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ISSUE: Volume 45, Number 13: November 14, 2007

Contents
Top Stories
Presidential Search Committee gives November report
Events to Note
Doctoral examination set for Ronald E. Loggins
Web conference is Nov. 14
Judy DeMers speaks at Memorial Union fall leadership series
Christus Rex book study continues
Doctoral examination set for Bonnie Higgins
Doctoral examination set for LoAnn Nelson
Mary Dibbern teaches master class Nov. 15
Great American Smokeout - Dance Dance Revolution Party is Nov. 15
Community brainstorming session: making ends meet in Grand Forks
Blue Cross Blue Shield presents "Beat the Bug" Nov. 15
Community Theatre brings Paris cabaret experience to life
Doctoral examination set for Christopher A. Knudson
Physics lecture is Nov. 16
Geography Awareness Week
National Nurse Practitioner Week honors profession
Metropolitan opera auditions set for Nov. 17
Doctoral examination set for Kristin Hillman
Women's Fund lecture is Nov. 19
U senate library committee meets Nov. 19
Astronomy talk is Nov. 20
Global Visions film series features "L'Enfant" Nov. 20
Check out Indian cooking at Burnt Toast Demo Kitchen
Doctoral examination set for Stuart Alan Schneider
Doctoral examination set for Megan N. Tollefson
Med research candidate presents seminar
Technology Trends Forum: Second Life is Nov. 26
Memorial Union announces upcoming holiday events
UND Belly Dance Club offers beginner classes
University Senate meets Dec. 6; agenda items due
IRB meets Dec. 7
Announcements
Nominations for Kupchella award due March 1
Faculty research seed money applications invited
Outstanding faculty award nominations due Nov. 16
Nursing considers accelerated post-baccalaureate degree option
UND 125th Committee gathering 125 ideas
Faculty invited to use Barnes & Noble Faculty Center Network
Law Library posts Thanksgiving holiday hours
UND Directory now available at bookstores, C-stores
Note out-of-state workers compensation coverage
Students urged to complete Student Health Satisfaction Survey
Reduce the price of textbooks today
Studio One features diagnosing autism, fencing
2007 National Survey of Student Engagement now available online
Mini-grants available for summer courses, programs
SSAC announces awards
Credit Union lists holiday promotions
Note Barnes & Noble sale on imprinted sweatshirts, sweatpants
Donated leave requested for Nadine Kotowicz
Donated leave requested for Elizabeth Fletcher Lamb
Barnes & Noble seeks book requests early
Special Denim Day set for Mortar Board turkey basket drive
Holidays present opportunity to gather valuable family medical history
Internal job openings listed
Presidential Search Committee gives November report

The Presidential Search Committee has narrowed the field of applicants to eight candidates who have been selected for screening interviews at the end of this month. The list of candidates appears at the end of this report.

The process used to select these eight candidates involved an initial screening to determine which of the applicants would be taken to the reference checking stage. At the Oct. 23 meeting, the committee identified 16 people to take to that stage, with one of those applicants withdrawing prior to references being checked. The committee met on Nov. 5 to review the information learned about those people whose references were checked. Based on that discussion, the committee unanimously approved the list of eight screening interview candidates.

At the Nov. 5 meeting, as had been indicated on the search timeline, the committee reviewed applications received after Oct. 23 to determine if any of those applicants should advance to the reference checking stage. One of the four applicants in that group was selected for reference checking. The committee authorized a subcommittee to do the reference checking and to decide whether to add that person to the screening interview list. Applying the same criteria used by the full committee Nov. 5, the three person subcommittee met Nov. 8 and voted not to add the person to the list.

One further procedural matter deserves an explanation. The search timeline approved by the State Board of Higher Education contained an unanticipated ambiguity. The committee had set Oct. 23 as the date for the first screening of applications, with a Nov. 5 screening of applications received after Oct. 23. The timeline then referred to the process that would be applied to applications received after Nov. 5, but was silent about any applications received on Nov. 5 following the committee’s meeting. The committee was presented with letters supporting an individual who had not applied prior to the meeting, and asked what would be done if an application were submitted. The committee discussed the situation at some length and concluded that the ambiguity in the timeline would be resolved in a way that treated any applications received on Nov. 5 in the same way that applications received between Oct. 23 and Nov. 5 were treated, i.e., an initial determination of whether an applicant should be advanced to reference checking, and if so, a subcommittee determination of whether to add the person to the screening interview list. As matters developed, no applications were submitted on Nov. 5.

The Search Committee will conduct interviews with the eight candidates Nov. 27 and 28 at the Marriott Hotel at the Minneapolis airport. Those interviews are open meetings. Each candidate will spend 90 minutes with the committee in an interview that explores the extent to which the candidate brings to the position the characteristics identified in the Position Profile as desirable in our next President. The input received by the committee in the open forums in September will provide valuable assistance to the committee in prioritizing among those characteristics and in refining questions to elicit information relevant to the characteristics.

After the last of the interviews on Nov. 28, the committee will conclude the meeting with a determination of which candidates to invite to campus for full interviews in January, beginning no earlier than Jan. 8 and extending no later than Jan. 26. The individual interview schedules will be published as soon as practicable, so that the January interview events and activities can be as well attended as possible. Procedures will also be established for providing input to the committee about the candidates.

The Search Committee will conclude its work on Jan. 28 when we recommend no fewer than three finalists to the State Board of Higher Education. The Board will interview the finalists and select our next president on Feb. 5-6.

Paul A. LeBel, dean, School of Law
Chair, UND Presidential Search Committee

Applicants selected for screening interviews on Nov. 27-28:
* Dennis Elbert, dean, College of Business and Public Administration, University of North Dakota
* Phyllis Johnson, Beltsville area director, USDA Agricultural Research Services
* Robert Kelley, dean, College of Health Sciences, University of Wyoming
* Thomas Keon, dean, College of Business Administration, University of Central Florida
* Kathleen Long, dean, College of Nursing, University of Florida
* Gary Olson, dean, College of Arts and Sciences, Illinois State University
* Bruce Smith, dean, School of Aerospace Sciences, University of North Dakota
* Greg Weisenstein, provost and vice president for academic affairs, University of North Dakota

Doctoral examination set for Ronald E. Loggins

The final examination for Ronald E. Loggins, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in biology, is set for 11 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 14, in 141 Starcher Hall. The dissertation title is "Historic Origin, Range Expansion, and Habitat Suitability of Introduced Wild Pigs (Sus scrofa) in California." Rick Sweitzer (Biology) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Web conference is Nov. 14

The Adult Re-Entry program /Student Success Center is hosting a Web conference about the unique challenges inherent in reaching nontraditional students from noon to 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 14, in the Badlands Room, Memorial Union. Bring your lunch and join us for a very interesting conversation.
-- Dean Dienslake, Coordinator, Adult Re-Entry, Student Success Center, deandienslake@mail.und.edu, 777-3228

Judy DeMers speaks at Memorial Union fall leadership series

Judy DeMers, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, will present "Leadership in the Public Sector" at 3 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 14, in the Badlands Room, second level, Memorial Union. This presenation is sponsored by the Memorial Union as part of the fall leadership series. Faculty, please announce this event to your students. The presentation is free and open to the entire University community.

There will be no presentation Wednesday, Nov. 21, due to the Thanksgiving holiday. The final presentation will be Wednesday, Nov. 28, with Linda Neuerburg from the American Indian Student Services speaking on "Cultural Competency and Leadership."
-- Kaleigh Lindholm, Project Coordinator for Leadership Development, Memorial Union Center for Student Involvement & Leadership, leadership@und.edu, 777-3665

Christus Rex book study continues

The community of Christus Rex invites you to join us as we study and discuss the book, "Come Be My Light," by Mother Theresa at noon Wednesdays, Nov. 14, 21, 28, in the Christus Rex lounge. Books are available for a cost of $20 (also includes a copy of "Mother Theresa, In My Own Words" at the office of Christus Rex. Snacks, coffee and water will be provided. Brown bag lunches are encouraged. Please reply to christusrex@und.nodak.edu to reserve a book.

Doctoral examination set for Bonnie Higgins

The final examination for Bonnie Higgins, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in teaching and learning, is set for 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 15, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "Graduate and Employer Perceptions Regarding Job Preparedness Skills of Design Technology Graduates." Lynne Chalmers (Teaching and Learning) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for LoAnn Nelson

The final examination for LoAnn Nelson, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in teaching and learning, is set for 2 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 15, in Room 308, Education Building. The dissertation title is "Tribal College Culture-Based Education Impacts American Indian Students in North Dakota." John Delane Williams (Education Foundations) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Mary Dibbern teaches master class Nov. 15

UND alum Mary Dibbern will teach a master class for French mélodie and opera, her specialties, from 2 to 4 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 15, at the Josephine Campbell Recital Hall, Hughes Fine Arts Center. Admission is free.

Dibbern grew up in Grand Forks, graduated from Red River High School and UND. She is highly esteemed in her profession as a vocal coach and collaborative artist. You can learn more about Ms. Dibbern from her web site at www.mary-dibbern.com/

Great American Smokeout - Dance Dance Revolution Party is Nov. 15

Everyone is welcome to join the fun at the Great American Smokeout - Dance Dance Revolution Party. Come to the Loading Dock in the Memorial Union Thursday, Nov. 15, from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and find helpful information on how to quit tobacco or how to support a friend or family member in quitting. You will have an opportunity to ask questions with a tobacco cessation counselor. While you are there, make sure you hop on a Dance Dance Revolution console and register to win your own DDR TV Pad. The party is sponsored by Student Health Services and the College of Nursing.
-- Jodi Ramberg, GSA, Student Health Promotion Office, jodi.ramberg@und.edu, 777-2097

Community brainstorming session: making ends meet in Grand Forks

A community brainstorming, dessert and discussion, "Making Ends Meet in Grand Forks and East Grand Forks," will be held from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 15, at the Grand Forks Herald Community Room. Child care will be provided by the Y Family Center.

Recently, NVNO, a collaboration of nonprofit organizations in the Northern Red River Valley, released a report that discussed the difficulties many families in our region are having in “making ends meet.” The report was authored by Carenlee Barkdull, assistant professor of social work. The content of the report has generated much discussion in the press, at social gatherings, and over coffee with neighbors.

Please join us as we continue the discussion. We invite you to help further identify the issues, and most importantly, discuss potential solutions that will help make our community the best place to live and work. Teresa Morrow from the Bremer Financial Corporation will facilitate our discussion as we explore ways to increase home ownership, help families afford child care and after school programs, as well as explore what we can do locally about health care costs.

For more information or questions, contact Pat Berger, president of United Way of Grand Forks, East Grand Forks and area at 775-8661.
-- Carenlee Barkdull, Assistant Professor, Social Work, carenleebarkdull@mail.und.edu, 777-3770

Blue Cross Blue Shield presents "Beat the Bug" Nov. 15

It's the time of year when the flu seems to creep up on you. After you get your flu shot this year, take some time to learn a little more about how to prevent the flu and how to take care of yourself if you catch it. Blue Cross Blue Shield will present "Beat the Bug," Thursday, Nov. 15, at noon and 12:30 p.m. in Room 10/12, Swanson Hall. Everyone in attendance will receive a free flu safety kit.
-- Amanda Eickhoff, Assistant Director for Work Well, Wellness Center, amandaeickhoff@mail.und.edu, 701.777.0210

Community Theatre brings Paris cabaret experience to life

Join the Community Theatre in a cabaret experience featuring "Jacques Brel is Alive and Well and Living in Paris," an American musical review composed of songs written by the famous traveling troubador Jacques Brel. The production runs Nov. 15-17 at 7:30 p.m. at the Empire Arts Center, downtown Grand Forks.

The show centers on various aspects of life -- love, marriage, death, war -- and is as poignant today as it was when it was written. A community theatre classic.

The production is directed by Job Christenson and features an all-star cast, including: Deborah Berger, the Community Theatre's Best Actress winner from 2007's "I Love You, You're Perfect, Now Change"; Dylan Croeker, Mari Behl, Daniel Dutot, Mare Thompson and Cory Diers.

General reserved seating: adult tickets are $18, students and seniors, $15. Enjoy the show from the seats of the Empire by reserving your tickets at the Chester Fritz Auditorium box office, 777-4090. Walk-up tickets will be available on a first-come, first-served basis, so reservations are recommended.

This show was last done by GGFCT 30 years ago. The production is sponsored, in part, by the Grand Forks Herald, the Level 10 Martini Bar, the UND Students in Free Enterprise, and the UND Nonprofit Leadership Student Association.
-- Benjamin Klipfel, Executive Director, GGF Community Theatre, ben@benklipfel.net, 701-321-2359

Doctoral examination set for Christopher A. Knudson

The final examination for Christopher A. Knudson, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in anatomy and cell biology, is set for 1 p.m. Friday, Nov. 16, in Room B-710, Frank Low Conference Room, School of Medicine and Health Sciences. The dissertation title is "Characterization of Adrenergic Receptor Subtypes in the Rodent Hippocampus." Patrick Carr (Anatomy) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Physics lecture is Nov. 16

Berislav Momcilovic from the Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health in Zagreb, Croatia, will discuss "Idiorrhythmic Dose Rate Feeding of Non-Energetic Nutrients" Friday, Nov. 16, in 211 Witmer Hall.

The current dose-response experimental model was introduced into nutrition from the physical sciences. However, that model does not take into account that we are fed neither continuously nor that the diet is not always the same. Since we are taking our food as meals, and the content of such diet varies from meal to meal, the new idiorrhythmic experimental model offers the study of the dose-rate in nutrition. The physiological response to such idiorrhythmic dose-rate feeding with non-energetic nutrient (zinc) was different from when animals were fed a constant diet. Indeed, the efficiency of the absorption is not a constant, but depends upon the availability of a particular non-energetic nutrient like vitamins and trace elements. Moreover, idiorrhythmic dose rate feeding may act like a natural synchronizer to the cell activity of the body, and hence offers new possibilities in therapeutic pharmacology.
-- Connie Cicha, Secretary, Physics, connie_cicha@und.nodak.edu, 701-777-2911

Geography Awareness Week

Geography Awareness Week runs through Nov. 17. The Geography Department and Gamma Theta Upsilon are sponsoring an information booth in the Memorial Union Tuesday and Wednesday of this week. In addition, Darryl A. Holman, a GIS specialist with the U.S. Forest Service at Chippewa National Forest in north central Minnesota, will present a talk, "Using GIS and GPS for Emergency Management," at noon Wednesday, Nov. 14, in Room 1, Gamble Hall.
-- Gregory Vandeberg, Assistant Professor, Geography, gregory.vandeberg@und.nodak.edu, 701-777-4588

National Nurse Practitioner Week honors profession

Gov. John Hoeven has proclaimed Nov. 11-17, as Nurse Practitioner Week in the state of North Dakota in honor of the profession’s 41st anniversary. Nurse practitioners provide healthcare to people of all ages and in diverse healthcare settings, including private office practice, hospitals, long-term care facilities, schools, state and local health departments, managed care facilities, and retail-based clinics.

The College of Nursing educates 30 to 35 nurse practitioner students each year, in various stages of their education. The nurse practitioner degrees that the College offers include the family nurse practitioner, psych/mental health nurse practitioner, and starting January 2008, gerontology nurse practitioner.

The family nurse practitioner (FNP) degree has been a part of the College since 1994 and has graduated over 100 FNPs. Graduates of the program are well-qualified, having achieved a 100 percent pass rate on their licensing exam for the last seven consecutive years. The national average pass rate is in the 80th percentile.

“The UND College of Nursing would like to congratulate all NPs during this week of celebration,” said Liz Tyree, FNP co-program director. “In the last four decades, each of you has continued a tradition of hard work and dedication – traits that have translated into quality patient care and ongoing professional development. We thank you and sincerely hope your success continues far into the future!”

Alumni of UND are employed as nurse practitioners throughout North America from Arizona to Nova Scotia, but mostly in North Dakota and Minnesota. The program is particularly strong in helping students develop critical thinking and clinical decision-making through problem-based learning and clinical conference calls in which students and faculty analyze cases.

There are more than 120,000 licensed nurse practitioners in the United States and more than 300 in North Dakota providing high-quality, cost-effective and personalized healthcare for citizens of our nation and state.

Nurse practitioners are important partners in the healthcare of their patients, and in addition to clinical services, focus on health promotion, disease prevention and health education and counseling, working to help their patients make smarter health and lifestyle choices.
-- Becky Cournia, Alumni Relations and Development, Nursing, beckycournia@mail.und.edu, 777-4526

Metropolitan opera auditions set for Nov. 17

The 44th annual North Dakota auditions conducted under the auspices of the Metropolitan Opera National Council will be held Saturday, Nov. 17, beginning at noon in the Josephine Campbell Recital Hall, Hughes Fine Arts Center. Korliss Uecker will conduct a public master class following the auditions. The auditions and master class are open to the public and makes for an enjoyable afternoon listening experience. There is no charge.

The North Dakota auditions are part of a North American-wide system of auditions held in all 50 states and in Canada to find exceptionally talented young singers between the ages of 20 and 30 and assist them in their development.

Singers in the North Dakota auditions compete for prize money and the chance to advance to the Upper Midwest Regional Auditions to be held in Minneapolis at the University of Minnesota Ted Mann Concert Hall Saturday, Jan. 19. The winners of the Upper Midwest and 15 other regional auditions held around the country will advance with all expenses paid to the national finals Feb. 17 and 24 on stage at the Met. It is estimated close to one-half million dollars will be awarded in prize money in the three levels of competition this year.

The North Dakota auditions are generously supported by the University of North Dakota Fellows, the Department of Music and individual contributors. For more information call G. Paul Larson at 791-2612 or visit www.metopera.org
-- G. Paul Larson, Director, North Dakta District of the Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions, Economics (emeritus), gpaul_larson@yahoo.com, 791-2612

Doctoral examination set for Kristin Hillman

The final examination for Kristin Hillman, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in pharmacology, physiology and therapeutics, is set for 1 p.m. Monday, Nov. 19, in Room 3933, School of Medicine and Health Sciences. The dissertation title is "Adrenergic Modulation of CA1 Neuron Activity." James Porter (Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Women's Fund lecture is Nov. 19

The Women’s Fund Advisory Committee invites you to a lecture by Martha Potvin, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Her lecture is titled “Promoting Gender Equity in a University Setting.”

Please join us at 4:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 19, in the Idea Lab of the Ina Mae Rude Entrepreneur Center, Center for Innovation, to hear the lecture. A reception will follow to meet and visit with Dr. Potvin. The event is free, and all are welcome to attend.
-- SuAnne Frasier, Director, Womens Fund, Community Foundation of GF, EGF & Region, sfrasier@gofoundation.org, 746-0668

U senate library committee meets Nov. 19

The University Senate Library Committee will meet Monday, Nov. 19, at 10 a.m. in Room 217D (Conference Room) at the Chester Fritz Library. This meeting is open to the public.
-- Karen Cloud, Administrative Assistant, Chester Fritz Library, karencloud@mail.und.edu, 7-2618

Astronomy talk is Nov. 20

The physics department will hold a public astronomy talk and telescope observing session at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 20, in 116 Witmer Hall. The talk, "Mars Rocks! Water! and the Quest for Life!", will be presented by Chris Milly Milford, NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador for North Dakota. Following the talk, attendees will be given the opportunity to observe the night sky through a telescope (weather permitting).
-- Wayne Barkhouse, Assistant Professor, Physics, wayne.barkhouse@und.nodak.edu, 777-3520

Global Visions film series features "L'Enfant" Nov. 20

The Global Vision Film Series, sponsored by the Department of Anthropology and the Anthropology Club, is a forum that promotes diversity at UND and within the community of Grand Forks at large through the venue of internationally acclaimed award-winning independent films. Film is a rich medium for the exploration of cultural diversity, the effects of globalization, human rights abuses, and the broad spectrum of human experiences that constitutes the nature of culture and the human condition. Every other Tuesday the Global Visions film series shows a movie at the Memorial Union in the Lecture Bowl. "L'Enfant" will be shown Nov. 20. This year, we are joined by the UND Law School’s International Human Rights Center, who will present two films under the umbrella of the Global Visions film series. All films in the series are award-winning films, recognized for their artistic scope and social impact. All films are open and free to UND students, faculty and Grand Forks community members. Several departments on the UND campus offer the films shown in the Global Visions film series as extra credit opportunities for students, who must write reviews and critiques of the issues presented in each of the outstanding films shown each semester.

Film review and synopsis by Kenneth Turan
Los Angeles Times staff writer
March 24, 2006

For 20-year-old Bruno, everything is fungible, negotiable, for sale. He's got the morals of a sneak thief, because that's what he is. Do you like his favorite hat? It's yours, for a price. A hustler and panhandler, living fecklessly in the moment on the streets of a Belgian industrial town, he mocks those who have regular jobs and simply does whatever comes to hand.

So when Bruno is introduced to his nine-day-old son by his young girlfriend Sonia, he does the expedient thing, the thing his whole life has pushed him toward: almost without thinking about it, he sells the baby to an adoption ring for a thick wad of cash.

But this horrific action, one that Bruno considers more or less business as usual, suddenly pushes him over a line he never knew existed. For Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne's quietly devastating film "L'Enfant" (The Child) is not really about what happens to that baby. It's about what that act does to Bruno, about the brutal consequences of the sudden discovery that everything is not a commodity.

"L'Enfant" was last year's winner of the Palme d'Or at Cannes; another Dardennes effort, "Rosetta," won the award in 1999. In these and the still earlier "La Promesse," the Belgian directing brothers deal with themes they have made their own: the difficulty of being moral in an amoral world and the grinding, unforgiving nature of reality for those forced by poverty to live on the margins of society. These are not easy films to experience, but they are uncompromising and unforgettable.

The exceptional thing about "L'Enfant" is how intensely dramatic the film makes the consequences of Bruno's choice. Trapped by character and circumstance, he is all of a sudden deeply in over his head thrice over: emotionally with Sonia, criminally with his cohorts and legally with society. (Olivier Gourmet, Renier's "La Promesse" costar, has a brief cameo as a policeman.)

Without Bruno realizing it, he has put powerful forces into motion that he can in no way influence or contain. And as he gains a knowledge of how costly it can be to have essential human emotions, the wonder of it all is that he never loses our sympathy or our concern.

MPAA rating: R for brief language
-- Marcia Mikulak, Assistant Professor, Anthropology, marcia.mikulak@und.nodak.edu, 77704718

Check out Indian cooking at Burnt Toast Demo Kitchen

Check out these classes at the Burnt Toast Demo Kitchen at the Wellness Center.
Indian Cooking with Kavita Rami will be taught Tuesday, Nov. 20, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Cost is $12. This course will help you learn about spices and herbs used for genuine Indian dishes. The class will teach how to make "Biryani," which is a rice dish that serves as a complete meal. All class participants will enjoy a serving of the savory dish and take a copy of the recipe home.

Sign up at the Wellness Center welcome desk by noon Monday, Nov. 19. The class must have minimum of four participants to be held.
-- Leah Wagner, Coordinator of Burnt Toast, Wellness Center, leahwagner@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-0842

Doctoral examination set for Stuart Alan Schneider

The final examination for Stuart Alan Schneider, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in communication and public discourse, is set for 1 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 21, in 200 O'Kelly Hall. The dissertation title is "Communication and Pandemic Preparedness in Rural Critical Access Hospitals." Pamela Kalbfleisch (Communication) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Megan N. Tollefson

The final examination for Megan N. Tollefson, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in communication and public discourse, is set for 10 a.m. Monday, Nov. 26, in 200 O'Kelly Hall. The dissertation title is "Social Isolation Meets Technological Innovation: Towards Developing a Model of Communication Among Parents Who Homeschool." Pamela Kalbfleisch (Communication) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Med research candidate presents seminar

Devendra Agrawal, professor of biomedical sciences, medicine, and medical microbiology and immunology, at Creighton University of School of Medicine, Omaha, Neb., will present a research seminar titled “Vision for the Office of Associate Dean for Research at the UNDSMHS,” from 2 to 3 p.m. Monday, Nov. 26, at the Reed T. Keller Auditorium, Room 1350, School of Medicine and Health Sciences. His presentation will include a description of his professional background and accomplishments as well as some of his current research interests. Dr. Agrawal is a candidate for the position of associate dean for research at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences. If you have any questions, please contact Jonathan Geiger, chair of the Search Committee at 777-2183 or via e-mail jgeiger@medicine.nodak.edu

Technology Trends Forum: Second Life is Nov. 26

On Monday, Nov. 26, the Center for Instructional and Learning Technologies/ITSS will host its monthly Technology Trends Forum. The topic this month is "Second Life: What is it and Why Would I Want One?" Lori Swinney, Chad Bushy, Elizabeth Becker and Christine Crawford from CILT/ITSS will be presenting. There will also be a Second Life Guest Avatar from New Media Consortium.
This forum will cover:
*What is Second Life?
*Who is using Second Life?
*How is it being used in higher education?
*Why should we use it at UND?

The event will be held from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 26, in the River Valley Room, Memorial Union. This forum is open to faculty, staff and students. To register, please call Diane Lundeen at 777-2129 or send an email to dianelundeen@mail.und.edu
-- Diane Lundeen, Workshop Coordinator, Center for Instructional & Learning Technologies/ITSS, dianelundeen@mail.und.edu, 777-2129

Memorial Union announces upcoming holiday events

The following holiday events will be held at the Memorial Union the week after Thanksgiving.
* Tuesday, Nov. 27, Lighting of the Green and Parade of Homes
* Friday, Nov. 30, and Saturday, Dec. 1, Madrigal Dinner
* Thursday, Dec. 6, Campus Crusade Winter Formal
* Sunday, Dec. 9, Study-A-Thon

The Holiday Art and Craft Fair, which is typically held in the Memorial Union Ballroom at the beginning of December, will not be held this year.
-- Bonnie Solberg, Associate Director, Memorial Union, bonnie.solberg@und.edu, 701-777-2898

UND Belly Dance Club offers beginner classes

Tone up for the holidays! Members of UND's Belly Dance Club are offering lessons for beginners on Nov. 30, Dec. 7 and 14 from noon to 1 p.m. in 260 Ireland-O'Kelly Hall (humanities and integrated studies space). Lessons are $5 each. Call club advisor Tami Carmichael at 777-3015 to register or for additional information.
-- Tami Carmichael, Director, Humanities & Integrated Studies, tami.carmichael@und.nodak.edu, 7-3015

University Senate meets Dec. 6; agenda items due

The University Senate will meet Thursday, Dec. 6, at 4:05 p.m. in Room 7, Gamble Hall. Agenda items for this meeting are due in the Office of the Registrar by noon, Thursday, Nov. 22. They may be submitted electronically to: lorihofland@mail.und.nodak.edu. It is recommended that some detail be included in the agenda items submitted. -- Suzanne Anderson (University registrar), secretary, University Senate.

IRB meets Dec. 7

The next meeting of the IRB will be at 3 p.m. Friday, Dec. 7, in 305 Twamley Hall. All research proposals submitted to the Institutional Review Board before Tuesday, Nov. 20, will be reviewed.

Clinical medical projects must be reviewed by the Clinical Medical Subcommittee before being brought to the full board. Proposals for these projects are due in the office of the Institutional Review Board before Tuesday, Nov. 13.

Minutes from the meeting will be available in the IRB office approximately one week after the meeting.
-- Kristie Reynolds, Administrative Secretary, Institutional Review Board, kristinereynolds@mail.und.edu, 777-4279

Nominations for Kupchella award due March 1

Nominations for the Charles E. Kupchella Preventive Medicine and Wellness Award are due by 5 p.m. March 1. Letters of nomination and supporting materials are due in the Office of Public Affairs, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, 501 N. Columbia Road Stop 9037, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9037.

The award recognizes the achievements of individuals and organizations who have worked to improve health and wellness through lowered rates of disease and disability by developing and delivering effective health promotion and prevention initiatives.

Named for the current president of UND, the Kupchella Wellness Award will be presented this spring. This will be the third time the award has been given. Last year's recipients were James Mitchell, chair and Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor of Clinical Neuroscience at the UND Medical School and president of the Neuropsychiatric Research Institute in Fargo, and Donald Hensrud, chair of the Division of Preventive, Occupational and Aerospace Medicine and associate professor of preventive medicine and nutrition at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and an alumnus of the UND medical school.

UND is seeking nominations of individuals and organizations in North Dakota and surrounding states who have contributed significantly to disease prevention and healthful living. Consideration will be given to those who have:
* made significant contributions in the field of health promotion and disease prevention including the clinical, education and research areas.
* demonstrated excellence in a function or on a project related to prevention or health promotion.
* taken initiative, shown innovativeness, persistence, has an impact and/or made a difference in prevention/health promotion to rural Americans.

Projects may address one or more of the goals and focus areas outlined in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services "Healthy People 2010: Understanding and Improving Health" and "Steps to a Healthier USA." See www.healthypeople.gov/ or call 800-367-4725 for more information. Areas of special interest are:
* Promotion of physical activity
* Reduction of overweight or obesity
* Reduction or elimination of tobacco use
* Reduction or elimination of substance abuse
* Promotion of responsible sexual behavior
* Reduction or elimination of injury and violence

The nomination should briefly address the following:
* Why should this individual (or organization) be considered for this award?
* What are the key outcomes and achievements of the program, policy, contribution or initiative?
* Describe the nominee's accomplishments; attach CV (up to three letters of support may be included.

Emphasis will be given to programs that demonstrate creativity and innovation, leadership, sustainability, replicability and effectiveness.

The award recipient will receive a $1,000 cash award and a commemorative plate. A picture of the recipient will be displayed on a plaque in UND's Student Wellness Center.

The award has been made possible by a gift to the UND Foundation from Manuchair Ebadi, former senior advisor to the president and associate vice president for health affairs and medical research at UND and associate dean for research and program development at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences. He retired this past summer.

For more information, contact the Office of Public Affairs at the UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences, 701-777-4305.
-- Shelley Pohlman, Asst. to the Director, Public Affairs, spohlman@medicine.nodak.edu, 701-777-4305

Faculty research seed money applications invited

Applications are invited for faculty research seed money awards. The deadline for submission is 4 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 4. Program details follow.

Description: The Faculty Research Seed Money Committee distributes funds to support projects by faculty in any department of the University. The goal of the Seed Money Program is to enhance the ability of the faculty to submit successful extramural research grant applications.

Eligibility: Applicants must have a faculty appointment at UND.

Faculty who have previously received funds from the Seed Money Committee must have a final report on file with Research Development and Compliance (105 Twamley Hall; Stop 7134) one month prior to the application date in order to be considered for an award.

Faculty who have previously received funds from the Seed Money Committee and who wish to apply for additional support must present evidence that they have submitted a related extramural research proposal since receiving committee funds. (An extramural application is one submitted to an agency or foundation “outside UND.” Thus, for example, proposals sent to the following are not extramural: UND Instructional Development, NRI, RD&C, SSAC and North Dakota EPSCoR). The new application must describe how the previous Seed Money Award was used and what applications or related publications resulted.

Review Criteria: Proposals will be subject to competitive review and ranking by discipline-related subcommittees whose members are appointed by individual departments. Proposals must be clear, of high quality, and be designed to develop a project or provide preliminary data for one or more extramural grant proposals.

Higher priority will be given to:
- Proposals with high potential for producing successful extramural applications
- Applicants who have not received recent funding from the Seed Money Committee
- Applicants with a demonstrated record of research or academic accomplishment
- Projects that can be completed in 12 to 18 months

Lower priority will be given to projects from investigators who have significant and/or continuous funding, unless the request is required to begin a project not currently supported. Projects will not be supported if they were previously submitted to an extramural agency but were declined funding because of lack of scientific, technical or academic merit. However, higher consideration will be given to those projects previously submitted to an external agency if the purpose of the Seed Money Application is to address reviewers’ comments, to improve the chance that a revised extramural application will be successful. Where applicable, a copy of the review summary from the most recent unfunded external proposal should be included.

Application Format:

The application should be prepared to convince and be understood by a general audience, only some of whom may be proficient in the applicant's area. The following headings and page limitations apply:

* Cover page: Include Target Subcommittee; principal investigator's name; department, college; proposal title; amount requested; proposed beginning and ending dates of the project; agency to which extramural proposal will be submitted; list of previous Faculty Research Seed Money Committee Awards and whether or not a final report and external proposal have been filed; signatures of the principal investigator, department chair, and dean of the college.
* Research or project plan: Three pages maximum. Include aims, background, significance, approach, methods

Format: One inch margins, single spaced, not to exceed six lines per linear inch. (The three page limit for the project plan will be strictly enforced. Proposals exceeding the limit will be returned without review. Appendices circumventing this limit will be discarded.)

* Detailed budget (including justification)
The budget should be for a maximum of 12 to 18 months.

Award amounts may range from $1,000 to $40,000.

Projected expenditures must be reasonable, justified and directly related to the project.

Unallowable budget items: The committee has ruled that seed money funds may not be used for travel and expenses in conjunction with attendance or presentation of materials at a conference. Exceptions to this policy will be considered on a case by case basis. If you choose to request travel funds that are later disallowed, please be assured this decision will have no impact upon the selection of the remainder of your proposal for an award.

* Biographical sketch (two pages maximum)
* Current and pending grant support (title, short description, agency, requested amount)
* Historical grant support at UND (including national, private and seed money awards)
* List of extramural applications submitted but not funded (include past three years)
* Statement of intent to submit extramural application (title, agency, time period, funds to be requested). Where support is requested for a project that will not serve as the basis for an extramural application, then potential future sources of external funding should be listed.

Submission:

All applications must be received in Research Development and Compliance (105 Twamley Hall) no later than 4 p.m. Dec. 4, 2007.

Submit the original application plus the appropriate number of copies for the target subcommittee (see below) to:
Faculty Research Seed Money Committee
c/o RD&C, Twamley Hall, Room 105
Stop 7134

Note: The subcommittee chair has the option to forward proposals outside the subcommittee expertise to a more appropriate subcommittee.

Award Requirements:
1. All recipients of Faculty Research Seed Money grants are required to submit a final report to Research Development and Compliance within one month of the project’s end date or depletion of awarded funds, if that occurs before the project ends. The report should include a brief summary of results of the study, how funds were expended and whether or not the project resulted in external grant proposals/awards, publications, presentations, etc.

2. All funds should be spent by the ending date of the award. In exceptional circumstances, recipients may request an extension for up to six months to complete a project. No further extensions will be granted.

3. All recipients of Faculty Research Seed Money grants are required to submit a proposal to an external funding agency within one year of the award’s end date.

4. All recipients must present evidence that all work associated with their proposal has been approved by the appropriate compliance committee (IRB, IACUC, IBC, etc.) before the award will be set up.

Target subcommittees (number of copies to submit)

Composition of Subcommittees

Behavioral Sciences (10)
Communication
Communication Sciences and Disorders
Counseling
Educational Leadership
Educational Foundations and Research
Psychology
Physical Education and Exercise Science
Statewide Psych-Mental Health
Teaching & Learning

Basic Medical Sciences (7)
Anatomy and Cell Biology
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Microbiology and Immunology
Neuroscience
Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics
Pathology

Engineering and Technology (8)
Aviation & Aerospace Sciences
Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering
Computer Science
Electrical Engineering
Industrial Technology
Mechanical Engineering

Health Sciences (10)
Community Medicine
Family Medicine
Internal Medicine
Nutrition and Dietetics
Obstetrics-Gynecology
Occupational Therapy
Pediatrics
Physical Therapy
Surgery

Humanities and Fine Arts (8)
Art
English
History
Languages
Music
Philosophy and Religion
Theatre Arts

Mathematics and Natural Sciences (9)
Atmospheric Sciences
Biology
Chemistry
Geography
Geology and Geological Engineering
Mathematics
Physics
Space Studies

Professional Disciplines (7)
Accounting
Finance
Information Systems and Business Education
Management
Marketing
Practice and Role Development (Nursing)

Social Sciences (9)
Anthropology
Economics
Family and Community Nursing
Indian Studies
Law
Political Science and Public Administration
Social Work
Sociology

Outstanding faculty award nominations due Nov. 16

Who are the outstanding teachers at UND? You can help decide. The nomination process is an easy, one-page form you can fill out online at www.awards.und.edu. The form is also linked on the UND home page. The Outstanding Faculty Awards Committee is accepting nominations for the following individual and departmental awards:

* Outstanding undergraduate teaching (individual)
* Outstanding graduate/professional teaching (individual)
* Excellence in teaching, research/creative activity and service - the "Faculty Scholar Award" (individual)
* Outstanding faculty development and service (individual)
* Departmental excellence in teaching (department)
* Departmental excellence in service (department)

Please take time to reward excellence in teaching by nominating a faculty member or department. The best nominations address specific award criteria. The nomination forms and criteria are available at www.awards.und.edu. Nomination forms must be received by 4 p.m. Friday, Nov. 16.

Paper nomination forms are also available at various locations around campus. Criteria for all six awards are listed on the Web site and on the nomination forms. Additional information is available by calling Jana Hollands at 777-4998.
-- Anne Kelsch, Director, Office of Instructional Development, anne.kelsch@und.nodak.edu, 777-4233

Nursing considers accelerated post-baccalaureate degree option

The College of Nursing is exploring establishing an accelerated post-baccalaureate nursing program. The program would be open to students who have completed a baccalaureate degree in a field other than nursing and would prepare them to become a registered nurse.

If you are interested in possibly enrolling in an accelerated post-baccalaureate nursing program at UND, please complete our interest survey, go to www.nursing.und.edu and click on “Accelerated Interest Survey.” The survey is anonymous and will only take 5 to 10 minutes to complete.

The U.S. Department of Labor has determined a need for more than one million new and replacement registered nurses by 2014. This nursing shortage has prompted many schools of nursing to offer creative alternatives for the baccalaureate nursing student, including accelerated degree options for students already possessing a college degree.

Helen Melland, associate dean of undergraduate studies at the College of Nursing, stated that “We are excited about this program. Nurses who graduate from accelerated programs such as the one we are developing do an excellent job in the workplace. They have extensive educational and life experience beyond their basic nursing preparation resulting in a well prepared, highly skilled professional nurse.”

Graduates of this program would be qualified to write the licensing exam to become registered nurses. The opportunities for baccalaureate prepared nurses to advance in nursing are great due to the current and predicted nursing shortage. Due to an increasing number of baby boomers now developing health care needs, the federal government predicts exceptional employment opportunities for nurses into the foreseeable future.

Experience in healthcare is not required to be admitted into this program or to be successful in it. Students will receive all the experience they need as they progress through the curriculum.
-- Becky Cournia, Alumni & Development Officer, Nursing, beckycournia@mail.und.edu, 777-4526

UND 125th Committee gathering 125 ideas

In preparation for UND's 125th Anniversary, the Office of Ceremonies and Special Events is collecting ideas for a publication titled, “125 Things Every Family Should Do At UND Before Your Student Graduates.” Please add your suggestions to the list by submitting them to dawnbotsford@mail.und.nodak.edu before Dec. 1. These will be printed and available soon after the beginning of the spring semester 2008. Ideas are being collected for a student list as well, so if you have a student in your home, encourage them to submit ideas; just make sure they let us know they’re students, not family members.
-- Dawn Botsford, Events Coordinator, Office of Ceremonies and Special Events, dawnbotsford@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-6393

Faculty invited to use Barnes & Noble Faculty Center Network

Need help in choosing a new text for your class? Benchmark with faculty across the United States with Barnes & Noble Faculty Center Network. See what text other faculty in colleges and universities around the country are using to teach a similar curriculum. Find out which books are the most popular choices and what your colleagues have to say about them.

Get more information to help you choose the best text for you and your students. Go to www.facultycenter.net and click on faculty services, where you'll see a link for Faculty Center Network.

Want to know more? Contact our textbook manager Tina Monette at 777-2106 or Casey Johnson at 777-2748.
-- Michelle Abernathey, General Manager, Barnes & Noble at UND, michelle_aberanthey@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2103

Law Library posts Thanksgiving holiday hours

Thanksgiving holiday hours for the Law Library follow.
Wednesday, Nov. 21, 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Thursday, Nov. 22, closed (Thanksgiving Day); Friday, Nov. 23, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, Nov. 24, noon to 5 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 25, noon to 11 p.m.
-- Jane Oakland, Circulation Manager, Law Library, oakland@law.und.edu, 7-3482

UND Directory now available at bookstores, C-stores

The UND student/faculty/staff directory is now available at Barnes & Noble University Bookstore, Dakota Textbook Co., and Wilkerson, Walsh, and Memorial Union convenience stores. It is not, however, available at the Memorial Union Service Desk as stated in the posters and other advertising. The cost is the same as last year, $1.25.

Along with student, faculty, and staff information, the Directory puts department information at your fingertips. Department addresses, phone numbers, e-mails, Web sites, and employees are in one location, which makes information much easier to find. Students and employees are also listed alphabetically as they have been in the past.

This marks the second year that we have used PeopleSoft data feeds for both students and employees. In some cases, that data may not have been updated by the student or employee. Students who wish to update information may do so through the PeopleSoft portal. In the case of employees, at least one person in each office has HRMS privileges and can update most information.

If you have any comments or suggestions to improve next year's edition, please contact me.

-- Jan Orvik, Coordinator of Internal Communications, University Relations, janorvik@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3621.

Note out-of-state workers compensation coverage

The University of North Dakota is required to procure workers compensation for employees working outside of the state of North Dakota for more than 30 consecutive days. This coverage MUST be in place at the time the employee begins his or her duties. The Risk Management Workers Compensation Program coordinates the purchase of this required coverage for all state agencies through its broker.

If an employee returns to work in North Dakota within the 30 days and works at his job for one day and then returns to his out-of-state employment and does this repeatedly through his employment, the employee would be covered under North Dakota Workforce Safety and would not need out of state coverage. Coming home for a weekend and not putting in a day's work, does not count. That employee would need out-of-state coverage.

This out-of-state workers compensation coverage need is not exclusive to full-time employees. Part-time employees, adjunct faculty, etc. must also be considered.

To obtain out-of-state coverage for a UND employee, please complete the out-of-state coverage form which is located on our web site: http://departments.und.edu/safety/forms/index.html. Send the completed information to Box 9031 or e-mail it to: corrinnekjelstrom@mail.und.nodak.edu. The information will be forwarded to Risk Management to obtain the coverage.

If you have any questions or concerns, feel free to contact the Safety Office at 777-3341.
-- Corrinne Kjelstrom, Insurance Specialist/Office Mgr., Campus Safety & Security, corrinnekjelstrom@mail.und.nodak.edu, 701-777-2785

Students urged to complete Student Health Satisfaction Survey

Student Health Services is seeking feedback from all students regarding their opinions on, or satisfaction with, services at Student Health. We are seeking feedback from all students, even those who have never visited Student Health before. We want to provide the best possible service for students that we can.

Please encourage your students to take the survey at www.undstudenthealth.com anytime before Friday, Nov. 30. It is a short five-minute survey and students will be eligible to win one of over 50 prizes, including movie tickets, gift certificates to the Union Food Court, Stomping Grounds, and even a one-hour massage. Thank you!
-- Theresa Magelky, Graduate Service Assistant, Student Health Promotion Office, theresa.magelky@und.edu, 701-527-3676

Reduce the price of textbooks today

Spring textbook requests were due Oct. 5. We have only received 50 percent of our spring textbook requests. Help reduce the price of textbooks by submitting yours today.

Submit your adoptions online at www.und.bkstore.com - then select the Faculty Services Tab or call 777-2106.

Here's why:
* Having your course and book information by Dec. 1 allows us to pay students who choose to sell their books 50 percent of the book price at buyback.
* Recycle and reuse - the more books we buy at the end of this fall term, the more students save next term. Used books are 25 percent off the new book price.
* If you adopt the text alone, (instead of a textbook package or bundle), more students actually buy it. Recent studies conducted by Student Monitor indicate that 77 percent of students would choose to purchase the text alone if given the option.
* With early information, we can notify you of publisher stock situations, edition changes, and out-of-print titles.
* Any custom course pack material should be submitted as soon as possible, but no later than Dec. 1 to ensure enough time for copyright, production, and receiving.

Thank you for your contuined support. -- Michelle Abernathey, general manager, Barnes & Noble, 777-2103; Tina Monette, 777-2106; and Casey Johnson, 777-2748.

Studio One features diagnosing autism, fencing

Learn why more children are being diagnosed with autism on the next edition of Studio One. Autism is a brain development disorder that occurs in children before the age of three. Recently, more children are being diagnosed with the syndrome. However, some of these new diagnoses may be contributed to a broadened definition of autism. See how this disorder is currently defined and learn about some of the specific symptoms on the next edition of Studio One.

Also on the show this week, learn how one man teaches his students about an art of combat. According to the International Federation of Fencing, fencing’s existence can be traced back to ancient Egypt. Watch as one guest demonstrates the traditional movements of the sport.

Studio One is an award-winning news and information program produced at the University of North Dakota Television Center. The program airs live on UND Channel 3 on Thursdays at 5 p.m. Re-broadcasts can be seen at 7 a.m., noon, 7 p.m. and 11 p.m. daily and on Saturdays at 10 a.m. Prairie Public Television airs Studio One on Saturday at 6 a.m. The program can also be seen by viewers in Fargo, Bismarck/Mandan and Minot, N.D.; Minneapolis, Minn.; Denver, Colo.; and Winnipeg, Manitoba.
-- Meghan Flaagan, Director of Marketing, Television Center, meghan.flaagan@und.edu, 777-3818

2007 National Survey of Student Engagement now available online

Freshmen and seniors were invited to participate in the 2007 National Survey of Student Engagement during spring semester. The results of the survey are now posted at http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/datacol/reports/subFolder/NSSE2007/NSSE2007.htm. This survey, administered every two to three years, focuses on assessing student engagement of freshmen compared to seniors, in the areas of academic challenge, active and collaborative learning, student-faculty interaction, enriching educational experiences, and campus environment. This is a national survey with comparative data from other four-year colleges and universities. This is the fourth time that UND has conducted this survey.

A couple of noteworthy items from the survey are:
• Students reported an increase in the quality of academic advising. Freshmen reported Excellent/Good at 74 percent in 2007, up from 70 percent in 2005; seniors reported Excellent/Good at 69 percent in 2007, up from 65 percent in 2005.
• Students were asked if they exercise or participate in physical fitness activities. 66 percent freshmen reported they participate, compared to 59 percent freshmen at comparable national institutions; 62 percent seniors reported they participate in fitness activities, compared to 54 percent at comparable institutions.

UND students rated their relationships with students, faculty, and administrative personnel to be similar to responses made by doctoral-intensive peer institutions. UND students and doctoral-intensive students were equally satisfied (85 percent rated Excellent/Good) with their educational experience.

For questions about this survey, please contact Sue Erickson at 777-2265.
-- Carmen Williams, Director, Institutional Research, carmenwilliams@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-4358

Mini-grants available for summer courses, programs

Are you planning an event at UND next summer but lack funding? Do you plan to develop a new summer course but need financial resources? Consider applying for a mini-grant through the Summer Programs and Events Council (SPEC).

SPEC’s Start-Up Mini-Grant Program will fund deserving proposals for:
1. The expansion of existing 2008 credit or non-credit summer courses/programs.
2. Or the redesign of existing 2008 credit or non-credit summer courses/programs.
3. Or the development of new 2008 credit or non-credit summer courses/programs.

Through the mini-grant program, the Council wants to create positive learning experiences for the citizens of the Red River Valley region and beyond by extending the resources of the University. The mini-grant funds will help cover the development, marketing and start-up costs for courses and programs held at UND during the summer months. Examples include camps for kids, academic classes that can be completed in the summer months, or any special event designed for the community. Quality, creativity and “out of the box” ideas are encouraged when developing new programs.

All interested UND faculty and staff are encouraged to submit proposals. Information can be found at www.summer.und.edu. The application deadline is 4:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 19. Recipients will be announced Dec. 19.

For more information on the mini-grant program, contact Diane Hadden, director of summer sessions (credit activities), 777-6284, dianehadden@mail.und.edu or Kerry Kerber, associate dean, Continuing Education (non-credit activities), 777-4264, kerrykerber@mail.und.edu. For operational questions, contact the Summer Events Office at 777-0841.
-- Jolene Marsh, Summer Events Program, Continuing Education, summerevents@mail.und.edu, 701-777-0841

SSAC announces awards

The Senate Scholarly Activities Committee received eight research/creative activity grant applications, requesting a tota1 of $15,993.72, and five publication applications, requesting a total of $4,044.50, in response to the October call for proposals. The following awards were made at the Oct. 24 committee meeting.

Research/creative activity awards
* Wayne Barkhouse (physics), “Quantifying Environmental Effects on the Star Formation Rate of Cluster Dwarf Galaxies,” $1,360
* Scott Engel (neuroscience), “Emotion Regulation in Anorexia Nervosa: A Naturalistic Study,” $2,500
* Roni Mayzer (criminal justice), “Neuropsychological Functioning and Juveniles Competency to Stand Trial,” $2,485
* Jeremiah Neubert (mechanical engineering), “Specifying a Robotic Grasping Task,” $2,195
* Ty Reese (history), “From Luxuries to Dependency: Abolition and the Nineteenth Century Foundations of England’s Gold Coast Colony,” $1,850
* Jefferson Vaughan (biology), “Monitoring Mosquito Biting Rates on Roosting Birds at Night with Use of Infra-Red Cameras,” $2,224.72

Publication awards
* Jihui "Susan" Chen (economics), publication of an article titled, "Backward Integrated Information Gatekeepers and Independent Divisions in the Product Market" in The B. E. Journal of Theoretical Economics, $150
* Kathleen Dixon (English), publication of a scholarly book titled, "The Global Village Re-Visited: Art, Politics, and Television Talk Shows," $711
* Kim Fink (art), presentation of mixed-media prints at a one-person exhibition at the College of the Sequoias Arts Gallery, $546
* Claudia Routon (modern and classical languages and literatures), publication of the translation of a short story by Spanish author Marina Mayoral in The North Dakota Quarterly, $100
-- Patrick A. Carr, Ph.D., Chair, Senate Scholarly Activities Committee, Anatomy and Cell Biology, pcarr@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-2576

Credit Union lists holiday promotions

The University Federal Credit Union is offering members the opportunity to skip their loan payment and enjoy extra cash this holiday season. For a $10 fee per loan, members can skip their payment in the month of November, December, or January. The credit union is also offering their annual holiday loan at a rate as low as 8 percent. Apply for any amount from $500 to $2,000. Loan applications and skip payment request forms are available on our web site, www.universityfederalcu.org or contact a member service representative at 777-2274 or 775-3738 for more information.
-- Marney Kresel, Manager, University Federal Credit Union, creditunion@und.edu, 777-4422

Note Barnes & Noble sale on imprinted sweatshirts, sweatpants

Check out Barnes & Noble at UND for 25 percent off cozy fleece you can't live without. Through Nov. 25, all Champion UND and Fighting Sioux imprinted youth and adult sweatshirts and sweatpants are 25 percent off. Stop in early for best selection.
-- Michelle Abernathey, General Manager, Barnes & Noble at UND, michelle_abernathey@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2103

Donated leave requested for Nadine Kotowicz

Annual and sick leave donations are sought for Nadine Kotowicz, Online Dakota Information Network (ODIN) technical services. She and her family thank you for your generosity. Please send any donations to Tony Stukel, director of ODIN, 81 Cornell Stop 7085. Donated leave forms are available at www.und.edu/dept/payroll, then click on forms. Thank you. -- ODIN.

Donated leave requested for Elizabeth Fletcher Lamb

Leave donations are sought for Elizabeth Fletcher Lamb, learning disability specialist at Disability Services. She and her family thank you for your generosity. Please send a donated sick or vacation leave form to Donna Ellertson, Stop 9040. Donated leave forms are available at www.und.edu/dept/payroll, then click on "forms."
-- Deb Glennen, Director, Disability Services, debglennen@mail.und.edu, 701 777-3425

Barnes & Noble seeks book requests early

Used books save students money. Students in your class this term win if you are using the same book. We can buy them from your students and pay them up to 50 percent of their current text.

Students in your class next term win because we not only buy books from our current students, but we can also get an early start on sourcing books nationally to get the most used text inventory possible. Used books save students 25 percent off the new book price.

Are you ready to give us your book request? Give our textbook manager Tina Monette a call at 777-2106 or Casey Johnson at 777-2748 or e-mail at und.bncollege.com.
-- Michelle Abernathey, General Manager, Barnes & Noble at UND, michelle_aberanthey@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2103

Special Denim Day set for Mortar Board turkey basket drive

Every year UND's Mortar Board chapter provides all the fixings for a Thanksgiving dinner to families in the Greater Grand Forks community who are in need. Approximately 700 families will receive a basket, sized to fit their family. A special Denim Day will be held Friday, Nov. 16, to help support this community-wide project.

Red River Valley Community Action assists with registration, and Associated Potato Growers donates 4,000 pounds of potatoes. Businesses within the community generously donate money to help out, and other UND student organizations conduct food drives and raise funds on their own. Red River High School National Honor Society trick-or-treats for canned food for the project, and the UND ROTC building provides use of the building for the distribution of the turkey baskets. The Turkey Basket Drive would not be possible without the great support of UND and the Greater Grand Forks community.

So, wear your denim Friday, Nov. 16, wear your button, and pay your building coordinator what you feel you can afford.
-- Patsy Nies, Special Project Assistant, Enrollment Services, patsynies@mail.und.nodak.edu, 701-775-5066

Holidays present opportunity to gather valuable family medical history

A new tool to help families capture and record their health history is now available through the Division of Medical Genetics at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

The family history form is a web-enabled program that helps people organize family health history information which can be printed out for the family's doctors. It also helps users save that information as a computer file and share it with other family members.

Family history is considered one of the most important elements in assessing risk factors for health problems such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer and certain psychiatric disorders.

For more information or to obtain a paper version of the family history form, contact the Division of Medical Genetics at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences, 777-4277, go to a local library and request assistance in accessing this form at the web site www.heartlandfamilyhistory.org <http://www.heartlandfamilyhistory.org/> or call Heartland Regional Coordinating Center at 1-888-881-8852.

"Families share more than genetic characteristics," said John Martsolf, professor of pediatrics and director of the Division of Medical Genetics at the Medical School. "They also share environments, lifestyles and personal habits, all of which can be factors for disease. Knowing the risk of certain diseases can motivate individuals to change any unhealthy behaviors."

Family health histories should be given to all health care providers to be retained as a permanent part of a patient's medical file, Martsolf said. "This information can help health care providers do a better job of assessing a patient’s risk of disease and prescribing appropriate preventive measures or courses of treatment."

North Dakota Gov. John Hoeven has declared November as Family History Month, and is encouraging North Dakotans to learn more about the diseases and causes of death affecting at least three generations of family members.

Family gatherings, such as holidays, present a great opportunity to learn about your family's health history, Martsolf said.

A survey, conducted last year by the U.S. Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, found that 96 percent of Americans believe that knowing a family history is important to their health. The survey also showed that only one-third of Americans has ever tried to gather and organize their families' health history.
-- Shelley Pohlman, Assistant to the Director, Public Affairs, spohlman@medicine.nodak.edu, 701-777-4305

Internal job openings listed

The following position vacancies are available only to regular UND staff employees who have successfully completed their six-month probation period, earn annual and sick leave, receive BC/BS health insurance and TIAA-CREF or ND PERS retirement benefits. Current UND faculty, please contact Human Resources for eligibility.

TO APPLY: Please complete UND Application/Control Card form. Send letter of application and resume, referencing position name and number, to: Human Resources, University of North Dakota, Twamley Hall, Room 313, 264 Centennial Drive Stop 8010, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8010. Applications MUST be received by the deadline date.

EXECUTIVE/PROFESSIONAL/ADMINISTRATIVE/ATHLETIC COACHES:

POSITION: Research Scientist/Engineer, Energy & Environmental Research Center, #08-138
DEADLINE: (I) 11/19/2007
SALARY: $40,000+/year

POSITION: Research Manager, Energy & Environmental Research Center, #08-137
DEADLINE: (I) 11/19/2007
SALARY: $50,000+/year

POSITION: Research Scientist/Engineer-Chemical Process, Energy & Environmental Research Center, #08-136
DEADLINE: (I) 11/19/2007
SALARY: $45,000+/year

POSITION: Senior Research Manager, Energy & Environmental Research Center, #08-135
DEADLINE: (I) 11/19/2007
SALARY: $70,000+/year

POSITION: Research Scientist/Engineer-Mechanical Design and Process, Energy & Environmental Research Center, #08-134
DEADLINE: (I) 11/16/2007
SALARY: $45,000+/year

POSITION: Associate Director, Intellectual Property Management and Technology Commercialization
DEADLINE: (I) 11/16/2007
SALARY: $140,000+

POSITION: Systems Administrator (re-advertised) Scientific Computing Center, #08-112
DEADLINE: (I) 11/19/2007
SALARY: $35,000+/year

POSITION: Assistant Archivist, Chester Fritz Library, #08-104
DEADLINE: Oct. 31 or until filled. (Applications received by Oct. 31, 2007 will receive first consideration) Internal Applicants will be considered along with the external applicants.
SALARY: $37,000+/year

TECHNICAL/PARAPROFESSIONAL:

POSITION: Computer Equipment Operator (variable schedule), ITSS, #08-139
DEADLINE: (I) 11/19/2007
SALARY: $22,000+/year

OFFICE SUPPORT:

POSITION: Communications Assistant, Student Financial Aid, #08-133
DEADLINE: (I) 11/19/2007
SALARY: $22,300+/year

CRAFTS/TRADES/SERVICE: No current vacancies.