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ISSUE: Volume 45, Number 12: November 07, 2007

Contents
Top Stories
Presidential Search Committee to interview eight candidates
Nursing dean to deliver faculty lecture Nov. 8
2008 Founders Day honorees sought
Events to Note
Global Visition film series presents "Who Killed the Electric Car"
Psychology colloquium is Nov. 7
Forensic pediatrician speaks on detection of physical/sexual abuse
Memorial Union Fall Leadership Series
Christus Rex book study continues
Women's Center Meet, Eat and Learn Nov. 7
Work Well: free cholesterol screenings
Burnt Toast Demo Kitchen offers cardio, Thai classes
CSD public comment meeting is Nov. 8
Community Theatre brings Paris cabaret experience to life
Ovarian cancer subject of Nov. 9 talk
Karl Wirth presents next LEEPS lectures Nov. 9
Doctoral examination set for Patty M. Vari
Doctoral examination set for Susan K. Plaine
Doctoral examination set for Ronald E. Loggins
Geography Department sponsors GIS Day speaker
Web conference is Nov. 14
Noon book group to hold first reading Nov. 14
Theatre Arts presents "The Elephant Man"
UND, CPA Society sponsor tax institutes
Doctoral examination set for Bonnie Higgins
Doctoral examination set for LoAnn Nelson
Box Lunch session focuses on "Encouraging Ethical Behavior in Class"
Blue Cross Blue Shield presents "Beat the Bug" Nov. 15
Wind Ensemble, Jazz Ensembles present combined concert Nov. 15
Great American Smokeout - Dance Dance Revolution Party is Nov. 15
Doctoral examination set for Christopher A. Knudson
Physics lecture is Nov. 16
Red River Women Studies Conference is Nov. 16
UND Dance Marathon is Nov. 17
Doctoral examination set for Kristin Hillman
Women's Fund lecture is Nov. 19
Astronomy talk is Nov. 20
Doctoral examination set for Stuart Alan Schneider
ExtravaBANDza is Nov. 27
IRB meets Dec. 7
Announcements
Getting up to speed with Microsoft Office 2007
Outstanding faculty award nominations due Nov. 16
Nominations sought for honorary degrees
Public scholarship proposals due Dec. 14
Books donated in honor of Elizabeth (Libby) Rankin
Departing faculty required to follow transfer of equipment procedure
Veterans Day is holiday
Chester Fritz Library lists Veterans Day weekend hours
UND Directory now available at bookstores, C-stores
Law library posts Veterans Day hours
International Centre lists holiday hours
ITSS lists holiday hours
Employees may enroll in courses at low cost
Studio One features string band, remembering Jason Stadstad
Mini-grants available for summer courses, programs
2007 National Survey of Student Engagement now available online
Students urged to complete Student Health Satisfaction Survey
Help bring music back to Northwood
Reduce the price of textbooks today
Facilities updates Web page
COSE offers clothing specials
Special Denim Day set for Mortar Board turkey basket drive
State Fleet rate adjustment effective Nov. 1
Seeking volunteers for calcium retention study
Work Well: know your numbers
Yoga classes begin
International Programs seeks volunteers for Thanksgiving dinner
Internal job openings listed
In the News
UND, NRI receive eating disorders grant
Medical School receives grant funding
Vossler's book named one of top 12 North Dakota memoirs
Presidential Search Committee to interview eight candidates

The University of North Dakota Presidential Search Committee met Monday, Nov. 5, and trimmed the list of candidates to eight. The committee, chaired by Paul LeBel, UND dean of Law, had planned to meet Nov. 6 to consider any applications filed up until midnight Monday, Nov. 5; there were no further applications and the meeting was canceled.

The following eight candidates, in alphabetical order, were selected by the committee for screening interviews in Minneapolis Nov. 27-28:

* Dennis Elbert, Dean, College of Business and Public Administration, University of North Dakota
* Phyllis Johnson, Beltsville Area Director, USDA Agricultural Research Services
* Robert Kelley, Dean, College of Health Sciences, University of Wyoming
* Thomas Keon, Dean, College of Business Administration, University of Central Florida
* Kathleen Long, Dean, College of Nursing, University of Florida
* Gary Olson, Dean, College of Arts and Sciences, Illinois State University
* Bruce Smith, Dean, Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences, University of North Dakota
* Greg Weisenstein, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, University of North Dakota

After the Nov. 27-28 screening, the committee will reduce the candidate pool to six to eight unranked candidates for campus interviews during Jan. 9-25. During a Jan. 28 meeting, the committee plans to select at least three candidates to recommend to the North Dakota State Board of Higher Education, which is scheduled to interview final candidates Feb. 4-5.

Nursing dean to deliver faculty lecture Nov. 8

"Interdisciplinary Research: A Modern Paradigm for Nursing Science" is the next talk in the 10th anniversary of the University Faculty Lecture Series. The talk, to be delivered by Chandice Covington, dean of the College of Nursing, is set for 4:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 8, with a reception at 4 p.m. in the North Dakota Museum of Art.

In honor of the 125th anniversary of the founding of the University and the 10th anniversary of the re-establishment of the lecture series at UND, the committee of Chester Fritz Professors coordinating the University Faculty Lecture Series invited the deans of colleges to speak on their research. This occasion will allow the deans to reflect on the important role that their scholarly work plays not only in their career path but in their work on campus today. And, again to break precedent a little, the committee commemorated President Charles Kupchella's tenure at UND by inviting him to give the opening lecture ("Chickens") Oct. 18. Subsequent lectures will be given in the spring and next fall, starting on Jan. 17 with Paul LeBel, dean of the School of Law. Please save the dates of Feb. 14, March 13 and April 10.

Chandice Covington, dean of the College of Nursing, holds a B.S.N. and M.S.N. from the University of Texas, and a doctorate in nursing from the University of Michigan. Covington spent most of her academic career at Wayne State, holding several positions including assistant dean of family, community, and mental health nursing and associate dean of academic and clinical affairs. She has also taught at the University of Arkansas Medical Sciences College of Nursing, University of Texas at Dallas, University of Michigan, Northwestern State University, Stephen F. Austin State University, University of Texas at Galveston, and Lamar University. Covington is a nationally certified Pediatric Nurse Practitioner with over 20 years of clinical experience in community-based primary care nursing.

Covington's research focuses on health promotion and the prevention of poor health outcomes in children, especially in vulnerable population in the United States and in international settings. Ongoing studies, funded through federal agencies and foundations, include breast feeding promotion in at-risk populations, alternative feeding technologies to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV via breast milk, school outcomes and prenatal substance exposures, genetic polymorphisms and child health in vulnerable populations.

As dean of the College of Nursing, Covington has articulated three main goals. The first is to have the best teaching program, second to no other. This is followed by the goals of focusing on research and establishing a virtual nursing center.

Covington is the author of over 148 publications and presentations in addition to being inducted into the American Academy of Nursing in 2004. Other awards received by Covington include the Midwest Nursing Research Society Harriet Werley New Investigator Award, the Meritorious Research Service Award from the Friends of National Institute of Nursing Research, the Graduate Research Assistant/Faculty Award and the President’s Recognition for Women Faculty Research, along with many others. Covington also serves as the college advisor to Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing, Eta Upsilon chapter.

2008 Founders Day honorees sought

The 2008 UND Founders Day banquet will be held Thursday, Feb. 28. The event will mark the 125th anniversary of the founding of the University of North Dakota and will serve as the kick-off activity for UND’s Quasquicentennial celebration year.

Employees with 25 years of service and retiring faculty and staff employees will be honored at the banquet as guests of the University. We request the assistance of all administrators, vice presidents, deans, department chairs, office heads and other supervisors in identifying eligible employees.

To prepare for Founders Day 2008, we request the following information:

1. Names of faculty and staff members who have completed 25 years of service to UND. To be honored, individuals must have completed 25 years of service since July 1, 2007, or will complete it by June 30, 2008. (In most cases, these people would have begun their employment at UND between July 1, 1982, and June 30, 1983.)

Please note that individuals eligible for 25-year recognition whose service at UND has not been continuous may have begun their employment prior to July 1, 1982. In those cases, documentation of cumulative years of service is requested.

Recognition for 25 years of service is given to all benefited employees, even though they may not be employed on a full-time basis. Please include names of benefited, part-time employees who will complete 25 years of service between July 1, 2007, and June 30, 2008.

2. Names of retired and retiring faculty and staff. To be honored, individuals must:
a. have retired since July 1, 2007, or will retire by June 30, 2008;
b. have a minimum of fifteen (15) years of service to the University;
c. be (or have been) full-time employees or in a benefited, part-time position at the time of retirement (or be completing an approved "phased" retirement); and
d. be making application for or receiving benefits through a UND-related retirement plan.

It is important that your list of eligible employees includes the following information:
 name of the employee
 position/faculty rank currently held
 department or unit
 initial appointment date
 mailing address, telephone number, and e-mail address for the employee
 dates of any breaks in service (please identify whether these breaks in service were compensated such as a developmental leave or a leave of absence without compensation)
 date of retirement (if applicable)

Please submit the names of eligible individuals and supporting information to Terri Machart in the Office of the Vice President, Student and Outreach Services, 264 Centennial Dr., Stop 7140, (terrimachart@mail.und.edu) by Friday, Nov. 16. Please call 777-2724 with any questions about employee eligibility or about the Founders Day banquet.
-- Fred Wittmann, Director, Ceremonies and Special Events, fredwittmann@mail.und.nodak.edu, 701-777-4267

Global Visition film series presents "Who Killed the Electric Car"

The Global Vision Film Series, sponsored by the Department of Anthropology and the Anthropology Club, is a forum that promotes diversity at UND and within the community of Grand Forks at large through the venue of internationally acclaimed, award-winning independent films. This year, we are joined by the UND Law School’s International Human Rights Center, which will present two films under the umbrella of the Global Visions Film Series. All films in the series are award-winning films, recognized for their artistic scope and social impact. All films are open and free to UND students, faculty and Grand Forks community members. Several departments on the UND campus offer the films shown in the Global Visions Film Series as extra credit opportunities for students, who must write reviews and critiques of the issues presented in each of the outstanding films shown each semester.

"Who Killed the Electric Car" will show Tuesday, Nov. 6, at 7 p.m. in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. A film review and synopsis follow.

New York Times
By MANOHLA DARGIS
A murder mystery, a call to arms and an effective inducement to rage, "Who Killed the Electric Car?" is the latest and one of the more successful additions to the growing ranks of issue-oriented documentaries. Like Al Gore's "Inconvenient Truth" and the better nonfiction inquiries into the war in Iraq, this information-packed history about the effort to introduce — and keep — electric vehicles on the road wasn't made to soothe your brow. For the film's director, Chris Paine, the evidence is too appalling and our air too dirty for palliatives.

Fast and furious, "Who Killed the Electric Car?" is, in brief, the sad tale of yet one more attempt by a heroic group of civic-minded souls to save the browning, warming planet. The story mostly unfolds during the 1990s, when a few automobile manufacturers, including General Motors, were prodded to pursue — only to sabotage covertly — a cleaner future. In 1990 the state's smog-busting California Air Resources Board adopted the Zero-Emission Vehicle mandate in a bid to force auto companies to produce exhaust-free vehicles. The idea was simple: we were choking to death on our own waste. The goals were seemingly modest: by 1998, 2 percent of all new cars sold in the biggest vehicle market in the country would be exhaust-free, making California's bumper-to-bumper lifestyle a touch less hellish.

It's a story Mr. Paine tells with bite. As Mr. Paine forcefully makes clear, the story of the electric car is greater than one zippy ride and the people who loved it. From the polar ice caps to Los Angeles, where many cars truly are to die for, it is a story as big as life, and just as urgent.

"Who Killed the Electric Car?" is rated PG (parental guidance suggested). Revelations of big-business and government collusion may provoke shock.
-- Marcia Mikulak, Assistant Professor, Anthropology, marcia.mikulak@und.nodak.edu, 777-4718

Psychology colloquium is Nov. 7

Verlin Hinsz from North Dakota State University will present "Team Performance in a Stimulated UAV Task Environment: A Combinations-of-Contributions Theory Analysis" at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 7, in 302 Corwin-Larimore Hall. The psychology colloquium is open to everyone.
-- Jeffrey Weatherly, chair, psychology, lauri_hanson@und.nodak.edu, 7-3451

Forensic pediatrician speaks on detection of physical/sexual abuse

Arne Graff, guest speaker to the UND Forensic Science Club, will describe some of his career experiences in a talk at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 7, in Medicine 1360. This talk is free and open to the public.
-- Phoebe Stubblefield, Assistant Professor/Director Forensic Science Program, Anthropology, phoebe.stubblefield@und.nodak.edu, 777-4870

Memorial Union Fall Leadership Series

Associate Dean of Students Cara Goodin and former student body treasurer Brandon Koeser will present "Ethics in Leadership" at 3 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 7, in the Badlands Room, second level, Memorial Union, as part of the Fall Leadership Series to be held Wednesdays through Nov. 28. The Fall Leadership Series is sponsored by the Memorial Union. Faculty, please announce this event to students. The series is free and open to the entire University community.

Next week Judy DeMers from the School of Medicine and Health Sciences will present "Leadership in the Public Sector."
-- Kaleigh Lindholm, Project Coordinator for Leadership Development, Memorial Union Center for Student Involvement & Leadership, leadership@und.edu, 777-3665

Christus Rex book study continues

The community of Christus Rex invites you to join us as we study and discuss the book, "Come Be My Light," by Mother Theresa at noon Wednesdays, Nov. 14, 21, 28, in the Christus Rex lounge. Books are available for a cost of $20 (also includes a copy of "Mother Theresa, In My Own Words" at the office of Christus Rex. Snacks, coffee and water will be provided. Brown bag lunches are encouraged. Please reply to christusrex@und.nodak.edu to reserve a book.

Women's Center Meet, Eat and Learn Nov. 7

The Women's Center Meet, Eat and Learn will gather from noon to 1 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 7, at the International Centre. They will focus on women in non-traditional roles in the workforce. Jeanne M. Dufner, retired Master Sergeant and a UND student, will share her experiences in the Air Force.

Come hear a female perspective on what it is like to work in a male-dominated field. Everyone is welcome, and lunch is provided.
-- Patty McIntyre, Program Associate, Womens Center, undwomenscenter@und.nodak.edu, 7-4302

Work Well: free cholesterol screenings

Free cholesterol screenings will be offered Wednesday, Nov. 7, in the LaVerendrye Room, Energy & Environmental Research Center, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Although it is not required, it is recommended that you fast for at least eight hours prior to the screening. You do not need to set up a time in advance. Plan for about 15-20 minutes.

And don't forget to visit www.workwell.und.edu to learn more about and register for the new Work Well program.
-- Amanda Eickhoff, Assistant Director for Work Well, Wellness Center, amandaeickhoff@mail.und.edu, 701.777.0210

Burnt Toast Demo Kitchen offers cardio, Thai classes

The Burnt Toast Demo Kitchen offers the following classes.

"College of Cardio: Kitchen Edition" from 6 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 7, at the Wellness Center. Cost is $5. Gain an extra edge and increase energy for your cardio workouts by incorporating the right foods in your diet at the right times. We will provide a quick lesson on carbs, fat, and protein, and how they can improve your workouts and health, demo the recipe for a post-workout meal, and offer ideas for how to stock the pantry for your high-energy lifestyle. Sign up at the Wellness Center welcome desk by Tuesday, Nov. 6.

"Thai Kitchen" from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 13, Wellness Center. Cost is $15. Come to learn and enjoy cooking and tasting Thai food. This class is designed to help you prepare authentic Thai meals for your family and friends. You will also learn what to ask for in Thai restaurants, the secrets of Thai cooking, and the philosophy of Thai food.

Due to ingredients coming from afar, participants need to register for this class by Tuesday, Nov. 6.

For more information please contact Leah Wagner at leahwagner@mail.und.nodak.edu
-- Leah Wagner, Coordinator of Burnt Toast, Wellness Center, leahwagner@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-0842

CSD public comment meeting is Nov. 8

The Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders will host a reaccreditation site visit by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). As part of the reaccreditation process, CSD is required to solicit public comments regarding the master's program in speech-language pathology. Individuals who wish to provide input about the program are invited to do so at a public comment meeting to be held from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 8, in 201 Montgomery Hall. All comments must relate to the program’s compliance with the Standards for Accreditation of Graduate Education Programs in Speech-Language Pathology. A copy of the Standards can be obtained from ASHA’s web site at http://asha.org/about/credentialling/accreditation.
-- John Madden, Chair, Communication Sciences and Disorders, john_madden@und.edu, 7-3728

Community Theatre brings Paris cabaret experience to life

Join the Community Theatre in a cabaret experience featuring "Jacques Brel is Alive and Well and Living in Paris," an American musical review composed of songs written by the famous traveling troubador Jacques Brel. The production runs Nov. 15-17 at 7:30 p.m. at the Empire Arts Center, downtown Grand Forks.

The show centers on various aspects of life -- love, marriage, death, war -- and is as poignant today as it was when it was written. A community theatre classic.

The production is directed by Job Christenson and features an all-star cast, including: Deborah Berger, the Community Theatre's Best Actress winner from 2007's "I Love You, You're Perfect, Now Change"; Dylan Croeker, Mari Behl, Daniel Dutot, Mare Thompson and Cory Diers.

General reserved seating: adult tickets are $18, students and seniors, $15. Enjoy the show from the seats of the Empire by reserving your tickets at the Chester Fritz Auditorium box office, 777-4090. Walk-up tickets will be available on a first-come, first-served basis, so reservations are recommended.

This show was last done by GGFCT 30 years ago. The production is sponsored, in part, by the Grand Forks Herald, the Level 10 Martini Bar, the UND Students in Free Enterprise, and the UND Nonprofit Leadership Student Association.
-- Benjamin Klipfel, Executive Director, GGF Community Theatre, ben@benklipfel.net, 701-321-2359

Ovarian cancer subject of Nov. 9 talk

Ovarian cancer will be the subject of the next Dean’s Hour address beginning at noon Friday, Nov. 9, at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences. The event is free and open to the public.

Catherine Casey, gynecologic oncologist at Minnesota Oncology Hematology in Edina, Minn., will present the talk, “Ovarian Cancer: What You Need to Know,” in the Keller Auditorium at the school’s Wold Center, 501 N. Columbia Road. Continuing medical education credit is available.

Casey plans to discuss the factors that increase a woman’s risk of developing ovarian cancer, as well as those factors that decrease her risk of developing the disease. She will describe symptoms associated with cancer of the ovary and the benefits and limitations of the CA-125 tumor marker. She will explain the difference that surgery by a gynecologic oncologist makes in the treatment and survival of ovarian cancer.

In 1982, Casey earned a Bachelor of Science degree, summa cum laude, from the University of Minnesota. She earned the Doctor of Medicine degree with honors from there in 1986, and completed residency training in obstetrics and gynecology in 1991 at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. She took fellowship training in gynecologic oncology at the University of California-Los Angeles Medical Center and Cedars-Sinai Medicine Center from 1992 to 1995.

She has presented widely on topics in her field and has received several awards for outstanding scholarship and teaching.

The presentation will be broadcast at the following UND Medical School video-conferencing sites: Southwest Campus conference Room B in Bismarck, Southeast Campus Room 225 in Fargo and Northwest Campus Office in Minot. It can also be viewed on the medical school’s Web page at: www.med.und.edu/webcasts/dean.html <http://www.med.und.edu/webcasts/dean.html> and through Internet video-conferencing on desktop computers through the Medical School’s CRISTAL Recorder (call 701-777-2329 for details).

The Dean’s Hour Lecture Series is a forum for the discussion of health care, medicine, research, education and related issues of the day. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean at 777-2312.
-- Shelley Pohlman, Asst. to the Director, Public Affairs, spohlman@medicine.nodak.edu, 701-777-4305

Karl Wirth presents next LEEPS lectures Nov. 9

Karl Wirth from Macalester College, St. Paul, Minn., is presenting the next LEEPS lectures Friday, Nov. 9. The Department of Geology and Geological Engineering Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary Science lecture program (LEEPS) brings nationally and internationally known scientists and others to UND to give talks on cutting edge science and engineering. Lectures cover a wide range of topics, including academic science, applied engineering, and environmental issues of current significance.

At noon Wirth will address “Extensive Regional Sedimentation Following Grenville Deformation: Evidence from the Midcontinent Region,” in 100 Leonard Hall. At 3 p.m. in 109 Leonard Hall, he will discuss “How Do We Know They Are Learning What We Want Them To? Assessing Our Classes and Our Curricula.”

For more information, contact Dexter Perkins at 777-2991.
-- Connie Larson, Administrative Secretary, Geology & Geological Engineering, connielarson@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2248

Doctoral examination set for Patty M. Vari

The final examination for Patty M. Vari, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in higher education, is set for 8 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 13, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is, "Community Breastfeeding Attitudes and Beliefs." Glenn Olsen (Teaching and Learning) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend. -- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School.

Doctoral examination set for Susan K. Plaine

The final examination for Susan K. Plaine, a candidate for the Ed.D. degree with a major in teaching and learning, is set for 1 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 13, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "The Advising Experiences of Students at a Midwestern University." Myrna Olson (Teaching and Learning) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, gailholweger@mail.und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Ronald E. Loggins

The final examination for Ronald E. Loggins, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in biology, is set for 11 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 14, in 141 Starcher Hall. The dissertation title is "Historic Origin, Range Expansion, and Habitat Suitability of Introduced Wild Pigs (Sus scrofa) in California." Rick Sweitzer (Biology) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Geography Department sponsors GIS Day speaker

Darryl A. Holman, a GIS specialist with the U.S. Forest Service at Chippewa National Forest in north central Minnesota, will present a talk, "Using GIS and GPS for Emergency Management," at noon Wednesday, Nov. 14, in Room 1, Gamble Hall. Holman will discuss his experiences using GIS and GPS as a firefighter, as part of an Incident Command Team, and with FEMA in support of Urban Search and Rescue Team efforts following the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. The talk will be held on GIS Day, an international event principally sponsored by the National Geographic Society, the Association of American Geographers, the University Consortium for Geographic Information Science, the U.S. Geological Survey, The Library of Congress, Sun Microsystems, Hewlett-Packard, and the Environmental Systems Research Institute. GIS Day is part of Geography Awareness Week, which is Nov. 11-17.
-- Brad Rundquist, Associate Professor, Geography, bradley_rundquist@und.nodak.edu, 7-4589

Web conference is Nov. 14

The Adult Re-Entry program /Student Success Center is hosting a Web conference about the unique challenges inherent in reaching nontraditional students from noon to 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 14, in the Badlands Room, Memorial Union. Bring your lunch and join us for a very interesting conversation.
-- Dean Dienslake, Coordinator, Adult Re-Entry, Student Success Center, deandienslake@mail.und.edu, 777-3228

Noon book group to hold first reading Nov. 14

The Healthy UND Spiritual Subcommittee would like to invite any interested student, staff member or faculty to join together to explore spirituality on our campus. As a first step, we have selected "Encouraging Authenticity and Spirituality in Higher Education" to read and discuss.

This groundbreaking book provides a comprehensive resource that addresses the growing movement for incorporating spirituality as an important aspect of the meaning and purpose of higher education. Written by Arthur W. Chickering, Jon C. Dalton, and Leisa Stamm, experts in the field of educational leadership and policy, "Encouraging Authenticity and Spirituality in Higher Education" shows how to encourage increased authenticity and spiritual growth among students and education professionals by offering alternative ways of knowing, being, and doing.

Each participant is encouraged to purchase a book. They can be ordered through Barnes & Noble or purchased online. The first meeting will be Wednesday, Nov. 14, from noon to 1 p.m. in the Leadership Conference Room, main floor, Memorial Union. An alternate meeting time may be determined based upon the wishes of the group. If you have any questions, you may contact Kay Williams at kay.williams@ARS.USDA.GOV We look forward to meeting you.
-- Kay Williams, Medical Laboratory Technician, Human Nutrition Research Center, kay.williams@ars.usda.gov, 701-795-8441

Theatre Arts presents "The Elephant Man"

The Department of Theatre Arts will host an after-performance talk-back discussion of "The Elephant Man" Wednesday, Nov. 14. John Martsolf from Pediatrics will moderate the discussion, along with Jim Williams from Theatre Arts, and will include input from the cast and designers of the production. "The Elephant Man," by Bruce Pomerance, opens at the Burtness Theatre Tuesday, Nov. 13, and runs through Saturday, Nov. 17.

"The Elephant Man" is a dramatized look at the life of John (Joseph) Merrick, a horribly disfigured man who became a celebrity in the late 19th Century while under the care of his benefactor, Dr. Frederick Treves. The play recounts the years from when Merrick is exhibited in freak shows to Dr. Treves’ rescue and care for the “elephant man” to Merrick’s early death. The central issue of the play, however, is not so much about Merrick’s disfigurement as it is about Treves’ motives in taking care of Merrick. Although Dr. Treves is a compassionate man to an extent, he views Merrick as a specimen to be studied and transformed into what English society considered to be “normal.” As "The Elephant Man" exemplifies, Merrick demonstrates he is more “normal” than the society around him. -- Theatre Arts.

UND, CPA Society sponsor tax institutes

The University of North Dakota and the North Dakota Society of Certified Public Accountants are co-sponsoring a tax institute to be held at two locations throughout the state:
* Nov. 14-15 at the Holiday Inn in Fargo;
* Nov. 28-29 at the Best Western Ramkota Hotel in Bismarck.

Both conferences will feature sessions on agricultural and business issues, individual taxpayer problems, investments, and Internal Revenue Service (IRS) matters.

Featured speakers will include:
* Neil E. Harl, distinguished professor in agriculture and emeritus professor of economics at Iowa State University, who will discuss tax issues relating to agricultural law as well as estate and business planning. Harl has published numerous books and articles in farm and financial publications, has been the recipient of more than 30 major awards, and has served on six advisory bodies throughout his career in finance.
* John Connors, experienced professor, accomplished tax consultant, and nationally known speaker, who will review individual taxpayer problems, investments, and IRS issues. Connors is well-versed in income and estate tax planning, as well as individual, partnership, and corporate tax return preparation and research.

Continuing education hours will be awarded to attendees and will vary from 14 to 16 hours, depending on the accrediting organization. UND will award 1.6 credits for attending both days or 0.8 hours for attending one day at either institute.

Early bird registration is $205 to attend both conference days and $125 to attend one day of sessions (includes conference materials, continuing education hours, and meals). The deadline for early registration is Nov. 13 for the Bismarck institute.

For a registration form, complete conference schedule and more information, visit www.conted.und.edu/ndtax or call the UND Office of Conferences Services at 701-777-2663 or 866-579-2663 (toll free) or e-mail conferences@mail.und.edu (ATTN: ND TAX).

-- Kathryn Schill, marketing coordinator, UND Division of Continuing Education, phone: 701-777-3396, fax: 701-777-0569, e-mail: kathrynschill@mail.und.edu

Doctoral examination set for Bonnie Higgins

The final examination for Bonnie Higgins, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in teaching and learning, is set for 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 15, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "Graduate and Employer Perceptions Regarding Job Preparedness Skills of Design Technology Graduates." Lynne Chalmers (Teaching and Learning) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for LoAnn Nelson

The final examination for LoAnn Nelson, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in teaching and learning, is set for 2 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 15, in Room 308, Education Building. The dissertation title is "Tribal College Culture-Based Education Impacts American Indian Students in North Dakota." John Delane Williams (Education Foundations) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Box Lunch session focuses on "Encouraging Ethical Behavior in Class"

The On Teaching Box Lunch discussion series continues Thursday, Nov. 15, with a session on "Encouraging Ethical Behavior in Class" from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in the Red River Valley Room, Memorial Union.

There are many ways that dishonest or unethical behavior can find its way into the classroom. Plagiarism is a very real concern for many faculty members. Cheating on exams and other assignments is also a problem teachers have to address. Deciding how to deal with students who have been dishonest can present a dilemma for faculty. Are there ways, though, that a teacher might be able to head off some instances of academic dishonesty? Are there methods for communicating with students to help them understand the importance of academic integrity? Can a teacher make a student feel more accountable for his or her academic actions?

In this lunch session, we’ll discuss ways faculty can talk to students about academic honesty and also possible methods for discouraging dishonest behavior in the classroom. Please bring any examples of ways you’ve found to help students understand the importance of academic honesty.

To register and reserve a free box lunch, call Jana Hollands at 777-4998 by noon Tuesday, Nov. 13. Please indicate if you require a vegetarian meal.
-- Anne Kelsch, Director, Office of Instructional Development, anne.kelsch@und.nodak.edu, 777-4233

Blue Cross Blue Shield presents "Beat the Bug" Nov. 15

It's the time of year when the flu seems to creep up on you. After you get your flu shot this year, take some time to learn a little more about how to prevent the flu and how to take care of yourself if you catch it. Blue Cross Blue Shield will present "Beat the Bug," Thursday, Nov. 15, at noon and 12:30 p.m. in Room 10/12, Swanson Hall. Everyone in attendance will receive a free flu safety kit.
-- Amanda Eickhoff, Assistant Director for Work Well, Wellness Center, amandaeickhoff@mail.und.edu, 701.777.0210

Wind Ensemble, Jazz Ensembles present combined concert Nov. 15

The Wind Ensemble and Jazz Ensembles will present a combined concert at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 15, at the Chester Fritz Auditorium. Tickets, available at the door, are $6 for adults, $3 for students and senior citizens, or $12 per family. The 1:00 Jazz Ensemble, directed by Robert Brooks, will open the concert with a program that includes such jazz classics as "Cottontail" and "In A Mellow Tone" by the great Duke Ellington, as well as Clifford Brown’s "Daahound, Clearwater" of Greg Yasinitsky, Rick Stitzel’s "Carnival Los Rios" and "Chicken Scratch." The UND Wind Ensemble, James Popejoy, conductor, will include in their program a performance of the monumental wind band classic, "Lincolnshire Posy" by Percy Grainger. They will also present new works by David Maslanka ("Mother Earth Fanfare") and Richard Saucedo ("Song of the Gandy Dancers"), as well as selections from the wonderful film score of John Williams for "The Cowboys." Under the direction of Ronnie Ingle, the 12:00 Jazz Ensemble will perform "Switch in Time" from the Count Basie book, Festival De Ritmo, Stan Kenton’s arrangement of "Send in the Clowns," "Up For Air" by Matt Harris, and Matt Catingub’s "Blues and the Abscessed Tooth." The Wind Ensemble and the 12:00 Jazz Ensemble will combine to perform "Rhapsody for Concert Band and Jazz Ensemble" by Pat Williams.

For additional information concerning this performance, please contact the UND Band Department at 777-2815. -- James Popejoy, director of bands, 777-2815.

Great American Smokeout - Dance Dance Revolution Party is Nov. 15

Everyone is welcome to join the fun at the Great American Smokeout - Dance Dance Revolution Party. Come to the Loading Dock in the Memorial Union Thursday, Nov. 15, from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and find helpful information on how to quit tobacco or how to support a friend or family member in quitting. You will have an opportunity to ask questions with a tobacco cessation counselor. While you are there, make sure you hop on a Dance Dance Revolution console and register to win your own DDR TV Pad. The party is sponsored by Student Health Services and the College of Nursing.
-- Jodi Ramberg, GSA, Student Health Promotion Office, jodi.ramberg@und.edu, 777-2097

Doctoral examination set for Christopher A. Knudson

The final examination for Christopher A. Knudson, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in anatomy and cell biology, is set for 1 p.m. Friday, Nov. 16, in Room B-710, Frank Low Conference Room, School of Medicine and Health Sciences. The dissertation title is "Characterization of Adrenergic Receptor Subtypes in the Rodent Hippocampus." Patrick Carr (Anatomy) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Physics lecture is Nov. 16

Berislav Momcilovic from the Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health in Zagreb, Croatia, will discuss "Idiorrhythmic Dose Rate Feeding of Non-Energetic Nutrients" Friday, Nov. 16, in 211 Witmer Hall.

The current dose-response experimental model was introduced into nutrition from the physical sciences. However, that model does not take into account that we are fed neither continuously nor that the diet is not always the same. Since we are taking our food as meals, and the content of such diet varies from meal to meal, the new idiorrhythmic experimental model offers the study of the dose-rate in nutrition. The physiological response to such idiorrhythmic dose-rate feeding with non-energetic nutrient (zinc) was different from when animals were fed a constant diet. Indeed, the efficiency of the absorption is not a constant, but depends upon the availability of a particular non-energetic nutrient like vitamins and trace elements. Moreover, idiorrhythmic dose rate feeding may act like a natural synchronizer to the cell activity of the body, and hence offers new possibilities in therapeutic pharmacology.
-- Connie Cicha, Secretary, Physics, connie_cicha@und.nodak.edu, 701-777-2911

Red River Women Studies Conference is Nov. 16

Get ready to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the UND Women Studies Program by attending the seventh annual Red River Valley Women Studies Conference. Fifty-two presenters from seven institutions, coming from as far away as Pennsylvania, will converge at the Memorial Union Friday, Nov. 16, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Undergraduates, graduate students, lecturers, faculty, and independent scholars will present papers on a wide variety of topics, including Native American Women in the 1800s, literature, leadership, and the Virgin Mary, as well as interviews with local women and the wisdom they have to share. Pop culture topics covered will be a springboard to discussion about such timely topics as communication styles at the local Starbucks, the body image of female bodybuilders, pro-natalism in Russia (citizens are being offered $10,000 to reproduce), as well as an examination of the cybersex shop.

The panel chair for the conference, Kathy Coudle-King, says, "This is not your typical conference -- it's a Women Studies conference. That in itself should tell you it is going to be exciting. There is much about women's lives which has not been given careful, academic analysis. Judging from the 30-plus students whose papers were accepted, it is clear to me that this generation of scholars believes that no topic is taboo and all are game for serious inquiry. Certainly, we welcome thought-filled reflection and academic analysis, but the whole world is a gendered world and there are all sorts of nooks and crannies of that world that these presenters will take us to."

The organizing committee, made up of students, faculty and staff, hope that people will register for the whole day -- it's free for students, but lunch is extra ($15 will get you a hot meal, including dessert). During the luncheon in the Red River Valley room, undergrads Heather and Rachel Bengs will perform "Judith & Janey," an original play written by Kathy Coudle-King and directed by Nichole Quam, graduate student in theatre arts. Another special feature of the conference will be the photography and art exhibit in the Red River Valley room, titled "Through Her Eyes," organized by Mary Jo Titus, and including her incredible photography and that of others.

You can find registration materials at http://www.und.edu/dept/women/rrwsconference07.htm . People can attend one panel or all four concurrent sessions. Lunch reservations and payment for the play are due Wednesday, Nov. 7, at the latest.

Contact 777-2787 or kathleen_king@und.nodak.edu for more info.
-- Kathy Coudle-King, Sr. Lecturer, English & Women Studies, kathleen_king@und.nodak.edu, 701-777-2787

UND Dance Marathon is Nov. 17

The mission of the University Dance Marathon is to build hope and inspiration for the children treated at MeritCare Children’s Hospital. The goal of this event is to involve the campus and community in a worthwhile cause while giving students an opportunity for leadership and development and raising money for the hospital.

The UND Dance Marathon will be Saturday, Nov. 17, from noon until midnight in the Memorial Union Ballroom. There will be music, including both a DJ and live performers and free food throughout the day. Most importantly, children that have benefited from the MeritCare Children’s Hospital will come with their families and share their stories with everyone attending the event.

To get involved, you must register for the event. Check our Web page through student organizations for registration materials. We ask that everyone who registers raise a minimum of $20 to receive a free T-shirt! You can get together in teams or register as an individual. Every cent that you donate goes straight to the MeritCare Children’s Hospital and is tax deductible.

MeritCare is the only non-profit children’s hospital in the state of North Dakota, and one of the leading children’s hospitals in the nation. Children and their families come to the hospital from all over the state of North Dakota as well as surrounding states. Many children from the Grand Forks area have been cared for by the MeritCare Children’s Hospital.

The Children's Miracle Network is a non-profit organization dedicated to saving and improving the lives of children by raising funds for children’s hospitals across North America. They are the national organization associated with MeritCare Children’s Hospital and UND Dance Marathon.

Faculty and staff: Come show your support and dance to give kids a chance!
-- Sally Pyle, Associate Professor, Honors Program, sally.pyle@und.nodak.edu, 777-3302

Doctoral examination set for Kristin Hillman

The final examination for Kristin Hillman, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in pharmacology, physiology and therapeutics, is set for 1 p.m. Monday, Nov. 19, in Room 3933, School of Medicine and Health Sciences. The dissertation title is "Adrenergic Modulation of CA1 Neuron Activity." James Porter (Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Women's Fund lecture is Nov. 19

The Women’s Fund Advisory Committee invites you to a lecture by Martha Potvin, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Her lecture is titled “Promoting Gender Equity in a University Setting.”

Please join us at 4:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 19, in the Idea Lab of the Ina Mae Rude Entrepreneur Center, Center for Innovation, to hear the lecture. A reception will follow to meet and visit with Dr. Potvin. The event is free, and all are welcome to attend.
-- SuAnne Frasier, Director, Womens Fund, Community Foundation of GF, EGF & Region, sfrasier@gofoundation.org, 746-0668

Astronomy talk is Nov. 20

The physics department will hold a public astronomy talk and telescope observing session at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 20, in 116 Witmer Hall. The talk, "Mars Rocks! Water! and the Quest for Life!", will be presented by Chris Milly Milford, NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador for North Dakota. Following the talk, attendees will be given the opportunity to observe the night sky through a telescope (weather permitting).
-- Wayne Barkhouse, Assistant Professor, Physics, wayne.barkhouse@und.nodak.edu, 777-3520

Doctoral examination set for Stuart Alan Schneider

The final examination for Stuart Alan Schneider, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in communication and public discourse, is set for 1 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 21, in 200 O'Kelly Hall. The dissertation title is "Communication and Pandemic Preparedness in Rural Critical Access Hospitals." Pamela Kalbfleisch (Communication) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

ExtravaBANDza is Nov. 27

This year’s annual UND ExtravaBANDza! will showcase the University Band, as well as the “Pride of the North” Marching Band, Tuesday, Nov. 27, at 7:30 p.m. at the Chester Fritz Auditorium. Tickets, available at the door, are $6 for adults, $3 for students and senior citizens, or $12 per family. The University Band, under the direction of James Popejoy with guest conductor Robert Brooks, will present an eclectic program of concert music, including such band classics as Aaron Copland’s "Fanfare for the Common Man" and the "Folk Song Suite" of Ralph Vaughan Williams. The “Pride of the North” Marching Band, directed by Robert Brooks and Tammy Mulske, will present a showcase concert of their fall season, including performances of the traditional school songs and cheers, as well as music from their field shows such as "Malaguena" and music by the rock group Chicago. The UND Color Guard and Drum Line units will also be featured during the event.

For additional information concerning this performance, please contact the UND Band Department at (701) 777-2815. -- James Popejoy, director of bands, 777-2815, james_popejoy@und.edu.

IRB meets Dec. 7

The next meeting of the IRB will be at 3 p.m. Friday, Dec. 7, in 305 Twamley Hall. All research proposals submitted to the Institutional Review Board before Tuesday, Nov. 20, will be reviewed.

Clinical medical projects must be reviewed by the Clinical Medical Subcommittee before being brought to the full board. Proposals for these projects are due in the office of the Institutional Review Board before Tuesday, Nov. 13.

Minutes from the meeting will be available in the IRB office approximately one week after the meeting.
-- Kristie Reynolds, Administrative Secretary, Institutional Review Board, kristinereynolds@mail.und.edu, 777-4279

Getting up to speed with Microsoft Office 2007

Office 2007 programs - Word, Excel, and PowerPoint - typically save files in a format that is not compatible with the older versions of Office; however, users can take steps to avoid problems when sharing files with others.

While you continue to use earlier versions of the Office suite, the following information will provide solutions for many compatibility issues with files created/saved in Office 2007 programs:

Microsoft Office 2007 information (includes Microsoft Office compatibility pack)
http://www.und.edu/dept/itss/train/office2007/Office2007.html

If you have any questions, please call the Help Desk at 777-2222.
-- Heidi Strande, Technical Trainer, ITSS, heidistrande@mail.und.edu, 701-777-3781

Outstanding faculty award nominations due Nov. 16

Who are the outstanding teachers at UND? You can help decide. The nomination process is an easy, one-page form you can fill out online at www.awards.und.edu. The form is also linked on the UND home page. The Outstanding Faculty Awards Committee is accepting nominations for the following individual and departmental awards:

* Outstanding undergraduate teaching (individual)
* Outstanding graduate/professional teaching (individual)
* Excellence in teaching, research/creative activity and service - the "Faculty Scholar Award" (individual)
* Outstanding faculty development and service (individual)
* Departmental excellence in teaching (department)
* Departmental excellence in service (department)

Please take time to reward excellence in teaching by nominating a faculty member or department. The best nominations address specific award criteria. The nomination forms and criteria are available at www.awards.und.edu. Nomination forms must be received by 4 p.m. Friday, Nov. 16.

Paper nomination forms are also available at various locations around campus. Criteria for all six awards are listed on the Web site and on the nomination forms. Additional information is available by calling Jana Hollands at 777-4998.
-- Anne Kelsch, Director, Office of Instructional Development, anne.kelsch@und.nodak.edu, 777-4233

Nominations sought for honorary degrees

Members of the University Council are invited to nominate outstanding individuals for an honorary degree. The deadline for submitting nominations is Friday, Nov. 30. Qualifications include, but are not limited to, the following State Board of Higher Education criteria (see SBHE, Policy 430.1):
1. The candidate should have had an association with the State of North Dakota. This association may be by virtue of birth, of residence, of education, of service to the state, the Board, or one of the institutions governed by the Board.
2. The candidate must have achieved a level of distinction which would merit comparable recognition in his or her profession or area of excellence.
3. The renown of the candidate should reflect favorably on the Board, the institutions it governs, and the State of North Dakota.

In order to avoid any embarrassment, no suggestion shall be made to any person to be so honored until the State Board of Higher Education has acted on the nomination.

Institutional criteria and standards for the awarding of honorary degrees at the University of North Dakota have been established by the University Senate. It is recommended that the following criteria be used in considering persons for an honorary degree:
1. Achievement of distinction in scholarship, or in comparable professional or creative achievement.
2. Recognized and outstanding service to the nation, to the state, or to the University of North Dakota.
3. Attendance at or graduation from the University of North Dakota, except as the individual is outstanding with reference to the preceding criteria 1 and 2.
4. Non-membership on the faculty of the University of North Dakota.
5. Scholarship specialization in an area in which the university normally grants an earned degree.

Procedures:
1. Nominations may be made by any member of the University Council.
2. Nominations must be accompanied by a factual dossier providing evidence that the nominee meets the criteria and standards established by the University Senate (Nos. 1-5 above). Factual compilation should include the following, in the order listed:
a. A brief biography
b. A list of scholarly writings, research and publications
c. Description of public service and achievements
d. List of offices and positions held
e. Other factual justifications for consideration
3. The nominee’s scholarship will be evaluated by the departmental faculty in the area of the nominee’s specialization, such evaluation to be a part of the dossier presented to the Honorary Degrees Committee.
4. A nominee will not be informed that he/she is being considered until the nomination has been approved at the SBHE level.
5. The titles of honorary degrees shall be distinct from those of earned degrees at UND.
6. No honorary bachelor’s or master’s degrees will be awarded.

On behalf of the Honorary Degrees Committee, nominations and all supporting materials may be sent to the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, Room 302, Twamley Hall. The dateline for submitting nominations is Friday, Nov. 30. - Greg Weisenstein, Provost, 10-03-07.

Public scholarship proposals due Dec. 14

Proposals are now being accepted from UND faculty for research and creative activity projects involving public or community partners in North Dakota. The UND Center for Community Engagement Public Scholarship Fund has been established with the support of the Office of the Vice President for Research. Public scholarship, also known as public policy research, action research, community-based research, participatory research, and public interest research, usually is concerned with addressing community needs by involving public members in research projects and by making research results broadly accessible. The Public Scholarship Committee encourages multidisciplinary projects, attention to the particular needs of North Dakota, and the involvement of students. A total of $20,000 is available for projects.

The application deadline is Dec. 14; award decisions will be made in January. Two types of projects are eligible for consideration: pre-research proposals from individual faculty members funded for up to $1,000 each and multidisciplinary proposals funded for up to $7,500. Application forms are downloadable from the Web site of the UND Center for Community Engagement: www.communityengagement.und.edu
-- Lana Rakow, Director, Center for Community Engagement, lanarakow@mail.und.edu, 777-2287

Books donated in honor of Elizabeth (Libby) Rankin

In honor of Elizabeth (Libby) Rankin, the President's Advisory Council on Women's Issues (PAC-W) has donated books about Middle Eastern women to the Chester Fritz Library. The books are currently on display by the the Main Reading Room, and they can be checked out from the library.
-- Janet Rex, Librarian, Chester Fritz Library, janetrex@mail.und.edu, 777-4641

Departing faculty required to follow transfer of equipment procedure

All departing faculty who wish to transfer equipment/supplies to their new institution of employment are required to follow the University’s “Equipment/Supplies – Transfer/Sale Procedure”.

The procedure is available on the Purchasing Web site: http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/purchase/html/Policies%20&%20Procedures.html#equipment


Contact our office with questions at 777-2681.

-- Scott Schreiner, Director of Purchasing, Purchasing, scottschreiner@mail.und.nodak.edu, 7-2681

Veterans Day is holiday

In accordance with State Board of Higher Education directives, Monday, Nov. 12, will be observed as Veterans Day by faculty and staff members of the University. Only those employees designated by their department heads will be required to work on this holiday. -- Greg Weisenstein, vice president for academic affairs and provost, and Diane Nelson, director, human resources.

Chester Fritz Library lists Veterans Day weekend hours

The Chester Fritz Library will observe the following hours of operation for the Veterans Day weekend: Saturday, Nov. 10, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 11, 1 to 5 p.m.; Monday, Nov. 12, 1 p.m. to midnight (observed Veterans Day).
-- Karen Cloud, Administrative Assistant, Chester Fritz Library, karencloud@mail.und.edu, 7-2618

UND Directory now available at bookstores, C-stores

The UND student/faculty/staff directory is now available at Barnes & Noble University Bookstore, Dakota Textbook Co., and Wilkerson, Walsh, and Memorial Union convenience stores. It is not, however, available at the Memorial Union Service Desk as stated in the posters and other advertising. The cost is the same as last year, $1.25.

Along with student, faculty, and staff information, the Directory puts department information at your fingertips. Department addresses, phone numbers, e-mails, Web sites, and employees are in one location, which makes information much easier to find. Students and employees are also listed alphabetically as they have been in the past.

This marks the second year that we have used PeopleSoft data feeds for both students and employees. In some cases, that data may not have been updated by the student or employee. Students who wish to update information may do so through the PeopleSoft portal. In the case of employees, at least one person in each office has HRMS privileges and can update most information.

If you have any comments or suggestions to improve next year's edition, please contact me.

-- Jan Orvik, Coordinator of Internal Communications, University Relations, janorvik@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3621.

Law library posts Veterans Day hours

On the Veterans Day holiday, Nov. 12, the Law Library will be open from noon to 11 p.m.
-- Jane Oakland, Circulation Manager, Law Library, oakland@law.und.edu, 7-3482

International Centre lists holiday hours

The International Centre's Veterans Day holiday hours will be noon to 10 p.m. Monday, Nov. 12.
-- Tatjyana Richards, Office Manager, Office of International Programs, tatjyanarichards@mail.und.edu, 777-6438

ITSS lists holiday hours

Information Technology Systems and Services will close for the Veterans Day holiday at midnight Sunday, Nov. 11, and will reopen at 5 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 13.

Employees may enroll in courses at low cost

For just $10.95 per credit hour, benefited employees may enroll in University classes. You may take up to three academic courses each calendar year, and may be granted work release time for one academic class per school session after receiving approval from your supervisor for release time during working hours. You can continue your education, earn a degree, or improve your skills. Staff members may work toward a degree; faculty may take courses for credit. Both faculty and staff members may audit courses. New employees may also take a course while on probation.

You can choose from hundreds of courses, ranging from management and sciences to languages and music, from exercise and ceramics to first aid and financial management. Here's how to enroll:

1. Pick up admissions materials, registration materials and a tuition waiver form at the Office of Admissions, 205 Twamley Hall (phone 777-3821) or at the Graduate School, 414 Twamley Hall (777-2784).

2. Choose the course you'd like to take. Prerequisites or other factors may affect registration.

3. Fill out the forms and have your supervisor/dean sign the tuition waiver forms. Return them to Admissions (undergraduates) or the Graduate School. Return the completed waiver forms to Admissions. The deadline for filing the waiver is Friday, Jan. 4.

4. Register according to instructions in the Time Schedule of Classes. Please be aware that, in addition to completing the tuition waiver form, you must log on to Campus Connection and register for the course.

If you are enrolling for the first time, you need to complete and return an Application for Admission form, available from the Admissions Office or Graduate School. There is a $35 matriculation fee for an employee who has not previously enrolled. You may need to file transcripts from schools that you previously attended. Please note that some courses have additional fees that cannot be waived.

Take advantage of your $1,000 benefit. -- Heidi Kippenhan, director of admissions, and Diane Nelson, director of human services.

Studio One features string band, remembering Jason Stadstad

See how one band is making music with unique instruments on the next edition of Studio One. The Too Old to Die Young String Band started making music three years ago. Amateur folk musician Dawn Yuhlenberg and two other members stay young through their lively folk music. This trio creates melodies with a variety of instruments as well as unconventional tools, including a jaw harp, penny whistle, and saw. Hear the band live on the next edition of Studio One.

Also on the show this week, one community remembers a frequent visitor to the town’s hockey rink. Jason Stadstad, who lost his life to cancer, grew up playing hockey in the small town of Manvel, N.D. Find out how residents are keeping Stadstad’s memory alive.

Studio One is an award-winning news and information program produced at the University of North Dakota Television Center. The program airs live on UND Channel 3 on Thursdays at 5 p.m. Re-broadcasts can be seen at 7 a.m., noon, 7 p.m. and 11 p.m. daily and on Saturdays at 10 a.m. Prairie Public Television airs Studio One on Saturday at 6 a.m. The program can also be seen by viewers in Fargo, Bismarck/Mandan and Minot, N.D.; Minneapolis, Minn.; Denver, Colo.; and Winnipeg, Manitoba.
-- Meghan Flaagan, Director of Marketing, Television Center, meghan.flaagan@und.edu, 777-3818

Mini-grants available for summer courses, programs

Are you planning an event at UND next summer but lack funding? Do you plan to develop a new summer course but need financial resources? Consider applying for a mini-grant through the Summer Programs and Events Council (SPEC).

SPEC’s Start-Up Mini-Grant Program will fund deserving proposals for:
1. The expansion of existing 2008 credit or non-credit summer courses/programs.
2. Or the redesign of existing 2008 credit or non-credit summer courses/programs.
3. Or the development of new 2008 credit or non-credit summer courses/programs.

Through the mini-grant program, the Council wants to create positive learning experiences for the citizens of the Red River Valley region and beyond by extending the resources of the University. The mini-grant funds will help cover the development, marketing and start-up costs for courses and programs held at UND during the summer months. Examples include camps for kids, academic classes that can be completed in the summer months, or any special event designed for the community. Quality, creativity and “out of the box” ideas are encouraged when developing new programs.

All interested UND faculty and staff are encouraged to submit proposals. Information can be found at www.summer.und.edu. The application deadline is 4:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 19. Recipients will be announced Dec. 19.

For more information on the mini-grant program, contact Diane Hadden, director of summer sessions (credit activities), 777-6284, dianehadden@mail.und.edu or Kerry Kerber, associate dean, Continuing Education (non-credit activities), 777-4264, kerrykerber@mail.und.edu. For operational questions, contact the Summer Events Office at 777-0841.
-- Jolene Marsh, Summer Events Program, Continuing Education, summerevents@mail.und.edu, 701-777-0841

2007 National Survey of Student Engagement now available online

Freshmen and seniors were invited to participate in the 2007 National Survey of Student Engagement during spring semester. The results of the survey are now posted at http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/datacol/reports/subFolder/NSSE2007/NSSE2007.htm. This survey, administered every two to three years, focuses on assessing student engagement of freshmen compared to seniors, in the areas of academic challenge, active and collaborative learning, student-faculty interaction, enriching educational experiences, and campus environment. This is a national survey with comparative data from other four-year colleges and universities. This is the fourth time that UND has conducted this survey.

A couple of noteworthy items from the survey are:
• Students reported an increase in the quality of academic advising. Freshmen reported Excellent/Good at 74 percent in 2007, up from 70 percent in 2005; seniors reported Excellent/Good at 69 percent in 2007, up from 65 percent in 2005.
• Students were asked if they exercise or participate in physical fitness activities. 66 percent freshmen reported they participate, compared to 59 percent freshmen at comparable national institutions; 62 percent seniors reported they participate in fitness activities, compared to 54 percent at comparable institutions.

UND students rated their relationships with students, faculty, and administrative personnel to be similar to responses made by doctoral-intensive peer institutions. UND students and doctoral-intensive students were equally satisfied (85 percent rated Excellent/Good) with their educational experience.

For questions about this survey, please contact Sue Erickson at 777-2265.
-- Carmen Williams, Director, Institutional Research, carmenwilliams@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-4358

Students urged to complete Student Health Satisfaction Survey

Student Health Services is seeking feedback from all students regarding their opinions on, or satisfaction with, services at Student Health. We are seeking feedback from all students, even those who have never visited Student Health before. We want to provide the best possible service for students that we can.

Please encourage your students to take the survey at www.undstudenthealth.com anytime before Friday, Nov. 30. It is a short five-minute survey and students will be eligible to win one of over 50 prizes, including movie tickets, gift certificates to the Union Food Court, Stomping Grounds, and even a one-hour massage. Thank you!
-- Theresa Magelky, Graduate Service Assistant, Student Health Promotion Office, theresa.magelky@und.edu, 701-527-3676

Help bring music back to Northwood

In light of the tornado disaster at Northwood and lack of insurance funds to rebuild the Northwood School’s music department, the University of North Dakota Staff Senate is spearheading a campaign to put music back into the school. The UND campus and the Grand Forks community are needed to make this project a success.

Contributions can be made in two ways:
1. Monetary donations
2. New or used instrument donations

The Staff Senate has set up giving trees in Twamley Hall, the Memorial Union, the Hughes Fine Arts Center, and Popplers Music Store. The trees will have gift tags with different giving options, from $2 to $10. Tags and donations should be made payable and sent to the University Federal Credit Union, Mail Stop 8222, Grand Forks, ND 58202.

New and used instruments may be brought to the UND Department of Music or to any UND Staff Senator.

On Dec. 7, all donated instruments and 100 percent of the monetary donations will be presented to the Northwood School. Your generous support will make this holiday season especially meaningful for all.

This project is sponsored by the UND Staff Senate with support from the UND President’s Office, University Senate, Student Senate, UND Department of Music, and Popplers Music. For more information contact any Staff Senator or Janice Hoffarth at 777-2646, Janice_hoffarth@und.nodak.edu.

Reduce the price of textbooks today

Spring textbook requests were due Oct. 5. We have only received 50 percent of our spring textbook requests. Help reduce the price of textbooks by submitting yours today.

Submit your adoptions online at www.und.bkstore.com - then select the Faculty Services Tab or call 777-2106.

Here's why:
* Having your course and book information by Dec. 1 allows us to pay students who choose to sell their books 50 percent of the book price at buyback.
* Recycle and reuse - the more books we buy at the end of this fall term, the more students save next term. Used books are 25 percent off the new book price.
* If you adopt the text alone, (instead of a textbook package or bundle), more students actually buy it. Recent studies conducted by Student Monitor indicate that 77 percent of students would choose to purchase the text alone if given the option.
* With early information, we can notify you of publisher stock situations, edition changes, and out-of-print titles.
* Any custom course pack material should be submitted as soon as possible, but no later than Dec. 1 to ensure enough time for copyright, production, and receiving.

Thank you for your contuined support. -- Michelle Abernathey, general manager, Barnes & Noble, 777-2103; Tina Monette, 777-2106; and Casey Johnson, 777-2748.

Facilities updates Web page

We've recently updated our Web page to make it more user-friendly to the departments on campus. The Facilities Charges reference numbers can be found by selecting the "Facilities Job Billing" button on the main menu of the Facilities web page; then by choosing the Facilities Charges Reference Numbers. A few other options related to the job billings are also available.

COSE offers clothing specials

The Council of State Employees (COSE) is having a fall blitz to give employees a chance to save on some clothing items. All items will have the state employee logo on them by the breast pocket. If you have any questions, please call me at 777-6057 or e-mail me at
leytonrodahl@mail.und.edu. You may also visit www.nd.gov/cose. -- Leyton Rodahl, UND facilities buyer.

Special Denim Day set for Mortar Board turkey basket drive

Every year UND's Mortar Board chapter provides all the fixings for a Thanksgiving dinner to families in the Greater Grand Forks community who are in need. Approximately 700 families will receive a basket, sized to fit their family. A special Denim Day will be held Friday, Nov. 16, to help support this community-wide project.

Red River Valley Community Action assists with registration, and Associated Potato Growers donates 4,000 pounds of potatoes. Businesses within the community generously donate money to help out, and other UND student organizations conduct food drives and raise funds on their own. Red River High School National Honor Society trick-or-treats for canned food for the project, and the UND ROTC building provides use of the building for the distribution of the turkey baskets. The Turkey Basket Drive would not be possible without the great support of UND and the Greater Grand Forks community.

So, wear your denim Friday, Nov. 16, wear your button, and pay your building coordinator what you feel you can afford.
-- Patsy Nies, Special Project Assistant, Enrollment Services, patsynies@mail.und.nodak.edu, 701-775-5066

State Fleet rate adjustment effective Nov. 1

The North Dakota State Fleet adjusted their rates effective Nov. 1. The motorpool rates listed below include the UND surcharge rate of .023/mile and .23/hour meter.

VEHICLE TYPE
Sedan - $0.293/mile
Minivan - seven-passenger - $0.413/mile
Van, 12 & 15 passenger - $0.573/mile
Compact 4x4 SUV - $0.493/mile
Suburban, five-passenger - $0.483/mile
Suburban, nine-passenger - $0.573/mile
Compact 4x4 Pickup - $0.483/mile
Cargo Van-Full Size - $0.573/mile
Mini Cargo Van - $0.483/mile
Handicapped Van-6 seats - $41.230/hour - one wheelchair
-- Mary L. Metcalf, Manager, Transportation, marymetcalf@mail.und.edu, 777-4123

Seeking volunteers for calcium retention study

The Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center is seeking healthy women who are under the age of 75 and have gone under menopause for at least three years.

The loss of bone that occurs with aging constitutes a major public health threat. Among dietary factors known to affect bone metabolism, high protein intake has been considered as a risk factor for osteoporosis because it may increase urinary acid and calcium excretion. You are invited to join this study to see if acid production, calcium retention, and bone metabolism are greater with a high-meat diet than with a low-meat diet.

Participants will live at home and eat breakfast at the Nutrition Center every weekday for 14 weeks. They will take lunch, dinner, and weekend meals home with them. They could earn up to $2,500 for this 16-week study. The study starts January 2008.

During the course of the study, they will eat meals provided by the Nutrition Center for 14 weeks (seven weeks of food high in meat protein, followed by one week of break, where they eat their own meals, and then followed by seven weeks of food low in meat protein).

For two days during each of the food periods (for a total of four days), they will consume radioactive calcium, which will allow us to measure calcium absorption from each diet. They will have your calcium absorption tested 20 times. There will be seven blood draws, urine collection, a three-day food diary, and questionnaires.

Participants must be non-smokers. They have gone under menopause for at least three years, have no chronic disorder, and not taking medications regularly. However, some stable conditions may be individually approved. The women must have no history of non-traumatic bone fractures, have an average body mass index, and be willing to eat only the food the Nutrition Center provides for 14 weeks. They must agree to not take vitamins/minerals/nutritional supplements, other than those provided by the Nutrition Center. They cannot donate blood or plasma, nor use a tanning bed during the study.

You can go online to apply to be in this study by going to http://ars.usda.gov/npa/gfhnrc
If you have questions, please call Dorothy Olson at (701) 795-8396 or (800) 562-4032.
-- Brenda Ling, Information Officer, USDA-ARS Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center, brenda.ling@ars.usda.gov, 795-8300

Work Well: know your numbers

It's that time again! Work Well is proud to introduce "Know Your Numbers!" This new program is exactly what you need to help you focus on those numbers in your life that really matter: your cholesterol, your blood pressure, and your body mass index. Know Your Numbers is simple to understand, and it's fun with lots of chances to win some great prizes! You get a free shirt, and who wouldn't want the chance to win $500 or even $1,000.

To get involved:
1. Call or e-mail Amanda Eickhoff and invite her to your department, your office, or your staff meeting sometime after Monday, Nov. 5. She will bring all of the information and materials that you and all of your coworkers need to get registered and participate. This really is the best way to get involved because you can get all of your questions answered right away.

2. If inviting Amanda to your department doesn't work out, you can always register online, beginning Nov. 5. Just go to www.workwell.und.edu to get all the details and register. All you will need to know is your Empl ID to get logged in. Once you get registered, your materials will either be sent to you via campus mail or hand delivered.

To Live Well is to WORK WELL, to Show a Good Activity - Saint Thomas Aquinas.
-- Amanda Eickhoff, Assistant Director for Work Well, Wellness Center, amandaeickhoff@mail.und.edu, 701.777.0210

Yoga classes begin

Yoga classes began at the Lotus Meditation Center Nov. 1. The seven-week session will continue through Dec. 20. The cost is $57 per session for one class per week, $84 for two classes per week, or $10 for a single drop-in class. Classes meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 5:30 to 6:45 p.m. For information, contact Dyan Rey at 772-8840 or e-mail dyanre@aol.com.
-- Dyan Rey, Lecturer, Visual Arts, dyanre@aol.com, 701 7728840

International Programs seeks volunteers for Thanksgiving dinner

Each year the Office of International Programs provides a traditional Thanksgiving dinner for our international students on Thanksgiving Day. We plan to serve about 200 students on this national holiday and seek volunteers to help serve the meal. All the food is prepared, and volunteers are needed to serve the meal. If you are interested in volunteering, please contact Shannon Jolly at 777-4118 by Friday, Nov. 9.
-- Shannon Jolly, International Student Advisor, International Programs, shannonjolly@mail.und.edu, 777-4118

Internal job openings listed

The following position vacancies are available only to regular UND staff employees who have successfully completed their six-month probation period, earn annual and sick leave, receive BC/BS health insurance and TIAA-CREF or ND PERS retirement benefits. Current UND faculty, please contact Human Resources for eligibility.

TO APPLY: Please complete UND Application/Control Card form. Send letter of application and resume, referencing position name and number, to: Human Resources, University of North Dakota, Twamley Hall, Room 313, 264 Centennial Drive Stop 8010, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8010. Applications MUST be received by the deadline date.

EXECUTIVE/PROFESSIONAL/ADMINISTRATIVE/ATHLETIC COACHES:

POSITION: Project Resource Analyst, Energy & Environmental Research Center, #08-132
DEADLINE: (I) 11/13/2007
SALARY: $29,000+/year

POSITION: Environmental Health and Safety Specialist, Safety and Environmental Health, #08-129
DEADLINE: (I) 11/08/2007
SALARY: $32,000+/year

POSITION: Outreach Coordinator - Bismarck, Continuing Education, #08-127
DEADLINE: (I) 11/07/2007
SALARY: $31,000+/year

POSITION: Associate Director, Intellectual Property Management & Technology Commercialization
DEADLINE: (I) 11/16/2007
SALARY: $140,000+

POSITION: Assistant Archivist, Chester Fritz Library, #08-104
DEADLINE: October 31 or until filled. (Applications received by October 31, 2007 will receive first consideration) Internal Applicants will be considered along with the external applicants.
SALARY: $37,000+/year

POSITION: Programmer (re-advertised, salary change) Aerospace Network) #08-087
DEADLINE: (I) 11/13/2007
SALARY: $32,000+/year

TECHNICAL/PARAPROFESSIONAL:

POSITION: Police Officer - Recruit (rotating schedule), UND Police, #-08-130
DEADLINE: (I) 11/09/2007
SALARY: $30,000+/year

OFFICE SUPPORT: No current vacancies.

CRAFTS/TRADES/SERVICE:

POSITION: Building Services Technician (Custodial, Monday - Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.), Facilities, #08-131
DEADLINE: (I) 11/09/2007
SALARY: $17,680+/year

POSITION: Heat Plant Operator (Shift Work), Facilities, 08-128
DEADLINE: (I) 11/07/2007
SALARY: $29,000+/year
-- Jan Orvik, Writer/Editor, University Relations, janorvik@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3621

Medical School receives grant funding

Jonathan Geiger, professor and chair of pharmacology, physiology and therapeutics at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences, has received funding from Johns Hopkins University Medical School and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for studies related to the dementia that afflicts patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

The studies, analyzing new methods and mechanisms that may be targeted to help treat HIV-dementia, will be conducted in collaboration with Norman Haughey, principal investigator on the two grants and assistant professor of neurology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Md.

The five-year grants, totaling $2,325,000, from the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and the National Institute of Mental Health will fund studies aimed at deepening scientists’ understanding of the mechanisms which lead to dementia in HIV/AIDS patients. Designated as RO1 grants, they are among the most highly ranked grants awarded by the NIH.

“Due to the increased effectiveness of treatments that have been developed for HIV, patients with this disease are living longer and the incidence of HIV-dementia has decreased,” said Geiger, a co-investigator on these grants.

“However, because people living with HIV/AIDS are living longer and are exposed to a number of other disorders and the ingestion of various drugs of abuse, including alcohol, the prevalence of HIV-dementia is increasing,” he said. “This underscores the importance of studying this form of dementia which is the most common form found in persons under 40 years of age.”

“It’s important to identify new therapeutic interventions designed to improve, or prevent further decline in, brain function because current treatments have had limited success,” he added.

“Our goal is to investigate underlying mechanisms in HIV-dementia and to identify effective interventions against the neurological complications experienced by HIV-infected individuals,” Geiger said.

“We are very pleased and proud of the success that Dr. Geiger and his colleagues have had in this area of brain research that is both important and timely and has earned a significant investment by the NIH,” said H. David Wilson, dean of the UND Medical School. “This is especially impressive, given the highly competitive atmosphere of the federal research funding environment.”

The NIH grant projects are titled “Dysfunctions of Sphingolipid and Sterol Metabolism in HIV-Dementia” and “Interaction of Alcohol with HIV Proteins.” -- School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

UND, NRI receive eating disorders grant

Researchers in the Department of Clinical Neuroscience at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences and the Neuropsychiatric Research Institute (NRI) in Fargo have received a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to advance the understanding of eating disorders among health professionals.

Stephen Wonderlich and James Mitchell, who each hold the title of Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor of Clinical Neuroscience at UND, have received $110,000 from the National Institute of Mental Health for a project aimed at furthering the scientific understanding of eating disorder diagnoses. Ross Crosby, clinical professor of clinical neuroscience at the Medical School and director of biomedical statistics and methodology at NRI, will also serve as a consulting statistician on the project.

With grant support, they plan to convene a series of meetings of a group of leading researchers in the field to clarify "the next generation of eating disorders diagnosis," Wonderlich said. The group will conduct scientific studies to improve the classification of symptoms and characteristics of eating disorders by professionals who treat these very serious mental health and medical disorders.

The group, which begins meeting in early 2008 at Washington, D.C., will invite other scientists to attend and present their research data on particular issues concerning eating disorders.

“Scientists and clinicians from around the world will be invited by our group to present information that will address important diagnostic questions,” Wonderlich said. “It provides us with an important and unique opportunity to better understand these disorders.”

Eating disorders, which are more prevalent in women than men, are very serious and sometimes fatal conditions. They include anorexia nervosa, characterized by self-starvation, intense fear of fat and gaining weight, and body image disturbances; and bulimia nervosa, marked by binge eating behaviors accompanied by self-induced vomiting, laxative abuse or excessive exercise. Patients who suffer from these disorders have high rates of other psychiatric problems such as major depression, anxiety disorders, substance use disorders and personality disorders, Wonderlich said.

Mitchell serves as president of the NRI and chairman of the Department of Clinical Neuroscience at the UND Medical School. Wonderlich is director of clinical research at NRI and associate chairman of the Department of Clinical Neuroscience at the UND Medical School. Together they serve as co-directors of MeritCare’s Eating Disorder Institute.

Both are internationally recognized as authorities in eating disorders research and treatment.

Vossler's book named one of top 12 North Dakota memoirs

Ronald Vossler's memoir, "Dakota Kraut: Or How I Learned to Love My Accent and Ancestry," has been named by Read North Dakota as one of the top dozen important memoirs/autobiographies of the past century in North Dakota. Other notable authors on that list include Larry Woidwode, Debra Marquart, and Eric Sevareid.

Organizations involved in the Read North Dakota Project selection of Vossler's book include the North Dakota Historical Society, the North Dakota Humanities Council, North Dakota Council on the Arts, Prairie Public Broadcasting, and the North Dakota Library Association.

In addition, Vossler, a senior lecturer in the English Department, has his most recent film, "We'll Meet Again in Heaven," one in a series of national and international award-winning films, currently airing on public television stations across the United States. Most recently it has appeared on San Mateo, Calif., public television, and Missoula, Mont., public television.
-- Ronald Vossler, Senior Lecturer, English, ronald_vossler@und.nodak.edu, 218-779-6835