivesummary.pdf>) and be prepared to visit with a member of the site visit team if requested to do so. You may also want to review the full HLC self-study document (about 30 pages in total) or other brief summary documents, all of which are available for you on the Accreditation Self-Study Report Web site (find this through the A-Z index).

If site visitors request an opportunity to meet with you or with a group of which you are a part, please make yourself available to the fullest extent possible. Some members of the UND community may receive last-minute telephone calls on April 7 or 8 if the site visitors decide during the course of their visit that additional conversations or materials would be helpful. Please do everything you possibly can to cooperate with such requests.

And finally:
Members of the university community have made tremendous progress in assessment during the last few years and, even more important, institutional structures are now in place to support our ongoing improvement in this area - thanks to you and to your colleagues who've been involved. This speaks to your commitment to the institution, and, especially, to our students. Thank you for all you've done! We hope this visit goes smoothly, and it's people like you who will have made it possible.

Members of the HLC Steering Committee
Co-chairs: Helen Melland (Nursing), Joan Hawthorne (assistant provost);
Members: Kim Kenville (School of Aerospace Sciences), Paul Sum (College of Business and Public Administration), Richard Schultz (School of Engineering and Mines), Eric Johnson (Law School), Margaret Healy (College of Education and Human Development), Sherrie Fleshman (College of Arts and Sciences), Wayne Swisher (Graduate School), Renee Mabey (School of Medicine and Health Sciences), Lillian Elsinga (Dean of Students), Jane Sims (Division of Continuing Education)

Former Members: Robert Newman (College of Arts and Sciences), Duane Helleloid (College of Business and Public Administration), and Kirsten Dauphinais (Law School).

Center of Excellence proposals are due June 9

Dear All,

The Centers of Excellence Application for the 2008 round of Center approvals was released by the Department of Commerce and calls for the submission of proposals by June 9. The application form is available on the UND Research Web site at http://www.und.edu/dept/research/ . Please note that the form will open as a Word document file.

I have asked Gary Johnson to coordinate and track all submissions from UND. Please advise the Office of the Vice President for Research, garyejohnson@mail.und.nodak.edu as soon as possible if you intend to submit a proposal in response to the current announcement. This will let us gauge the number of proposals expected from the UND campus. As with the previous round, it is expected that UND will be limited to a maximum of five proposals.

Please note that "The approval and recommendation by the President of the University is required to insure that the funding request is consistent with the mission and development plans of the institution." Please route proposals through the Office of the Vice President for Research by June 5 for review and for my signature.

Please make this announcement known to all faculty and professional staff in your areas of responsibility.

Note that the questions about the application process or the Centers of Excellence program may be directed to:
Justin Dever, Manager
Office of Innovation and Strategic Initiatives
North Dakota Department of Commerce
701 328 7258 (office)
701 202 6767 (cell)
jdever@nd.gov
www.ndcommerce.com

Hands-On Learning Fair is April 19

Children, birth through age 7 and their families, are invited to attend the Hands-On Learning Fair, a free family event that is part of the Month of the Young Child and Child Abuse Prevention Month celebrations in April. The 17th annual Hands-On Learning Fair will be held from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, April 19, at the Purpur Arena in Grand Forks. The fair features an exciting variety of learning activities for children age birth to 7 and their families, as well as parent information displays. The mayor’s proclamation will kick off the event at 9:45 a.m. "Bring Communities Together for Children —Children Bring Communities Together" is this year’s national theme, emphasizing how critical early education is to the vitality of each community. Sponsors of the event are the Northeast Chapter of the North Dakota Association for the Education of Young Children and Prevent Child Abuse North Dakota. Its purposes include:
* To provide an exciting way for children ages birth to 7 and their families in the Grand Forks and East Grand Forks area to celebrate this special month.
* To underscore the importance of parent involvement to healthy development and optimal early learning in children.
* To create awareness of learning as a process that begins at birth and continues lifelong, with the most rapid brain development occurring during early childhood.
* To highlight the nature of appropriate early education as hands-on, or experiential, building on children's inborn curiosity and motivation to understand their world.

Creative art, language, science, math, sensory exploration, dramatic play, music, games, and stories are among the many choices of age-appropriate activities for children attending the Hands-On Learning Fair. There is also a parent/infant interaction area designed for the very young. Emphasis is on active involvement in the learning process, rather than entertainment, with learning as its own reward. Adults guide children in their explorations, allowing the youngsters to experience the joy of discovery. There are also informational exhibits for parents.

Local early childhood programs, including the University Children’s Center and many other entities involved in early education and development, provide these learning activities. These professionals plan and carry out the educational experiences on a voluntary basis, applying the same commitment and expertise with which they engage in their regular early care and education responsibilities. In the spirit of working together for children, Dakota Science Center’s Super Science Saturday and the annual Scout Show will be in the adjacent Gambucci Arena.

Community partners for this year’s Hands-On Learning Fair are Grand Forks County Social Services, Tri-Valley Child Care Resource and Referral, Healthy Families, Northland Community and Technical College Early Childhood Program, Safe Kids Grand Forks, Parent Information Center, Lakes and Prairies Child Care Resource and Referral, Dakota Science Center, and Boy Scouts of America. Many area businesses, institutions, service clubs and individuals donate goods and services for the celebration. These include the Grand Forks Park District, and the University of North Dakota. Their support and the hundreds of hours contributed by early childhood educators have helped to achieve 16 years of success for this family event — and to keep it free of charge.
-- Jo-Anne Yearwood, Director/Instructor, Teaching and Learning, joanneyearwood@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3947

Open house for newly-remodeled pharmacy is through April 11

Students, faculty, and staff are invited to attend an open house to celebrate the newly-remodeled Student Health Services Pharmacy. The open house is from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. through Friday, April 11 at Student Health Services in McCannel Hall. Enjoy free food and register for door prizes, including a massage and food court gift certificates. Be sure to check out the wide variety of affordable over-the-counter products.
-- Theresa Magelky, Graduate Research Assistant, Student Health Promotions Office, theresa.magelky@und.edu, 701-777-2097

Author of "Generation Me" to give lecture April 2

The Graduate School is excited to host Jean Twinge, author of “Generation Me." Dr. Twenge’s lecture will be held at 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 2, in the Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union. The title of her lecture is “Generation Me: How When You Were Born Influences Your Personality and Outlook on Life.” Please join us for refreshments in the Fireside Lounge at 3.30 p.m. This event is free and open to the public.

For more information about Dr. Twenge's research, and for reviews of "Generation Me", visit her Web site at www.generationme.org
-- Susan Caraher, Marketing & External Relations, The Graduate School, susancaraher@mail.und.edu, 777-2524

Digital sound recital/demonstration is April 2

The (Sound) Wave of the Future: Blah-Blah-Blah, Blee-Blee-Blee. UND music faculty Ronnie Ingle and Michael Wittgraf will give a recital/demonstration on the future of digital sound. Dr. Ingle will use electronic valve instruments and Dr. Wittgraf will use KYMA software. Come and explore the sonic possibilities at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 2, in the Josephine Campbell Recital Hall, Hughes Fine Arts Center. Admission is free.
-- Michael Wittgraf, Associate Professor, Music, michael.wittgraf@und.edu, 777-4716

Apartment community hosts Kupchella performance, acrobatics demonstration

The UND Apartment Community Center is hosting two events in honor of Celebrate U Week. Everyone is welcome to attend President Kupchella's coffeehouse performance at the Aparment Community Center at 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 9. This will be one of his final performances as UND's president, and a first for this venue. The Wushu Dragon & Lion Acrobatics Team will perform at 7 p.m. at the Apartment Community Center Friday, April 11. -- Apartment Community Center.

Theology for Lunch begins April 2

Theology for Lunch features Faith Stories, Part II, Wednesdays at noon April 2, 9, 16, and 23, at the Christus Rex Lutheran Campus Center, 3012 University Ave. A free lunch is provided; bring a friend.

In Part I, we explored the faiths of our global neighbors. Join us now as we explore some of the faiths we find in our own neighborhoods.
* Week 1: Roman Catholic (Newman Center)
* Week 2: Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (Christus Rex)
* Week 3: Lutheran Church Missouri Synod (Wittenberg Chapel)
* Week 4: Presbyterian (First Presbyterian Church, Grand Forks)

The series is sponsored by the Campus Ministry Association: St. Thomas Aquinas Newman Center, Wittenberg Lutheran Chapel, United Campus Ministry, and Christus Rex Lutheran Campus Center.
-- Jan Orvik, Writer/Editor, University Relations, janorvik@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3621

Doctoral examination set for Jana C. McCormick

The final examination for Jana C. McCormick, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in counseling psychology, is set for 1 p.m. Thursday, April 3, in 318 Montgomery Hall. The dissertation title is "The White Privilege Attitudes Scale -- General Version: A Validation Study." Michael Loewy (counseling psychology) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

James Moliterno to discuss exporting American legal ethics

James Moliterno, the Tazewell Taylor Professor of Law at William and Mary School of Law, will discuss “Exporting American Legal Ethics” at 3:30 p.m. Thursday, April 3, in the Baker Courtroom at the School of Law. Moliterno will be the inaugural speaker of the Mart Vogel Lecture on Professionalism and Legal Ethics. The lecture is free and open to the public.

Moliterno earned his J.D. from Akron University. He joined the faculty of William & Mary School of Law in 1988; in addition to teaching, he is the director of the Legal Skills Program and director of the Clinical Program. Moliterno’s areas of specialization include professional responsibility, civil procedure, clinical legal education, evidence, legal skills, legal writing, and the practice of law. Moliterno has practiced law at the West Virginia Legal Services Plan and has taught at Texas Tech, West Virginia and Puget Sound law schools.
-- Rob Carolin, Director of Alumni & Public Relations, Law School, carolin@law.und.edu, 777-2856

Bill Ayers speaks April 3

Bill Ayers, Distinguished Professor of Education at the University of Illinois, Chicago, will give a talk, "Freedom Now!", at 6 p.m. Thursday, April 3, in the the Ballroom, Memorial Union. There will be a book signing after the talk, with book sales of Dr. Ayers's recent texts available outside the lecture at the Ballroom from 6 to 9 p.m., courtesy of UND Barnes & Noble.

The Department of Educational Foundations and Research, The College of Education and Human Development and Students for a Democratic Society present the talk.
-- Richard Kahn, Assistant Professor of Educational Foundations and Research, EFR, richard.kahn@und.edu, 777-3431

Sustainable agriculture, land use change in the Northern Plains

What would the landscape of the Northern Plains look like if agriculture was sustainable? That depends on many factors, from one's definition of sustainability, to which agro ecosystem are found to be sustainable, to the long-term changes in our climate and more.

Frank Kutka of North Dakota State University's Dickinson Research Extension Center will discuss the long-term impacts of sustainable agriculture on landscape and watershed level processes and properties at 2 p.m. Thursday, April 3, in Room 210, Clifford Hall Auditorium.

Kutka coordinates the USDA Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) program in North and South Dakota as part of a cooperative arrangement between NDSU and SDSU. He has a bachelor's degree in biology from the University of Wisconsin, a master's degree in animal ecology from Iowa State University, and a Ph.D. in plant breeding from the Department of Plant Breeding and Genetics at Cornell University.

The presentation is part of the Northern Great Plains Center for People and the Environment Spring 2008 Colloquium Series. For more information, contact Michael Hill at 777-6071, or hillmj@aero.und.edu.

Cooperstown Medical Center to host community forum

The Cooperstown (N.D.) Medical Center has been selected as one of two sites in North Dakota to host a community forum on the future of rural health care, facilitated by the Center for Rural Health. The forum will take place from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Thursday, April 3, at the Park Place Assisted Living Facility, 1204 Park Place Ave., Cooperstown, N.D. It is open to anyone with an interest in the health and well-being of rural people and communities across the upper Midwest.

The forum will focus on the future of rural health care and feature a keynote presentation by Brad Gibbens, associate director for community development and policy at the UND Center for Rural Health.

“This is an excellent opportunity for us to learn about rural health care from one of the state’s top experts,” said Greg Stomp, Cooperstown Medical Center administrator. “Citizens can voice their concerns as well as offer ideas for solutions to make rural health care in Cooperstown and North Dakota better."

Attendees will participate in facilitated discussions on items such as health care costs, maintaining access to quality services, and health care workforce availability.

“Rural health care is important not only for improving health status, but also as part of the rural economic system. Rural health organizations are typically in the top two employers in a community,” said Gibbens. “However, the viability of such organizations is more and more threatened. Public discussion and input is critical to thinking through options for the future of rural health in North Dakota.

“Our goal in having these community meetings is to offer health care consumers a chance to learn more about rural health at the national and state level. Health care is in the national spotlight and is an important subject in the upcoming elections. A community meeting allows people to also share their thoughts on what they see as issues, what they see that is working, and how health care should be reformed.”

For more information, contact Greg Stomp or Pam Ressler at (701) 797-2221.
-- Wendy Opsahl, Communications Coordinator, Center for Rural Health, wopsahl@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-0871

Bangladesh Night is April 3

Thursday, April 3, is Bangladesh Night at the Loading Dock in the Memorial Union. Come learn about the culture and customs of Bangladesh and stay to try some typical food. The program is free and begins at 7 p.m.; food is $1 per try.
-- Shannon Jolly, International Student Advisor, International Programs, shannonjolly@mail.und.edu, 777-4118

Doctoral examination set for Sofokli Garo

The final examination for Sofokli Garo, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in teaching and learning, is set for 9 a.m. Friday, April 4, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "Educational Practices and Students' Achievement in Algebra 1: A Cross-Cultural Perspective." Lars Helgeson (teaching and learning) and Michele Iiams (mathematics) are the committee co-chairs. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Primary care expert presents Dean's Hour address Friday

Robert Ferrer, associate professor and deputy chair for research, Department of Family and and Community Medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, will present a Dean's Hour address at noon, Friday, April 4, in the Keller Auditorium, Wold Center, the Medical School's southwest addition at 501 N. Columbia Rd.

Dr. Ferrer received his medical degree from the Hahnemann University School of Medicine. He completed his family medicine residency at Duke University and a National Research Service Award Fellowship and MPH at the University of Washington.

Dr. Ferrer's research interests include the relationship between social class and health outcomes, as well as the effect of primary care on population health. In 2002, he was selected as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Generalist Physician Faculty Scholar. Dr. Ferrer practices and teaches at an outpatient clinic in San Antonio that serves disadvantaged inner-city residents. He is on the medical staff at University Hospital in San Antonio.

The presentation, free and open to the public, will be broadcast at the following UND medical school video-conferencing sites: Southwest Campus conference Room A in Bismarck, Southeast Campus Room 225 in Fargo, and the Northwest Campus Office in Minot. It is also available through H.323 (Internet videoconferencing) on the BT-WAN and at medical school employees' desktop computers through the CRISTAL Recorder.

The Dean's Hour Lecture Series is a forum for the discussion of health care, medicine, research, education and related issues of the day. -- School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

Using GIS to study evolution of invasive species

Alycia Stigall of the Ohio University at Athens will present two LEEPS lectures this Friday, April 4, in Leonard Hall. The noon talk in Room 100 is “Using GIS and Phylogenetic Biogeography to Quantify Biogeographic Patterns in Late Devonian Brachiopod and Bivalve Species Invasions over Short Temporal Intervals.” The 3 p.m. talk in Room 109 is on “Taphonomy of High-Latitude Jurassic Lake Deposits of Antarctica.”

The LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary Sciences) lecture series brings speakers to UND’s Department of Geology and Geological Engineering throughout the year and, as always, all are welcome to attend.

Dr. Stigall is a graduate of the University of Kansas and is on the advisory board for the Ohio Center for Ecology and Evolutionary Studies. Dr. Stigall has been named both the Outstanding Teacher and Researcher of the Year in the Department of Geological Sciences at Ohio University.
-- Joseph Hartman, Associate Professor, Geology and Geological Engineering, joseph_hartman@und.edu, 777-5055

Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics seminar is Friday

Karen Duff, professor of pathology at Columbia University, will present a seminar titled, "Abnormal Phosphorylation as a Pathogenic Mechanism in Alzheimer’s Disease," at 1 p.m. Friday, April 4, in Room 3933, School of Medicine. This seminar is sponsored by the Center of Biomedical Research Excellence Pathophysiological Signalling in Neurodegenerative Disorders and the Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics. All are welcome to attend.
-- Deb Kroese, Administrative Officer, Pharmacology, Physiology & Therapeutics, dkroese@medicine.nodak.edu, 7-6221

Pancakes for awareness set for April 5

Pancakes for Awareness about Violence against Students: In Memory of Dru Sjodin, Mindy Morgenstern and Anita Knutson will be held Saturday, April 5, from 8 to 10 a.m. at Applebee's in the two Greater Grand Forks locations and three Fargo locations. Students from around North Dakota will serve pancakes.

Grand Forks/East Grand Forks:
1. 415 Second St. NW, East Grand Forks, Minn.
2. 2851 S. Columbia Road, Grand Forks

Tickets are $5 pre-sale or at the door.

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month. All proceeds go to Dru's Dive: Awareness about Violence against Students and will be submitted to our scholarship fund with North Dakota Council on Abused Women Services for North Dakota residents to attend a North Dakota institution.

Volunteers are needed to sell tickets and work the event. If you cannot volunteer, please come and eat.

Dru's Dive is a campaign with the mission to increase Awareness about Violence against Students. The objective is to unite people across the state of North Dakota in the cause, increase Awareness about Violence against Students, and to create multiple scholarships to be distributed through the North Dakota Council on Abused Women's Services (NDCAWS) in the names of the three students in North Dakota who have been murdered, Dru Sjodin (UND), Mindy Morgenstern (VCSU), and Anita Knutson (MSU).

For more information, please contact Shelle Michaels, state advocate,
shellemichaels@msn.com or (218) 779-7271, www.drusvoice.com ( http://www.drusvoice.com/ )

Kids fly for free at Crookston fly-in

The UND Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) Chapter will hold its annual Fly-In at the Crookston airport from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, April 5. There will be activities for the whole family which include a free BBQ, refreshments, aircraft on display, PC Flight Simulators, and flights with a UND pilot (free of charge for kids ages 8 to 17). A legal guardian must be present to sign a permission form for each child wishing to fly. For information on the EAA Young Eagles’ program visit www.youngeagles.org.

If you have any questions about this event, please feel free to call or e-mail Taylor (Taylor.butterfield@und.edu) or Keegan Karp at (970) 227-7116 (Keegan.karp@und.edu).
-- Karen Ryba, Director of Communications, Aerospace, ryba@aero.und.edu, 701-777-4761

Experience art collections at Afternoon of the Arts

The University of North Dakota celebrates 125 years with two art collections that have never before been seen in their entirety at an Afternoon of the Arts from 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday, April 6.

An exhibition showcasing selections from the UND art collection will be on display at the Colonel Eugene E. Myers Art Gallery, Edmond A. Hughes Fine Arts Center, featuring recently found pieces of the UND art collection that have been reframed, as well as recently acquired works. This collection includes numerous contemporary art works, some by students and former students of UND, as well as artists such as Andy Warhol. Arthur Jones, chair of the Department of Art and exhibition curator, will present a gallery talk on this exhibition at 2:30 p.m. in the Myers Art Gallery.

Across the coulee, an exhibition of works by Native North American artists from the University of North Dakota Art Collections will open at the North Dakota Museum of Art. The exhibition will highlight the University’s extensive holding of Native North American art, including numerous historical, traditional and ceremonial objects, some with intricate bead and quillwork. Dr. Jones will present a gallery talk on the Native American Art collection at 4 p.m. in the Museum. This exhibition will be up through June 1, and can be viewed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and on weekends from 1 to 5 p.m.

The afternoon will be alive with music and art, as well as refreshments. Live walking tours between the Hughes Fine Arts Center and the North Dakota Museum of Art will occur every half hour, and current UND art students will provide narrative about pieces within the collection and outdoor sculptures along the walk.

This is a rain or shine event, and weather contingencies are being planned. The event is sponsored by the UND 125th Anniversary Committee, as well as the Department of Art and the North Dakota Museum of Art.

For more information on UND 125th anniversary events, visit 125.und.edu.
-- Benjamin Klipfel, Marketing Coordinator, 125th Anniversary, benjamin.klipfel@und.edu, 7-0857

Scott Wolter lectures on Kensington Rune Stone

Scott Wolter, professional geologist and president of American Petrographic Services, will address "The Kensington Rune Stone: Compelling New Evidence about Vikings in Minnesota" at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 8, at the Idea Lab, Ina Mae Rude Entrepreneur Center. Admission fee is $5; students are free.

Controversy has raged ever since 1898 when Olaf Ohman, a Swedish immigrant farmer working his fields near what is now Alexandria, Minn., found a 202-pound, mysteriously engraved stone tangled in the roots of an uprooted tree. Experts have debated whether this runic writing was authentic. The stone, dated 1362, soon provided how difficult the search for the truth can be - and raised eyebrows over the possibility that Nordic explorers predated Columbus in America by more than a century. Most historians, archaeologists and linguists over the decades have said "nonsense" to the idea that wandering Norsemen in 1362 got to Minnesota and left a carved stone in memory of slain members of their expedition. What is the truth after 110 years?

Geologist Scott Wolter will talk about his exhaustive research and objective analysis on this rune stone. Wolter will discuss some of the initial tests that were done on the stone, and why it was initially called a fake. He will also review what was new in his research, including his scientific process for testing the stone and how it brings new light to the rune stone. Wolters will cover the geological evidence, previously ignored but unmistakable, and now a powerful dating testimony; an astounding connection to previously undeciphered runes found in the graveyards of Sweden; a treasure trove of unknown letters from the Ohman family themselves -- as well as private interviews that break a decades-long silence on critical events; and the final decoding of the curious, but deliberate, anomalies in several significant runes.

Scott Wolter has been president of American Petrographic Services of St. Paul since 1990, and is responsible for the independent petrographic analysis testing laboratory. Petrography deals with the description and classification of rocks, especially by microscopic examination. He has been principal petrographer in over 5,000 investigations throughout the United States as well as Canada and Puerto Rico, including the evaluation of fire-damaged concrete at the Pentagon following the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Wolter published a book, "The Kensington Rune Stone: Compelling New Evidence," with Richard Nielsen, where they presented the startling new evidence on the authenticity of the stone by compiling their 25 years of collective research on the artifact.

This speaking engagement is co-sponsored by three Norwegian-affiliated organizations in Greater Grand Forks: Nordic Initiative, Norseman Federation, and the Association of Norwegian Students Abroad (ANSA) at UND.

Global Visions film series features "The Clay Bird" April 8

The Global Visions film series will present "The Clay Bird" (Bangladesh) at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 8, in the Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union. Admission is free.

This is probably an unusual, but perhaps apt, time for this intelligent drama, easily one of the finest pictures of 2003 or any other year. Tareque Masud's expansive fluidity is rapturous, inspired equally by the floating equanimity of Satyajit Ray and the work of the Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami, who deftly uses ritual behavior to provide social commentary. Set in Bangladesh in the 1960s, "The Clay Bird" questions the nature of dedication to Islam. It doesn't attack fealty but eventually rebukes zealotry by showing a boy's reaction to his father's recent total immersion. Anu (Nurul Islam Bablu) is sent off to a religious school by his father, Kazi (Jayanto Chattopadhyay). Kazi doesn't want his son tainted by the outside world. His obedient though doubtful wife, Ayesha (Rokeya Prachy), quietly expresses through frowns her concern about Kazi's close-minded new seriousness. She gently reasons with her boy, and the bright Anu resigns himself to his new life. Mr. Masud's sensitivity gives the film a pungent emotional clarity; he recognizes that naïveté isn't a province only of childhood. Kazi's a naïf, too, and learns the hard way that following a path without independent thought is a fool's errand. He's ultimately devastated when he learns of the civil war and Muslims attacking other Muslims: the revolution is coming, and it claims Kazi's way of life. — Elvis Mitchell, The New York Times

The Department of Anthropology’s Global Visions film series brings an exciting array of films to the community of Grand Forks for the fifth consecutive year. Two films are presented each month in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. The series is currently the only venue in Grand Forks to view award-winning, nationally recognized independent films from a wide variety of contemporary film makers around the world.

All films are at 7 p.m. on various Tuesday evenings between now and the end of April at the UND Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. The series, free and open to the public, is partially funded by the Multicultural Awareness Committee. Filmgoers are encouraged to come early to ensure a seat.

The last movie will be April 22, "The Wind Will Carry Us" (Iran).

This series is funded by the Multicultural Awareness Committee, and the Department of Anthropology and the Anthropology Club.
-- Marcia Mikulak, Assistant Professor, Anthropology, marcia.mikulak@und.nodak.edu, 777-4718

Check out these classes at Wellness Center's Burnt Toast Kitchen

Check out the following classes at Wellness Center's Burnt Toast Kitchen.

Italian Cooking
Tuesday, April 8, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Cost is $10.
Tom Petros joins Sonia Marrone for more adventures in Italian cooking. Learn ways to cook authentic Italian food from two Italian cooking experts. This class will focus on preparing basic Italian fare with a healthy flair.

Amazing Appetizers
Wednesday, April 9, 6 to 7 p.m. Cost is $6.
All good appetizers don’t have to be deep fried and unhealthy. Learn to make a variety of healthy appetizers that will make any group rave.

One-Pot Meals
Thursday, April 10, 6 to 7:30 p.m. Cost is $6.
Are you tired of cleaning up all the pots and pans after making a delicious meal? Cut that down to a minimum and join us in the Burnt Toast kitchen for one-pot meals. Learn delicious recipes that only require one pot from start to finish.

Classes are located in the Wellness Center Burnt Toast Demo Kitchen.
Sign up for classes 24 hours in advance at the Wellness Center welcome desk. For more information, please contact me.
-- Leah Wagner, Coordinator of Wellness Programs, Wellness Center, leahwagner@mail.und.nodak.edu , 777-0842

Doctoral examination set for Dan Thomas Jensen

The final examination for Dan Thomas Jensen, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in educational leadership, is set for 9 a.m. Wednesday, April 9, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is: "Catholic Identity and Mission in Post Ex Corde Ecclesiae Catholic Higher Education: The Perceptions and Experiences of Lay Faculty at a Jesuit University." Margaret Healy (educational leadership) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Post-traumatic stress talk is April 9

A post-traumatic stress counselor, Jim Tougas from the Vet's Center in Fargo, will give an informal talk on "Post Traumatic Stress" on at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 9, in the top floor lounge, of the student Memorial Union. This is located next to the Veterans' Upward Bound Program office, which is co-located with the Adult Re-Entry program. Colleen Reuter is the director of Veterans' Upward Bound and her number is 777-6465.

University sponsors 2008 Diversity Conference April 9-10

The University of North Dakota, in conjunction with the North Dakota University System Diversity Council and the Multicultural Awareness Committee (MAC), will sponsor the 2008 Diversity Conference Wednesday and Thursday, April 9-10, at the Memorial Union. This year's theme, "Understanding the Experience," provides participants with the opportunity to learn about issues that challenge current understandings of the world around us, including race, ethnicity, religion, culture, sexual orientation, life style, and learning.

The purpose of the Diversity Conference is to educate communities to be responsive to the needs of all publics and encourage training in campus and community human relations. Members of the North Dakota higher education institutions, other institutions within the region, and the public are invited to attend to learn about diversity issues that impact the lives of students, faculty, staff, and the broader community.

The two-day conference will features sessions by faculty and staff from UND and other institutions, as well as nationally known speakers and panelists. Session topics will include current challenges in education that impact perceptions of economic status, class, sexual orientation, race and ethnic backgrounds, religion and culture, learning styles, images in society, and more. Through "Understanding the Experience," participants will gain a broader appreciation and commitment to diversity by learning to respect differences and promote support for others in learning environments and broader communities.

There is no cost to attend the conference, and all participants must pre-register by Monday, April 7, to determine counts for meals and materials. Registration includes entry to all panel discussions and conference events, supplemental resource materials, all meals and breaks. The conference is coordinated by the UND Office of Conference Services.

For a registration form, complete conference schedule and more information, visit www.conted.und.edu/diversity or call UND Office of Conference Services at 777-2663 or 866-579-2663 (toll free) or e-mail conferences@mail.und.edu (ATTN: Diversity).

Note men's hockey pre-game fan gathering

Cheer on the Fighting Sioux men's hockey team at the Frozen Four. All UND alumni, students, friends and fans are welcome at a Fan Gathering before and after the Fighting Sioux men's hockey game Thursday, April 10, at Brooklyns at The Pepsi Center, 901 Auraria Parkway, Denver, Colo. Gather anytime before the game at 6 p.m. and meet up again to celebrate after the game. There is no cost. Food and drinks will be available for purchase.

If you have questions about the party, please call (800) 543-8764 and ask for Meghan Hopps. The Denver Regency Hyatt has a Frozen Four room rate available for hockey fans.
* Great fan rates that include a $20 dining credit each night of your stay!
* Just moments away from the Pepsi Center.
* Reserve your rooms at this great location before they are gone at http://denverregency.hyatt.com/groupbooking/denccfroz2008

Looking for a place to watch the game in your area? The semifinal games on Thursday will be carried on ESPN2, and the championship game will be on ESPN. For more information, log on to www.NCAA.com.

Essential Studies transition summit set for April 11

A year of transition for the new Essential Studies (ES) program continues with tremendous work being completed by the ES transition team, the general education requirement committee and others (for example, criteria have been developed to help faculty design and validate "A," "O," "G," "U," and "QR" special emphasis courses and are now available online at http://www.und.edu/dept/oid/summitsched.htm

Friday, April 11, 2008
* 8:30 to 10 a.m., GERC Revalidation Workshop (River Valley Room)
How to Get Your Course(s) Validated or Revalidated (And, What to Do to Fit Your Course Into the ES Transition)
* 10 to 11 a.m., The Nuts and Bolts of ES for Advisors, Staff, and Faculty (Lecture Bowl)
What Faculty, Programs, Advisors and Support Staff Need to Know About Essential Studies
* 11 a.m. to noon, ES Program Goals and Special Emphasis Courses (Lecture Bowl)
The Development of the ES Program and its Goals for Student Learning
* noon to 1 p.m., ES Roundtable Discussions (Swanson 10-12)
An informal lunch and table conversation about various aspects of the program

The ES program will be implemented for entering first-year UND students in fall 2008 and for transfer students in fall 2009. The program emphasizes a stronger focus on specific learning goals and advocates practices that will help students better understand the value of general education. If you have questions about the program, its goals or the special emphasis courses, and would like more information, join us for any or all of the sessions offered at the Transition Summit. Please indicate which sessions you will attend by e-mailing oid@und.nodak.edu . If you would like to join the box lunch discussion at noon, you must RSVP to instructional development via e-mail by April 3 to reserve a meal.
-- Anne Kelsch, Director, Office of Instructional Development, oid@und.nodak.edu, 777-3325


-- Ann Kelsch, Director, Instructional Development, anne_kelsch@und.nodak.edu, 777-3325

Doctoral examination set for Pauline Stonehouse

The final examination for Pauline Stonehouse, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Educational Leadership, is set for 1:00 p.m., April 11, 2008, in room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is: The Application of mVal Software in Assessing Teacher Performance: A Case Study. Dr. Gary Schnellert (Educational Leadership) is the committee chair.

The public is invited to attend.

-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

PAC-W presents "A Glimpse Through the Glass Ceiling"

The UND President’s Advisory Council on Women (PAC-W) presents "A Glimpse Through the Glass Ceiling: Challenges for Women in the Workforce" from 11 a.m. to noon or noon to 1 p.m. Friday, April 11, in the Memorial Union River Valley Room. During the first hour, several local women in leadership roles will share their individual stories about the interesting challenges and different expectations they face as a woman in their profession. The second hour will include a lunch buffet and a question/answer session with the panelists.

The panelists are Julie Tweit, grief support counselor and pastor; Deb Gordon Kleven, District Court judge; Christina Brown, M.D., family medicine resident; Deborah Carlson, juvenile court director; and Cres Compton, vice president, Alerus Financial.

These are two separate events; come to one or both. This event is free. To register for a free lunch, please RSVP no later than Friday, April 4, to Patty McIntyre (Women’s Center) at 777-4302. Space is limited to the first 100 people.
-- Patty McIntyre, Program Associate, Womens Center, undwomenscenter@und.nodak.edu, 777-4302

Doctoral examination set for Brandon J. Semler

The final examination for Brandon J. Semler, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in communication and public discourse, is set for 8:30 a.m. Monday, April 14, in 200 O'Kelly Hall. The dissertation title is "Exploring Future Workforce Perceptions of Leadership and Relationships." Pamela Kalbfleisch (communication) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Michael Adam Bitz

The final examination for Michael Adam Bitz, a candidate for the Ed.D. degree with a major in educational leadership, is set for 1 p.m. Monday, April 14, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "The Impact, on Equity, of Raising the Mill Deduct in the North Dakota Foundation Aid Formula." Larry Klundt (educational leadership) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Rebecca Anhorn

The final examination for Rebecca Anhorn, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in educational leadership, is set for 9 a.m. Monday, April 14, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "The Experiences of First Year Elementary Teachers." Sherryl Houdek (educational leadership) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Astronomy public talk is April 15

The Physics Department will hold an astronomy public talk and telescope observing session at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 15, in Witmer 116, 101 Cornell Street. The talk, "Space Age Myths," will be presented by David Whalen, chair of Space Studies. Following the talk, attendees will be able to observe the night sky through a telescope (weather permitting). For more information, see www.physics.und.edu/tour
-- Wayne Barkhouse, Assistant Professor, Physics, wayne.barkhouse@und.nodak.edu, 777-3520

Theatre Arts presents "Bus Stop"

The Department of Theatre Arts will present "Bus Stop" by William Inge, as its last production of the 2007–2008 season. "Bus Stop" is directed by Mary Cutler, professor of theatre arts. Performance dates are Tuesday, April 15, through Saturday, April 19. All performances will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Burtness Theatre. There will also be a matinee for area schools Friday, April 18, beginning at 10 a.m.

"Bus Stop" is a romantic comedy that charts the matrix of relationships between ordinary people who are in love, and those who think they are in love. It is a warm and endearing play that occasionally borders on the sentimental but, in turn, often reflects the character and resilience of people who live in the Midwest, where Inge was raised and educated. The play begins when a snow blizzard strands a group of bus passengers at a small diner 30 miles outside of Kansas City. Among the characters are a pretty lounge singer, Cherie; Bo, a stubborn cowboy who attempts to take Cherie home to his ranch in Montana to marry her, oblivious to the fact that she does not love him; Virgil, Bo’s buddy and often responsible for keeping Bo out of trouble; Dr. Lyman, an Ivy League educated alcoholic who likes his women younger than himself, especially the diner’s high school-age waitress, Elma; Grace, the owner of the diner who is secretly having a relationship with Carl the bus driver, and Will, the town sheriff.

"Bus Stop" premiered on Broadway in 1955 starring Kim Stanley as the young chanteuse, Cherie. The following year, the play was the basis for the film "Bus Stop," starring Marilyn Monroe, also as Cherie. Prior to "Bus Stop," Inge received critical and commercial success with his plays "Come Back, Little Sheba" (1950) and "Picnic" (1953), for which he received a Pulitzer Prize. After "Bus Stop," Inge wrote "The Dark at the Top of the Stairs" (1957) and won an Academy Award for Best Screenplay for the film "Splendor in the Grass" in 1961. Later in his life, Inge never matched the commercial and critical success of his work in the 1950s; after struggling with bouts of depression and alcoholism, he ended his life in 1973.

Throughout his work, Inge often situated his characters and scenarios in the Midwest, coupled with themes of loneliness and romance, repressed sexuality in small towns, and the search for happiness and satisfaction in a modern world. Despite glimpses of tragic undertones in some of Inge’s other work – "Come Back, Little Sheba," "The Dark at the Top of the Stairs" – "Bus Stop" reflects Inge’s capacity to also write plays that are chocked with comic moments and dialogue, warm-hearted and charismatic characters. In much of Inge’s work he depicts everyday ordinary people who are looking for or grappling with issues that are universal – love, self-identity, honesty, and reassurance that although they come from small towns, their lives are significant.

For more information about the matinee or evening performances, please call the Burtness Box Office at 777-2587. There is free parking available for the evening performances.

Doctoral examination set for Adonica Schultz Aune

The final examination for Adonica Schultz Aune, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in communication and public discourse, is set for 10 a.m. Wednesday, April 16, in 200 O'Kelly Hall. The dissertation title is "Women, Doctoral Degrees, and Technology: Female Doctoral Students Online." Lana Rakow (communication) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Anne M. Haskins

The final examination for Anne M. Haskins, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in teaching and learning, is set for 3:15 p.m. Wednesday, April 16, in Room 308, Education Building. The dissertation title is "An Exploration of Satisfaction, Psychological Stress, and Readiness for Interprofessional Learning in Medical, Nursing, Allied Health, and Social Work Students in an Interprofessional Health Care Course." Richard Landry (educational foundations and research) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Extended Writing Across the Curriculum faculty workshop set for May

Applications are being accepted for the extended (summer) Writing Across the Curriculum faculty workshop to be held in six sessions from 8:30 a.m. to noon Friday, May 16, and Monday through Friday, May 19-23.

Participation provides an opportunity for faculty at all levels of experience and from all disciplines to consider and reconsider the writing that students do (or could be doing) in their courses. Issues from creating writing assignments to grading student papers will be addressed and participants will be able to get valuable feedback from other members of the group.

This workshop might also be of special interest to faculty who are revisiting writing in new or existing courses as they consider Essential Studies Advanced Communication goals.

For more information, or to find out how to apply, contact Kim Crowley at 777-6381 or at kimberly.crowley@und.edu .
-- Kimberly Crowley, Coordinator, University Writing Program, kimberly.crowley@und.edu, 777-6381

Register now for R&D Showcase

Register now for the R&D Showcase April 16-17 at http://www.ndsuresearchpark.com ( http://www.ndsuresearchpark.com/ )

It's a small world in a global economy. Join North Dakota's universities and technology partners to learn how the state's economy is being shaped by research and technology developments. Learn how our research universities are working with the state, federal and private sectors to spur technology-led economic development.

Additional keynote speakers with Global Perspectives:
Alton Romig, senior vice president for integrated technology programs at Sandia National Laboratories; Dan Berglund, CEO of State Science and Technology Institute; Jeffrey Black, chairman and CEO of Teleflex, Inc.; Roger Brown, technology and innovation manager at Akzo Nobel Aerospace Coatings; Troy Kraft, vice president for global engineering at Bobcat Company; and Brian Mortenson, president of Sanford Health Foundation.

Learn about research at universities and colleges across North Dakota. University researchers, as well as state and local economic development officials, will cover developments in technology, successful partnerships, programs and their statewide impacts.

Hear more about technology developments in:
-advanced electronics
-aerospace
-agriculture
-energy
-life sciences
-manufacturing and information technology

What you'll discover:
-Find out how you can partner in these technology initiatives
-Learn more about R&D tax credits
-Identify global opportunities
-Hear about North Dakota's technology businesses
-Learn how federal, state, local and university research partnerships fuel economic development

For more information, contact Jan Sobolik at jan@ndsuresearchpark.com
701-499-3602, NDSU Research and Technology Park, 1854 NDSU Research Circle North, Fargo, ND 58102.

American Indian Health Research Conference is April 18

Please mark your calendars for the sixth annual American Indian Health Research Conference from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Friday, April 18. This conference is a venue to share current research activities concerning health risk and health promotion among Native American communities. It will include:
* A nationally recognized speaker on American Indian cancer
* Student and researcher oral and poster presentations featuring American Indian populations
* American Indian research opportunity development

The conference is free and open to the public. Register online at: http://ruralhealth.und.edu/projects/aihrc/#info
-- Wendy Opsahl, Communications Coordinator, Center for Rural Health, wopsahl@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-0871

Museum seeking jewelry donations for children's fundraiser.

The third annual Antique to Chic jewelry sale and raffle will be held at the North Dakota Museum of Art from 3 to 5 p.m. Saturday, May 4. We are seeking costume or more valuable jewelry, scarves and accessories to be donated for the sale. All proceeds will go to the Museum's children’s programs.

Jewelry donations can be brought to the North Dakota Museum of Art or you can call for pick-up. Contact Sue Fink at 777-4195 for more information.
-- Sue Fink, Director of Education, North Dakota Museum of Art, sfink@ndmoa.com, 701-777-4195

Conflict Resolution Center lists mediation training events

The Conflict Resolution Center lists the following mediation training events.

May 12-16, 40-hour Family Mediation Seminar
Learn to mediate family and divorce conflict. You will learn about mediation theory and skills, practice mediation skills, understand mediation in the context of family dynamics, conflict, domestic violence and high emotion. Mediation ethics and professional conduct are covered in this interactive seminar. The cost is $875; UND rate is $300. Register early; space is limited. Continuing education is available.

June 16-20, 40-hour Workplace Mediation Seminar
( http://conflictresolution.und.nodak.edu/train-workplace.php?id=7 ) Learn the leadership skill of effective conflict management and third-party mediation to transform destructive workplace conflict into opportunities for change, connection, and growth. With the nice low unemployment rates in North Dakota and the region, losing employees creates major problems for employers. These skills will be helpful in managing light conflict to mediating major conflict, with the possibility to create positive impact in workplace culture. The cost is $875; UND rate of $300. Register early; space is limited. Continuing education is available.

June 21, 6 p.m.: Banquet celebrating the 20th anniversary of the UND Conflict Resolution Center, Hilton Garden Inn at UND. The cost is $35. Register by May 1.

June 22: "Transforming Communities Where We Live, Work and Play: A Conference Celebrating 20 Years of Conflict Resolution," at the Energy & Environmental Research Center. We welcome the campus community to join us for a day of thinking and learning about peacemaking and conflict resolution in a variety of contexts. There will be a welcoming breakfast plenary; three concurrent 1.5 hours sessions; a keynote luncheon; and an exhibitors reception (wine tasting). The cost is $160 or $125 if registered by May 1. Register online at http://conflictresolution.und.edu
( http://conflictresolution.und.edu/ ) or call us at 777-3664 - space is limited. Consider an exhibit and sponsorship package.

June 23-26: Conflict Transformation Symposium Seminars ( http://conflictresolution.und.edu/savethedate.php )
Two days on team development: a transformative approach to facilitating teams with Joseph P. Folger, author of "The Promise of Mediation," many legal journal articles, founder of the Institute for the Study of Conflict Transformation, and consultant to many Fortune 500 companies. Learn new skills and ideas for supporting a team atmosphere in the organizations you belong to and work with. The transformative approach is responsive to both the empowerment of individuals and the desire to have connection with others and support common goals in order to achieve outstanding results. This is a must for anyone who works with people. Expect a lively, interactive, and hands-on experience with one of the best workshop leaders and trainers in the industry. The cost is $450. Register early; space is limited.

Two days with Judith Saul and Scott Sears, New York: Relational Facilitation: The Purpose and Practice of Leading Groups Responsively
Description: Working effectively as a facilitator of group deliberations requires a firm grasp of group dynamics and an understanding of the contexts in which groups are interacting. Working from a transformative perspective offers new ideas to the group leader to integrate this knowledge with interactive and process skills that are responsive to the group's (and the facilitator's) sense of purpose. This training will provide a new framework specifically developed for relational group facilitation. Scenarios will be generated by participants with opportunities for interaction and hands-on exercises. A great workshop for anyone who works in and with all kinds of groups, political parties, environmental and civic groups, and others. The cost is $450. Attend both at a cost of only $800. Register early; space is limited.

July 21-25, 40-hour Family Mediation Seminar on Beautiful Lake Bemidji, Minn.
Learn to mediate family and divorce conflict. You will learn about mediation theory and skills, practice mediation skills, understand mediation in the context of family dynamics, conflict, domestic violence and high emotion. Mediation ethics and professional conduct are covered in this interactive seminar on beautiful Lake Bemidji at the Hampton Inn & Suites. Enjoy the lake and nature on breaks and in the evenings. The cost is $875; UND rate of $500. Register early; space is limited. Continuing education is available.

Awards banquet set for May 13; nominations sought

Again this spring, the University of North Dakota will present 10 awards for merit of $1,000 each to staff employees. In addition, the Ken and Toby Baker UND Proud Award of $1,000 will be presented.

The Meritorious Service Awards will be given to employees in each of five major groups. These groups and the number of awards presented are: Executive, Administrative, and Professional (three); Technical/ Paraprofessional (one); Office Support (three); Crafts/Trades (one); and Services employees (two). The Ken and Toby Baker UND Proud Award may be given to an employee from any of the groups.

Eligible employees are UND employees employed on a regular basis who are not in a probationary period. Those not eligible for consideration include the president, vice presidents, deans, associate and assistant deans, teaching and research faculty, and the Human Resources director. Also ineligible are award winners from the previous seven years. All members of the University community are encouraged to nominate eligible employees for the awards. Submit nomination forms to Human Resources, Stop 8010, by Wednesday, April 16. Nomination forms are available from the Office of Human Resources, 313 Twamley Hall, or electronically at www.humanresources.und.edu.

The awards will be presented during the annual Recognition Ceremony for staff personnel Tuesday, May 13.

Please direct any questions concerning this program to the Office of Human Resources at 777-4361 or humanresources@mail.und.nodak.edu. -- Diane Nelson, director, Office of Human Resources.

Gregory Patton, Robert Boyd honored by Mortar Board

Robert Boyd, vice president for student and outreach services, and Greg Patton, assistant professor of management, have been inducted as honorary members of Mortar Board. This honor, received by so few, recognizes scholars who have made a lifelong commitment to leadership, scholarship and service -- the three ideals upon which the organization was founded. These awards are the third and fourth ever given by the Quo Vadis Chapter of Mortar Board at UND in its 76 years of existence at this institution.

Mortar Board is a national college senior honor society founded on Feb. 15, 1918, by The Ohio State University, Swarthmore College, The University of Michigan and Cornell University. Membership is based on demonstrated leadership, scholarship and service. The organization serves as a vehicle to continue leadership development, promote service to colleges and universities and encourage lifelong contribution to the global community.

Grants and Contracts office closes for PeopleSoft review, testing

The go live date for the PeopleSoft 9.0 version has been delayed until May 13. The new schedule will require the office to be closed on the following dates:
* Wednesday and Thursday, April 9–10, for an overview of the system.
* Monday through Friday, April 14–18, for user acceptance testing.

These dates are the only opportunity the Grants and Contracts staff will have to review the system and get hands-on assistance from the consultants and North Dakota University System staff prior to the go live date of Sunday, May 13.

Please plan accordingly if you have proposals due or other items that need our attention, as the Grants and Contract officers will be in Fargo on April 9 and 10 and April 14 through 18.
-- David Schmidt, Manager, Grants & Contracts Administration, davidschmidt@mail.und.nodak.edu, 7-2505

Researchers with NIH funding may be subject to new mandate

The Library of the Health Sciences and the Chester Fritz Library encourage faculty, staff and students to become familiar with the recently adopted NIH public access policy http://publicaccess.nih.gov/policy.htm. This policy will impact anyone who intends to publish research resulting from recently received NIH grants. The purpose of the policy is to ensure that the public has access to the final, peer-reviewed, published results of NIH-funded research.

It requires that any articles accepted for publication on or after April 7, 2008, be accessible to the public on PubMed Central http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/. The NIH Public Access Web site http://publicaccess.nih.gov/ is available to facilitate the process.

This mandate results from the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2007 (H.R. 2764) signed Dec. 26, 2007, which directs the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to provide public access to its funded research. It requires researchers funded by NIH to deposit articles on PubMed Central http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/. Scientists may submit their articles directly or publishers may perform the submission. The articles must be available to the public within 12 months of publication. Each article will then be given a unique PubMed Central reference number (PMCID) and will be available for anyone to read.

As of May 25, 2008, researchers need to include the PubMed Central reference number (PMCID) when citing an article in NIH applications, proposals, and progress reports that fall under the policy. This policy includes applications submitted to the NIH for the May 25, 2008, due date and subsequent due dates.

The Public Access Frequently Asked Questions located at: http://publicaccess.nih.gov/FAQ.htm is very helpful in providing more information. In addition, there are two resources that may assist researchers with potential copyright issues resulting from deposition of the articles. One is called Complying with the National Institutes of Health Public Access Policy: Copyright Considerations and Options and is available at: http://www.arl.org/sparc/bm%7Edoc/NIH_Copyright_v1.pdf It includes a list of publishers and their current policies regarding deposit to PMC. The other is a recent webcast exploring the legal aspects of author rights management within the context of the new policy. It is archived and available free of charge at: http://www.arl.org/sc/implement/nih/webcast/

If you have further questions about the NIH Public Access Policy, please e-mail PublicAccess@nih.gov directly, or contact campus library staff. Call the Library of the Health Sciences reference desk at 701-777-3994, Judy Rieke, 777-4129 or jrieke@medicine.nodak.edu. At the Chester Fritz Library, contact Mary Drewes at 777-4648 or e-mail marydrewes@mail.und.edu.
-- Judy Rieke, Assistant Director and Collection Management Librarian, Library of the Health Sciences, jrieke@medicine.nodak.edu, 701-777-4129

Valid photo ID required for personal check payments

In an effort to protect UND students, faculty, and staff from check-writing fraud, UND Student Account Services (formerly the UND Business Office) now requires a valid photo ID when making payments by personal check at our cashier windows. Valid photo IDs include: driver's license, military ID, government-issued identification card, passport, and U-Card. -- Matthew Lukach, student account relations manager, UND Student Account Services.

Funding available for curriculum development retreat

The Office of Instructional Development is making grants available to academic programs and departments conducting curriculum development retreats. The most useful and productive program development occurs when there’s a mechanism for collective conversation around student learning goals, pedogogy and curriculum design. These retreats are intended to serve that purpose by providing opportunities to bring faculty together to analyze, discuss, and develop curriculum across their program or department. So, if you have a grad program in need of attention or are trying to figure out the implications of the new ES program for your department and your majors, this funding can help advance those necessary conversations.

An academic department or program may request a maximum of $500. Funding will be available on a first-come, first-served basis for qualifying departments until the available funds are exhausted. Funds awarded may be used for food (consistent with University guidelines), duplicating, and/or faculty stipends for pre-retreat organization, retreat facilitation, or data analysis. The funding will expire June 30, 2008.

To apply for retreat funding, please submit a one- or two-page memo that includes a proposed retreat agenda and budget, as well as a narrative description of both. Also include a letter of support from the chair (unless the chair is submitting the proposal). Inquiries and applications should be directed to Anne Kelsch at anne_kelsch@und.nodak.edu You may also be aware of funding available through the Provost’s office for assessment retreats (information available from Joan Hawthorne at joan_hawthorne@und.nodak.edu ). If you are working on both curriculum development and assessment activities, please consider applying for both: the same application can be submitted to both offices and both offices should be informed on the dual application.
-- Ann Kelsch, Director, Instructional Development, anne_kelsch@und.nodak.edu, 777-3325

Call for models of innovation, best practices in teaching and learning

Do you have a classroom strategy that works really well to engage students and get them excited about learning? Is there a teaching method or approach that you developed for your students as a result of work on a Bush Teaching Scholars project or some other inquiry into their learning in your class that has been particularly successful? Have you developed class exercises or assignments in creating or reconfiguring a class in preparation for the new ES program that seem to accomplish significant learning around broader learning goals? Or an approach that works really well to teach key concepts or ways of thinking to your majors?

There are so many great things happening in our classrooms at UND. And we are asking you to let us know about the successful, effective and/or innovative teaching and learning strategies that you have developed for our students. We want to gather these strategies with the intent of both acknowledging this good work and compiling inspiring models for others. We will share them on campus (for example to ground ongoing conversations on best teaching practices), and we also hope that over time this collection might grow into something larger for an audience external to UND.

Teachers whose strategies are selected will be expected to:
â—¦ create a "free-standing" handout that explains your strategy thoroughly and addresses its impact on student learning
◦ participate in an "On Teaching" session on “Innovative and Best Practices at UND”
â—¦ create a poster for display to provoke conversation around your teaching strategy (for those who are in disciplines that do not typically utilize posters, we can help with the technical issues of creating one. Basically the poster's purpose is to provide enough background information and a description of your teaching strategy to provoke conversation around your work at a poster session.)

The Faculty Instructional Development Committee (FIDC) will evaluate the strategies submitted for inclusion, and $750 will be awarded to faculty whose projects are selected. As with all FIDC funding, eligible faculty include those teaching full- or part-time; tenure-track or non-tenure track; adjunct or professorial faculty. If you would like more information, please contact the Office of Instructional Development at 777-3325 or oid@und.edu

Applications are due Wednesday, April 30. To apply for your teaching and/or learning strategy to be included among the “Models of Innovation and Best Practices in Teaching and Learning at UND”
1. fill out cover sheet available at http://www.und.edu/dept/oid/Documents/Models_of_Innovation_cover_sheet.pdf
2. in an attached narrative of no more than two pages, answer the following:
(a) What strategy are you submitting? What inspired it and how did you developed it? [cite your sources if appropriate]
(b) What do you want students to know or be able to do as a result of your teaching strategy? How do you know that learning occurred?
(c) Is there any other information that will help us determine the suitability of your strategy for this project?
-- Anne Kelsch, Director, Office of Instructional Development, anne_kelsch@und.nodak.edu, 7-4233

Rural health coalition forms

A new coalition of rural health officials has banded together to speak “with one voice” on issues affecting rural health care.

The announcement was made official at a membership kick-off event on March 26 at the annual Dakota Conference on Rural and Public Health in Fargo, N.D. The North Dakota Rural Health Association (NDRHA) intends to bring together diverse interests and provide a unified voice to promote and enhance the quality of rural health through leadership, advocacy, coalition building, education and communication.

“Health care is a hot issue, especially this year with the presidential elections,” said Pete Antonson, NDRHA president and administrator of the Northwood Deaconess Health Center. “We’re ready to roll up our sleeves and work collaboratively to improve the health status of North Dakotans.”

The NDRHA will be governed by a board of directors and organized by committees of member representatives in seven key areas: advocacy, membership, community relations, annual conference, executive, nominating and finance.

Officials from the National Rural Health Association spoke at the kick-off event, which was open to anyone involved with rural health interests, including legislators, health care professionals, consumers and economic development representatives. George Miller, past president, and Brock Slabach, senior vice president for member services, shared national perspectives of rural health care issues.

“We’ve seen the challenges to rural health care become greater in recent years,” said Antonson. “By partnering together, we will be able to have a much stronger impact on educational and legislative efforts."

The NDRHA is a chapter of the National Rural Health Organization (NRHA). The NRHA is a national nonprofit organization with more than 18,000 members that provides leadership on rural health issues. The Association’s mission is to improve the health and well-being of rural Americans and to provide leadership on rural health issues through advocacy, communications, education, and research. The NRHA membership is made up of a diverse collection of individuals and organizations, all of whom share the common bond of an interest in rural health.
-- Wendy Opsahl, Communications Coordinator, Center for Rural Health, wopsahl@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-0871

Submissions sought for Merrifield competition

The Chester Fritz Library and the Alumni Association and Foundation will sponsor the annual Merrifield Competition for the most outstanding scholarly research paper submitted by a UND undergraduate or graduate student. A grant from the Alumni Association and Foundation enables the library to recognize outstanding scholarly research that utilizes primary source materials held in the Elwyn B. Robinson Department of Special Collections. This recognition is provided through a UND scholarship of $1,500.

Papers will be juried by Curt Hanson, head of Special Collections, and the following faculty members: Cindy Anderson, nursing; Hans Broedel, history; Sherryl Houdek, educational leadership; and Gregory Vandeberg, geography. Deadline for submission of papers is Friday, April 25. Brochures that outline the competition guidelines are available at the Chester Fritz Library reference desk, administrative office, or Special Collections.
-- Curt Hanson, Department Head, Department of Special Collections, Chester Fritz Library, curthanson@mail.und.edu, 777-4626

Nominations sought for Memorial Union Leadership Awards

Nominations for the Memorial Union Outstanding Student Leader Award, Outstanding Student Organization Advisor Award, and Outstanding Student Organization Award are now being accepted. Nomination submission forms and leadership award policies are available online at www.union.und.edu. You are strongly encouraged to nominate student leaders and student organization advisors who have demonstrated outstanding leadership and service.

The Outstanding Student Leader Award recognizes students who have exhibited exemplary leadership skills through their campus involvement, volunteer service efforts, on-campus employment, or other life experiences.

The Outstanding Student Organization Advisor Award recognizes student organization advisors for their commitment and dedication to students and their campus involvement.

The Outstanding Student Organization Awards recognize student organizations that have contributed in a significant way to the University and Grand Forks community over the past year. Nominations for this award should come from members of the organization.

Recipients of the awards will be honored at the Memorial Union Leadership Awards reception Thursday, May 1.

Nominations for students and advisors need to be submitted online at www.union.und.edu.

Nomination forms and instructions for organizations are also available at www.union.und.edu, but completed nomination packets must be submitted to the Center for Student Involvement and Leadership.

All nominations are due Friday, April 4, by 4:30 p.m.

Contact Bonnie Solberg at 777-2898 or e-mail leadership@und.edu with questions or for more information.
-- Bonnie Solberg, Associate Director, Memorial Union, leadership@und.edu, 777-2898

Large passenger van training offered

The North Dakota State Fleet requires all drivers of large passenger vans (10 or more passengers) to satisfactorily complete a designated web-based training program. Please call 777-4122 to arrange for an appointment to take the Web-based training well in advance of any planned travel.

Anyone interested in acquiring a 2007 State Fleet Services Policy Manual, please call 777-4122, e-mail transportation@mail.und.edu with your mailing address, or stop by the office.
-- Mary Metcalf, Manager, Transportation, marymetcalf@mail.und.edu, 777-4123

Note University printing procedures

All printing and duplicating must be completed on campus by the Printing Center or Duplicating Services. Departments must check with the Printing Center or Duplicating Services to determine if they can complete the job.

If a department decides to have printing performed off campus, the Purchasing Department must issue formal quotes/bids. All printing that is performed off campus is required to go through the Purchasing Department regardless of the dollar value of the order.

Departments should submit a requisition to the Purchasing Department with a sample of the document or complete specifications. The Purchasing Department will contact the vendors (not the requesting department), for prices, delivery dates and other pertinent information.

All printing expenditures are required to be submitted on a purchase requisition; vouchers are not valid for printing or duplicating. Any printing job processed for payment on a voucher, after completion, will require justification and may be returned to the department and become the responsibility of the individual who placed the order.

Please contact the Purchasing Department (7-2681) with any questions.
-- Scott Schreiner, Director of Purchasing, Purchasing, scottschreiner@mail.und.edu, 7-2681

Need help in choosing a new text for your class?

See what texts other faculty in colleges and universities around the country are using to teach a similar curriculum. Find out which books are the most popular choices and what your colleagues have to say about them. Get more information to help you choose the best text for your and your students.

Go to www.bncollege.com and click on Faculty Services, where you'll see a link for Faculty Center Network.

Want to know more? Contact our Barnes & Noble Bookstore textbook manager, Tina Monette, at 777-2106.
-- Michelle Abernathey, General Manager, Barnes & Noble at UND, michelle_abernathey@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2103

Spots available for Kids Summer Arts Day Camp

Registration for the North Dakota Museum of Art’s Summer Arts Day Camps begins April 15, 16 and 17 for those holding, renewing or purchasing family memberships. Registration continues for all others until camps are filled. This year's camps include painting, drawing, clay building, sculpture, nature and digital media. For more information contact Sue Fink at 777-4195 or sfink@ndmoa.com
-- Sue Fink, Director of Education, North Dakota Museum of Art, sfink@ndmoa.com, 701-777-4195

Studio One features exercising at work, new home for church

Learn how one job may be considered a workout for employees on the next edition of Studio One. Fed Ex package handlers prefer to be on their feet, due to their early morning and late night shifts. As a result, package handling ranks as one of the top 10 positions where employees work and exercise at the same time (CNN). Watch as these employees dismiss their desks, computers, and chairs.

Also on the show this week, a small congregation is creating a new home for their faith. Many years ago, its stage was home to dramatic music; however, today the sounds of a hammer break the silence. Learn how one community is converting an aging opera house into a church.

Studio One is an award-winning news and information program produced at the University of North Dakota Television Center. The program airs live on UND Channel 3 on Thursdays at 5 p.m. Re-broadcasts can be seen at 7 a.m., noon, 7 p.m. and 11 p.m. daily and on Saturdays at 10 a.m. Prairie Public Television airs Studio One on Saturday at 6 a.m. The program can also be seen by viewers in Fargo, Bismarck/Mandan and Minot, N.D.; Minneapolis, Minn.; Denver, Colo.; and Winnipeg, Manitoba.
-- Meghan Flaagan, Director of Marketing, Television Center, meghan.flaagan@und.edu, 777-3818

U2 lists workshops

University within the University (U2) lists the following workshops:

But I’m Just Too Busy...!!
All workshops are in 211 Skalicky Tech Incubator
April 8, 2:30 to 4 p.m., or
April 8, 5 to 6:30 p.m., or
April 9, 6 to 7:30 a.m., or
April 9, 10:30 a.m. to noon
Too busy for what? To exercise? To eat well? To take time for yourself? We will show you how to make healthy choices a part of your day. You will leave this interactive session with a customized office workout that fits your space. Come and get motivated to make a lifestyle change. Presenters: Stef Meyer nd Amanda Eickhoff.

Taking the Next Step: Intermediate Ergonomics
April 9, 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Conference Room, Auxiliary Services
Following a brief review of information of an introductory nature, the following areas will be discussed and reviewed: Tool selection, the NIOSH Lifting equation, specific repetitive trauma disorders of the feet, shoulder, and thumb, characteristics of an effective ergonomic chair, and current statistics here at the University of North Dakota. Presenter: Claire Moen.

How to Process Payment Documentation
April 9, 2008, 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Reed Keller Auditorium and IVN sites at Bismarck, Fargo, and Minot UNDSMHS campuses
Learn how to process payments for purchase orders, blanket purchase orders, and vouchers. Presenter: Allison Peyton.

Facilities Discoverer Reports Training**
April 15, 11 a.m. to noon, 361 Upson II
The billing charges from facilities will be posted to PeopleSoft in a summarized format. To access the detailed information each department will need to have access to Discoverer reports and be trained on how to access the detail and summary information for their departments. These reports will break down the charges by individual work orders and/or projects. Presenter: Laura Thoreson.

Records Disposal Procedures
April 15, 10 to 11 a.m., Memorial Room, Memorial Union
Learn more about the process for destroying or transferring records that have passed their retention time limits. We’ll review the system used, discuss why it’s necessary to document, and take part in a hands-on run-through of the entire process. It’s fun to clean out, it’s easier to do than you think, and now’s the time to do it! Presenter: Chris Austin.

TIAA-CREF Pre-Retirement Seminar
April 15, 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., Room 10-12, Swanson Hall
Information will be presented on retirement options when withdrawing your retirement from TIAA-CREF. Presenter: Chris Stephens, TIAA-CREF.

Laboratory Safety
April 15, 10 a.m. to noon, President's Room, Memorial Union
Learn general lab-safety principles for the use of chemicals in laboratories. The workshop covers potential health hazards in the laboratory, protective measures, and response to incidents and emergencies. This training is required for all University employees working in a laboratory. Presenter: Eric Pearson.

What Am I Signing Anyway?
April 16, 2: to 3 p.m., Reed Keller Auditorium, School of Medicine and Health Sciences
It is the policy of the University that all externally funded proposals be reviewed and signed by the principal investigator(s), department chair, dean, Grants and Contracts Administration, and the Research Development and Compliance Office. We all know that, but what does it mean when you sign this proposal? This training session discusses in detail (1) what the principal investigator and the University is committing to by signing this proposal; (2) how different employees review the proposal for different reasons; and (3) how this proposal will affect individuals and resources at the department and college level. This session is part of the Grant and Contract Training Series sponsored by the UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences. Presenter: Corey Graves.

Duplicating Procedures
April 16, 9 to 10 a.m., 211 Skalicky Tech Incubator
Learn about the process of online submission, creating PDFS, offered at Duplicating Services. Presenters: Shawn Leake and Sherry Metzger.

Records Retention and E-Mail
April 17, 10 to 11 a.m., Memorial Room, Memorial Union
Learn what role e-mail plays in an organization,.UND policy and best practices for retaining e-mail messages. Presenter: Chris Austin.

Defensive Driving
April 17, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Room 10-12, Swanson Hall
This workshop is required by state fleet for all UND employees who drive state vehicles on a regular (monthly) basis, received a traffic violation, or had an accident while operating a state vehicle. Employees are encouraged to bring a family member (spouse and/or dependents). This workshop may also reduce your North Dakota insurance premiums and could possibly remove points from your driving record
Presenter: Jason Uhlir.

** Limited Seating

Please reserve your seat by registering with U2 by: Phone, 777-2128, E-mail U2@mail.und.nodak.edu, or online www.conted.und.edu/U2/. Please include: (1) workshop title/date, (2) name, (3) department, (4) position, (5) stop number, (6) phone number, (7) e-mail, and (8) How you first learned about this workshop. Thank you for registering in advance; it helps us plan for materials and number of seats.
-- Kathy Williams, Coordinator, U2 Program, U2@mail.und.edu, 777-2128

Get free publicity for your UND summer events

Is your department or program area planning a non-credit event at UND from May 1 to Aug. 31? Do you want free publicity for your summer events? Take this opportunity to list your event information on the UND Summer Events Calendar by going to www.summer.und.edu or calling 777-0841.

Beginning April 1, the Summer Events Calendar is strategically marketed throughout the spring and into the summer through newspaper, radio, magazines, and local community outreach.

In addition to submitting your event information, you may also request to:
* Post your event brochure
* Link your Web site to the Summer Events Calendar

Other reasons to submit your event information include:
* The potential to reach a larger audience
* The Web site can serve as a resource for participants

Examples of non-credit summer events include, but are not limited to, workshops, musical and theatrical performances, athletic events, and campus for kids.

Submit your event information by using the online form found at www.summer.und.edu or calling the UND Summer Programs and Events office at 777-0841. -- Brenda Dufault, Summer Programs and Events coordinator, 777-0841, brendadufault@mail.und.edu.

UND Aerospace receives Cessna Citation Mustang

UND Aerospace announces the delivery of a Citation Mustang from Cessna Aircraft Company, a Textron Inc. (NYSE: TXT) company. The delivery of the Citation Mustang marks another milestone occasion during the 40th Anniversary celebration of the John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences. This delivery makes the Odegard School the first collegiate flight program to have a Citation Mustang in its fleet. This entry-level Citation jet will be used for executive travel as well as flight training for undergraduate and contract students within the Odegard School.

“We’re excited to have the Mustang join our fleet of more than 120 aircraft,” said Bruce A. Smith, dean of the Odegard School. “We have anticipated the arrival for quite some time. We know the Mustang will be a great recruiting tool for the School, an amazing opportunity for our students as they transition from pistons and turboprops to flying jets, and a tremendous asset to the entire UND community.”

“We’re pleased to see UND Aerospace as the first flight training school to have access to the new Citation Mustang,” said Mick Hoveskeland, Cessna’s vice president, administration and a UND alumnus. “Whether they are moving to the airlines, charter flying or corporate flight departments, students will get a kick start to their careers by flying the large-format glass-cockpit flight displays and integrated systems.”

The Mustang became the first of a new category of entry-level jets to achieve full certification from the Federal Aviation Administration (September 2006) and the European Aviation Safety Agency (May 2007). Twenty-seven have been delivered after assembly at Cessna’s facility in Independence, Kan., where a total of 44 Mustangs are scheduled to be delivered by year’s end. By 2009, production is expected to reach 150 per year.

Along with the Citation Mustang, a Cessna 150 aircraft was scheduled to arrive into Grand Forks. This aircraft is one of the original airplanes used to start the UND aviation program. The Cessna 150 has been completely refurbished to its original specifications upon delivery to UND in 1968. Unfortunately, the C150 was delayed due to weather and is expected to arrive into Grand Forks sometime this week.
-- Karen Ryba, Director of Communications, Aerospace, ryba@aero.und.edu, 701-777-4761

International Programs newsletter available online

The latest issue of the International Programs newsletter, "Building Bridges," is available online at http://www.und.edu/dept/oip/documents/3-26-08.pdf
Featured this month:
* Internationalization in higher education
* International Women's Day
* Education Abroad pre-departure orientations
* Education Abroad thank you
* Advising notes for International students
* Cultural nights
* U2 workshop: Basic International Student Requirements for Faculty and Staff
* Country in focus: Bangladesh
-- Ray Lagasse, Director, International Programs, raymondlagasse@mail.und.edu, 701.777.2938

Shuttle bus service highly recommended to Democratic Convention

Shuttle bus service is highly recommended for the Democratic National Convention with Senators Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. Remote parking at the Memorial Stadium on the UND campus with shuttle service to the Alerus Center is available and strongly encouraged. Be informed that shuttles will run continuously to and from the Alerus Center beginning at 2 p.m. Friday, April 4, but expect and prepare for delays. Grand Forks Police will be on site directing both ingress and egress traffic. Parking at the Alerus Center is free for this event.

Museum Cafe lists soups, specials

The North Dakota Museum of Art Cafe lists the following soups and specials.

April 2-4
Soups for the week: Chicken Consomme / Roasted Root Vegetable
Wednesday: Chicken, Mushroom, and Cashew Risotto
Thursday: Risotto Primavera
Friday: Pumpkin Risotto

April 7-11
Soups for the Week: Minestrone / Beer Cheese
Monday: Thai Chicken Stir-fry with Spicy Peanut Sauce
Tuesday: Rueben Sandwich
Wednesday: Tuscan Vermicelli with shrimp
Thursday: Caprese on warm baguette
Friday: Hawaiian Pulled Pork Sandwich

The Museum Café is open weekdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with lunch served from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
-- Brian Lofthus, Assistant to the Director, North Dakota Museum of Art, blofthus@ndmoa.com, 777-4195

Work Well and Wellness Center sponsors "But I'm Just Too Busy...!"

Do you just seem unable to find enough time in your day to exercise, eat well, or just take some time for yourself? Are you interested in taking a few steps to wellness and better health? If you’ve answered yes to these questions, then you might just be interested in attending the upcoming U2 session, “But I’m Just Too Busy…!” This two-hour session sponsored by WorkWell and Wellness Center will show you how to make healthy choices a part of your busy day. You will leave this interactive session with a customized office workout that fits your workspace. The presenters for this session are Stef Meyer and Amanda Eickhoff, UND Work Well.

If you're “just too busy” to come to this session, which is being conveniently offered at four different times during April 8 and 9, contact Work Well. Departments with 10 more people interested in a “But I’m Just Too Busy…!” session may have a custom-designed workshop delivered directly to their department or staff meeting.

Come and get motivated to make a lifestyle change. Dates/times for this very fun and very informative event follow: April 8, 2:30 to 4 p.m. or 5 to 6:30 p.m.; April 9, 6 to 7:30 a.m. or 10:30 a.m. to noon. Location for all events is 211 Skalicky Tech Incubator.

Register with U2 – Phone: 777-2128; e-mail: U2@conted.und.edu/U2 or web: www.conted.und.edu/U2.

For more information about this session or information about having a custom-designed workshop for your workplace, contact Amanda Eickhoff at 777-0210 or e-mail at amandaeickhoff@mail.und.edu
-- Kathy Williams, U2 Coordinator, Division of Continuing Education, kathrynwilliams@mail.und.edu, 777-4266

Note health club membership reimbursements

The Payroll Office has received several calls regarding a notice about reimbursement of health club memberships that was sent to people insured directly by Blue Cross/Blue Shield of North Dakota.

UND benefited employees are insured by an NDPERS Health Insurance plan, which is only administered by Blue Cross/Blue Shield. Therefore, the NDPERS plan is different than a Blue Cross/Blue Shield plan. At this time, the NDPERS plan does not offer a reimbursement of a portion of your health club membership dues. Our health insurance plan is up for renewal in the summer of 2009, so no changes are possible until that time.

Employees interested in this option should contact the PERS office in Bismarck to voice their interest. Employees can call 1-800-803-7377 and ask for Kathy Allen or e-mail kallen@nd.gov.

Alumni says thanks for making UND in Minneapolis successful

UND in Minneapolis was a successful week.
* Tuesday, March 18 – Alumni said farewell to President and Adele Kupchella at the home of Rick and Leslie Kupchella.
* Wednesday, March 19 – More than 210 UND alumni from the Twin Cities attended a Taste of UND at the Walker Art Center. Displays from various colleges and departments highlighted the spirit, innovation and entrepreneurship of campus. Alumni feedback encourages this and more events in the future.
* Friday, March 21 – Nearly 400 UND hockey fans joined forces before the UND vs. Denver WCHA Final Five game.
* Saturday, March 22 – Approximately 100 people met before the third place game to cheer UND on to a win over Colorado College.

Thank you to all the people and departments who made the event possible. It was a team effort all around. -- Amanda Hvidsten, '01
director of Alumni Relations and Marketing, UND Alumni Association.

Frozen Four hockey T-shirts available

Your Barnes & Noble Bookstore has long- and short-sleeve Frozen Four Hockey T-shirts available now. Stop by for all your apparel needs. While you're in, check out our clearance items, which are now an additional 25 percent off their low clearance price.

Ray Richards golf course 2008 season passes now available

The 2008 golf season passes for faculty and staff are now available for $240. With your purchase, you will receive a free season pass for the driving range ($140 value).

UND faculty and staff family season passes are $500; they are not eligible for the free driving range pass, but for an extra $150 the family can have season driving range passes.

Stop at the Ray Richards clubhouse or call 777-4340. Club house hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday. Remember that passes may be paid through payroll deduction over six pay periods.
-- Tom Swangler, Asst Director, Ray Richards Golf Course, tomswangler@mail.und.edu, 777-4090

Internal job openings listed

The following position vacancies are available only to regular UND staff employees who have successfully completed their six-month probation period, earn annual and sick leave, receive BC/BS health insurance and TIAA-CREF or ND PERS retirement benefits. Current UND faculty, please contact Human Resources for eligibility.

TO APPLY: Please complete UND Application/Control Card form. Send letter of application and resume, referencing position name and number, to: Human Resources, University of North Dakota, Twamley Hall, Room 313, 264 Centennial Drive Stop 8010, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8010. Applications MUST be received by the deadline date.

EXECUTIVE/PROFESSIONAL/ADMINISTRATIVE/ATHLETIC COACHES:

POSITION: Assistant Archivist, #08-273
APPLICATION DEADLINE: (I) 4/4/2008
COMPENSATION: $37,000 plus/year

POSITION: Education Abroad Advisor, International Programs, #08-267
APPLICATION DEADLINE: (I) 4/03/2008
COMPENSATION: $26,000 plus/year

POSITION: Administrative Officer, Graduate School, #08-269
APPLICATION DEADLINE: (I) 4/2/2008
COMPENSATION: $32,000 plus/year



TECHNICAL/PARAPROFESSIONAL:

POSITION: Publications Assistant, Aerospace Flight Support Services, #08-272
APPLICATION DEADLINE: (I) 4/03/2008
COMPENSATION: $21,000 plus/year

POSITION: Office Coordinator/Account Specialist, Communications Sciences and Disorders, #08-268
APPLICATION DEADLINE: (I) 4/3/2008
COMPENSATION: $26,000 plus/year

OFFICE SUPPORT:

POSITION: Administrative Assistant, Microbiology and Immunology, #08-265
APPLICATION DEADLINE: (I) 4/02/2008
COMPENSATION: $30,000 plus/year

POSITION: Office Assistant/Account Technician, Center for Family Medicine – Bismarck, #08-264
APPLICATION DEADLINE: (I) 4/2/2008
COMPENSATION: $19,240 plus/year

CRAFTS/SERVICE/TRADES: No vacancies.

Kenneth Ruit appointed to NCACS

Kenneth Ruit, associate professor of anatomy and cell biology, has been appointed to serve on the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (NCACS).

Ruit will serve a five-year term as a consultant-evaluator on the Higher Learning Commission, which accredits degree-granting educational institutions in the North Central region. The region includes more than 1,000 colleges and universities extending from West Virginia to Arizona and includes North Dakota.

Ruit was appointed on the basis of his experience in medical and graduate education, assessment of student learning, curriculum design and pedagogy.

Consultant-evaluators serve on visiting teams that comprehensively evaluate institutions of higher learning and provide the initial recommendations regarding accreditation. A consultant-evaluator usually visits one or two institutions each year as part of an accreditation team.

Founded in 1895 as one of six regional institutional accrediting bodies in the U.S., the Higher Learning Commission is recognized by the United States Department of Education and the Council on Higher Education Accreditation.
-- Shelley Pohlman, Admin Secretary, Public Affairs, spohlman@medicine.nodak.edu, 701-777-4305

Awards honor rural and public health

Several awards were presented to rural and public health providers, volunteers and organizations recently at the Dakota Conference on Rural and Public Health held in Fargo.

Awards included:
• North Dakota Public Health Association Public Health Worker of the Year, presented to Theresa Knox, Grand Forks Public Health Department, Grand Forks
• Outstanding Service, presented to Senator Judy Lee, Fargo, and Representative Clara Sue Price, Minot
• North Dakota Medicare Rural Hospital Flexibility Program Making a Difference Award, presented to Presentation Medical Center, Rolla, and St. Andrew's Health Center, Bottineau
• Outstanding Rural Health Professional, presented to Darrold Bertsch, administrator/CEO, Southwest Healthcare Services, Bowman
• Outstanding Rural Health Program, presented to Valley Community Health Centers, Northwood and Larimore
• Outstanding Rural Health Provider, presented to Eric “Jack” Larson, Altru Clinic, Cavalier
• Outstanding Rural Health Volunteer, presented to Wayne Koltes, West River Ambulance, Hettinger

The awards are presented annually as part of the Dakota Conference on Rural and Public Health, facilitated by the Center for Rural Health at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

The Dakota Conference is sponsored by Altru Health System of Grand Forks, North Dakota Public Health Association, UND College of Nursing, and the School of Medicine and Health Sciences’ Center for Rural Health and Department of Family and Community Medicine.
-- Wendy Opsahl, Communications Coordinator, Center for Rural Health, wopsahl@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-0871

Nursing student named 2008 North Dakota Student Nurse of the Year

Rhianna Ghents, a senior in the nursing program, was elected as the North Dakota Student Nurse of the Year (SNOY) for 2008. Ghents was awarded this honor at the North Dakota Nursing Student Association conference held in Grand Forks in early March.

Elected as the UND SNOY representative, Ghents outshone seven deserving students from other schools across the state. She particularly impressed the judges with her writing and verbal presentation skills during the competition.

Ghents shares that “my passion for nursing has come about with my own personal growth and realization of the uniqueness of this craft and the true impact that nurses have on the world. I believe that we are all driven by a need to help each other and make a difference in each other’s lives.”

“I cannot speak highly enough about this outstanding student,” shares associate dean of undergraduate studies Helen Melland. “Rhianna is indeed deserving of being named North Dakota Student Nurse of the Year. I have no doubt she will make an outstanding nurse and am confident she will be a great asset to the profession of nursing.”

According to Dr. Melland, Ghents has a strong passion for nursing. “It is clear to me that Rhianna ‘gets it’ – what nursing is really about.”

Ghents has held leadership positions with many organizations at UND, including two years with Residence Hall Government, UND Honors Program, and the UND Student Ambassadors program. She is currently the director of membership for the UND chapter of the Nursing Student Association (NSA). This position requires her to get other new nurses excited about the organization and what they can achieve as caregivers.

Future plans include becoming an obstetrics nurse and eventually a Certified Nurse Midwife. “With any luck, I will someday work with high-risk teenage pregnancy and work to reduce the teen pregnancy rate in our country,” shares Ghents.
-- Becky Cournia, Alumni Relations & Development Officer, Nursing, beckycournia@mail.und.edu, 777-4526

Remembering Lee Nybo

Lee E. Nybo, retierd building services technician, facilities, died March 24, 2008, after a long illness at Altru Hospital in Grand Forks. He was 68.

Nybo, the son of Roald and Caroline (Blegen) Nybo, was born Dec. 17, 1939, in Twin Lake Township near York, N.D. He graduated from Leeds High School in 1957, and attended Aaker's Business College from 1959-60.

He married Patricia "Pat" Rourke Jan. 6, 1962, in Our Savior's Lutheran Church in East Grand Forks.

Nybo worked for Western Auto Parts for over 20 years, and UND for 13 years before retiring. He enjoyed sports, both professional and local, and had a passion for UND athletics. He also loved to follow his grandchildren's interests and activities. He was a lifetime member of the East Grand Forks Fraternal Order of Eagles.

He is survived by his wife of 46 years, Pat of Grand Forks; son, Dennis (Alison) Nybo of Bismarck, N.D.; daughter, Dawn (Robert) DeMers of Peoria, Ariz.; three grandchildren, two nephews, one niece, several cousins and a special mother-in-law, Hazel Rourke.

Nybo was perceded in death by his parents; sister, Phyllis; brothers, Meryl and Donald; and father-in-law, Howard Rourke.