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ISSUE: Volume 45, Number 14: November 21, 2007

Contents
Top Stories
Weisenstein will chair athletic director search committee
Volunteers sought for winter commencement ceremonies Dec. 14
Air traffic control program ranked No. 1 in nation
Events to Note
Check out these GREAT classes at the Burnt Toast Demo Kitchen at the Wellness Center!!!
Work Well offers free cholesterol screenings
Doctoral examination set for Megan N. Tollefson
Doctoral examination set for Eric N. Njabon
Technology Trends Forum: Second Life is Nov. 26
Doctoral examination set for Tina M. Squire
Doctoral examination set for David Bartz
Lighting of the Green is Tuesday, Nov. 27
Box Lunch session focuses on "Teaching in the Capstone"
Book discussion continues Nov. 28
Forget your flu shot?
Doctoral examination set for Peter Schmutzer
Thai Kitchen class available at Burnt Toast Demo Kitchen
Physics lecture is Nov. 30
Barnes & Noble at UND hosts holiday open house
UND Belly Dance Club offers beginner classes
Grand Forks movie to premiere at Forx Film Fest
Thursday Music Club Christmas Musicale set for Dec. 2
Women's Center discusses de-stressing for the holidays
Announcements
Library of Health Sciences lists Thanksgiving weekend hours
Nominations for Kupchella award due March 1
Arts, humanities, social sciences funding application procedures listed
Nursing considers accelerated post-baccalaureate degree option
Faculty Instructional Development Committee lists awards
Faculty invited to use Barnes & Noble Faculty Center Network
Veterans Day is holiday
Chester Fritz Library lists Thanksgiving hours
Law Library posts Thanksgiving holiday hours
ITSS lists holiday hours
Museum lists Thanksgiving holiday hours
International Centre lists updated holiday hours
Flex benefits enrollment deadline is Nov. 30
UND 125th Committee gathering 125 ideas
Note personal long-distance telephone call policy
Martin Luther King Jr. awards nomination forms available online
Note Barnes & Noble sale on imprinted sweatshirts, sweatpants
Exhibition opens at North Dakota Museum of Art
PenAir chooses UNDAF Flight Training Center to recruit pilots and mechanics
Bring music back to Northwood
Donated leave requested for Elizabeth Fletcher Lamb
Note out-of-state workers compensation coverage
Wednesday, Nov. 28, is Denim Day
Holidays present opportunity to gather valuable family medical history
Work Well: Win $1,000
Seeking volunteers for calcium retention study
Internal job openings listed
In the News
UND nurse anesthesia grads score 100 percent on exam
Gjovig elected officer of Norwegian-American Foundation
Tracy Evanson re-elected vice president for international nursing organization
Alan Allery receives posthumous award
Medical School dean begins term as chair of AAMC Council of Deans
In Remembrance
Memorial service set for Jay Meek
Weisenstein will chair athletic director search committee

Vice President for General Administration Phil Harmeson has named 17 members to the UND Athletic Director Search Committee. Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Greg Weisenstein with chair the committee.

Harmeson said the representatives were chosen to connect with various stakeholder groups during the search. He said the process is to have the representatives act as a liaison with the constituencies they represent. He said a common review mechanism will be implemented within a defined process in conjunction with the director of human resources.

The charge to the search committee is to recommend no fewer than three and no more than five unranked candidates to be invited to Grand Forks for campus and community interviews. After those interviews, the vice president for general administration as the hiring authority, in consultation with the President, will make the appointment. UND hopes to have a director of athletics in place as soon as practicable.

Constituencies (with named representatives):

Administration/faculty/staff
* Greg Weisenstein, provost and vice president for academic affairs, committee chair
* Sue Jeno, faculty athletic representative
* Jon Jackson, faculty

Athletic department staff
* Betty Ralston, co-acting athletic director and senior women's administrator
* Jayson Hadju, assistant director of media relations, UND Athletics

Students
* Christy Carlson

Student-Athletes
* Amanda Kaler, UND golf team

Athletic department/men's sports
* Brian Jones, head coach, men's basketball

Athletic department/women's sports
* Dick Clay, head coach, women's track

Institution/budget/finance
* Alice Brekke, director, budget office

Human Resources
* Diane Nelson, director, human resources

Alumni Association and Foundation
* Steve Brekke, director of development, athletics, co-acting athletic director

Ralph Engelstad Arena
* Jody Hodgson, general manager

Letterwinners/athletic alumni
* Dan Martinsen, UND letterwinners, UND athletic alumni, special assistant to the UND president

Boosters/Public Input
* Pete Kuhn, president, UND Boosters
* Hal Gershman, businessman, Grand Forks City Council
* Wes Rydell, businessman
-- Jan Orvik, Writer/Editor, University Relations, janorvik@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3621

Volunteers sought for winter commencement ceremonies Dec. 14

Please consider serving as a "Green Vest Volunteer" at one or both of the 2007 winter commencement ceremonies which will be held Friday, Dec. 14, at the Chester Fritz Auditorium. Volunteers assist by seating guests, helping organize graduates, and greeting visitors attending the ceremonies.

This year, UND will hold two commencement ceremonies. One ceremony will be held at 10 a.m. for graduate degrees and a second at 2 p.m. for undergraduate degrees. Volunteers are asked to report to the lower level of the Chester Fritz Auditorium 90 minutes prior to the beginning of the ceremony. We anticipate the ceremonies to be 1 and one-half hour in length.

If you are able to volunteer for one or both ceremonies, please contact the Office of Ceremonies and Special Events in the Vice President for Student and Outreach Services Office at 777-2724 or e-mail terri.machart@mail.und.nodak.edu by Wednesday, Dec. 5. Please feel free to call if you have any questions.
-- Dawn Botsford, Events Coordinator, Office of Ceremonies and Special Events, dawnbotsford@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-6393

Air traffic control program ranked No. 1 in nation

UND's Air Traffic Control Training (ATC) program has been ranked number one after the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) completed their evaluation of 33 Air Traffic Collegiate Training Initiative (AT-CTI) schools. UND’s program currently has over 300 students enrolled in the air traffic control degree program. Program co-directors Paul Drechsel and Craig Carlson stated, “The rankings are a validation of all the hard work that the ATC staff has put into the program.” Some of the comments offered by the FAA evaluators about the UND ATC program were, “leadership demonstrates full understanding of AT-CTI program,” “impressive list of professional affiliations,” “excellent faculty performance,” and “teaching ability, experience, and expertise.” This was backed up by “excellent well structured curriculum and programs” with “excellent facilities and equipment.” Other ATC personnel at UND include instructors Gary Bartelson, Bill Schroeder, and Dale Raatz.

The 33 schools were evaluated on three components. The first component evaluated the areas of leadership, goals, objectives, program alignment, scope of participation and location, along with resources, student support, and capacity. The second component was comprised of accreditation, student selection process, external relations, outreach and recruitment. The final component evaluated curriculum and facilities, including curriculum and programs, facilities and equipment, student assessment and testing, along with aviation program instructors, staff, and management.

The Department of Aviation was founded in 1968 with a degree in airways sciences. In the 1970’s an Introduction to Air Traffic Control course was offered. The ATC program was first proposed in 1991 when a Non-Financial Air Traffic Control Proposal was sent to the FAA in response to the “ATC Demonstration Project Proposal.” The UND Aerospace Foundation (UNDAF) was then tasked to develop a virtual radar simulation that became the ATC 2000 simulator. These 10 radar simulators were made available for all aviation students to learn the basics of ATC within the aviation curriculum. After joining the AT-CTI program in 1991, the overall vision was to make the AT-CTI Program at UND “the best of the best.”

Bruce Smith was appointed dean of the Odegard School in 1999. One of his first steps in his position was to utilize UNDAF to secure advanced tower and radar simulations to prepare graduates for the FAA Academy. This goal was accomplished in 2001 with the purchase of a 225-degree 3D virtual tower and eight radar (terminal and en route) positions. With the School’s rising enrollment of ATC students, the department was awarded a 360-degree 3D tower simulator including four integrated radar positions in 2003. Currently, along with classroom instruction, the program utilizes three air traffic control simulators.
-- Karen Ryba, director of communications, aerospace, ryba@aero.und.edu, 701-777-4761

Check out these GREAT classes at the Burnt Toast Demo Kitchen at the Wellness Center!!!

Bread Making with Dakota Harvest
When: November 27, 2007
Time: 5:30 pm to 7:30 pm
Cost: $7
Nothing is as inviting as the smell of fresh baked bread. Join our local Dakota Harvest Bakers for a hands-on course in French and whole-grain bread baking.
Sign up at the Wellness Center welcome desk by noon on Nov. 26.


Eating Organic
When: November 28, 2007
Time: 6:00 pm to 7:00 pm
Cost: $5

Join our very own local grocery store Amazing Grains and come learn what it means to eat organic! What are the benefits of eating organically grown food? Does it pay to go organic? Join us and you can decide for yourself and while you try some tasty organic recipes.
Sign up at the Wellness Center welcome desk by November 27.


Thai Kitchen
When: November 29, 2007
Time: 6:00 pm to 7:30 pm
Cost: $15

Come to learn and enjoy cooking and tasting Thai food. This class is designed to help you prepare Authentic Thai Meals for Your Family and Friends. You will also learn what to ask for in Thai restaurants, the secrets of Thai cooking and the philosophy of Thai food. Due to ingredients coming from afar, participants need to sign up for the class at the Wellness Center welcome desk by Nov. 26th.


*Classes are located in the Wellness Center Burnt Toast Demo Kitchen

-- Leah Wagner, Coordinator of Burnt Toast, Wellness Center, leahwagner@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-0842

Work Well offers free cholesterol screenings

Free cholesterol screenings will be offered Wednesday, Nov. 21, in the Facilities Oak Room, from 7 to 10 a.m. Although it is not required, it is recommended that you fast for at least eight hours prior to the screening. You do not need to set up a time in advance. Plan for about 15 to 20 minutes.
-- Amanda Eickhoff, Assistant Director for Work Well, Wellness Center, amandaeickhoff@mail.und.edu, 701.777.0210

Doctoral examination set for Megan N. Tollefson

The final examination for Megan N. Tollefson, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in communication and public discourse, is set for 10 a.m. Monday, Nov. 26, in 200 O'Kelly Hall. The dissertation title is "Social Isolation Meets Technological Innovation: Towards Developing a Model of Communication Among Parents Who Homeschool." Pamela Kalbfleisch (Communication) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Eric N. Njabon

The final examination for Eric N. Njabon, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in chemistry, is set for noon Monday, Nov. 26, in 138 Abbott Hall. The dissertation title is "Brownian Dynamics Simulations of Interactions Between Aldolase, Gapdh or LDH with Cytoskeletal Proteins." Kathryn Thomasson (chemistry) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Technology Trends Forum: Second Life is Nov. 26

On Monday, Nov. 26, the Center for Instructional and Learning Technologies/ITSS will host its monthly Technology Trends Forum. The topic this month is "Second Life: What is it and Why Would I Want One?" Lori Swinney, Chad Bushy, Elizabeth Becker and Christine Crawford from CILT/ITSS will be presenting. There will also be a Second Life Guest Avatar from New Media Consortium.
This forum will cover:
*What is Second Life?
*Who is using Second Life?
*How is it being used in higher education?
*Why should we use it at UND?

The event will be held from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 26, in the River Valley Room, Memorial Union. This forum is open to faculty, staff and students. To register, please call Diane Lundeen at 777-2129 or send an email to dianelundeen@mail.und.edu
-- Diane Lundeen, Workshop Coordinator, Center for Instructional & Learning Technologies/ITSS, dianelundeen@mail.und.edu, 777-2129

Doctoral examination set for Tina M. Squire

The final examination for Tina M. Squire, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in biology, is set for 1:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 27, in 141 Starcher Hall. The dissertation title is "Population Genetics of Wood Frogs, Rana Sylvatica, across their Geographic Range." Robert Newman (biology) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for David Bartz

The final examination for David Bartz, a candidate for the Ed.D. degree with a major in educational leadership, is set for 2 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 27, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "Mentoring and Retention of First and Second Year Teachers in North Dakota Public Schools." Larry Klundt (educational leadership) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Lighting of the Green is Tuesday, Nov. 27

Students, faculty, staff, and Greater Grand Forks community members are invited to attend the sixth annual Lighting of the Green Tuesday, Nov. 27, at 5 p.m. near the north entrance of the Memorial Union. The Lighting of the Green is the University’s annual kick-off to the holiday season. In addition to holiday greetings and songs, the program will feature the lighting of the large fir tree on the north lawn of the Memorial Union and the raising of the 125th Anniversary Flag. Refreshments will be provided and the event is free and open to the public.

Following Lighting of the Green, the fraternity and sorority community will host a Parade of Homes from 5:30 to 7 p.m. The names of participating chapters and maps to the houses will be provided at Lighting of the Green. There is no cost for the Parade of Homes, though canned food items will be collected at the participating chapters to be donated to local charities.
-- Cassie Gerhardt, Coordinator of Greek Life, Memorial Union, cassiegerhardt@mail.und.edu, 777-3667

Box Lunch session focuses on "Teaching in the Capstone"

The On Teaching Box Lunch discussion series continues Wednesday, Nov. 28, with a session on "Teaching in the Capstone" from noon to 1 p.m. in the Red River Valley Room, Memorial Union.

Many majors and programs at UND offer or require capstone courses. Capstones provide a “culminating experience” in the sense that they are usually taken in the last year of college and would typically be expected to pull together learning that occurred in previous courses. Capstones in the major often offer students the opportunity to develop skills that will help their transition into the workplace.

With the implementation of the new Essential Studies (ES) Program at UND, a capstone course will be required for graduation by freshmen who start in the fall of 2008. As of fall 2009, incoming transfer students — including those who come with their lower division GE/Essential Studies requirements completed — will also be required to have the capstone for graduation. The capstone is an upper division ES requirement which can be taken in the major or in another discipline. An ES capstone should pull together learning around two or more of the Essential Studies goals. It is separate from the distribution requirement, but it is designed to integrate and reinforce the Essential Studies learning goals: thinking and reasoning, communication, diversity and information literacy.

In this discussion, members of the panel (Melinda Leach, Anne Kelsch, and Matt Cavalli) will share their experiences with capstone courses. They will address creating or revising capstone courses, assigning and assessing student learning in a capstone course, and talking to students about the capstone. Information will also be available on the new ES program and the capstone requirement.

To register and reserve a free box lunch, call Jana Hollands at 777-4998 by noon Monday, Nov. 26. Please indicate if you require a vegetarian meal.
-- Anne Kelsch, Director, Office of Instructional Development, anne.kelsch@und.nodak.edu, 777-4233

Book discussion continues Nov. 28

The spirituality subcommittee of the Healthy UND Coalition invites the UND community to join in a discussion of the book, “Encouraging Authenticity and Spirituality in Higher Education” by Arthur Chickering, Jon Dalton and Liesa Stamm from noon to 1 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 28, in the Memorial Union’s Leadership Room, Room 115. The reading schedule is as follows: Nov. 28, Chapter 4 and 5; Dec. 12, Chapters 6 and 7; Jan. 9, Chapters 8 and 9; Jan. 23, Chapter 10 and 11. It is not too late to join this discussion. Everyone is welcome to attend any or all of the discussion sessions. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Linda Rains at 777-4076 or by e-mail at lindarains@mail.und.edu.
-- Linda Rains, Coordinator of Civic Leadership, Memorial Union, lindarains@mail.und.edu, 701-777-4076

Forget your flu shot?

Students, faculty and staff are invited to take advantage of the final on-campus flu vaccination clinic of the season to be held Wednesday, Nov. 28, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Student Health Promotion Office, main floor, Memorial Union. Vaccinations will be provided while supplies last.

Who should get vaccinated? Everyone, especially those at high risk of complications from the flu, their caregivers, and those who live with them.

The cost is $20. No insurance will be filed. Pay by check, cash or students may charge to their UND accounts. Sponsored by Student Health Services. For more information call 777-4500.
-- Jane Croeker, Health Promotion Advisor, Student Health Services, jane.croeker@und.edu, 777-2097

Doctoral examination set for Peter Schmutzer

The final examination for Peter Schmutzer, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in clinical psychology, is set for 8 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 29, in 210 Corwin-Larimore Hall. The dissertation title is "Effect of Motivation on Superlative Responding Among Aviation and Psychology Students on the MMPI-2." Tom Petros (psychology) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Thai Kitchen class available at Burnt Toast Demo Kitchen

The Burnt Toast Demo Kitchen at the Wellness Center will have a Thai Kitchen class Thursday, Nov. 29, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Cost is $15. Come learn, enjoy cooking and taste Thai food. This class is designed to help prepare authentic Thai meals for your family and friends. You will also learn what to ask for in Thai restaurants, the secrets of Thai cooking and the philosophy of Thai food. Due to ingredients coming from afar, participants need to sign up for the class at the Wellness Center welcome desk by Monday, Nov. 26.
-- Leah Wagner, Coordinator of Burnt Toast, Wellness Center, leahwagner@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-0842

Physics lecture is Nov. 30

Clayton Gearhart, Department of Physics, St. John’s University, Collegeville, Minn., will present "The Rotational Specific Heat of Molecular Hydrogen in the Old Quantum Theory," at 4 p.m. Friday, Nov. 30, in 211 Witmer Hall. Coffee and cookies will be served at 3:30 p.m. in 215 Witmer Hall.

“Astonishing successes” and “bitter disappointment”: Thus did the German physicist Fritz Reiche portray the state of quantum theory in his 1921 textbook. As Reiche’s words suggest, the “old quantum theory” — that is, quantum theory up to Heisenberg’s breakthrough in 1925 — was a mélange of inspired guesses and arbitrary assumptions, with many successes, and as many frustrating failures. It was sophisticated and wide-ranging—the impression given by the treatment of the Bohr model in modern physics texts today is thoroughly misleading.

Reiche’s words apply in miniature to the attempts to describe the decrease in the specific heat of hydrogen gas at low temperatures—among the first systems studied in the old quantum theory, and one to which Reiche made important contributions. The first measurements were published early in 1912 by Arnold Eucken in Walther Nemst’s laboratory in Berlin. The theory should have been simple — the rigid rotator, the model for a diatomic molecule, was a standard textbook problem, as it still is today.

Nernst applied a quantum theory of rotators to diatomic gases even before Eucken’s measurements were completed, and that theory figured in the discussions at the first Solvay conference — the meeting that introduced quantum theory to European physicists — late in 1911. Albert Einstein, Paul Ehrenfest, Max Planck, Edwin C. Kemble, Niels Bohr, Erwin Schrodinger, and John Van Vleck, among others, attempted theoretical descriptions of the rotational specific heat, as did Reiche himself in a widely cited 1919 paper.

But for over 15 years, despite persistent and energetic efforts, the problem proved intractable — its solution involves identical particles in ways unsuspected before modern quantum mechanics. By contrast, the old quantum theory worked fairly well to describe infrared spectra of diatomic molecules such as HCI—and in the process, made the specific heat measurements even more puzzling. Later in the 1920s, increasingly detailed measurements of electronic transitions in the spectrum of molecular hydrogen further complicated matters. But those same measurements also helped David Dennison, an American theorist, to come up with a successful theory in 1927 — and in the process, to find persuasive evidence for proton spin! Gearhart will sketch the history of this intriguing problem in early quantum theory.
-- Connie Cicha, Secretary, Physics, connie_cicha@und.nodak.edu, 7-2911

Barnes & Noble at UND hosts holiday open house

Mark your calendar for Friday, Nov. 30, to attend the annual holiday open house at Barnes and Noble at UND, one day only! The doors are open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. For best selection, come early for store-wide savings.

Join our local and regional authors for a book signing from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. we already have 25-plus authors confirmed to be on hand.

* 25 percent off selected adult and youth clothing.
* 25 percent off our large assortment of board games.
* 20 percent off holiday boxed cards.
* 25 percent off calendars and bookmarks.
* Discounts on selected general teading titles.

Don't forget to register to win a $500 shopping spree.
-- Michelle Abernathey, General Manager, Barnes & Noble at UND, michelle_aberanthey@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2103

UND Belly Dance Club offers beginner classes

Tone up for the holidays! Members of UND's Belly Dance Club are offering lessons for beginners on Nov. 30, Dec. 7 and 14 from noon to 1 p.m. in 260 Ireland-O'Kelly Hall (humanities and integrated studies space). Lessons are $5 each. Call club advisor Tami Carmichael at 777-3015 to register or for additional information.
-- Tami Carmichael, Director, Humanities & Integrated Studies, tami.carmichael@und.nodak.edu, 7-3015

Grand Forks movie to premiere at Forx Film Fest

The world premiere of a new movie shot in Grand Forks this summer will be at the sixth annual Forx Film Fest, which is being held Nov. 30 through Dec. 2 at the Empire Arts Center in downtown Grand Forks. “Dangers from Within” is an 81-minute feature by local filmmaker and UND lecturer Christopher P. Jacobs. It is scheduled to screen Saturday afternoon, Dec. 1, at approximately 3:15 p.m., followed by a brief question and answer session with the director.

Jacobs has completed five other independent features since 2002, all shot locally, and several recognized at film festivals around the country. He describes this movie as “sort of a combination of Nancy Drew and the DaVinci Code with a touch of Indiana Jones and a Midwestern college town flavor. It's basically a gothic thriller with an underlying sense of humor.”

The plot concerns a troubled teen sent to live with her eccentric aunt, where she meets a graduate student translating a rare and controversial ancient manuscript he's smuggled out of the Middle East. However, the two soon must rescue his kidnapped girlfriend while dealing with threats by various fanatics attempting to obtain his document and/or sabotage his work. Meanwhile, their house may or may not be haunted.

Starring in the major roles are Ellie Unkenholz, David Henry, Tara Ulness, Sarah Phillips, Ali Scrable, Paul Kelly, and Mark Landa, all of Grand Forks, and Jeff Kinney, Manvel. “Dangers from Within” was shot throughout most of July, using the HDV high-definition digital video format. A local theatrical release is planned for later in December.

A web site with background information, photos, and preview trailers can be found by a Google search on: “dangers from within” jacobs movie.

Thursday Music Club Christmas Musicale set for Dec. 2

The Thursday Music Club presents their 84th annual Christmas Musicale at 4 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 2, at United Lutheran Church, 324 Chestnut St. A free will offering wil be taken for student scholarships to the International Music Camp and UND. For further information, call Darlene Holien, Christmas Musicale chair, at 746-7673.

Women's Center discusses de-stressing for the holidays

Berrylin Martin and Jane Hull from the Counseling Center will present “De-Stress for the Holidays” at Women’s Center’s Meet, Eat, and Learn Wednesday, Dec. 5, from noon to 1 p.m. Berrylin will introduce the StressEraser and Jane will do a guided imagery exercise.

The StressEraser is a handheld biofeedback device that is used to train individuals in proper relaxation breathing to counter the body's stress response. Guided Imagery is a relaxation technique used to reduce stress. Participants will get a chance to participate in both exercises. Everyone is welcome and lunch is provided.
-- Patty McIntyre, Program Associate, Womens Center, undwomenscenter@und.nodak.edu, 777-4300

Library of Health Sciences lists Thanksgiving weekend hours

The Library of Health Sciences will be open the following hours over the Thanksgiving weekend: Wednesday, Nov. 21, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, Nov. 22, closed; Friday, Nov. 23, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, Nov. 24, 1 to 5 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 25, 1 p.m. to midnight.
-- Jan Orvik, Writer/Editor, University Relations, janorvik@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3621

Nominations for Kupchella award due March 1

Nominations for the Charles E. Kupchella Preventive Medicine and Wellness Award are due by 5 p.m. March 1. Letters of nomination and supporting materials are due in the Office of Public Affairs, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, 501 N. Columbia Road Stop 9037, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9037.

The award recognizes the achievements of individuals and organizations who have worked to improve health and wellness through lowered rates of disease and disability by developing and delivering effective health promotion and prevention initiatives.

Named for the current president of UND, the Kupchella Wellness Award will be presented this spring. This will be the third time the award has been given. Last year's recipients were James Mitchell, chair and Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor of Clinical Neuroscience at the UND Medical School and president of the Neuropsychiatric Research Institute in Fargo, and Donald Hensrud, chair of the Division of Preventive, Occupational and Aerospace Medicine and associate professor of preventive medicine and nutrition at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and an alumnus of the UND medical school.

UND is seeking nominations of individuals and organizations in North Dakota and surrounding states who have contributed significantly to disease prevention and healthful living. Consideration will be given to those who have:
* made significant contributions in the field of health promotion and disease prevention including the clinical, education and research areas.
* demonstrated excellence in a function or on a project related to prevention or health promotion.
* taken initiative, shown innovativeness, persistence, has an impact and/or made a difference in prevention/health promotion to rural Americans.

Projects may address one or more of the goals and focus areas outlined in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services "Healthy People 2010: Understanding and Improving Health" and "Steps to a Healthier USA." See www.healthypeople.gov/ or call 800-367-4725 for more information. Areas of special interest are:
* Promotion of physical activity
* Reduction of overweight or obesity
* Reduction or elimination of tobacco use
* Reduction or elimination of substance abuse
* Promotion of responsible sexual behavior
* Reduction or elimination of injury and violence

The nomination should briefly address the following:
* Why should this individual (or organization) be considered for this award?
* What are the key outcomes and achievements of the program, policy, contribution or initiative?
* Describe the nominee's accomplishments; attach CV (up to three letters of support may be included.

Emphasis will be given to programs that demonstrate creativity and innovation, leadership, sustainability, replicability and effectiveness.

The award recipient will receive a $1,000 cash award and a commemorative plate. A picture of the recipient will be displayed on a plaque in UND's Student Wellness Center.

The award has been made possible by a gift to the UND Foundation from Manuchair Ebadi, former senior advisor to the president and associate vice president for health affairs and medical research at UND and associate dean for research and program development at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences. He retired this past summer.

For more information, contact the Office of Public Affairs at the UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences, 701-777-4305.
-- Shelley Pohlman, Asst. to the Director, Public Affairs, spohlman@medicine.nodak.edu, 701-777-4305

Arts, humanities, social sciences funding application procedures listed

Arts, humanities and social sciences funding application procedures and criteria for award selection follow.

ELIGIBILITY
1. Faculty members in the following departments may apply for funding from this program: Anthropology, Art, Criminal Justice, English, History, Indian Studies, Interdisciplinary Studies, Languages, Music, Philosophy and Religion, School of Communication, Theatre Arts (i.e., those that are not eligible for National Science Foundation funding); and the following programs: Humanities and Integrated Studies; Honors, Interdisciplinary Studies.

2. Faculty who have previously received funding from this program are not eligible for another award until they have submitted a request for funding to an external funding agency.

3. Faculty who have previously received funding from this program are not eligible for another award until they have submitted a final report for the previously funded project.

4. The following are unallowable budget items: travel to attend conferences, infrastructure, public relations activities, salary of the principal investigator, studies already completed

5. Preference will be given to proposals requesting $5,000 or less.

6. Although these awards are primarily intended for tenured and tenure-track faculty, temporary faculty may apply as long as creative activity is required in their contract and they are able to complete their proposed activity while employed at the University of North Dakota.

APPLICATIONS SHOULD INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:
I. One page academic résumé: The résumé should include education, employment history, and relevant citations (e.g., publications, presentations, performances, juried exhibitions)

II. Project narrative
The narrative text should not exceed three single spaced pages (approximately 1,785 words).

The narrative should clearly convey the ideas, objectives, and methods of the project. It should also communicate the project's substance, potential contribution to the field, overall significance, the intended audience where appropriate, the likely outcome, and your ability to carry out the project successfully. A simple statement of need or intent is insufficient. Because reviewers may not possess specialized knowledge of the proposed field of study, the project description should be free of jargon.

There is no formula for writing a successful application. However, applicants may find it helpful to address the following questions where appropriate in their narratives:

A. What are the basic ideas, problems, or questions examined by the study? Explain the planned approach or line of thought. If the area is a new area of research, explain the reasons for working in it, if the area is not a new area describe the significance of the area. If the project is creative activity in one of the arts, describe what you intend to create and/or perform.

B. For what part or stage of your project are you seeking support? Provide an overview of the project and describe what part of the study/creative activity you will undertake dur-ing the award period. If you will be working with someone else describe your contribu-tions to the project. If working on a book, provide a tentative chapter outline.

C. What work will be accomplished during the award period? Supply a brief work plan.

D. Will this project be supported by other resources? If so what is the source and amount, and what portion of the project will the other resources cover?

E. How will the project complement, challenge, or expand relevant work in the field? Explain what makes the project distinctive.

F. What contribution will the project make to the field?

G. What is the project’s overall significance in terms of its potential social, cultural, and/or educational benefits?

H. Where will you conduct the study/create and/or perform the work? What materials will you use? Describe access to archives, collections, performance/studio venues, or insti-tutions with the necessary resources.

I. What is the intended audience for the results of the project?

J. What are the intended results of the project? Indicate plans for articles, conference papers, books, recordings, exhibit, or other forms of outcomes.

III. One page budget and justification: The budget must be broken down into individual items with each item justified. The following are unallowable budget items: travel to attend conferences, infrastructure, public relations activities, salary of the principal investigator, studies already completed.

IV. Project bibliography (if appropriate to the proposed work)

The bibliography should not exceed one single spaced page (4,000 characters, approximately 570 words).

The bibliography should consist of primary and secondary sources that relate directly to the project. It is usually advisable to include works that pertain to both the project's substance and its theoretical or methodological approaches. Titles cited in the application narrative do not have to be included in the bibliography. Reviewers often use the bibliography to evaluate your preparation in the subject area and your approach to the topic.

CRITERIA FOR AWARD SELECTION

Reviewers are asked to evaluate an application according to the following criteria:

1. The significance of the contribution that the project will make to knowledge in the specific field and to the humanities or social sciences generally, OR in the case of projects in the arts, the potential: (a) to impact the artistic and/or cultural heritage of the nation, region, or field, and/or (b) to broaden and/or deepen public understanding and appreciation of and ac-cess to the arts, and/or (c) to have a positive effect on the development of arts learning for children and youth.

2. The quality or promise of quality of the applicant's work;

3. The quality of the conception, definition, organization, and description of the project;

4. The likelihood that the applicant will complete the project including the appropriateness of the budget, the quality and clarity of the project goals and design, the resources involved, and the qualifications of the applicant;

5. The likelihood that the successful completion of the project will bring some return to the Uni-versity.

6. Evidence that previous awardees have fulfilled all requirements for their previous award(s).

DEADLINE AND NUMBER OF COPIES

The application, with original signatures of the principal investigator, department chair, and dean, and nine (9) copies must be submitted to Research Development and Compliance (105 Twamley Hall) on or before 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2007.

PROCESS FOR AWARD SELECTION

Applications will be reviewed and ranked by a committee of arts, humanities, and social sciences faculty, chosen and chaired by the Associate Vice President for Research. Applications from faculty teams/groups are encouraged.

Award Requirements

1. All recipients of arts, humanities and social sciences grants are required to submit a final report to Research Development and Compliance within one month of the project’s end date or depletion of awarded funds, if that occurs before the project ends. The report should include a brief summary of results of the study, how funds were expended and whether or not the project resulted in publications, external grant proposals/awards, presentations, etc.

2. All recipients of arts, humanities and social sciences grants are required to submit a proposal to an external funding agency within one year of the award’s end date.

3. If an award results in a tangible product such as a book, article, or a video or audio recording, a copy must be provided to the Division of Research.

Nursing considers accelerated post-baccalaureate degree option

The College of Nursing is exploring establishing an accelerated post-baccalaureate nursing program. The program would be open to students who have completed a baccalaureate degree in a field other than nursing and would prepare them to become a registered nurse.

If you are interested in possibly enrolling in an accelerated post-baccalaureate nursing program at UND, please complete our interest survey, go to www.nursing.und.edu and click on “Accelerated Interest Survey.” The survey is anonymous and will only take 5 to 10 minutes to complete.

The U.S. Department of Labor has determined a need for more than one million new and replacement registered nurses by 2014. This nursing shortage has prompted many schools of nursing to offer creative alternatives for the baccalaureate nursing student, including accelerated degree options for students already possessing a college degree.

Helen Melland, associate dean of undergraduate studies at the College of Nursing, stated that “We are excited about this program. Nurses who graduate from accelerated programs such as the one we are developing do an excellent job in the workplace. They have extensive educational and life experience beyond their basic nursing preparation resulting in a well prepared, highly skilled professional nurse.”

Graduates of this program would be qualified to write the licensing exam to become registered nurses. The opportunities for baccalaureate prepared nurses to advance in nursing are great due to the current and predicted nursing shortage. Due to an increasing number of baby boomers now developing health care needs, the federal government predicts exceptional employment opportunities for nurses into the foreseeable future.

Experience in healthcare is not required to be admitted into this program or to be successful in it. Students will receive all the experience they need as they progress through the curriculum.
-- Becky Cournia, Alumni & Development Officer, Nursing, beckycournia@mail.und.edu, 777-4526

Faculty Instructional Development Committee lists awards

The following faculty members were awarded Faculty Instructional Development Committee (FIDC) grants in September, October and November.

September:
* Connie Bateman (accountancy), “Fall Marketing Management Association Conference,” $500
* Jared Keengwe (teaching and learning), “E-Learn 2007 – World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare and Higher Education,” $750

October:
* Steve Finney (languages), “Nortana Pedagogy Workshop and Annual Norgeseminar,” $420
* Sherrie Fleshman (languages), “Mountain Interstate Foreign Language Conference,” $453.39
* Anne Haskins (occupational therapy), “An American Canadian Dialogue on Interprofessional Health Education,” $587
* David Pierce (chemistry), “Instructional Materials for Chem 121 and Chem 122,” $900
* Robert Wood (political science and public administration), “Instructional Materials for POLS 405,” $716

November:
* Tami Carmichael (humanities and integrated studies), “Instructional Materials for HUM 224 and HUM 225," $250
* Mary Haslerud-Opp (communication), “National Communication Association Convention,” $87.20

FIDC grant proposals may be used to purchase instructional materials, travel to teaching-related conferences, or other projects related to teaching. To submit a proposal, call the Office of Instructional Development (OID) for guidelines and materials or find the necessary information on the OID web site.

Proposals may be submitted at any time during the academic year and are reviewed on a monthly basis by the Faculty Instructional Development Committee. Next deadline to submit your proposal is Monday, Dec. 3, at noon.

Instructional or professional development projects that fall outside FIDC guidelines may qualify for funding through OID’s flexible grant program. For further information, or to discuss ideas and drafts before submitting a final proposal, contact me. – Anne Kelsch, director, Office of Instructional Development, 777-3325 or anne_kelsch@und.nodak.edu

Faculty invited to use Barnes & Noble Faculty Center Network

Need help in choosing a new text for your class? Benchmark with faculty across the United States with Barnes & Noble Faculty Center Network. See what text other faculty in colleges and universities around the country are using to teach a similar curriculum. Find out which books are the most popular choices and what your colleagues have to say about them.

Get more information to help you choose the best text for you and your students. Go to www.facultycenter.net and click on faculty services, where you'll see a link for Faculty Center Network.

Want to know more? Contact our textbook manager Tina Monette at 777-2106 or Casey Johnson at 777-2748.
-- Michelle Abernathey, General Manager, Barnes & Noble at UND, michelle_aberanthey@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2103

Veterans Day is holiday

In accordance with State Board of Higher Education directives, Monday, Nov. 12, will be observed as Veterans Day by faculty and staff members of the University. Only those employees designated by their department heads will be required to work on this holiday. -- Greg Weisenstein, vice president for academic affairs and provost, and Diane Nelson, director, human resources.

Chester Fritz Library lists Thanksgiving hours

The Chester Fritz Library will observe the following hours of operation for Thanksgiving.
Wednesday, Nov. 21, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Thursday, Nov. 22, closed (Thanksgiving Day); Friday, Nov. 23, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Saturday, Nov. 24, 1 to 5 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 25, 1 p.m. to midnight.
-- Karen Cloud, Administrative Assistant, Chester Fritz Library, karencloud@mail.und.edu, 7-2618

Law Library posts Thanksgiving holiday hours

Thanksgiving holiday hours for the Law Library follow.
Wednesday, Nov. 21, 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Thursday, Nov. 22, closed (Thanksgiving Day); Friday, Nov. 23, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, Nov. 24, noon to 5 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 25, noon to 11 p.m.
-- Jane Oakland, Circulation Manager, Law Library, oakland@law.und.edu, 7-3482

ITSS lists holiday hours

Information Technology Systems and Services will close for the Thanksgiving Day holiday at midnight Wednesday, Nov. 21, and will reopen at 5 a.m. Friday, Nov. 23. -- ITSS.
-- Jan Orvik, Writer/Editor, University Relations, janorvik@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3621

Museum lists Thanksgiving holiday hours

Holiday hours for the North Dakota Museum of Art follow:

Thursday, Nov. 22 (Thanksgiving Day), closed; Friday, Nov. 23, open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 24 and 25, open 1 to 5 p.m.

The Museum Cafe is closed Nov. 22-25. It will reopen Monday, Nov. 26.

The North Dakota Museum of Art is located on Centennial Drive, Grand Forks. Although the Museum does not charge an admission fee, the suggested donation is $5 for adults and change for children. Wireless internet access is available.
-- Brian Lofthus, Assistant to the Director, North Dakota Museum of Art, blofthus@ndmoa.com, 777-4195

International Centre lists updated holiday hours

The International Centre lists the following updated holiday hours: Wednesday, Nov. 21, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Thursday, Nov. 22 (Thanksgiving Day),1 to 3 p.m., Thanksgiving dinner will be served; Friday, Nov. 23 and 24, Centre will be closed; Sunday, Nov. 25, noon to 10 p.m.
-- Tatjyana Richards, Office Manager, Office of International Programs, tatjyanarichards@mail.und.edu, 777-6438

Flex benefits enrollment deadline is Nov. 30

Only two weeks remain to sign up for flexible benefits for 2008. All benefited employees have the opportunity to enroll or re-enroll in this benefit. The program helps employees pay for medical and dependent care expenses with pre-tax dollars instead of after-tax dollars.

Enrollment agreements MUST be returned to the Payroll Office by 4:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 30. NO exceptions will be made for mail delays. If you have questions or need additional information, call Cheryl Arntz, flex-comp specialist at 777-4423.

UND 125th Committee gathering 125 ideas

In preparation for UND's 125th Anniversary, the Office of Ceremonies and Special Events is collecting ideas for a publication titled, “125 Things Every Family Should Do At UND Before Your Student Graduates.” Please add your suggestions to the list by submitting them to dawnbotsford@mail.und.nodak.edu before Dec. 1. These will be printed and available soon after the beginning of the spring semester 2008. Ideas are being collected for a student list as well, so if you have a student in your home, encourage them to submit ideas; just make sure they let us know they’re students, not family members.
-- Dawn Botsford, Events Coordinator, Office of Ceremonies and Special Events, dawnbotsford@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-6393

Note personal long-distance telephone call policy

I would like to remind faculty and staff that the UND long distance telephone and cellular telephone service are to be used only for conducting University business. The policy states that use of the University of North Dakota long distance networks for personal calls or non-university business may result in disciplinary action, termination of employment and/or personal liability. State and federal regulations also do not permit this type of activity even if the employee reimburses the University.

Use of the incoming toll-free 1-800 CALLUND line is for the recruiting, advising and assisting students. The toll-free line should not be used for long distance calls to the campus by anyone for any other purpose.

On the UND campus, long-distance calling cards for personal use can be purchased either at Wilkerson, the Memorial Union or the University Barnes & Noble Bookstore. Many retail establishments located off-campus also sell long-distance calling cards.

-- Robert Gallager, vice president for finance and operations.

Martin Luther King Jr. awards nomination forms available online

Nomination forms for the 11th annual Martin Luther King Jr. awards ceremony are now available online. The form can be reached by following the link on the Office of Multicultural Student Services home page at http://sos.und.edu/erabell or directly via http://sos.und.edu/erabell/PDFs/Current/MLK_Nomination_Form_08.pdf .

To nominate a deserving individual for one of the awards, please fill out and return the nomination form to Michael Crenshaw, president of the Black Student Association, via e-mail at mss@mail.und.nodak.edu or regular mail at Box 7092, Grand Forks, ND 58202, by Friday, Dec. 14. -- Multicultural Student Services.

Note Barnes & Noble sale on imprinted sweatshirts, sweatpants

Check out Barnes & Noble at UND for 25 percent off cozy fleece you can't live without. Through Nov. 25, all Champion UND and Fighting Sioux imprinted youth and adult sweatshirts and sweatpants are 25 percent off. Stop in early for best selection.
-- Michelle Abernathey, General Manager, Barnes & Noble at UND, michelle_abernathey@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2103

Exhibition opens at North Dakota Museum of Art

The Craig Langager exhibition and Warren McKenzie: Legacy of an American Potter will run through Jan. 20. Langager is donating a significant amount of his work to the permanent collection of the North Dakota Museum of Art. We are inviting the public to vote for their favorite pieces in his exhibit to help us make this curatorial decision. Voting will continue through the closing of the exhibition. -- North Dakota Museum of Art.

PenAir chooses UNDAF Flight Training Center to recruit pilots and mechanics

PenAir, a 121 and 135 operator based in Anchorage, Alaska, has chosen the UND flight training center operated in conjunction with Chandler Gilbert Community College (CGCC) located at Williams Gateway Airport in Mesa, Ariz., to recruit qualified pilots and mechanics to work for Alaska’s largest commuter airline. Such recruiting efforts involved scheduled stops at various key locations by PenAir.
-- Karen Ryba, director of communications, aerospace, ryba@aero.und.edu, 777-4761

Bring music back to Northwood

The Northwood School was recently informed that their insurance coverage will be even less than previously expected. Therefore the Staff Senate “Bring Music Back to Northwood” project has been even more important and time is running out.

You can contribute by:
1. Monetary donations
2. New or used instrument donations

The Staff Senate has set up giving trees in Twamley Hall, Memorial Union, Hughes Fine Arts Center and Poppler's Music Store with gift tags. Mail your tag and donation to the University Federal Credit Union, Mail Stop 8222, Grand Forks, ND 58202.

New and used instruments may be brought to the Department of Music or to any Staff Senator.

On Friday, Dec. 7, all donated instruments and 100 percent of the monetary donations will be presented to the Northwood School.

Your generous support will make this holiday season especially meaningful for all.

This project is sponsored by the UND Staff Senate with support from the president’s office, University Senate, Student Senate, Department of Music, and Poppler's Music. For more information contact any Staff Senator or Janice Hoffarth at 777-2646, Janice_hoffarth@und.nodak.edu.

Donated leave requested for Elizabeth Fletcher Lamb

Leave donations are sought for Elizabeth Fletcher Lamb, learning disability specialist at Disability Services. She and her family thank you for your generosity. Please send a donated sick or vacation leave form to Donna Ellertson, Stop 9040. Donated leave forms are available at www.und.edu/dept/payroll, then click on "forms."
-- Deb Glennen, Director, Disability Services, debglennen@mail.und.edu, 701 777-3425

Note out-of-state workers compensation coverage

The University of North Dakota is required to procure workers compensation for employees working outside of the state of North Dakota for more than 30 consecutive days. This coverage MUST be in place at the time the employee begins his or her duties. The Risk Management Workers Compensation Program coordinates the purchase of this required coverage for all state agencies through its broker.

If an employee returns to work in North Dakota within the 30 days and works at his job for one day and then returns to his out-of-state employment and does this repeatedly through his employment, the employee would be covered under North Dakota Workforce Safety and would not need out of state coverage. Coming home for a weekend and not putting in a day's work, does not count. That employee would need out-of-state coverage.

This out-of-state workers compensation coverage need is not exclusive to full-time employees. Part-time employees, adjunct faculty, etc. must also be considered.

To obtain out-of-state coverage for a UND employee, please complete the out-of-state coverage form which is located on our web site: http://departments.und.edu/safety/forms/index.html. Send the completed information to Box 9031 or e-mail it to: corrinnekjelstrom@mail.und.nodak.edu. The information will be forwarded to Risk Management to obtain the coverage.

If you have any questions or concerns, feel free to contact the Safety Office at 777-3341.
-- Corrinne Kjelstrom, Insurance Specialist/Office Mgr., Campus Safety & Security, corrinnekjelstrom@mail.und.nodak.edu, 701-777-2785

Wednesday, Nov. 28, is Denim Day

The last Wednesday of the month means it's Denim Day. So Wednesday, Nov. 28, pay your coordinator your dollar, dig out your button, and proudly wear your denim. All proceeds to to the selected Denim Day charities, as always. Need a button or more information? Call me.
-- Patsy Nies, Special Project Assistant, Enrollment Services, patsynies@mail.und.nodak.edu, 701-777-3791

Holidays present opportunity to gather valuable family medical history

A new tool to help families capture and record their health history is now available through the Division of Medical Genetics at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

The family history form is a web-enabled program that helps people organize family health history information which can be printed out for the family's doctors. It also helps users save that information as a computer file and share it with other family members.

Family history is considered one of the most important elements in assessing risk factors for health problems such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer and certain psychiatric disorders.

For more information or to obtain a paper version of the family history form, contact the Division of Medical Genetics at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences, 777-4277, go to a local library and request assistance in accessing this form at the web site www.heartlandfamilyhistory.org <http://www.heartlandfamilyhistory.org/> or call Heartland Regional Coordinating Center at 1-888-881-8852.

"Families share more than genetic characteristics," said John Martsolf, professor of pediatrics and director of the Division of Medical Genetics at the Medical School. "They also share environments, lifestyles and personal habits, all of which can be factors for disease. Knowing the risk of certain diseases can motivate individuals to change any unhealthy behaviors."

Family health histories should be given to all health care providers to be retained as a permanent part of a patient's medical file, Martsolf said. "This information can help health care providers do a better job of assessing a patient’s risk of disease and prescribing appropriate preventive measures or courses of treatment."

North Dakota Gov. John Hoeven has declared November as Family History Month, and is encouraging North Dakotans to learn more about the diseases and causes of death affecting at least three generations of family members.

Family gatherings, such as holidays, present a great opportunity to learn about your family's health history, Martsolf said.

A survey, conducted last year by the U.S. Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, found that 96 percent of Americans believe that knowing a family history is important to their health. The survey also showed that only one-third of Americans has ever tried to gather and organize their families' health history.
-- Shelley Pohlman, Assistant to the Director, Public Affairs, spohlman@medicine.nodak.edu, 701-777-4305

Work Well: Win $1,000

Who wouldn't want the chance to win $500? How about $1,000? Your first step is to sign up for Know Your Numbers. Go to www.workwell.und.edu to register and find out what you need to do next. Know Your Numbers will provide you with the tools you need to get healthier, not to mention prizes and the chance at the big money. Sign up today and get a free Work Well shirt.
-- Amanda Eickhoff, Assistant Director for Work Well, Wellness Center, amandaeickhoff@mail.und.edu, 701.777.0210

Seeking volunteers for calcium retention study

The Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center is seeking healthy women who are under the age of 75 and have gone under menopause for at least three years.

The loss of bone that occurs with aging constitutes a major public health threat. Among dietary factors known to affect bone metabolism, high protein intake has been considered as a risk factor for osteoporosis because it may increase urinary acid and calcium excretion. You are invited to join this study to see if acid production, calcium retention, and bone metabolism are greater with a high-meat diet than with a low-meat diet.

Participants will live at home and eat breakfast at the Nutrition Center every weekday for 14 weeks. They will take lunch, dinner, and weekend meals home with them. They could earn up to $2,500 for this 16-week study. The study starts January 2008.

During the course of the study, they will eat meals provided by the Nutrition Center for 14 weeks (seven weeks of food high in meat protein, followed by one week of break, where they eat their own meals, and then followed by seven weeks of food low in meat protein).

For two days during each of the food periods (for a total of four days), they will consume radioactive calcium, which will allow us to measure calcium absorption from each diet. They will have your calcium absorption tested 20 times. There will be seven blood draws, urine collection, a three-day food diary, and questionnaires.

Participants must be non-smokers. They have gone under menopause for at least three years, have no chronic disorder, and not taking medications regularly. However, some stable conditions may be individually approved. The women must have no history of non-traumatic bone fractures, have an average body mass index, and be willing to eat only the food the Nutrition Center provides for 14 weeks. They must agree to not take vitamins/minerals/nutritional supplements, other than those provided by the Nutrition Center. They cannot donate blood or plasma, nor use a tanning bed during the study.

You can go online to apply to be in this study by going to http://ars.usda.gov/npa/gfhnrc
If you have questions, please call Dorothy Olson at (701) 795-8396 or (800) 562-4032.
-- Brenda Ling, Information Officer, USDA-ARS Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center, brenda.ling@ars.usda.gov, 795-8300

Internal job openings listed

The following position vacancies are available only to regular UND staff employees who have successfully completed their six-month probation period, earn annual and sick leave, receive BC/BS health insurance and TIAA-CREF or ND PERS retirement benefits. Current UND faculty, please contact Human Resources for eligibility.

TO APPLY: Please complete UND Application/Control Card form. Send letter of application and resume, referencing position name and number, to: Human Resources, University of North Dakota, Twamley Hall, Room 313, 264 Centennial Drive Stop 8010, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8010. Applications MUST be received by the deadline date.

EXECUTIVE/PROFESSIONAL/ADMINISTRATIVE/ATHLETIC COACHES:

POSITION: Assistant Archivist, Chester Fritz Library, #08-104
DEADLINE: Oct. 31 or until filled. (Applications received by Oct. 31 will receive first consideration) Internal applicants will be considered along with the external applicants.
SALARY: $37,000+/year

TECHNICAL/PARAPROFESSIONAL: No position vacancies.

OFFICE SUPPORT:

POSITION: Administrative Assistant, Application Systems Development/ODIN, #08-140
DEADLINE: (I) 11/21/2007
SALARY: $26,000+/year

CRAFTS/TRADES/SERVICE: No position vacancies.

UND nurse anesthesia grads score 100 percent on exam

UND nurse anesthesia grads score 100 percent pass rate on national board exam, besting average by 20 points

University of North Dakota College of Nursing anesthesia grads just got news that they all passed this year’s national board exam on their first attempt.

“This 100 percent pass rate is a terrific accomplishment and one we’ve come to expect from the UND College of Nursing, but one we should never take for granted and fail to celebrate,” says UND president Charles Kupchella, himself a former medical researcher.

The national average pass rate on the first try on the National Certification Exam of the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists is about 80 percent, notes UND nursing dean Chandice Covington.

This is a stellar accomplishment for the UND College of Nursing, which continues its distinguished long-term track record of placing highly qualified graduates directly into the workforce, Covington notes. The recent 100 percent pass rate on a vital national board exam underscores UND nursing’s commitment to preparing graduates for prosperous careers in a very demanding profession.

To help ensure that only competently educated practitioners enter this field, licensing authorities across the country require each candidate for licensure to pass a national exam that measures the competencies needed to perform safely and effectively as a newly licensed nurse anesthetist, Covington explains.

Gjovig elected officer of Norwegian-American Foundation

Bruce Gjovig has been elected treasurer of the Norwegian-American Foundation based in Seattle, Wash., at their recent board of directors meeting in Minneapolis. Elected to the board of directors in June 2006, he is one of 19 members of the board representing more than 900 Norwegian-American organizations in the United States and Norway. Gjovig now joins the executive committee.

Gjovig was a co-founder of UND Nordic Initiative and has been chair for 10 years, spearheading efforts to forge strong educational, cultural, trade and technology alliances with Norway and other Nordic countries. UND hosts more Norwegian students than any other university in North America, and has since 1999. Gjovig has worked with several incubators and entrepreneur programs in Norway as well as with several Norwegian entrepreneurs interested in international trade and strategic relationships.

Gjovig is entrepreneur coach and director of the Center for Innovation and CEO of the Center for Innovation Foundation. He was the founder of the Center for Innovation in 1984 which now operates two tech incubators on the UND Tech Park, leads the statewide InnovateND entrepreneur program, and works with entrepreneurs and angel investors on venture growth opportunities.

Along with the UND academic entrepreneur program, the Center for Innovation has been ranked among the top 10 best entrepreneur programs in the nation by Princeton Review and Entrepreneur magazine among 900 programs across the United States.

The Norwegian American Foundation was founded in 2001. NAF fosters cooperation among the over 900 Norwegian American organizations, to present modern Norway in the United States, and is building an international endowment to support Norwegian American programs and organizations as well as cultural and educational initiatives. NAF sponsors the Norway.com magazine, sub-titled 'The Gateway to Modern Norway,' which is published three times per year and distributed primarily in North America. Readership of Norway.com Magazine is expected to exceed 500,000 people per issue. This complimentary magazine is supported by advertisers, sponsors, and Innovation Norway.

Tracy Evanson re-elected vice president for international nursing organization

Tracy Evanson, assistant professor of nursing, has been re-elected to a second term of vice president at the most recent Nursing Network on Violence Against Women International (NNVAWI) conference, held in London, Ontario, Canada, in October 2007.

The abuse and exploitation of women is a social problem of epidemic proportions which adversely affects the health of millions of women each year. NNVAWI's ethic fosters the ideal of nursing practice designed to provide assistance and support to women in the process of achieving their own personal empowerment.

“As vice president I am pleased to be able to provide leadership in advancing nursing education, research and practice in violence against women,” said Dr. Evanson.

International conferences, held approximately every 18 months, bring together academicians and practitioners from all over the world to share cutting-edge research, as well as hopeful and successful prevention and intervention programs. Their elected officers and board members now include representatives from the United States, Canada, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom.

Dr. Evanson's research focuses on the role of home-visiting nurses in intimate partner violence prevention and intervention. “My goal in this leadership role is to help unite nurses, regardless of location or practice setting, to understand violence as a health care issue and to become skilled and committed to providing intimate partner violence screening and intervention as a routine part of nursing practice.”

Statistics on violence against women in the United States are staggering. According to the National Organization for Women:
• Every year approximately 132,000 women report that they have been victims of rape or attempted rape, and more than half of them knew their attackers.
• Every year 1.2 million women are forcibly raped by their current or former male partners, some more than once.
• Every day four women die in this country as a result of domestic violence, the euphemism for murders and assaults by husbands and boyfriends. That's approximately 1,400 women a year, according to the FBI. The number of women who have been murdered by their intimate partners is greater than the number of soldiers killed in the Vietnam War.

The Nursing Network on Violence Against Women International (NNVAWI) was formed to encourage the development of a nursing practice that focuses on health issues relating to the effects of violence on women's lives. The ultimate goal of NNVAWI is to provide a nursing presence in the struggle to end violence in women's lives. NNVAWI includes membership of nurses and others from countries throughout the world, who are committed to research, education, and practice that will end violence against women around the globe. For more information on NNVAWI, visit www.nnvawi.org
-- Becky Cournia, Alumni & Development Officer, Nursing, beckycournia@mail.und.edu, 777-4526

Alan Allery receives posthumous award

Alan Allery, former director of Student Health Services, was posthumously presented the Gail Proffitt Award in October at the North Central College Health Association Conference in Iowa City, Iowa. The Gail Proffitt Award is the highest honor bestowed by the North Central College Health Association (NCCHA). Dana Mills, NCCHA outgoing president, and Barb Lonbaken, NCCHA board member, visited UND Nov. 16 to present the award to Alan’s wife, Kathryn Allery.

Alan was a former president of the National College Health Association. In addition to his college health accomplishments, he was the director of the National Resource Center on Native American Aging. The following remarks were made about Dr. Allery by those who nominated him for the award:

· Alan Alley deserves the Gail Proffitt Award not just for his many accomplishments and his leadership but for the expanded vision of health and community that he freely shared with all of us.

· Alan was always looking for new connections and ways to expand and expend those already in existence, because he saw that those connections enriched all of the programs and services involved and broadened the horizons of all the participants in those programs, both recipient and providers. He understood that those connections ultimately strengthened the communities that were the real focus of his passion for health and social justice.

· He was a quiet leader who mentored, befriended, and educated many in his too short life.

· We will miss his glowing smile, wise counsel, laid-back “no problem” style and deep James Earl Jones voice.
-- Jane Croeker, Health Promotion Advisor, Student Health Services, jane.croeker@und.edu, 701-777-2097

Medical School dean begins term as chair of AAMC Council of Deans

H. David Wilson, dean of the School of Medicine and Health Sciences, has begun a one-year term as chair of the Council of Deans of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). He officially assumed the position during the AAMC annual meeting held recently in Washington, D.C. Wilson has been serving as chair-elect of the Council of Deans for the past year.

The first North Dakota dean to serve in this position, Wilson presides over meetings of the council, which includes 126 medical school deans; chairs the administrative board, the council's governing body, and represents the deans on the AAMC executive council and its 10-member executive committee.

"I feel gratified that my colleagues chose me to represent this extremely talented group," he said. "It is an honor for me, the medical school, the University and the state."

Several issues, including health care reform, are important for the council to address, he said. "There are 45 million Americans without health insurance. The AAMC is a player in looking at the health care system and how it should be paid for and delivered."

Wilson served as chair of the AAMC section on community-based medical schools from 2002 to 2007 and was elected to the AAMC Executive Council in 2004. He was elected to the 12-member Council of Deans Administrative Board by his peers in 2004.

The AAMC is a non-profit association representing 143 accredited U.S. and Canadian medical schools; nearly 400 teaching hospitals, 98 affiliated health systems, 68 Department of Veterans Affairs medical centers, and 94 academic and scientific societies.

Through these institutions and organizations, the AAMC represents 109,000 faculty members, 67,000 medical students, and 104,000 resident physicians.
-- Shelley Pohlman, Asst. to the Director, Public Affairs, spohlman@medicine.nodak.edu, 701-777-4305

Memorial service set for Jay Meek

Please join us for a memorial service as we celebrate the life of Jay Meek, professor of emeritus who retired from UND in 2004, with his poetry, with music, good food, and good company. We would be honored by your presence. The memorial service will be at 2 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 2, in the Loft Literary Center Auditorium (second floor of Open Book), 1011 Washington Avenue South, Minneapolis.

For those coming from out of town, we have reserved a block of rooms at:
University Days Inn
2407 University Ave. SE
Minneapolis, MN
612-623-3999

Rooms are $65 a night; the rooms will no longer be available at that rate after Nov. 26. Ask for the "Jay Meek Memorial" event.

The Days Inn is in close proximity to the Loft Literary Center where the memorial will be held. Please note that a football game will be going on at the Metrodome nearby, and parking will be more difficult than usual. We can provide transportation for those who need it. If you know of someone who might like to attend, please don't hesitate to pass this message on. -- Martha Meek, associate professor emerita of English, and Anna Meek.
-- Jan Orvik, Writer/Editor, University Relations, janorvik@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3621