The University of North Daktoa

University Relations | University Letter
sEARCH und
A to Z IndexMap
About U Letter
U Letter
 
ISSUE: Volume 45, Number 30: March 19, 2008

Contents
Top Stories
Salman Rushdie opens Writers Conference
Biomedical researcher receives $1.5 million from NIH
"Taste of UND" Showcase set for March 19 in Minneapolis
Events to Note
Note Lotus Meditation Center events
Learn what students are saying about UND
Spring yoga classes begin at Lotus Meditation Center
Prairie Public fundraiser is Wednesday
Doctoral examination set for David L. Crawford
Exploring Second Life web conference is March 20
Final Five pre-game parties are in St. Paul
Graduate School information retreat is March 24
Farewell reception will honor Don Kojich
Law students sponsor two speakers
Museum lecture canceled
U2 lists workshops
Technology Trends Forum: Fun with Photos is March 31
National exercise, wellness expert Steven Blair to visit UND March 26-27
Mark your calendar for Dakota Conference in March
Box Lunch session focuses on technology to facilitate student learning
Theology for Lunch lists lunch topics
American Indian nursing alumni seminar set for April 18
Farewell reception honors John Watson
"Course Design Considerations for Online Delivery" offered again
Annual Science Day for children set for March 29
Second annual UCC silent auction is March 29
Medical School for the Public begins in April
Author of "Generation Me" to visit campus April 2
"Beatlemania Now," "Gypsy" to play Chester Fritz Auditorium
HLC site visit: How are we doing on assessment of student learning?
UND to host NDUS Diversity Council Conference April 9-10
University Curriculum Committee to hear program terminations
Biomass conference to focus on sustainability
Symposium on sustainability is April 21-22
R&D Showcase set for April 16, 17
Super Science Saturday is April 19
Teaching with technology applications now being accepted
Announcements
New Emeritus faculty named
Peter Johnson named interim head of University Relations
Director named for Student Health Services
Faculty can receive feedback on teaching
Darla Adams appointed nurse anesthesia program director
Grants and contracts administration office lists closing dates for PeopleSoft testing
Assessment retreat grant funding is available
Note final deadline for submission of SSAC travel grant applications
Bookstore offers 25 percent off hats, T-shirts
Good Friday is holiday
Chester Fritz Library lists hours for Easter weekend
Library of the Health Sciences lists Easter week end hours
Law library announces Easter weekend hours
Ray Richards lists winter golf specials
International Centre lists Easter hours
ITSS lists holiday hours
Sign & Design Studio lists Easter break hours
Donated leave sought for Karlene Clark
Donated annual leave requested for Jane Grega
Archaeological documentary released
Dependents of benefitted staff may apply for scholarship
Comments sought on third UND home page design
Studio One features rising trucking costs, international soccer team
UND's BBER examines importance of farm income to North Dakota economy
University Children's Center has summer openings
Senate Scholarly Activities Committee awards funds
Senate Scholarly Activities Committee awards new faculty
Barnes & Noble urges faculty to submit fall, summer textbook requests
Museum Cafe lists soups, specials
The invisible injury: March is Brain Injury Awareness Month
Ray Richards golf course season passes now available
Start! walking with a free pedometer
Win in so many ways with Work Well!
Internal job openings listed
In the News
Inventors recognized for contributions to intellectual property
New book on Soviet collectivization published
George Bibel publishes book
In Remembrance
Remembering Carol Larson
Salman Rushdie opens Writers Conference

You're invited to join the conversation with Salman Rushdie at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 25, at the Chester Fritz Auditorium. The event is free and open to the public.

As the opening speaker for the 2008 Writers Conference, the Great Conversation offers an opportunity for you to participate in a conversation with Sir Salman Rushdie.

Including a reading by Sir Rushdie from his works, Rebecca Weaver-Hightower (English) will facilitate the discussion between Rushdie and the audience. The focus of the discussions will come from his novel, "Midnight’s Children" (1981) which catapulted him to literary fame. This work won the 1981 Booker Prize and, in 1993, was awarded the Booker of Bookers as the best novel to have received the prize during its first 25 years. It still receives accolades for being Rushdie’s best, most flowing and inspiring work.

For more information on 125th events, visit 125.und.edu.

For more information on the UND Writer's Conference, visit www.undwritersconference.org.
-- Benjamin Klipfel, Marketing Coordinator, 125th Anniversary, benjamin.klipfel@und.nodak.edu, 7-0857

Biomedical researcher receives $1.5 million from NIH

The role diet and the environment play in causing Alzheimer’s disease is the focus of new funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for a biomedical research scientist at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences. Othman Ghribi received a five-year RO1 grant, totaling nearly $1.5 million, from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences to study the links between high cholesterol levels and Alzheimer’s disease (AD).

This is the largest individual grant awarded to a UND researcher for the study of Alzheimer’s disease. RO1 grants are very difficult to obtain and are awarded to relatively few researchers.

Investigations to date in Dr. Ghribi’s lab have suggested that high cholesterol levels in the blood may be a risk factor for developing Alzheimer’s disease, he says.

In addition to cholesterol, trace metals such as iron have also been suspected to play a role in the “sporadic” forms of AD, by far the most prevalent form of the disease. A much smaller proportion of AD cases are related to a genetic mutation, he said. “In the absence of known genetic factors that lead to the sporadic form of the disease, any knowledge about risk factors that can cause or exacerbate the disease would allow us to better understand the pathophysiology of this disease,” said Ghribi, assistant professor of pharmacology, physiology and therapeutics.

It’s been shown that people with high cholesterol as well as high levels of iron in the brain are more susceptible to have the disease than people who have either high cholesterol or high levels of iron in the brain, Ghribi says.

However, to date “there’s been no animal model that combines these two risk factors to help us understand the progression of AD,” he said. It’s the combination of the risk factors, high levels of cholesterol and iron, that interests him most. He has developed an animal model that exhibits both increased cholesterol and iron levels to test his hypothesis.

“It is estimated that about five million U.S. citizens have Alzheimer’s disease,” Ghribi said. “If we don’t find some answer about its cause or the mechanisms that lead to the disease, that number will increase to 15 million people by 2050. That’s a huge health, economic and emotional burden for the people living with Alzheimer’s, the families of these people, and the government.”

Ghribi expects that, by the end of his study, “I will have a better understanding of some of the factors that lead to Alzheimer’s disease,” he said, and “if we find that the metabolism of cholesterol and/or iron is a risk factor of Alzheimer’s disease, then regulation of the metabolism of these molecules may prevent or stop the progression of Alzheimer’s disease.”

The NIH grant will support the hiring of three or four employees to work in his laboratory.

Ghribi’s investigations were initially funded by North Dakota Biomedical Research Infrastructure Network (BRIN), now called the North Dakota IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence (INBRE). More recently, his studies have been funded by the Center of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE), a highly competitive federal initiative that helps support researchers in states which traditionally have not attracted large amounts of NIH research funding.
-- Shelley Pohlman, Admin Secretary, Public Affairs, spohlman@medicine.nodak.edu, 701-777-4305

"Taste of UND" Showcase set for March 19 in Minneapolis

It will be "show and tell" higher education-style when the University of North Dakota takes its show on the road Wednesday, March 19, 6 to 9 p.m. at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis. The event is free and open to the public.

The "show" is the "Taste of UND" Showcase, featuring exhibits from 16 of UND's best-known campus units. On display, for example, will be the CropCam, an example of the newest venture of the John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences: Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS). The four-foot-long, eight-foot-wingspan, six-pound CropCam is an unmanned aerial vehicle with a digital camera mounted under the wing. It represents a new future for aviation, according to Robert Concannon, UAS course manager at UND's Odegard School. Although UAS have been used in military applications, their non-military use in the United States is essentially non-existent, in large part because they are restricted from U.S. airspace. UND has attracted significant funding in recent years to study the use of UAS, to work with the FAA to develop standards for safely flying UAS, and to study the psychological and behavioral factors of the personnel who operate UAS.

Other UND departments and units showing their stuff include the School of Medicine and Health Sciences, School of Engineering and Mines, College of Nursing, College of Business and Public Administration, College of Arts and Sciences and the Department of English, College of Education and Human Development, School of Law, Division of Continuing Education, Enrollment Services, the Graduate School, UND Athletics, and the UND Alumni Association.

The "tell" is President Charles Kupchella, Alumni Association Executive Vice President Tim O'Keefe, and others who will talk about the UND of today and tomorrow.

The event is free and open to the public.

"We're being proactive in telling our UND story. We have great things going on and we wanted to share that -- to bring a little bit of the UND experience to our many alumni and friends in the Twin Cities area and beyond. We want them to know where we are, and where we're going," said President Charles Kupchella. In his ninth year as UND's 10th president, Kupchella retires June 30.

Kupchella said UND is in the third year of its second five-year strategic plan. He credited the plan, as well as UND's faculty, staff and supporters, for much of the growth that the University has achieved in the past six years. UND, for example, now has an annual economic impact of nearly $1 billion dollars. That includes a doubling in the past five years of the research and supported program dollars to more than $100 million in 2006-07, said Kupchella.

The evening will include an opportunity for old friends to reconnect and to meet new friends, said Don Kojich, UND executive associate vice president for university relations.

Note Lotus Meditation Center events

The Lotus Meditation Center, 2908 Univeristy Ave., lists the following events:

Monday evening book study begins March 17
Eckhart Tolle's "A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life's Purpose" will be discussed after the 7 p.m. sitting at the Lotus Meditation Center for the next 10 weeks. This book is also the subject of a major web event with Oprah Winfrey and Eckhart Tolle discussing the book together and taking questions from online viewers. The 10-week online series started March 3 at 8 p.m. central time. The archives can be accessed at any time for use as a supplement to the Lotus book study. You can find out more about the book and the web event at Oprah.com. The book is widely available in local bookstores and through Internet book sellers. The format for the Monday evening meetings at LMC includes 30 minutes of silent meditation followed by 45 minutes of book discussion.

Music for Meditation and Contemplation: Friday, March 28, at 7 p.m.
Rarely heard classical compositions performed by Eric Lawson, violin, and Jeffrey Anvinson, guitar.

Insight Meditation Retreat with John Travis: April 25-27.
This is a non-residential weekend retreat that starts Friday evening at 7 p.m. and ends early Sunday afternoon. Brochures will be available in the next two weeks. There is a suggested fee of $85 for the weekend, which includes meals. Scholarships and work exchange are available. More information about John Travis is available at www.mtstream.org.

Friday Evening Dharma Talk with John Travis: April 25
The opening of the weekend retreat will be a 7 p.m. talk that is free of charge and open to the public.

For more information about any of these events, contact Lora or Patrick Sloan Anderson at 787-8839.

Learn what students are saying about UND

Want to learn about what students are saying about UND? Come to the U2 session sponsored by Institutional Research Thursday, March 27, 10 to 11 a.m., in Swanson Hall, Room 10-12. This session will summarize some of the key findings from the several surveys that UND students fill out. The session will illustrate some of the trends over the last several years and show how UND compares with other institutions. Some of the surveys highlighted will include: the CIRP Freshman Survey, Student Satisfaction Inventory, National Survey of Student Engagement, Placement Survey, and Alumni Survey. While these surveys are directed to all UND students, some of the survey data is available at the department and/or college level. To register: www.conted.und.edu/U2 or U2@mail.und.edu or call 777-2128.
-- Kathy Williams, U2 Coordinator, University Within the University (U2) Program, kathrynwilliams@mail.und.edu, 777-4266

Spring yoga classes begin at Lotus Meditation Center

Spring yoga classes will begin Tuesday, March 18, at the Lotus Meditation Center. The beginner's class meets on Tuesdays from 5:30 to 6:45 p.m. The class for experienced students meets on Thursday at the same time. The eight-week session costs $65, while single classes are $10. Contact Dyan Rey for information or to register, 772-8840 or dyanre@aol.com.
-- Dyan Rey, Instructor, Visual Arts, dyanre@aol.com, 772-8840

Prairie Public fundraiser is Wednesday

A wine and appetizer fundraiser for Prairie Public Broadcasting will be held from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 19, at Discovery Hall, Energy and Environmental Research Center. The program begins at 7 p.m. Everyone is welcome to help support public radio and television. Please RSVP at 738-2461 or richb7742@aol.com. -- Rich Becker, board member, Prairie Public Broadcasting, and member, Center for Innovation.
-- Jan Orvik, Writer/Editor, University Relations, janorvik@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3621

Doctoral examination set for David L. Crawford

The final examination for David L. Crawford, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in teaching and learning, is set for 1:30 p.m. Thursday, March 20, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "A Comparative Analysis of Practitioner and Educator Preferences Regarding Accounting Curriculum Meeting the 150-Hour Requirement." David Yearwood (technology) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph.Benot, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Exploring Second Life web conference is March 20

The Center for Instructional and Learning Technologies will host a web conference on Exploring Second Life from noon to 2 p.m. Thursday, March 20, in the River Valley Room, Memorial Union. This web conference is presented by Academic Impressions and features Ken Hudson from Loyalist College and Christopher Keesey from Ohio University. The agenda is:
* What is a multi-user virtual environment (MUVE)?
* Why would/should I use a MUVE for learning?
* Getting started in Second Life
* Second Life activities
* Learning experience possibilities with Second Life as platform
* We want to deliver learning in Second Life, where do we start?
* Case studies of successes
* Recommendations and take-aways

To register for this web conference, please call 777-2129 or send an e-mail to ciltworkshops@mail.und.edu
-- Diane Lundeen, Workshop Coordinator, Center for Instructional & Learning Technologies/ITSS, dianelundeen@mail.und.edu, 777-2129

Final Five pre-game parties are in St. Paul

Cheer on the Fighting Sioux men’s hockey team at the WCHA Final Five hockey tournament this weekend. All UND alumni, students, friends, and fans are welcome to pre-game parties this Friday and Saturday in St. Paul. Games, raffle prizes, the Cheer Team, and the Pride of the North Band will all make this party the place to be for adults and children alike.

The party will be at noon Friday, March 21, at the Historic Hamm Building, 408 St. Peter St., St. Paul, Minn., next door to Great Waters Brewing Co. It is before the 2 p.m. Fighting Sioux face off vs. Denver. This is the same location as last year, the party room is in the basement. Look for the green and white balloons.

Saturday, March 22, the party will be two hours before game.

Cost is $10 general admission (includes food), and $5 Sioux crew members (includes food).
Friday: Enjoy chili or meatless chili with all the fixings, and chips and salsa.
Saturday: Enjoy barbeque pork sandwich, potato salad and chips.
No RSVP necessary, pay at the door; cash bar available.

Come back to the Hamm Building after the games to celebrate the Sioux. Snacks and a cash bar will be available. Brought to you by UND Alumni Association, Fighting Sioux Club and Sioux Crew.

Graduate School information retreat is March 24

The Graduate School will host an information retreat for all interested faculty from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, March 24, at the Idea Lab, Ina Mae Rude Center. The purpose of this day is to present new information related to current graduate school activities, as well as to guide you through our processes, explain forms, answer questions and get feedback. Graduate program directors are encouraged to attend.

Lunch will be provided, so we would like your RSVP to assist with providing adequate catering. Visit www.graduateschool.und.edu and click on the RSVP link.

Please note the graduate school office will not be open March 24, as all staff will be at the information retreat. For more information contact the graduate school.
-- Susan Caraher, Marketing & External Relations, The Graduate School, susancaraher@mail.und.edu, 777-2524

Farewell reception will honor Don Kojich

A farewell reception will honor Don Kojich, executive associate vice president for University Relations, from 10 to 11 a.m. Monday, March 24, in the Twamley Hall Snack Bar, fourth floor. He has been with UND since 2005, and is leaving to take a position as associate vice president for marketing and communications at the University of Illinois Foundation. Please join us as we wish him well. -- University Relations.

Law students sponsor two speakers

The week of March 24 will provide a wonderful opportunity for the UND community to attend several different presentations at the School of Law. The Student Trial Lawyers Association is sponsoring two speakers and would like to invite the public to a pair of insightful discussions that have been a highly debated topic in the legal community:

Kitzmiller v. Dover Area School District. 4 p.m., Wednesday, March 26, Baker Courtroom.

Stephen G. Harvey is a Philadelphia attorney who, along with others, represented Tammy Kitzmiller and other parents in their suit which revolved around the controversy of teaching intelligent design in public schools. Kitzmiller v. Dover Area School District, 400 F.Supp.2d 707 (D. Penn. 2005). The school board required that intelligent design be taught to ninth grade students. The parents sued and the court granted an injunction against the school district reasoning that the policy violated the Lemon test and therefore the First Amendment Establishment Clause which was incorporated to the states through the Fourteenth Amendment. Mr. Harvey will discuss the case, the controversy, and the aftermath from a lawyer's point of view.

In the Limelight or Lost in It? The Victim and the Victim's Family during a High Profile Trial. 3 p.m., Friday, March 28, Baker Courtroom.

This presentation features Drew Wrigley, United States Attorney for the District of North Dakota, and Linda Walker, Dru Sjodin's mother. Drew Wrigley will update the audience on the pending appeal for Alfonso Rodriguez, Junior, who was convicted and sentenced to death for Dru Sjodin's kidnapping which resulted in her death. The focus of this presentation will not be the case itself but rather the role the victim and her family played in it. Linda Walker will discuss her experience and emotion as she followed the developments in her daughter's case for three years. Both speakers will discuss the effectiveness of our current system in recognizing the role of the victim and improvements which could be made.

Museum lecture canceled

Due to personal matters, sculptor Siah Armajani will not be available for the Elaine McKenzie Memorial Lecture from 4 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, March 25. The lecture and reception will be rescheduled for a later date.

Armajani is one of six artists in the Museum’s current exhibition Artists and War. His sculpture Fallujah echoes the themes and images of Picasso’s Guernica. Picasso was inspired by the Nazi German bombing of Gernika on April 26, 1937, just as Armajani made Fallujah in response to the April 28, 2003 beginning of combat in the city of Fallujah, Iraq. Fallujah was unveiled in April 2007 at the Artium de Alava in Vitoria, Spain, three miles from the village of Guernica, before returning to the States. The Lannan Foundation has purchased Fallujah and has loaned it for the exhibition.
-- Brian Lofthus, Assistant to the Director, North Dakota Museum of Art, blofthus@ndmoa.com, 777-4195

U2 lists workshops

University within the University (U2) lists the following workshops:

Power Point XP: Beginning**
March 25, 26, and 27, 1 to 4 p.m.* (nine hours total), 361 Upson II
Prerequisite: Basic understanding of computers, mouse and file saving/retrieving skills. Learn to create presentations, add graphics and objects to slides, add tables and charts to slides, prepare a presentation, sort slides, add slide transitions, and animate text. Presenter: Heidi Strande.

What Students are Saying About UND (NEW)
March 27, 10 to 11 a.m., Room 10-12, Swanson Hall
This session summarizes some of the key findings from the several surveys that UND students fill out. The session will illustrate some of the trends over the last several years, as well as show how we compare with other institutions. Some of the surveys that we'll be highlighting will be the CIRP Freshman Survey, Student Satisfaction Inventory, National Survey of Student Engagement, Placement Survey, and Alumni Survey. While these surveys are directed to all UND students, some of the survey data is available at the department and/or college level. Come learn what students say about the U!
Presenters: Carmen Williams and Sue Erickson.

Basic International Student Requirements for Faculty and Staff (NEW)
March 28, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., International Centre
It is important for faculty and staff who advise international students to be aware of the extra regulatory expectations placed on these students and what this may mean for their programs. This workshop will provide an overview of the basic requirements governing most international students’ ability to enter and remain in the U.S. for their studies-from admission to graduation. Topics addressed will include the visa application process, enrollment requirements, international student employment and social security, program completion requirements. Lunch provided by International Centre.
Presenters: Shannon Jolly and Anne Ekkaia.

** Limited seating – register early

Please reserve your seat by registering with U2 by: phone, 777-2128, Email U2@mail.und.nodak.edu, or online www.conted.und.edu/U2/. Please include: (1) workshop title/date, (2) name, (3) department, (4) position, (5) stop number, (6) phone number, (7) e-mail, and (8) How you first learned about this workshop. Thank you for registering in advance; it helps us plan for materials and number of seats.
-- Kathy Williams, Coordinator, U2 Program, U2@mail.und.edu, 777-2128

Technology Trends Forum: Fun with Photos is March 31

On Monday, March 31, the Center for Instructional and Learning Technologies/ITSS will host its monthly Technology Trends Forum. Kristen Borysewicz, art bibliographer from the Chester Fritz Library, and Chuck Kimmerle, photographer from University Relations, along with Lori Swinney, Elizabeth Becker and Chad Bushy from CILT, will present information on adding pictures and graphics to your course.
This forum will cover:
* What are image hosting sites (Flickr and Photobucket?)
* What is the Library of Congress doing with images and Flickr?
* How can the Chester Fritz Library's Artstor be used in your course?
* What are the copyright policies for pictures and graphics?
* How to use UND photos and other web images.

The forum will be held from 2:30 to 4 p.m. Monday, March 31, in the River Valley Room, Memorial Union. This forum is open to faculty, staff and students. To register, please call Diane Lundeen at 777-2129 or e-mail ciltworkshops@mail.und.edu.
-- Diane Lundeen, Technology Coordinator, Center for Instructional & Learning Technologies/ITSS, dianelundeen@mail.und.edu, 701-777-2129

National exercise, wellness expert Steven Blair to visit UND March 26-27

Steven Blair, a national expert on exercise and wellness, will visit the University of North Dakota and Grand Forks March 26-27 for a series of presentations.

Blair is professor of exercise science at the Arnold School of Public Health at the University of South Carolina, Columbia. He has 26 years as director of epidemiology/research and CEO of the Cooper Institute for Aerobics Research. Blair is the recipient of the Surgeon General’s Medallion, and many other national and international honors. He is the senior scientific editor for the U.S. Surgeon General’s Report on Physical Activity and Health, and the author of more than 400 scientific papers.

Blair's itinerary includes:

Wednesday, March 26:
* Noon, "Exercise is Medicine," a Dean's Hour presentation at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences. Free and open to the public. Lunch will be provided for all attendees!

* 7 p.m., Is Weight Loss the “Holy Grail” in the Quest for Good Health? presentation at the Red River High School Auditorium. Free and open to the public. Healthy drinks and snacks will be available at 6:30 p.m.

Thursday, March 27
* 11 a.m., Ideas for Researching and Promoting Physical Activity for Health — Especially in Rural Environments presentation at the Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center.

* 4 p.m., Fitness and Fatness Fireside Chat session at the UND Student Wellness Center. This session is especially for present/future exercise and wellness professionals.

While at the Cooper Institute, Blair did extensive research using the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study (ACLS) which examines the impact of diet, physical activity and other lifestyle factors on mortality. The ACLS database, the largest of its kind, is based on objective measures of fitness collected on more than 80,000 patients at the Cooper Institute since 1970. Steve plans to continue to use that database in his research at USC.

Blair says he’s delighted to return to the South Carolina campus where he first worked in 1966 as a PE instructor, and he looks forward to working at the new research center at the Arnold School at USC. He says he also hopes to devote some time to public health issues particularly in light of a newly announced effort by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to develop comprehensive physical activity guidelines. The guidelines are long overdue, said Blair, and there is a great need to have a process similar to the dietary guidelines, which are issued every five years. The physical activity guidelines can form the foundation for the development of a national physical activity plan, noting that the USA is one of the few industrialized countries without such a plan.

“Physical inactivity is one of the biggest public health problems we have. Inactivity and low fitness are powerful predictors of morbidity and mortality for millions of Americans,” he said.

The guidelines will be based on the best scientific findings on physical activity, something that Blair’s research has documented extensively.

Blair is preparing to publish the results of a five-year exercise study involving a group of postmenopausal, moderately hypertensive, sedentary women who were tested at different levels of exercise. “We pretty much know that exercise is good for you, but how much is really required to have any benefit? Is it the public health consensus rate – 30 minutes of moderate intensity five days per week? Well, suppose you do half that. Do you get any benefit? Well, nobody knew,” Blair said.

The women were tested at various percentages of the current recommendations. The results indicated that even a little exercise goes a long way. Even performance at 50 percent of the recommended exercise levels produces “significant physiologic adaptations that are healthy. So that’s good news,” Blair said.

Steven Blair is a professor in the exercise science program at the Arnold School of Public Health at the University of South Carolina. After 26 years as director of epidemiology and research, and as CEO of the Cooper Institute for Aerobics Research in Dallas, Blair returned to USC last year. He is a Benjamin Meaker Fellow at the University of Bristol, England. He is a fellow in the American College of Epidemiology, Society for Behavioral Medicine, American College of Sports Medicine, American Heart Association, and American Academy of Kinesiology and Physical Education; and was elected to membership in the American Epidemiological Society.

Dr. Blair is a past-president of the National Coalition for Promoting Physical Activity, and the American Academy of Kinesiology and Physical Education. He is the recipient of three honorary doctoral degrees -- Doctor Honoris Causa degree from the Free University of Brussels, Belgium; Doctor of Health Science degree from Lander University, U.S.; and Doctor of Science Honoris Causa, University of Bristol, UK.

Blair has received awards from many professional associations, including a MERIT Award from the NIH, ACSM Honor Award, Robert Levy Lecture Award from the American Heart Association, and is one of the few persons outside the U.S. Public Health Service to be awarded the Surgeon General's Medallion. He has lectured to medical, scientific, and lay groups in 48 states and 30 countries. His research focuses on the associations between lifestyle and health, with a specific emphasis on exercise, physical fitness, body composition, and chronic disease. He has authorship on over 400 papers in the scientific literature, and was the senior scientific editor for the U.S. Surgeon General's Report on Physical Activity and Health. He also is the author, or edited several books, including Fitness After 50, Active Living Every Day, and Physical Activity and Health.

Dr. Blair’s visit is possible because of the sponsorship and the assistance of the following people and groups: H. David Wilson, dean of the School of Medicine and Health Sciences; President Charles Kupchella; Laurie Betting, assistant vice president for wellness; Jane Croeker, health promotion/market advisor in student, health services; Red River High School; Department of Phyical Education, Exercise Science and Wellness; Allen Anderson, family health team leader, Grand Forks Public Health Department; Donna Bernhardt, NDSU Extension Services, Grand Forks.

For more information contact Jim Whitehead at 777-4347 or james_whitehead@und.nodak.edu.

Mark your calendar for Dakota Conference in March

The 23nd annual Dakota Conference on Rural and Public Health, an interdisciplinary forum for sharing strategies for building and sustaining healthy rural communities, is set for March 26-28 at the Ramada Plaza in Fargo, N.D.

This year’s conference, “Addressing Health Care Changes,” will offer participants a chance to hear from some of the most knowledgeable people in the areas of rural and public health. Oral and poster presentations will address health care administration, health promotion and disease prevention, environmental health and occupational health, and diverse populations and health disparities.

“The purpose of an annual statewide health care conference, such as Dakota Conference on Rural and Public Health, is not only to instill newfound skills, knowledge and resources,” said Lynette Dickson, project director at the Center for Rural Health at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences, and chair of the Dakota Conference committee, “but also to challenge and motivate people to integrate what they have learned in to their individual program, organization or facility.”

This year’s keynote speakers and topics include:
• “Public Health Leadership: Transforming Passion and Power into Purpose” by Linda Olson-Keller, a senior research scientist at the University of Minnesota
• “The Future of Rural Health Care” by George Miller, past president of the National Rural Health Association
• “Life in the Blender: Generational Diversity” by Rick Gessler, employment/employee relations manager and Jeff Franck, compensation and benefits manager, both of Altru Health System
• “Advocating for Public Health” by Linda Degutis, president of the American Public Health Association

For more information, visit http://ruralhealth.und.edu/projects/sorh/dakotaconf.php

The Dakota Conference is facilitated and sponsored by the Center for Rural Health. Additional sponsors are Altru Health System, North Dakota Public Health Association, College of Nursing, and the Department of Family and Community Medicine.
-- Wendy Opsahl, Communications Coordinator, Center for Rural Health, wopsahl@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-0871

Box Lunch session focuses on technology to facilitate student learning

Do you teach a large introductory style survey course, and have you wondered about the choices students make in regard to preparing for your class? Perhaps you have posted all sorts of materials online, but question how they are being utilized? Maybe you have even suspected that some of the strategies that students use outside class are ineffective and that your students make poor choices about studying for your class even though more productive options are available.

The April 2 On Teaching session titled, "Using Technology to Facilitate Student Learning in Large Introductory Courses: Implications of Research Findings" will feature Mark Grabe (psychology) discussing the use of online technology to analyze student learning strategies in large introductory courses. Tapping into the online environment has allowed him to collect data on how students utilize out-of-class study options made available to them. We will also hear from Dr. Grabe about his research tools (including a wiki project for constructing class notes) and findings based on UND students in his Introduction to Psychology courses. A discussion will follow on the factors that influence student performance in large classes and potential ways to help students be more effective once they leave the classroom.

This session will be held from noon to 1 p.m. Wednesday, April 2, in the Red River Valley Room, Memorial Union. To register and reserve a free box lunch, call Jana Hollands at 777-4998 by noon Monday, March 31. Please indicate if you require a vegetarian meal.
-- Anne Kelsch, Director, Office of Instructional Development, anne.kelsch@und.nodak.edu, 701-777-4233

Theology for Lunch lists lunch topics

Join the Campus Ministry Association, representing Christus Rex, Newman Center, United Campus Ministry, and Wittenberg Lutheran Chapel, for the spring Theology for Lunch series. The topic for the spring series will be:

4 Faiths 4 Stories Part II
April 2 – Roman Catholic (Newman Center)
April 9 – Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (Christus Rex)
April 16 – Lutheran Church Missouri Synod (Wittenberg Chapel)
April 23 – Presbyterian (First Presbyterian Church, Grand Forks)

Each presentation will take place at noon at Christus Rex. A light lunch will be served, so bring your appetite, a friend, and an interest in exploring these faith traditions.

-- Lisa Burger, Director, Student Success Center, lisaburger@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-4706

Farewell reception honors John Watson

A farewell reception will honor John Watson, dean of the School of Engineering and Mines, from 1 to 3 p.m. Friday, March 28, in the North Dakota Museum of Art. Dr. Watson joined the School of Engineering and Mines as dean in October 2001, after working in industry and academia in England, Australia, New Zealand, and the United States. He most recently spent 20 years at the University of Missouri-Rolla, with 12 years as chair of the Department of Metallurgical Engineering. He and his wife Ann are retiring to Georgia at the end of March. Please join us as we wish them well. -- School of Engineering and Mines.

American Indian nursing alumni seminar set for April 18

Five outstanding UND College of Nursing American Indian graduates, who are currently nursing professionals, will be on campus from 9:30 to 11 a.m. Friday, April 18, for the American Indian Nursing Alumni Seminar. The seminar will be held in Room 102, College of Nursing. They will discuss
* Why nursing?
* Challenges of transitioning from a student to a professional role
* Challenges faced in education and nursing careers, and
* Where their nursing education has taken them

The graduates are:
* Anthony Agard, 1988 graduate. He is the director of nursing for the Standing Rock IHS Hospital in Fort Yates, N.D.
* Madonna Azure, 1988 and 2001 graduate. She is a retired nurse from the PHS Commissioned Corps.
* Mary Lynn Eaglestaff, 1996 graduate. She is currently a nurse consultant for the Aberdeen Area IHS office in Aberdeen, S.D.
* Misty Wilkie Confiff, 2003 graduate. She is currently finishing her Ph.D. degree from the University of Minnesota.
* Alyssa Martinez deCoteau, 1996 and 2003 graduate. She is currently an advanced practice nurse at the Standing Rock IHS Hospital in Fort Yates, N.D.

The College of Nursing and the RAIN Program invite all interested students, faculty, staff, and community members to join us for this seminar on American Indian nursing. Refreshments will be served. It is free and open to the public.

"Course Design Considerations for Online Delivery" offered again

Due to overwhelming response to our Feb. 13 On Teaching discussion, we are offering a repeat session of “Course Design Considerations for Online Delivery.” Clearly, distance learning is an important growth area in higher education. At UND many on-campus courses utilize online delivery for some aspects of the curriculum while Continuing Education offers students both semester and independent study formats for completing courses completely online. Many teachers are concerned about the implications of distance delivery for their classes and student learning, and are working hard to measure and assess how students learn in these online delivery formats, employing a variety of techniques for engaging and motivating students and assessing their learning.

Jane Sims (continuing education), Katherine Anderson (teaching and learning), Victoria Beard (associate provost), and Joshua Reidy (dean, outreach programs) will present "Course Design Considerations for Online Delivery," a second time from 3 to 4 p.m. Friday, March 28, in Swanson 10/12. They will share techniques for enhancing student learning in distance delivery formats. We will also discuss how continuing education courses are evolving to mainstream into the UND campus community.

To register, call Jana Hollands at 777-4998.
-- Anne Kelsch, Director, Office of Instructional Development, anne.kelsch@und.nodak.edu, 701-777-4233

Annual Science Day for children set for March 29

Fifth- and sixth-grade students are invited to attend the annual Science Day Saturday, March 29, at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

The free event is designed to stimulate children's interest in science and features a hands-on approach to learning. It is hosted by the UND chapter of the American Medical Student Association (AMSA). A pre-registration form, available online, www.med.und.edu/publicaffairs/scienceday, can be downloaded, printed, completed and returned as noted on the form. Pre-registration is requested by Friday, March 14.

Participants may choose to attend either the morning session (9 a.m. to noon), with on-site registration beginning at 8:30 a.m., or afternoon session, 1 to 4 p.m., with registration beginning at 12:30 p.m.

Supervised by medical students, activities will focus on human health and anatomy, the heart and the importance of exercise, awareness of the dangers of tobacco use, "grossology," medical instruments and how they’re used, and various projects that demonstrate scientific principles.

Space is limited. The event, offered on a first-come, first-served basis, is held at the UND medical school, 501 N. Columbia Road. Participants should enter through the school's south entrance.

For more information or to request a registration form, please contact Shelley in the Office of Public Affairs, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, 777-4305 or spohlman@medicine.nodak.edu .
-- Shelley Pohlman, Admin Secretary, Public Affairs, spohlman@medicine.nodak.edu, 701-777-4305

Second annual UCC silent auction is March 29

The University Children’s Center (UCC) will host their second annual silent auction Saturday, March 29, at University Place from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. The event’s theme, "Imagination at Hand – Art and Literacy," showcases four books written by UCC children. "Tell Me What You Did Today," a book written by regional author Rick Kupchella, was used as the inspiration for the UCC childrens’ books. Adele Kupchella, UND’s first lady, serves at the honorary chair for the event.

Children ages 2-5 attending UCC have been illustrating and writing their books which will be published and auctioned in the silent auction. A total of four books will be completed by the UCC children. Also included in the event is a silent auction featuring works from local artists. All proceeds benefit programs at the Children’s Center.

Tickets are $15 and may be purchased at the University Children’s Center at 525 Stanford Road; call 777-3947 for more information. The event is open to the public.
-- JoAnne Yearwood, Director, University Childrens Center, joanneyearwood@mail.und.edu, 777-3947

Medical School for the Public begins in April

"Drugs and Bugs: Medical Education from Lab to Community" is the theme for this year's Medical School for the Public, presented by the School of Medicine and Health Sciences.
Free and open to everyone, the classes are set for 6:30 to 8 p.m. Tuesdays, April 1, 8, 15 and 22. People may participate in person at the UND medical school's facilities in Grand Forks, Fargo, Bismarck and Minot or online. The sites will be connected via video-conferencing; presentations will originate from the different locations depending on the faculty presenter.

For more information, and to pre-register, visit: www.med.und.nodak.edu/msp . Pre-registration is requested by Tuesday, March 25.

Sessions are:
* April 1, Informed Decision-Making about Substance Abuse
* April 8, Women and Alcohol Abuse and Tobacco Abuse and Cessation – A Community Approach
* April 15, Influenza: A Virus of Many Coats and Common Flu, Avian Flu and Pandemic Flu: What's the Difference?
* April 22, Community Response to Pandemic Influenza, North Dakota's Readiness Plan

Participants will learn about what's happening in the body that leads to drug addiction and contracting viruses, as well as public health approaches to tobacco cessation and responding to the threat of a pandemic influenza outbreak.

In the session on pandemic flu, "I hope participants will come away with an awareness that North Dakota has a good plan in place," said Linda Olson, director of special projects in the Office of Medical Education at the UND medical school. "We'll lead them to other informational resources on how to prepare" for such an event.

Participants will also gain insight into web-based resources for health information and public health initiatives. They will have the opportunity to take an online learning module, similar to the case-based medical education.

UND medical school faculty presenters are recognized, many of them nationally, as leading teachers, physicians, allied health professionals and researchers in their respective fields. Elizabeth Burns, professor of family and community medicine, is coordinating this year's program.

Medical School for the Public is "an excellent way to give people the most current information concerning their health and to learn from our outstanding faculty members," said H. David Wilson, dean of the UND medical school. "Participants are in for a real treat!"

For additional information, participants may also check with the School of Medicine and Health Sciences in:

* Bismarck, Lonna Augustadt, 751-9579
* Fargo, Kristi Hofer, 293-4108
* Grand Forks, Faye Aker, 777-3800
* Minot, Jodee Nielsen, 858-6774
-- Shelley Pohlman, Admin Secretary, Public Affairs, spohlman@medicine.nodak.edu, 701-777-4305

Author of "Generation Me" to visit campus April 2

The Graduate School is excited to host Jean Twenge, author of “Generation Me.” Dr. Twenge’s lecture, “Generation Me: How When You Were Born Influences Your Personality and Outlook on Life,” will be held at 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 2, in the Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union. This event is free and open to the public.

For more information about Jean Twenge and her research, visit her web site http://www.generationme.org/index.html
-- Susan Caraher, Marketing & External Relations, The Graduate School, susancaraher@mail.und.edu, 777-2524

"Beatlemania Now," "Gypsy" to play Chester Fritz Auditorium

"Beatlemania Now" will perform at the Chester Fritz Auditorium at 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 4. Touring for more than a decade, "Beatlemania Now" has become the premier multi-media Beatles show in America today, incorporating seven costume changes in this two-hour extravaganza. Featuring a big screen video presentation and performing over 35 songs, "Beatlemania Now" chronologically traces the Beatles career from their 1964 U.S. debut explosion on the The Ed Sullivan Show, to the finale of "Let it Be" in 1970.

"Beatlemania Now" successfully recaptures the mood and frantic intensity of that by-gone era. The performers skillfully and effectively recreate the sights and sounds that were and still are the Beatles! Additional information on "Beatlemania Now" can be found at their web site: www.beatlemanianow.com

"Gypsy" will be performed at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 17, at the Chester Fritz Auditorium. Based on the memoirs of entertainer Gypsy Rose Lee, "Gypsy" tells the story of Rose, an overbearing stage mother who is determined to make her girls the stars of vaudeville. Rose overwhelmingly favors her younger daughter, June, who headlines the act, while Louise is relegated to the chorus. Rose’s attention eventually turns to her older daughter, but it is Louise herself who discovers her own talent, and becomes a bigger star than Rose ever dreamed possible. Set against the freewheeling days of vaudeville and burlesque, "Gypsy" explores ambition, jealousy, family relationships, and the bittersweet loss of innocence.

Tickets for both shows are on sale now at the Chester Fritz Auditorium Box Office Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., by phone 772-5151, or online at www.ticketmaster.com/venue/49273. Ticket prices and additional information are available at www.cfa.und.edu
-- Betty Allan, Director, Chester Fritz Auditorium, bettyallan@mail.und.edu, 7-2170

HLC site visit: How are we doing on assessment of student learning?

On April 7-8, two site visitors will be on campus to evaluate progress made at the University on assessment of student learning. This will be a mandated follow-up to the fall 2003 accreditation site visit from the Higher Learning Commission (HLC) of the North Central Association.

Here is a sampling of the kind of information site visitors will find about the work of the University Assessment Committee, the General Education Requirements Committee, and academic departments. To read the two-page summary document from which this was excerpted (“How are we doing on assessment of student learning?”), please go to the web site < www.und.edu/org/hlc/hlc_update.pdf>.

Improvements in Committee Oversight
UND committees, especially the University Assessment Committee (UAC) and the General Education Requirements Committee (GERC), have implemented policies and procedures to support quality assessment efforts. Among the accomplishments of the UAC are the following:
• A recently developed (2006) assessment plan is posted on the UAC web site, and that plan is now under revision to reflect changes occurring in the general education program.
• Resources to aid departments in developing and carrying out assessment plans are available on the UAC web site.
• Assessment plans are posted for degree programs and other units with responsibility for student learning and development on the UAC web site.
• The annual reports for all departments and other units with responsibility for student learning and development are now expected to include details about assessment activities and findings.
• The assessment sections of annual reports are reviewed by UAC members on a cyclical basis (1/3 of academic departments per year, 1/3 of relevant non-academic departments per year), information is collected for institutional use, and results of the review are sent back to the department with comments about means of improving assessment activities in the future.

Members of the GERC expect to see assessment findings reported as part of every course revalidation, including comments about any loop-closing activities that may grow out of those findings. In addition, several major studies of general education outcomes have been completed, and findings from those studies affected decisions about the new Essential Studies program.

Improvements at the department level
The core of assessment of student learning activities occurs at the departmental level. Almost 100 percent of all degree-granting programs and many non-degree-granting programs and non-academic units at UND now have assessment plans posted on the University web site. Many of those plans are in a second or third iteration, with the department having learned from attempting to implement a first version that changes in the goals or assessment methods were desirable.

Significant percentages (varying by college, by type of program, and by level of program) have reported results, findings, and/or loop-closing activities. Many additional programs should reach that loop-closing stage within the next couple of years. In every college, a number of different and significant loop-closing activities have been reported.

These findings do not signify total success, but total success is a moving target and takes time to achieve. However, they do signify that more programs, more departments, and more faculty and staff are
• recognizing the need to pay attention to what students are learning, as well as what the faculty member intends to teach;
• recognizing the need to collect and review information systematically;
• achieving some benefits from assessment that demonstrate the value, in terms of student learning, of conducting assessment.
-- Joan Hawthorne, Assistant Provost, VPAA/Provost, joan_hawthorne@und.nodak.edu, 7-4684

UND to host NDUS Diversity Council Conference April 9-10

The University of North Dakota, in conjunction with the North Dakota University System Diversity Council and the Multicultural Awareness Committee (MAC), will host the 2008 NDUS Diversity Council Conference April 9-10, at the Memorial Union. This year’s theme, “Understanding the Experience,” provides participants with the opportunity to learn about issues that challenge current understandings of the world around us, including race, ethnicity, religion, culture, sexual orientation, life style, and learning.

The purpose of the diversity conference is to educate communities to be responsive to the needs of all publics and encourages training in campus and community human relations. Members of the North Dakota higher education institutions, other institutions within the region, and the public are invited to attend to learn about diversity issues that impact the lives of students, faculty, staff, and the broader community.

The two-day conference will feature sessions by faculty and staff from the University of North Dakota and other institutions, as well as nationally known speakers and panelists. Session topics will include current challenges in education that impact perceptions of economic status, class, sexual orientation, race and ethnic backgrounds, religion and culture, learning styles, images in society, and more. Through “Understanding the Experience,” participants will gain a broader appreciation and commitment to diversity by learning to respect differences and promote support for others in learning environments and broader communities.

There is no cost to attend the conference, and all participants must pre-register by March 31 to determine counts for meals and materials. Registration includes entry to all panel discussions and conference events, supplemental resource materials, all meals and breaks. The conference is coordinated by the UND Office of Conference Services.

For a registration form, complete conference schedule and more information, visit www.conted.und.edu/diversity or call UND Office of Conferences Services at 701-777-2663 or 866-579-2663 (toll free) or e-mail conferences@mail.und.edu (ATTN: NDUS Diversity).

University Curriculum Committee to hear program terminations

The University Curriculum Committee will meet at 3:30 p.m. Thursday, April 10, 305 Twamley Hall, to discuss the proposed requests to terminate the major and minor in Vocational Marketing Education. All interested parties are invited to attend.
-- Connie Borboa, Admissions and Records Officer, Office of the Registrar, connieborboa@mail.und.nodak.edu, 7-4852

Biomass conference to focus on sustainability

The opening general session at the International Biomass ’08 Conference and Trade Show, to be held at the Minneapolis Convention Center in Minneapolis, Minn., April 15–17, will feature a biofuels sustainability panel titled "Biofuels, Sustainability, and Carbon: Getting It Right," setting the theme of sustainability for the conference.

The panel will be made up of three of the most highly cited environmental scientists and analysts in the world, including Lee Lynd, professor of engineering and adjunct professor of biology, Dartmouth College; David Tilman, Regent’s professor and plant ecologist, University of Minnesota; and Nathanael Greene, senior policy analyst and environmental advocate, Natural Resource Defense Council.

“Whereas some recent analyses of biofuels have focused largely on how we might ‘get it wrong’ with respect to sustainability and carbon emissions, this panel will focus on strategies to ‘get it right,’” said Lynd. “Perspectives will be offered on paths forward that reconcile sustainability objectives and the interests of the existing biofuels industry.”

An international panel covering opportunities and challenges of biomass utilization in regions of Asia, Europe, North America, and South America will conclude the opening general session, followed by sessions on new technologies, government policies, alternative feedstocks, and financing as related to the biomass industry.

The second-day general session will highlight the latest information on climate science and policy and look at opportunities for biomass energy as part of the solution. Featured presentations will include climate change: science, policy, and business reactions, presented by J. Drake Hamilton, science policy director, fresh energy; improving energy sustainability of communities with biomass, presented by Art Wiselogel, manager, Community Initiative To Improve Energy Sustainability, BBI International; and The U.S. Voluntary Carbon Market: Risk and Opportunity for Biomass and Waste Energy Project Developers, presented by Andy Dvoracek, senior client manager, EcoSecurities.

“Reductions of greenhouse gas emissions will require an energy transformation at large scale,” said Hamilton. “This session will highlight opportunities for biomass energy in that transformation.”

Other conference attractions include a sold-out, world-class trade show featuring more than 90 exhibiting companies and two networking receptions and industry tours of the District Energy St. Paul Combined Heat and Power Plant and the Minnesota Renewable Energy Research and Demonstration Center.

The International Biomass ’08 Conference and Trade Show is being developed through a partnership between BBI International, a globalbiomass service company, and the Energy & Environmental Research Center, one of the world’s leading developers of cleaner, more efficient energy and environmental technologies.

Registration fees start at $695 a person and include an all-access pass to the general sessions, technical workshops, and trade show. Registration fees also include all conference materials, six meals, and three refreshment breaks. Industry tours will be offered Tuesday, April 15, for $50 a person. Visit www.biomassconference.com for registration information and a complete conference program.

R&D Showcase set for April 16, 17

Save the Date! The 2008 R&D Showcase event, which is alternately hosted by UND and NDSU, is scheduled for April 16 and 17 at the Fargodome. Please view the preliminary agenda for the meeting at http://www.ndsuresearchpark.com/pdf/RDShowcase2008.pdf .

It's a small world in a global economy. Join North Dakota's universities and technology partners to learn how the state's economy is being shaped by research and technology developments. Learn how our research universities are working with the state, federal and private sectors to spur technology-led economic development.

Keynote speakers include:
Yongmaan Park, chair of Doosan Infracore Co., Ltd. (Bobcat); Dan Berglund, CEO of State Science znd Technology Institute; Jeffrey Black, chair and CEO of Teleflex, Inc.; and Roger Brown, technology and innovation manager at Akzo Nobel Aerospace Coatings. State and local economic development officials, as well as university researchers, will cover developments in technology, successful partnerships and programs and their statewide impacts.

Hear more about technology developments in
-advanced electronics
-aerospace
-agriculture
-energy
-life sciences
-manufacturing and information technology

What you'll discover:
-Find out how you can partner in these technology initiatives
-Learn more about R&D tax credits
-Identify global opportunities
-Hear about North Dakota's technology businesses
-Learn how federal, state, local and university research partnerships
fuel economic development

Attend if you are a:
-business leader
-entrepreneur
-legislator
-student
-individual interested in advancing North Dakota's position in a
competitive global economy

Go to http://www.ndsuresearchpark.com ( http://www.ndsuresearchpark.com/ )
to view a complete program and register!

For more information, contact Jan Sobolik, jan@ndsuresearchpark.com
701-499-3602, NDSU Research and Technology Park, 1854 NDSU Research Circle North, Fargo, ND 58102.

Symposium on sustainability is April 21-22

A symposium on sustainability is set from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday and Tuesday, April 21 and 22, at the Chester Fritz Auditorium.

The presidential address, "The Great Ocean Adventure," will be given by Jean-Michel Cousteau, president, Ocean Futures Society, at 7:30 p.m. Monday, April 21, at the Chester Fritz Auditorium.

We are the first generation more powerful than nature, and the last generation to escape the consequences. Find out why and how universities, businesses, non-profits, governments, and individuals are committed to improving well-being indefinitely.

Sustainability is meeting the needs and values of the present generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet theirs.

Other speakers to hear from, and discuss with, leaders from a wide spectrum of viewpoints and ways to achieve ecological integrity, economic security, and social justice follow.

- Dr. Charles Kupchella, president, University of North Dakota
- Senator Byron L. Dorgan, U.S. Senator
- Dr. Lloyd Axworthy, president and vice chancellor, University of Winnipeg; Canadian Foreign Minister, 1996-2000
- Dr. Berrien Moore, CEO, Climate Central Member; National Academy of Sciences, Nobel Peace Laureate, 2007
- Dr. Anthony Cortese, president, Second Nature; former commissioner, Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection
- Dr. Richard Norgaard, professor of agriculture and economics, University of California Berkeley
- Kibbe Conti, RD, CDE, LN, registered dietitian, Northern Plains Nutrition Consulting
- Audrey Barnhart, curator, Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site, National Park Service
- Dr. Michael R. Brown, mayor, Grand Forks; obstetrician, Altru Health System
- Bruce Farnsworth, M.A., editorial photographer; Bruce Farnsworth Photography
- John Harju, associate director for research, Energy & Environmental Research Center, UND
- Bonny Bentzin, assistant director, Office of Sustainability Initiatives, Arizona State University
- Sarah James, Gwich\'in Activist; recipient, Goldman Environmental Prize, 2002, Arctic Village, Alaska
- Dr. John G. Watson, environmental scientist, Division of Atmospheric Sciences; Desert Research Institute
- Dr. Judith C. Chow, environmental scientist, Division of Atmospheric Sciences; Desert Research Institute
- Dr. Jerry M. Melillo, ecologist; director, The Ecosystems Center, MBL
Science Advisor for Environment to President Clinton, 1996-97
- Dr. Joseph Kiesecker, senior ecologist, The Nature Conservancy

For more information, please e-mail katrinak@aero.und.edu or call (701) 777-2482, http://sustainability.und.edu/ .

Super Science Saturday is April 19

Super Science Saturday will take place at the Gambucci Arena Saturday, April 19, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Dakota Science Center and the Parent Information Center have joined together for this free family event featuring hands-on science activities and informational exhibits for children in grades 1-6. The Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts will hold their Scout Show in the Gambucci Arena for children of all ages. The Hands-On Learning Fair, for children birth to age 7, will be held in the Purpur Arena sponsored by the Northeast Chapter of the North Dakota Association for the Education of Young Children (NENDAEYC), Child Care Resource & Referral (CCR&R), Healthy Families Region IV, and Grand Forks County Social Services.

Families with children will enjoy hands-on activities designed to spark an interest in the sciences during Super Science Saturday. In addition, "Extreme Science" demonstrations will take place on the center stage during the eventʼs hours.

Super Science Saturday is part of National Environmental Education Week. Greater Grand Forks residents will be able to bring their ink cartridges, laser cartridges, laptops, cell phones, pdaʼs, iPods, dvd movies, viseo systems and games, and digital cameras for recycling to the event. The Dakota Science Center uses the cartridges for Kids program to raise money for hands-on science activities in our community. A technotrash box will also be available for residents to recycle electronic media such as videos, cassettes, computer disks, cdʼs and dvdʼs. The GreenDisk Company began on Earth Day 1993 to provide a secure way to dispose of intellectual property in an environmentally responsible manner. -- Laura Munski, executive director, Dakota Science Center, lmunski@yahoo.com or 772-8207.

Teaching with technology applications now being accepted

The Center for Instructional and Learning Technologies will hold a teaching with technologies seminar/workshop for faculty interested in using technology to enhance traditional classroom teaching. This six day seminar will be held from 9 a.m. to noon Friday, May 16, and Monday through Friday, May 19-23. Registration is limited to 10 faculty. A $600 stipend is offered through funding from the Office of Instructional Development. The deadline for applications is April 1. For application instructions or more information, please see our web site at www.cilt.und.nodak.edu
-- Diane Lundeen, Workshop Coordinator, Center for Instructional & Learning Technologies/ITSS, dianelundeen@mail.und.edu, 777-2129

New Emeritus faculty named

The following persons have been granted emeritus status:

College of Arts and Sciences: Associate Professor Emeritus of Chemistry Thomas Ballintine (1975-2007); Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Art Brian Paulsen (1973-2007).

College of Business and Public Administration: Professor Emeritus of Economics David Ramsett (1970-2007).

College of Education and Human Development: Associate Professor Emerita of Teaching and Learning Beverly Uhlenberg (1983-2008).

John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences: Associate Professor Emeritus of Aviation Allan Skramstad (1991-2008).

School of Engineering and Mines: School of Engineering and Mines Dean Emeritus John Watson (2001-2008).

School of Medicine and Health Sciences: Professor Emeritus of Pathology A. Wayne Bruce (1975-2007); Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology David Lambeth (1977-2008); Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Microbiology and Immunology Roger Melvold (1997-2007).

Peter Johnson named interim head of University Relations

Peter Johnson has been named interim executive associate vice president for University Relations by President Charles Kupchella. Johnson, who has served as associate director of University Relations since 2005, will continue his duties as media relations coordinator, a job he has held since 1988. The new appointment is effective March 26.

Johnson is a former managing editor of the Devils Lake Daily Journal and once co-published and edited a weekly newspaper, The Chronicle, with his brother Sam. He also was an editor at The Pierce County Tribune in Rugby, N.D., and news editor at The Journal in Crosby, N.D. Johnson has taught Reporting and Feature Writing and Advanced Journalism and Principles of Public Relations in the UND School of Communication.

Johnson is a member of the North Dakota Newspaper Association Education Foundation Board of Directors and a former northeast district co-director of North Dakota Professional Communicators. He is a former director of the Northern Interscholastic Press Association, which provides educational support for North Dakota high school newspaper and yearbook advisors and students. Johnson has been involved with the Society of Professional Journalists, and also serves as a board member of The Arc, Upper Valley, and the LISTEN Center in Grand Forks. He serves as executive director of the Grand Forks Master Chorale. He holds degrees in English and education from UND.

He and his wife, Marsha, have four children.

Director named for Student Health Services

Michelle Eslinger has been named director of Student Health Services. She comes to us from the UND Bismarck Family Medicine Center, and holds an MBA from UND. She will begin her position Tuesday, March 25.
-- Linda Palmiscno, Medical Office Manager, Student Health Services, lindapalmiscno@mail.und.ed, 777-2546

Faculty can receive feedback on teaching

It's not too late to make plans to use the SGID (Small Group Instructional Diagnosis) method for receiving midterm feedback from students in your classes. The SGID process, facilitated by a trained faculty colleague, is a method of soliciting student perceptions about the progress of their learning. Since it is conducted by an outsider to your class, students are free to be direct, but since it is normally done around mid-semester, you receive the feedback at a time when there is still ample opportunity for you to consider any changes that might improve student learning. The SGID process is flexible enough to be used with both large and small classes, and yields information likely to be useful to both beginning and experienced faculty.

For more information about the SGID processor, or if you would like to request an SGID, contact Jana Hollands at 777-4998 or jana_hollands@und.nodak.edu .
-- Anne Kelsch, Director, Office of Instructional Development, anne.kelsch@und.nodak.edu, 777-4233

Grants and contracts administration office lists closing dates for PeopleSoft testing

The finance upgrade to PeopleSoft 9.0 is moving along quickly. The go live date for the 9.0 version is Monday, April 21. The Grants and Contracts Administration office will be taking part in an overview of the system on March 25 and 26. The office will participate in user acceptance testing April 1-4.

These dates will be the only opportunity for the Grants and Contracts staff to review the system and get hands-on assistance from the consultants and North Dakota University System staff prior to the go live date of April 21.

Please plan accordingly if you have proposals due or other items that need our attention, as the grants and contract officers will be in Fargo on March 25 and 26 and April 1 through 4.

-- David Schmidt, Manager, Grants & Contracts Administration, davidschmidt@mail.und.nodak.edu, 7-2505

Darla Adams appointed nurse anesthesia program director

Darla Adams has been named nurse anesthesia program director. Dr. Adams has served as interim program director of our nurse anesthesia program specialization since February 2005 and accepted the role as program director effective March 15, 2008.

Dr. Adams earned a Ph.D. in teaching and learning in December 2007. Her dissertation was titled “Adequacy of Labor Epidural Information for Informed Consent.”
-- Chandice Covington, Dean, Nursing, chandicecovington@mail.und.edu, 777-4555

Assessment retreat grant funding is available

“Closing the Assessment Loop” funding will again be made available to academic departments conducting assessment retreats. The best and most useful assessment occurs when there’s a mechanism for yearly conversations about data collected. These retreats are intended to serve that purpose by providing opportunities to bring faculty together to review, discuss, and use findings from assessment efforts.

More information on the retreat grant program and details on the application process are available through Joan Hawthorne at <joan_hawthorne@und.nodak.edu>.
-- Joan Hawthorne, Assistant Provost, VPAA/Provost, joan_hawthorne@und.nodak.edu, 777-4684

Note final deadline for submission of SSAC travel grant applications

Thursday, May 1, is the final deadline for submission of Senate Scholarly Activities Committee travel grant applications for fiscal year 2007-2008. This deadline is for travel occurring between May 2 and Sept. 15, 2008.

The committee reminds applicants to carefully prepare their proposals and be specific and realistic in their budget requests. Although the SSAC encourages submission of travel requests, the committee takes into consideration the most recent SSAC award granted to each applicant. Priority will be given to beginning faculty and first-time applicants.

Application forms are available at Research Development and Compliance, 105 Twamley Hall, 777-4278, or on RD&C's home page (UND's home page under "Research"). Please feel free to contact RD&C (777-4278) for information or guidance when preparing your application.
-- Patrick A. Carr, Ph.D., Chair, Senate Scholarly Activities Committee, Anatomy and Cell Biology, pcarr@medicine.nodak.edu, 701/777-4278

Bookstore offers 25 percent off hats, T-shirts

The Barnes & Noble at UND Spring Fling Sale continues through March 29, with 25 percent off men's and women's hats and short sleeve T-shirts. Stop in early for best selection.
-- Michelle Abernathey, General Manager, Barnes & Noble at UND, michelle_abernathey@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2103

Good Friday is holiday

Friday, March 21, Good Friday, will be observed as a holiday by faculty and staff members of the University. Only those employees designated by their department heads will be required to work on this holiday. -- Greg Weisenstein, vice president for academic affairs and provost, and Diane Nelson, director, human resources.

Chester Fritz Library lists hours for Easter weekend

The Chester Fritz Library will observe the following hours of operation for Easter weekend: Thursday, March 20, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Friday, March 21 (Good Friday), closed; Saturday, March 22, 1 to 5 p.m.; Sunday, March 23 (Easter Sunday), closed.
-- Karen Cloud, Administrative Assistant, Chester Fritz Library, karencloud@mail.und.edu, 7-2618

Library of the Health Sciences lists Easter week end hours

The Library of the Health Sciences will be open Thursday, March 20, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Friday, March 21, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, March 22, 1 to 5 p.m.; Sunday, March 23, closed, and Monday, March 24, 8 a.m. to midnight.
-- April Byars, Adm. Asst., Library of the Health Sciences, abyars@medicine.nodak.edu, 7-3893

Law library announces Easter weekend hours

Easter weekend hours for the law library follow: Friday, March 21, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, March 22, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, March 23, closed. Regular hours resume Monday, March 24.
-- Jane Oakland, Circulation Manager, Law Library, oakland@law.und.edu, 7-3482

Ray Richards lists winter golf specials

Ray Richards is offering a winter golf special. Buy a punch card for five rounds of golf for $45 ($50-$63 value) or 10 rounds of golf for $90 ($100-$126 value). Added bonus: The buyer will receive a free round of golf for buying the 10-round punch card.

Also this year, you may buy a cart seat for each punch card. Five rounds of golf with a cart seat will cost $70 ($85-$98 value) or 10 rounds of golf with a cart seat for $140 ($170-$196 value). A free round is included with a 10-round purchase.

Winter golf special punch cards may be bought by stopping at the Chester Fritz Auditorium Box Office or by calling 777-4090. Box office hours are 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. Payroll deductions are accepted. The deadline to purchase is April 15.
-- Tom Swangler, assistant director, Ray Richards Golf Course, tomswangler@mail.und.edu, 777-4090

International Centre lists Easter hours

The International Centre lsits the following Easter hours: Friday, March 21, noon to 8 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, March 22-23, closed; Monday, March 24, regular hours resume, 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.
-- Tatjyana Richards, Office Manager, Office of International Programs, tatjyanarichards@mail.und.edu, 777-6438

ITSS lists holiday hours

Information Technology Systems and Services will close for the Good Friday holiday at midnight Thursday, March 20, and will reopen at 5 a.m. Saturday, March 22. -- ITSS.

Sign & Design Studio lists Easter break hours

The Sign & Design Studio will be closed Friday, March 21, through Monday, March 24. Regular hours will resume Tuesday, March 25: Monday through Friday: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Sundays: closed.
-- Rebecca Slade, Marketing Coordinator, Memorial Union, rebecca.slade@und.edu, 777-3938

Donated leave sought for Karlene Clark

Leave donations are sought for Karlene Clark, circulation student supervisor at the Chester Fritz Library. She and her famly thank you for your generosity. Please send a donated sick or vacation leave form to Karen Cloud, Chester Fritz Library, Stop 9000. Donated leave forms are available at www.und.edu/dept/payroll, then click on "forms."
-- Karen Cloud, Administrative Assistant, Chester Fritz Library, karencloud@mail.und.edu, 777-2618

Donated annual leave requested for Jane Grega

Donations of annual leave are sought for Jane Grega, serials manager at the law library, due to a family medical condition. She and her family thank you for your generosity. Donated leave forms are available at http://www.und.edu/dept/payroll, then click on forms. Please send completed form for annual leave to Sherry Zeman, 2968 2nd Ave. N. Stop 9004, Grand Forks, ND 58202. -- Kaaren Pupino, head of technical services, UND Thormodsgard Law Library.

Archaeological documentary released

The Pyla-Koustopetria Archaeological Project and PatrowVisual announce the release of their newest archaeological documentary, "Emerging Cypriot." The project is a collaboration between William Caraher, assistant professor of history and director of the Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project, and Josiah Patrow, who received his M.A. at UND in 2005 and is currently working in the film industry in Los Angeles.

"Emerging Cypriot" is a series of short documentary films which serve as a sequel to the award-winning documentary, "Survey on Cyprus," which premiered in Grand Forks in 2006 and has been shown nationally. "Emerging Cypriot" provides an unprecedented look into the day-to-day workings of a small archaeological project on the island of Cyprus. All aspects of archaeological life are shown from the excitement of discoveries to the stresses and aggravations of living and working together. Patrow is particularly skilled at capturing the comic aspects of the serious business of archaeological research without obscuring the project’s conspicuously academic goals.

Each week a new Emerging Cypriot documentary short will be released at http://www.und.nodak.edu/instruct/wcaraher/Emerging_Cypriot.html. The shorts are accompanied by brief commentaries available on Caraher’s blog: http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/emerging_cypriot/index.html
For more information on the Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project visit: http://www.pkap.org

The documentary project was funded by the University of North Dakota, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, and Messiah College.

Dependents of benefitted staff may apply for scholarship

Dependents of benefitted staff members may apply for the 2008-2009 Staff Senate Scholarship. Please visit our web site at www.und.nodak.edu/org/undss for the application form and scholarship criteria. All applications must be returned to the Student Financial Aid Office by Friday, March 14, in order to be considered.

Comments sought on third UND home page design

A third proposed home page has been posted on the UND redesign blog, http://www2.und.edu/our/redesign_blog/ . Please feel free to comment on the design, which is nearing final stages. Once the design is finalized, we'll develop new templates for department use. -- Jan Orvik, web manager, University Relations.

Studio One features rising trucking costs, international soccer team

Learn how independent truck drivers’ costs are increasing on the next edition of Studio One. Jerry Nelson, an independent truck driver, faces many challenges when it comes to his business. According to Nelson, rising costs are not only fuel-related, but also include parts and maintenance. Learn how some owner-operators are dealing with the changing prices.

Also on the show this week, one group of international students at the University of North Dakota are discovering a common language through sports. Although these students may be an ocean away from home, they have found a way to reconnect through soccer.

Studio One is an award-winning news and information program produced at the University of North Dakota Television Center. The program airs live on UND Channel 3 on Thursdays at 5 p.m. Re-broadcasts can be seen at 7 a.m., noon, 7 p.m. and 11 p.m. daily and on Saturdays at 10 a.m. Prairie Public Television airs Studio One on Saturday at 6 a.m. The program can also be seen by viewers in Fargo, Bismarck/Mandan and Minot, N.D.; Minneapolis, Minn.; Denver, Colo.; and Winnipeg, Manitoba.
-- Meghan Flaagan, Director of Marketing, Television Center, meghan.flaagan@und.edu, 777-3818

UND's BBER examines importance of farm income to North Dakota economy

The Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of North Dakota released the Winter 2008 quarterly forecast report. The QFR provides growth projections for numerous U.S. macroeconomic variables as well as regional income variables. New to this edition of the QFR is a recession probability calculation for the state of North Dakota. There are also forecasts of unemployment for North Dakota and the three largest urban areas, Bismarck, Fargo and Grand Forks.

A copy of the Research Bulletin is available at http://business.und.edu/bber/publications/qfr/qfr-winter2008.pdf .

The Bureau of Business and Economic Research studies issues of importance to the businesses and economy of North Dakota and the region. The Bureau is located in the Department of Economics, College of Business and Public Administration.

University Children's Center has summer openings

There are summer program openings at University Children’s Center.
* Fun, educational care continues at UCC for children 2-5 during the summer months.
* UCC also offers a summer program for children 5-12. Children of students, faculty, staff, and Grand Forks community members are all welcome.
* The summer program for 5-12 year olds includes many outdoor and indoor activities: there are lots of opportunities to explore the UND campus and to take off-campus field trips. This year the program will focus on arts and crafts, cooking, and creative kid presentations.
* Full-time summer enrollment or short-term enrollment is available.

Please contact UCC at 777-3947 for information and registration materials.

Senate Scholarly Activities Committee awards funds

The Senate Scholarly Activities Committee received three publication grant applications requesting $4,876.60, and four research/creative activity grant applications, requesting a total of $8,175 in response to the February call for proposals. The following awards were made at the committee meeting in February.

Publication awards
* Mark Jendrysik (political science and public administration), $821.60
* Steven Light (political science and public administration), $1,000
* Min Wu (biochemistry and molecular biology), $645

Research and creative activity awards
* Frank Cuozzo (anthropology), "Using Stable Isotopes to Assess ‘Ecological Disequilibrium’ in Madagascar," $2,475
* Kathleen Coudle King (English), "Attend Performance of St. Bette’s," $900
* Richard Van Eck (teaching and learning), "Design and Psychometric Properties of the Intrinsic Motivation Scale," $2,500
-- Patrick A. Carr, Ph.D., Chair, Senate Scholarly Activities Committee, Anatomy and Cell Biology, pcarr@medicine.nodak.edu, 701/777-4278

Senate Scholarly Activities Committee awards new faculty

The Senate Scholarly Activities Committee (SSAC) announces the following New Faculty Scholar Awards. Eleven applications were received for this award; the total amount requested was $51,459.41. New Faculty Scholar Awards provide support for research and creative activity of assistant professors who have completed less than three years at UND. Criteria used to review applications included excellence of the application, potential national prominence of the applicant, and potential for future external funding, if applicable.

* Amanda Boyd (modern and classical languages and literatures), "Demonizing Esotericism: Spirituality and Popular Culture in the Works of Gustav Meyrink," $4,500
* Dane Crossley II (biology), "To Understand Environmental Impact on Cardiovascular Physiology in Embryonic Snapping Turtles," $1,600
* Joel Jonientz (art), "Traditional Cell Animation," $4,988.98
* Krista Minnotte (sociology), "Examining the Role of Emotions in Work-Family Conflict and Marital Outcomes," $4,965
* Cynthia Culver Prescott (history), "Remembering and Redefining Western Women: Pioneer Monuments in the American West, 1900-1950," $4,979.43
* Steven Ralph (biology), "Improvement of Insect Resistance in Poplar Trees Using Activation Tagged Forward Genetics," $5,000
* Rebecca Romsdahl (Earth systems science and policy), "Adaptation Planning for Potential Impacts from Climate Change on the Northern Great Plains," $1,600
* Marcus Weaver-Hightower (educational foundations and research), "Mystery Meal: The Politics of Food at School," $5,000.
-- Patrick A. Carr, Ph.D., Chair, Senate Scholarly Activities Committee, Anatomy and Cell Biology, pcarr@medicine.nodak.edu, 701/777-4278

Barnes & Noble urges faculty to submit fall, summer textbook requests

Fall and summer textbook requests were due Feb. 28 to Barnes & Noble UND Bookstore. Faculty are urged to submit your adoptions online at: http://und.BNcollege.com - click on the faculty service tab. We can also take these requests through intercampus mail, fax, or by phone, 777-2106. Having your course and book information to us early allows us to pay students who choose to sell their books up to 50 percent of the book price at buyback.

Recycle and reuse - the more books we buy at the end of this spring term, the more students save next term. Used books are 25 percent off the new book price.

With early information, we can notify you of publisher stock situation, edition changes, and out-of-print titles.

We would like to thank you in advance for turning in your textbook requests. Because of your concern and support in the past we are winning the battle of maintaining and reducing the costs of textbooks. Our used textbook inventory this past semester was once again over a million dollars! The savings to UND students based on this inventory was over $350,000.

-- Michelle Abernathey, General Manager, Barnes & Noble at UND, michelle_aberanthey@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2103

Museum Cafe lists soups, specials

The North Dakota Museum of Art Cafe lists their soups and specials.

Through March 21:
Soups for the week: Lobster Bisque / Squash and Blue Cheese Risotto
Wednesday: Dagwood Panini
Thursday: Hot Meatloaf Sandwich
Friday: closed

March 24-28:
Soups for the week: Cream of Onion / Succotash Soup with Chicken
Monday: Club Sandwich
Tuesday: Gnocchi
Wednesday: Chicken Marsala
Thursday: Chicken Chettinad
Friday: Salmon Caesar Salad

The Museum Café is open weekdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with lunch served from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
-- Brian Lofthus, Assistant to the Director, North Dakota Museum of Art, blofthus@ndmoa.com, 777-4195

The invisible injury: March is Brain Injury Awareness Month

What do falling off a horse, crashing a motorcycle, slipping in the bathtub and getting a concussion while playing football all have in common? They can all cause a traumatic brain injury (TBI).

March is Brain Injury Awareness Month across the United States. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, each year in the United States an estimated 1.4 million people sustain a traumatic brain injury. Of them, about 50,000 die, 235,000 are hospitalized and 1.1 million are treated and released from an emergency department. Many people recover from their injuries, but each year an estimated 80,000 to 90,000 people sustain a TBI resulting in a permanent disability. Currently, there are at least 5.3 million Americans living with a disability because of brain injury.

“Traumatic brain injury is frequently referred to as the ‘invisible injury’ because the complications that result from a TBI, such as problems with thinking and memory, are often not visible, and because awareness about TBI among the general public is limited,” according to Susan H. Connors, president and CEO of the Brain Injury Association of America. “With TBI occurring every 23 seconds, this public health concern ranks as a leading cause of death and disability in children and young adults. TBI costs our nation a staggering $56.3 billion a year.”

Each year, more Americans will experience brain injury than HIV/AIDS, breast cancer, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury combined. Despite incidence rates, brain injury remains largely unseen by the American population while awareness and prevention are key to lowering occurrence.

The Traumatic Brain Injury State Partnership Grant Program in North Dakota is building a comprehensive system of coordinated services for individuals with TBI and their families. This program will support individuals with TBI, their family members and caregivers, service providers, advocates and others and work together to build a stronger, more viable service system.

Coordinated by the Center for Rural Health at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences, the program is funded by the North Dakota Department of Human Services and partners with the Anne Carlsen Center for Children, Dakota Medical Foundation, North Dakota Brain Injury Association and Evaluation Group LLC.

In North Dakota, TBI professionals are available to provide presentations and information regarding “TBI 101,” “Brain Injury and Veterans,” and much more. Please contact Rebecca Quinn for more information at 777-5200 or rquinn@medicine.nodak.edu.
-- Wendy Opsahl, Communications Coordinator, Center for Rural Health, wopsahl@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-0871

Ray Richards golf course season passes now available

The 2008 golf season passes for faculty and staff are now available for $240. With your purchase, you will receive a free season pass for the driving range ($140 value).

UND faculty and staff family season passes are $500; they are not eligible for the free driving range pass, but for an extra $150 the family can have season driving range passes.

Stop at the Chester Fritz box office or call 777-4090. Box office hours are 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. Remember that passes may be paid through payroll deduction over six pay periods.
-- Tom Swangler, Asst Director, Ray Richards Golf Course, tomswangler@mail.und.edu, 777-4094

Start! walking with a free pedometer

Attention employees -- help UND continue to be a Start! Fit-Friendly Company by participating in our sixth annual walking challenge. It will begin March 31, so sign up as a team or sign up as an individual to Start! increasing your walking.

Throughout the challenge, you will report your weekly steps from the week before. The first week, you will get points for each step you walk. For the following three weeks after that, you will get points based on the percentage increase of steps. Once all steps have been collected, your total points will be calculated and communicated to you within the week.

The team and individual with the most points by April 25 will be our big winners, each receiving a 1GB iPod Shuffle, valued at $50 each.

There are two easy ways to register:
1. Beginning March 25, fill out the short registration form online at www.workwell.und.edu
2. E-mail amandaeickhoff@mail.und.edu or call 777-0210 with the following information:
• Team or individual name (maximum of five/team)
• Team members’ names (if applicable)
• Contact information
• Current daily steps
• Daily step goal, to be accomplished by April 25

All that register will receive a free pedometer (while supplies last), featuring a calorie calculator, timer, step/distance counter, clock, alarm, and stopwatch! So sign up and Start! walking your way to health!
-- Amanda Eickhoff, Assistant Director for Work Well, Wellness Center, amandaeickhoff@mail.und.edu, 701.777.0210

Win in so many ways with Work Well!

Here’s what people are saying about Work Well and Know Your Numbers:

• Kudos! This is really well thought out. It is easy to follow.
• Just wanted to say, I love the new "community" feel of the Work Well web site
• Thank you for this opportunity to better ourselves.
• Thank you so much for taking care of us.
• Great to have such support for the life changing adventure
• It is always good to have these reminders and support. Too easy to start something and not finish with our busy routines.

Congratulations to our latest big winners:
Becky Cournia, $1,000
Lisa Burger, $500
Angie Carpenter, $500
Peter Meberg, $500

Benefited employees -- wish you could have been a part of the drawings? It’s not too late. Sign up now and you could be in the May drawing for $500 or even $1,000!

Go to www.workwell.und.edu to register and find out more about Know Your Numbers!
-- Amanda Eickhoff, Assistant Director for Work Well, Wellness Center, amandaeickhoff@mail.und.edu, 701.777.0210

Internal job openings listed

The following position vacancies are available only to regular UND staff employees who have successfully completed their six-month probation period, earn annual and sick leave, receive BC/BS health insurance and TIAA-CREF or ND PERS retirement benefits. Current UND faculty, please contact Human Resources for eligibility.

TO APPLY: Please complete UND Application/Control Card form. Send letter of application and resume, referencing position name and number, to: Human Resources, University of North Dakota, Twamley Hall, Room 313, 264 Centennial Drive Stop 8010, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8010. Applications MUST be received by the deadline date.

EXECUTIVE/PROFESSIONAL/ADMINISTRATIVE/ATHLETIC COACHES:

POSITION: Research Engineer, Energy & Environmental Research Center, #08-255
DEADLINE: (I) 3/18/2008
SALARY: $50,000+/year

TECHNICAL/PARAPROFESSIONAL:

POSITION: Assistant to the Associate Dean/Clinical Database Coordinator, Nursing, #08-257
DEADLINE: (I) 3/24/2008
SALARY: $28,000 plus/year

OFFICE SUPPORT:

POSITION: Administrative Secretary, Student Success Center, #08-256
DEADLINE: (I) 3/18/2008
SALARY: $23,850+/year

CRAFTS/SERVICE/TRADES: No vacancies.

Inventors recognized for contributions to intellectual property

The Office of Intellectual Property Commercialization and Economic Development held the first inventor’s recognition ceremony March 13. There were 54 inventors from seven UND schools and colleges. Two UND centers were recognized for filing 47 invention disclosures, 38 patent applications, and four trademark applications.

The following filed an invention disclosure: Ted Aulich, Energy & Environmental Research Center; Anamitro Banerjee, chemistry; Ofer Beeri, space studies; Timothy Bigelow, electrical engineering; David Bradley, microbiology and immunology; Matthew Cavalli, mechanical engineering; Liying Chi, anatomy and cell biology; Colin Combs, pharmacology, physiology and therapeutics; Pablo de Leon, space studies; Saleh Faruque, electrical engineering; Jonathan Geiger, pharmacology, physiology and therapeutics; Othman Ghribi, pharmacology, physiology and therapeutics; Dagmar Hajkova, biochemistry and molecular biology; Jade Herzog, family medicine; Andi Jakupi, geology and geological engineering; Naima Kaabouch, electrical engineering; Edward Kolodka, chemical engineering; Evguenii Kozliak, chemistry; Alena Kubatova, chemistry; Evelyn Labun, nursing; Nathan Lilke, electrical engineering; Rugao Liu, anatomy and cell biology; Larry Louisiana II, chemistry; Michael Mann, chemical engineering; Ronald Marsh, computer science; Barry Milavetz, biochemistry and molecular biology; Masaru Miyagi, biochemistry and molecular biology; Darrin Muggli, chemical engineering; Ryan Nelson, chemical engineering, Julius Ngwendson, chemistry; Matthew Nilles, microbiology and immunology; Linda Olson, medical education; David Pierce, chemistry; K.C. Sekhar Rao, biochemistry and molecular biology; Wayne Riveland, Human Nutrition Research Center; Robert Rubeck, family medicine; Michele Schenk, mechanical engineering; Richard Schultz, electrical engineering; Wayne Seames, chemical engineering; Stephen Stripe, family practice-Minot; Brian Tande, chemical engineering; Sam Trandem, mechanical engineering; Eric Walter, family medicine; Min Wu, biochemistry and molecular biology; Eleanor Yurkovich, nursing; Marcellin Zahui, mechanical engineering; Thomas Zeidlik, aviation instruction; Zhengwen Zeng, geology and geological engineering; Xiaojun Julia Zhao, chemistry.

The following filed a U.S. or foreign patent application: Ted Aulich, Anamitro Banerjee, David Bradley, Liying Chi, Dagmar Hajkova, Evguenii Kozliak, Rugao Liu, Michael Mann, Barry Milavetz, Masaru Miyagi, Darrin Muggli, Julius Ngwendson, Linda Olson, David Pierce, K.C. Sekhar Rao, Wayne Seames, Stephen Stripe, Thomas Zeidlik, Xiaojun Julia Zhao.

The following filed a U.S. trademark application: Steven Light, political science and public administration; Linda Olson, Kathryn Rand, law school.

Linda Olson had three registered trademarks and Evguenii Kozliak had an issued U.S. patent application.

The Office of Intellectual Property Commercialization and Economic Development is responsible for working with faculty and students to support innovative activity at the University of North Dakota.
-- James K. Petell, Associate Vice President, IP Commercialization & Economic Development, jimpetell@mail.und.edu, 777-6708

New book on Soviet collectivization published

Ron Vossler's eighth book, "Wedding in the Darkness," has been published.

Subtitled "Three Accounts from Collectivization and the Great Terror, 1928-1938," the book draws on several hundred hours of survivor interviews, along with secret police reports, and numerous personal letters sent from Soviet Ukraine to the Dakotas in the 1930s.

The author, a senior lecturer in the English Department, and a recent appointee to the International Commission of the Ukrainian World Congress, draws on some of the same material as his film "We'll Meet Again in Heaven," one of an award-winning series that has premiered on Prairie Public Television.

The picture that emerges from these accounts is the manner in which Marxist tactics, including formation of Committees of the Poor, were instrumental in the wholesale repression in the ethnic German villages in the former Soviet Union.

Vossler's next research trip to Ukraine in May 2008 will focus in part on the role of the self protection units from German villages in the mass murder of Jews in 1941-1942 -- which is part of the focus of his next book, "German Ghosts."

Contact information:
Michael Miller, director and bibiographer, Germans from Russia Heritage Collection, NDSU Library, P.O. Box 5599, 1201 Albrecht Blvd.,
Fargo, N.D. 58501-5599, or e-mail: Michael.Miller@ndsu.edu
-- Ronald Vossler, Senior Lecturer, English, ronald_vossler@und.nodak.edu, 1-218-779-68

George Bibel publishes book

George Bibel (mechanical engineering) recently published a book, "Beyond the Black Box: The Forensics of Airplane Crashes" (Johns Hopkins University Press). The book attempts to teach popular science through accident and crash stories. In related activity, a guest column "Listen Up and Fly Right" appeared in the New York Times on Jan. 26, 2008 and was reprinted in the International Herald Tribune, the China Daily, on numerous flight attendant union's web pages and other newspapers. The book was favorably reviewed in the New Scientist and several other publications. A book signing occurred at the Smithsonian Air & Space Museum Feb. 16 and 17. Professor Bibel was recently interviewed about his book by Neal Conan on National Public Radio Talk of the Nation, on NPR KPCC Los Angeles, WPHT Philadelphia; the Grand Forks Herald and the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. A forthcoming feature article in the British Royal Air Force News is in the works.

Remembering Carol Larson

Carol E. Larson, retired facilities custodian, died March 15 at Altru Hospital, Grand Forks. She was 62.

Larson, the daughter of Melvin and Pearl Larson, was born June 15, 1945 in Northwood, N.D. She grew up in Northwood and worked at Deaconess Nursing Home. She then moved to Superior, Wis., and worked as a nurses aide at a nursing home. She moved to Grand Forks in 1987 to help take care of her sister, Karen. She worked at UND as a custodian for many years.

Larson was a big Packers fan. She was taken care of by her sister, Virginia Johnson, Grand Forks. She is survived by her sister, Marlys (Orin) Thompson, Mayville, N.D.; brothers, Manny Larson, Northwood, and Robert (Rika) Mandt, Fargo, N.D., and several nieces and nephews.

She was preceded in death by her parents and brothers, Charles, Galen, Orville, Ardell, and sister Karen Flesche, Grand Forks.

Funeral services are set for 2 p.m. Wednesday, March 19, in University Lutheran Church of Grand Forks. Visitation will be Tuesday from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. with a 7:30 prayer service in Amundson Funeral Home. Visitation will continue for the hour before the service in the church.