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ISSUE: Volume 45, Number 11: October 31, 2007

Contents
Top Stories
President Kupchella issues statement on Vice President for Research search
State of the U is exceptional, says Kupchella
Presidential Search Committee gives October report
Events to Note
Technology Trends Forum: Social Networking is Oct. 31
Student Success Center open house is Oct. 31
Memorial Union Fall Leadership Series
Flu vaccination clinics offered
Work Well: free cholesterol screenings
Forensic Science Club hosts haunted lab
University Senate meets Nov 1; agenda listed
Enron investigative reporter speaks Nov. 1
Sexual Health Carnival is Nov. 1 at Memorial Union
Burnt Toast Demo Kitchen hosts Happy 'n Healthy Hunting class
Enrollment Services fall open house is Saturday, Nov. 3
RRVWP hosts workshop on reaching boy readers and writers
"Fierce Grace" will be shown Nov. 4
Indian Studies Association lists film festival dates
Ethiopian dinner served Nov. 6 by Friends of Ethiopia Reads
Burnt Toast Demo Kitchen offers cardio, Thai classes
Women's Center Meet, Eat and Learn Nov. 7
SIFE to host regional financial competition Nov. 8-10
Doctoral examination set for Susan K. Plaine
Geography Department sponsors GIS Day speaker
Noon book group to hold first reading Nov. 14
Box Lunch session focuses on "Encouraging Ethical Behavior in Class"
Red River Women Studies Conference is Nov. 16
Announcements
Nominations, applications invited for faculty research award
Klosterman family expresses gratitude and establishes aviation scholarship
Nominations invited for departmental research award
Information provided on assessment
Next year will be a transitional year for general education
Cross-list women studies courses
Books donated in honor of Elizabeth (Libby) Rankin
Studio One features classroom clickers, ADHD
Sign up to participate in International Education Week Quiz Bowl
Sign & Design Studio will be closed Nov. 2-3
International Programs newsletter available online
State Fleet rate adjustment effective Nov. 1
Yoga classes begin
Please donated to Operation Christmas Child
Have your students bought all required texts?
Work Well: know your numbers
International Programs seeks volunteers for Thanksgiving dinner
Girls Scout troop seeks Yoplait lids
Internal job openings listed
In the News
Medical School receives grant funding
UND, NRI receive $110,000 grant for eating disorders study
Vossler's book named one of top 12 North Dakota memoirs
Flight Training Center in North Carolina opens new hangar
Campus, community engagement awards announced
President Kupchella issues statement on Vice President for Research search

Because the search for a Vice President for Research failed to produce a consensus of acceptable candidates, the search committee, chaired by Dr. H David Wilson, Vice President for Health Affairs and Dean of the UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences, recommended that the search be discontinued this year and reactivated in the fall of 2008. In the meantime, Dr. Gary Johnson continues to do a fine job serving as Interim Vice President for Research. -- President Charles Kupchella.

State of the U is exceptional, says Kupchella

The state of the University is exceptional, said President Kupchella in his annual address to the University Council Oct. 23.

With record research support of more than $100 million and great new facilities, UND serves 25,000 students each year. Around 15,000 are seeking degrees, and summer enrollment has increased nearly 4 percent. UND is one of 47 public universities with both law and medical schools, he said, and the law school, with more than 700 applications, is one of just 20 in the nation with increasing enrollment.

The economic impact of UND exceeds $1 billion, and three publications, Washington Monthly, US News & World Report, and Princeton Review have ranked UND nationally. The medical school is ranked fifth in the nation for rural medicine, and Entrepreneur Magazine and Princeton Review named UND’s entrepreneurship program in the top 10. The Energy and Environmental Research Center has approached $40 million in contracts, Kupchella said. And UND athletic teams played in seven national title games.

The University will celebrate its 125th anniversary in 2008, Kupchella said, and mentioned events that will mark the quasquicentennial, including talks by noted authors Salman Rushdie and Stephen Bloom.

He emphasized the rich cultural tapestry of the University, which has faculty and students from 60 nations, and discussed his recent trip to the Kyrgyz Republic to establish an exchange program with the University of Osh there.

UND is an innovative, creative, and entrepreneurial university, Kupchella said, and that has served as a guiding spirit since its founding. UND Aerospace, he reminded the audience, began with two airplanes and a dream.

Philanthropy has made a big difference at UND, Kupchella said, citing donors such as Chester Fritz and the Hopper-Danleys, who made possible the recent refurbishment of the Adelphi Fountain, along with the Memorial Chapel and celebration wall.

The University is currently in the “silent phase” of a major campaign to increase our endowment to $500 million. The campaign is necessary to help support faculty, students, facilities, and our signature programs, Kupchella said. Harvard’s endowment, he noted, is $35 billion, and they distributed $1 billion back to the university last year.

UND is at a crossroad, Kupchella said. We can’t rest on our accomplishments, and we must look toward the future. Higher education is an investment, and we must be proactive as we carve out a place in the higher ed landscape. Our goal, he said, is to be in the top 50 universities in the nation. We’re already in the top 100.

Getting there will require additional resources from both the state and private funding. State funding must increase so we can offer better salaries, cover operating costs, and continue to work on economic development. Private funding will help with endowed chairs, scholarships, to increase the performing arts, add a clinical center, and add a program in aerospace engineering, along with transitioning to Division I.

We can, should, and will do these things, Kupchella said, but we need resources. And we need to more aggressively market the University.

The state’s higher education institutions have added a net total of 231 new academic programs since 1988, Kupchella said, adding 307 programs and dropping 76. UND deleted 31 of those programs, and other campuses are increasing their program numbers. There is a lot of unnecessary duplication across the state, Kupchella said. It’s a matter of remodeling and looking to the future.

“We need to skate to where the puck is going to be, not where it was a couple of years ago,” he said. He would like to add an Earth System and Environmental Science unit to take advantage of EERC and engineering resources, noting that it’s a program in demand.

“We’re working for the resources to make the future happen,” Kupchella said. “The possibilities are enormous, and limited only by resources.”

(Editor’s Note: President Kupchella recognized a large number of students, faculty, staff and units for their achievements. They will all be listed in a printed piece which will be distributed to the University community.)
-- Jan Orvik, Writer/Editor, University Relations, janorvik@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3621

Presidential Search Committee gives October report

The Presidential Search Committee met Oct. 23 to screen the applications received as of that date. The Committee reviewed 38 applicants and selected 16 to take to the next stage, which will be reference checking for these applicants. The names and affiliations of those 16 people appear at the end of this report.

The next meeting of the committee will be Monday, Nov. 5. The agenda for that meeting includes three items: (1) review any applications received since the Oct. 23 meeting; (2) report on the reference checks; and (3) select candidates to advance to the stage of screening interviews with the committee. We anticipate inviting 8-10 candidates to the screening interviews, to be held at an airport hotel in Minneapolis on the Tuesday and Wednesday after Thanksgiving.

At this time, the committee’s checking will be limited to calling references named by the applicants and to using search engines to explore information posted on the web. For the applicants who are advanced to the next stage on Nov. 5, the committee will expand its inquiry to include sources not listed by the applicants as references.

Following the November screening interviews, the committee will select the candidates to invite for on-campus interviews in January, with each of those candidates visiting campus for two full days of interview activities. The committee will meet for the last time on Jan. 28, to determine which candidates to recommend to the State Board of Higher Education. The Board will then convene in Grand Forks on Feb. 4 and 5 to conduct its interviews with the finalists and select the next President.

We appreciate the continued interest in the search process, and look forward to presenting the campus and the wider community with a strong slate of candidates as we go forward in the search.

Paul A. LeBel, dean, UND School of Law
Chair, UND Presidential Search Committee

Applicants selected for reference checking:
* Brown, Ronald, Dean, College of Health Professions, Temple University
* Caputo, David, President Emeritus and Professor, Pace University
* Elbert, Dennis, Dean, College of Business and Public Administration, University of North Dakota
* Isenhour, Thomas, Provost, Old Dominion University
* Johnson, Phyllis, Beltsville Area Director, USDA Agricultural Research Services
* Kelley, Robert, Dean, College of Health Sciences, University of Wyoming
* Keon, Thomas, Dean, College of Business Administration, University of Central Florida
* Long, Kathleen, Dean, College of Nursing, University of Florida
* Myerson, Allen, Provost and Senior Vice President, Illinois Institute of Technology
* Olson, Gary, Dean, College of Arts and Sciences, Illinois State University
* Roth, Don, Dean, Graduate School, University of Wyoming
* Scarborough, Scott Former Executive Vice President, DePaul University
* Smith, Bruce, Dean, School of Aerospace Sciences, University of North Dakota
* Staben, Charles, Associate Vice President for Research, University of Kentucky
* Weisenstein, Greg, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, University of North Dakota
* Wray, Warren, Kent Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, University of Missouri - Rolla
-- Jan Orvik, Writer/Editor, University Relations, janorvik@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3621

Technology Trends Forum: Social Networking is Oct. 31

On Wednesday, Oct. 31, the Center for Instructional and Learning Technologies/ITSS will host a Technology Trends Forum. John Osborne, marketing director of Meridian Environmental Technology, and Lori Swinney, Chad Bushy and Elizabeth Becker from CILT/ITSS will present information on MySpace, Facebook and Blackboard Expo.

This forum will cover:
* What are social networking sites?
* How are students using social networking sites?
* How can social networking sites be utilized in higher education?
* What is Blackboard Expo?

The event will be held from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 31, in the River Valley Room, Memorial Union. This forum is open to faculty, staff and students. To register, please call Diane Lundeen at 777-2129 or send an e-mail to dianelundeen@mail.und.edu.
-- Diane Lundeen, Adminstrative Assistant/Workshop Coordinator, Center for Instructional & Learning Technologies/ITSS, dianelundeen@mail.und.edu, 701-777-2129

Student Success Center open house is Oct. 31

Please join us from 10 a.m. to noon Wednesday, Oct. 31, for tricks or treats, and help us celebrate the recent reorganization of three units, Student Academic Services, University Learning Center, and the Adult Re-entry Center, into one, now known as the Student Success Center. We are located on the second floor of the Memorial Union, Room 201.
-- Lisa Burger, Director, Student Success Center, lisaburger@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2117

Memorial Union Fall Leadership Series

Gordon Henry will present "The Art of Caring Leadership" at 3 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 31, in the Badlands Room, second level, Memorial Union, as part of the Leadership Series held Wednesdays through Nov. 28. The series is sponsored by the Memorial Union. Faculty, please announce this to your students. The series is free and open to the entire University community.

Next week Cara Goodin and former student body treasurer Brandon Koeser will speak on "Ethics in Leadership."
-- Kaleigh Lindholm, Project Coordinator for Leadership Development, Memorial Union Center for Student Involvement & Leadership, leadership@und.edu, 777-3665

Flu vaccination clinics offered

Take advantage of convenient, on-campus flu vaccination clinics for UND students, faculty, and staff.
* Wednesday, Oct. 31, 9 to 11:30 a.m., Room 5006, School of Medicine, and 1 to 3 p.m. in 404 Twamley Hall.
* Tuesday, Nov. 6, 9:30 a.m. to noon, 251A Odegaard Hall.
* Wednesday, Nov. 7, 9 to 11:30 a.m., Wellness Center Assessment Room
and 4:30 to 7 p.m., University Place Main Lobby.
* Thursday, Nov. 8, 6:30 to 9 a.m., Oak Room, Facilities, and 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., LaVerendrye Room, Energy & Environmental Research Center.

Who should get vaccinated? Everyone, especially those at high risk for complications from the flu, their caregivers, and those who live with them. The cost is $20. No insurance will be filed. Pay by check, cash or students may charge to their UND account. Flu shots and mist available at all locations.

Please remember to wear short sleeves. The clinic is sponsored by Student Health Services. For more information call 777-4500.
-- Jane Croeker, Health Promotion Advisor, Student Health Services, jane.croeker@und.edu, 701-777-2097

Work Well: free cholesterol screenings

Free cholesterol screenings will be offered Wednesday, Oct. 31, in 303 Twamley Hall. Times will be 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Although it is not required, it is recommended that you fast for at least eight hours prior to the screening. You do not need to set up a time in advance. Plan for about 15-20 minutes.
-- Amanda Eickhoff, Assistant Director for Work Well, Wellness Center, amandaeickhoff@mail.und.edu, 701.777.0210

Forensic Science Club hosts haunted lab

The Forensic Science Club Haunted Maze has become the Haunted Lab. Experience the chills of fourth floor O'Kelly Hall decorated with the fervor of budding forensic scientists. A children's area is available for the tender of heart; otherwise be prepared for a creepy experience. Open Halloween Wednesday, Oct. 31, from 2 to 7 p.m. Take the elevator up to the fourth floor and turn right. Price is $3.
-- Phoebe Stubblefield, Assistant Prof/Director Forensic Science Program, Anthropology, phoebe.stubblefield@und.nodak.edu, 7-4870

University Senate meets Nov 1; agenda listed

The University Senate will meet Thursday, Nov. 1, at 4:05 p.m. in Room 7, Gamble Hall.

AGENDA
1) Announcements:
a. Tobacco cessation.
b. NDUS common drop/add dates, Suzanne Anderson.
2) Minutes of the previous meeting and business arising from the minutes.
3) Question period.

CONSENT CALENDAR:
4) Annual report of the Senate Student Policy Committee, Matthew Bookout, chair.
5) Annual report of the Senate Honorary Degrees Committee, Fred Remer, past chair.

BUSINESS CALENDAR:
6) Curriculum Committee report, Matthew Cavalli, chair.
7) Proposal to change the description for the Senate Conflict of Interest/Scientific Misconduct Committee, Jon Jackson.
8) Resolution on athletic and academic funding, Dexter Perkins.
-- Lori Hofland, Administrative Assistant, Registrars Office, lorihofland@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3892

Enron investigative reporter speaks Nov. 1

UND students and the local business community can hear, first-hand, from the reporter who investigated the Enron company's unethical behavior. Bethany McLean, a senior writer at Fortune magazine and co-author of the book titled, "The Smartest Guys in the Room: The Amazing Rise and Scandalous Fall of Enron," is the keynote speaker for the third annual Olafson Ethics Symposium, hosted by the College of Business and Public Administration.

The symposium will be held Thursday, Nov. 1, beginning at 4 p.m. in the Memorial Union's Fred Orth Lecture Bowl with a viewing of the documentary film, "Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room." Following the film, at 5:45 p.m., there will be a pizza social and round table discussion in the Memorial Union Ballroom. At 7 p.m. McLean will discuss her investigation of Enron and the ethics related to this company and businesses in general. The event is free and open to all UND students and the Greater Grand Forks community.

McLean graduated from Williams College in 1992 with a double major in mathematics and English. She began her career in the investment banking division of Goldman Sachs, where she worked from 1992 to 1995, spending two years in the Mergers and Acquisitions Department and one year in Real Estate Principal Investing. In 1995, McLean joined Fortune magazine as a reporter, and soon began writing pieces on everything from 401(k) plans to the latest innovations in biotechnology. She covers a wide variety of topics, with recent stories ranging from Barry Diller and his controversial company InterActiveCorp to the strange world of the Masters of Wine.

In early 2001, she wrote a skeptical story about Enron, which was then a high-flying company with a stock price of around $80 a share. Her story asked the simple question, "How does Enron make money?" and is widely viewed as the first questioning story about the company to run in a national publication. Along with another senior writer at Fortune magazine named Peter Elkind, she began to work on a book, and in the fall of 2003, Penguin published "The Smartest Guys in the Room: The Amazing Rise and Scandalous Fall of Enron."

The purpose of the Olafson Ethics Symposium is to provide a platform for students, and the business community, to explore the importance of ethical behavior in the workplace. This event is named in honor of Robert Olafson, who is a 1971 graduate of the University of North Dakota, earning a degree in mathematics. He lives in St. Paul, Minn., where he serves as vice president at Minnesota Life Insurance Company. Olafson is a native of Edinburg, N.D., and established a gift in 2005 to support ethics education and awareness in the College of Business and Public Administration.

This is the third year of Olafson Ethics Symposium and the College of Business and Public Administration is grateful to Mr. Olafson for his generosity and support of UND students and this event. Additional support for this event was made possible by Jane Fercho Ludlow.
For more information regarding the Olafson Ethics Symposium, please contact CK Braun-Schultz at 777-6937 or via e-mail at: ck.schultz@mail.business.und.edu.

Sexual Health Carnival is Nov. 1 at Memorial Union

A Sexual Health Carnival will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 1, in the Memorial Union Loading Dock. Prizes, games, snacks, and activities promoting sexual health and responsibility will be offered.

Information and games include:
· Sexual health
· Condom use and other contraceptive options
· Abstinence and safer sex options
· Healthy relationships, fun dating ideas
· HPV and Gardasil vaccine
· Sex and alcohol
· STD/SDI prevention and testing

Register to win a camping tent and other camping-related gear and prizes, bath and body products, and other romantic goodies.

Please join us and help spread the word to students. Sponsored by the College of Nursing and the Student Health Promotion Office. For more information call 777-2097.
-- Jaryn Allen, Health Promotion GSA, Student Health Services/Health Promotion Office, jaryn.allen@und.edu, 777-2097

Burnt Toast Demo Kitchen hosts Happy 'n Healthy Hunting class

The Happy 'n Healthy Hunting class is from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 2, at the Wellness Center Burnt Toast Demo Kitchen.

Guys, do you get sick of preparing game the same way every time? Looking for new tricks of the trade? Come to our Healthy Hunting class and you will learn creative, tasty ways to prepare game. Not only will you get to taste a sample, but you will leave with different recipes for different kinds of game, and a great snack for while you're in the stand.

Class cost is $10. Sign up for class at the Wellness Center welcome desk by Oct. 31.
-- Leah Wagner, Coordinator of Burnt Toast, Wellness Center, leahwagner@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-0842

Enrollment Services fall open house is Saturday, Nov. 3

On Saturday, Nov. 3, the Office of Enrollment Services will host an open house for prospective UND students. Departments have been invited to participate and we're anticipating a good group of incoming students and their families. We appreciate the involvement of all those who partner with us in these events. Check-in begins for families and students at 9 a.m. in the Memorial Union and all events conclude at 1:30 p.m. If you have any questions about this event, please contact Jen Provolt at jenniferprovolt@mail.und.edu or 777.4463.
-- Kenton Pauls, Director, Enrollment Services, kentonpauls@mail.und.edu, 777.4463

RRVWP hosts workshop on reaching boy readers and writers

The Red River Valley Writing Project will host "Reaching Boy Readers and Writers (K-12)" from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3, in Merrifield Hall. Featured speaker will be Marcus Weaver-Hightower, a specialist in gender, literacy, and education. Dr. Weaver-Hightower is co-editor of "The Problem with Boys: Beyond the Backlash in Boys' Education" (forthcoming) and is an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Foundations and Research at UND. Grand Forks teacher Becky Trapnell will present examples of differentiated instruction in the afternoon session.

Registration is $45 for RRVWP TCs and $70 for all other educators and paraprofessionals. Registration includes breakfast, lunch, and a copy of the book, "Boy Writers: Reclaiming Their Voices" by Ralph Fletcher. You can find additional information, including the schedule and registration form, at www.rrvwp.und.edu or www.english.und.edu/RRVWPworkshop.html. E-mail questions to Marci Glessner at marci.glessner@und.edu or call (701) 780-0996.

The RRVWP is a site of the National Writing Project.
-- Jessica Zerr, Assistant, Red River Valley Writing Project, English, jessica.zerr@und.edu, 777-4162

"Fierce Grace" will be shown Nov. 4

Lotus Meditation Center, 2908 University Ave., will host a documentary film, "Fiece Grace," at 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 4.

The film is about Ram Dass' spiritual journey and recent stroke. Newsweek magazine named "Fierce Grace" one of the top five nonfiction films of 2002. The film is about 90 minutes in length and there will be an optional discussion afterward. Tea and refreshments will be served. The film is free of charge and open to all. Call 787-8839 for more information.
-- Lora Sloan, Showing of Fierce Grace, Lotus Meditation Center, lorasloan@gra.midco.net, 701-787-8839

Indian Studies Association lists film festival dates

Here are the film dates and titles of the Indian Studies Association Film Festival:
* Monday, Nov. 5 - Thunderheart
* Wednesday, Nov.7 - When Your Hands Are Tied
* Tuesday, Nov. 13 - The Canary Effect
* Monday, Nov. 19 - Edge of America
* Tuesday, Nov.27 - Christmas in the Clouds
* Wednesday, Nov.28 - A Thief of Time
* Thursday, Nov. 29 - Coyote Waits
All films are shown in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl from 7 to 9 p.m. Discussion will follow all films. Please ask faculty and staff to invite their students to attend these wonderful films. -- Indian Studies.

Ethiopian dinner served Nov. 6 by Friends of Ethiopia Reads

Ethiopia Reads works to improve literacy in Ethiopia in order to bring hope, vision and educational skills to this generation of Ethiopian children. The Friends of Ethiopia Reads will serve an authentic Ethiopian meal at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 6, in the Fellowship Hall at Calvary Lutheran Church, 1405 S. 9th St. Yohannes Gebregeorgis will share his dream of bringing books and reading to Ethiopia's children, and how he enlisted the support of former Grand Forks resident Jane Kurtz. A limited number of tickets ($30) will be sold for this event. Call me at 777-6393 for ticket information or e-mail at dawnbotsford@mail.und.nodak.edu if you are interested in attending.
-- Dawn Botsford, Events Coordinator, Office of Ceremonies and Special Events, dawnbotsford@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-6393

Burnt Toast Demo Kitchen offers cardio, Thai classes

The Burnt Toast Demo Kitchen offers the following classes.

"College of Cardio: Kitchen Edition" from 6 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 7, at the Wellness Center. Cost is $5. Gain an extra edge and increase energy for your cardio workouts by incorporating the right foods in your diet at the right times. We will provide a quick lesson on carbs, fat, and protein, and how they can improve your workouts and health, demo the recipe for a post-workout meal, and offer ideas for how to stock the pantry for your high-energy lifestyle. Sign up at the Wellness Center welcome desk by Tuesday, Nov. 6.

"Thai Kitchen" from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 13, Wellness Center. Cost is $15. Come to learn and enjoy cooking and tasting Thai food. This class is designed to help you prepare authentic Thai meals for your family and friends. You will also learn what to ask for in Thai restaurants, the secrets of Thai cooking, and the philosophy of Thai food.

Due to ingredients coming from afar, participants need to register for this class by Tuesday, Nov. 6.

For more information please contact Leah Wagner at leahwagner@mail.und.nodak.edu
-- Leah Wagner, Coordinator of Burnt Toast, Wellness Center, leahwagner@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-0842

Women's Center Meet, Eat and Learn Nov. 7

The Women's Center Meet, Eat and Learn will gather from noon to 1 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 7, at the International Centre. They will focus on women in non-traditional roles in the workforce. Jeanne M. Dufner, retired Master Sergeant and a UND student, will share her experiences in the Air Force.

Come hear a female perspective on what it is like to work in a male-dominated field. Everyone is welcome, and lunch is provided.
-- Patty McIntyre, Program Associate, Womens Center, undwomenscenter@und.nodak.edu, 7-4302

SIFE to host regional financial competition Nov. 8-10

The Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE) organization at UND has been chosen by a national committee to host “Duel in the Valley,” a regional, personal financial case study competition. The UND SIFE group is one of only eight schools chosen to host this competition, and the only university chosen within the Midwest. The competition will take place Nov. 8-10, with events being held on the UND campus at the Hilton Garden Inn, the Center for Innovation, and Gamble Hall. The final competition and awards ceremony will be Saturday morning, Nov. 10, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Center for Innovation.

At the Duel in the Valley event, teams are given a hypothetical case study about a family in financial distress. In 36 hours competitors must research the situation and design a reasonable, workable and creative solution to the dilemma, based on the family’s situation, economics, geography and resources. Each team presents their results to a panel of Grand Forks financial professionals, who decide which team has best resolved the family’s finances.

The purpose of the Duel in the Valley program is to develop and increase financial literacy among college students. With credit card debt at a monstrous $2 trillion and escalating bankruptcies, students are able to enhance their awareness of money management through case study analysis. The UND SIFE team and this year’s Duel in the Valley winning team will advance to a national competition in Tucson, March 6-9, which is hosted by the University of Arizona Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE) and sponsored by Take Charge America, a non-profit national credit counseling company based in Phoenix.

The competition will be held on the University campus Thursday, Nov. 8, 6:30 to 8 p.m., Nov. 9, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Nov. 10, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Representatives from six universities are scheduled to compete, which include St. Cloud State University, University of Minnesota Crookston, North Central University, Dakota State University, Southwest State University, and University of Mary.

Doctoral examination set for Susan K. Plaine

The final examination for Susan K. Plaine, a candidate for the Ed.D. degree with a major in teaching and learning, is set for 1 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 13, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "The Advising Experiences of Students at a Midwestern University." Myrna Olson (Teaching and Learning) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, gailholweger@mail.und.edu, 777-4005

Geography Department sponsors GIS Day speaker

Darryl A. Holman, a GIS specialist with the U.S. Forest Service at Chippewa National Forest in north central Minnesota, will present a talk, "Using GIS and GPS for Emergency Management," at noon Wednesday, Nov. 14, in Room 1, Gamble Hall. Holman will discuss his experiences using GIS and GPS as a firefighter, as part of an Incident Command Team, and with FEMA in support of Urban Search and Rescue Team efforts following the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. The talk will be held on GIS Day, an international event principally sponsored by the National Geographic Society, the Association of American Geographers, the University Consortium for Geographic Information Science, the U.S. Geological Survey, The Library of Congress, Sun Microsystems, Hewlett-Packard, and the Environmental Systems Research Institute. GIS Day is part of Geography Awareness Week, which is Nov. 11-17.
-- Brad Rundquist, Associate Professor, Geography, bradley_rundquist@und.nodak.edu, 7-4589

Noon book group to hold first reading Nov. 14

The Healthy UND Spiritual Subcommittee would like to invite any interested student, staff member or faculty to join together to explore spirituality on our campus. As a first step, we have selected "Encouraging Authenticity and Spirituality in Higher Education" to read and discuss.

This groundbreaking book provides a comprehensive resource that addresses the growing movement for incorporating spirituality as an important aspect of the meaning and purpose of higher education. Written by Arthur W. Chickering, Jon C. Dalton, and Leisa Stamm, experts in the field of educational leadership and policy, "Encouraging Authenticity and Spirituality in Higher Education" shows how to encourage increased authenticity and spiritual growth among students and education professionals by offering alternative ways of knowing, being, and doing.

Each participant is encouraged to purchase a book. They can be ordered through Barnes & Noble or purchased online. The first meeting will be Wednesday, Nov. 14, from noon to 1 p.m. in the Leadership Conference Room, main floor, Memorial Union. An alternate meeting time may be determined based upon the wishes of the group. If you have any questions, you may contact Kay Williams at kay.williams@ARS.USDA.GOV We look forward to meeting you.
-- Kay Williams, Medical Laboratory Technician, Human Nutrition Research Center, kay.williams@ars.usda.gov, 701-795-8441

Box Lunch session focuses on "Encouraging Ethical Behavior in Class"

The On Teaching Box Lunch discussion series continues Thursday, Nov. 15, with a session on "Encouraging Ethical Behavior in Class" from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in the Red River Valley Room, Memorial Union.

There are many ways that dishonest or unethical behavior can find its way into the classroom. Plagiarism is a very real concern for many faculty members. Cheating on exams and other assignments is also a problem teachers have to address. Deciding how to deal with students who have been dishonest can present a dilemma for faculty. Are there ways, though, that a teacher might be able to head off some instances of academic dishonesty? Are there methods for communicating with students to help them understand the importance of academic integrity? Can a teacher make a student feel more accountable for his or her academic actions?

In this lunch session, we’ll discuss ways faculty can talk to students about academic honesty and also possible methods for discouraging dishonest behavior in the classroom. Please bring any examples of ways you’ve found to help students understand the importance of academic honesty.

To register and reserve a free box lunch, call Jana Hollands at 777-4998 by noon Tuesday, Nov. 13. Please indicate if you require a vegetarian meal.
-- Anne Kelsch, Director, Office of Instructional Development, anne.kelsch@und.nodak.edu, 777-4233

Red River Women Studies Conference is Nov. 16

Get ready to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the UND Women Studies Program by attending the seventh annual Red River Valley Women Studies Conference. Fifty-two presenters from seven institutions, coming from as far away as Pennsylvania, will converge at the Memorial Union Friday, Nov. 16, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Undergraduates, graduate students, lecturers, faculty, and independent scholars will present papers on a wide variety of topics, including Native American Women in the 1800s, literature, leadership, and the Virgin Mary, as well as interviews with local women and the wisdom they have to share. Pop culture topics covered will be a springboard to discussion about such timely topics as communication styles at the local Starbucks, the body image of female bodybuilders, pro-natalism in Russia (citizens are being offered $10,000 to reproduce), as well as an examination of the cybersex shop.

The panel chair for the conference, Kathy Coudle-King, says, "This is not your typical conference -- it's a Women Studies conference. That in itself should tell you it is going to be exciting. There is much about women's lives which has not been given careful, academic analysis. Judging from the 30-plus students whose papers were accepted, it is clear to me that this generation of scholars believes that no topic is taboo and all are game for serious inquiry. Certainly, we welcome thought-filled reflection and academic analysis, but the whole world is a gendered world and there are all sorts of nooks and crannies of that world that these presenters will take us to."

The organizing committee, made up of students, faculty and staff, hope that people will register for the whole day -- it's free for students, but lunch is extra ($15 will get you a hot meal, including dessert). During the luncheon in the Red River Valley room, undergrads Heather and Rachel Bengs will perform "Judith & Janey," an original play written by Kathy Coudle-King and directed by Nichole Quam, graduate student in theatre arts. Another special feature of the conference will be the photography and art exhibit in the Red River Valley room, titled "Through Her Eyes," organized by Mary Jo Titus, and including her incredible photography and that of others.

You can find registration materials at http://www.und.edu/dept/women/rrwsconference07.htm . People can attend one panel or all four concurrent sessions. Lunch reservations and payment for the play are due Wednesday, Nov. 7, at the latest.

Contact 777-2787 or kathleen_king@und.nodak.edu for more info.
-- Kathy Coudle-King, Sr. Lecturer, English & Women Studies, kathleen_king@und.nodak.edu, 701-777-2787

Nominations, applications invited for faculty research award

Nominations/applications are invited for the UND Foundation Thomas J. Clifford Faculty Achievement Award for Excellence in Research. The winner of this award will receive a plaque and a check for $2,000 at the Founders Day Banquet Thursday, Feb. 28.

The following information should be provided:

(1) A listing of publications of significant, original and high-quality research, scholarly, and creative contributions in nationally recognized professional journals that are refereed by peer reviewers and/or a listing of juried competitions and invited performances/exhibitions.

(2) Overall scholarly activities, such as service as a reviewer of research proposals for federal agencies or other funding sources, service as a referee or editor for professional journals, and contributions to training students in research, scholarly, and creative endeavors;

(3) Potential for significant contributions to enhancing the effectiveness of the subject matter taught in the classroom.

Faculty, staff and students may make nominations, and faculty are invited to nominate themselves. Since the committee will not engage in the gathering of documentation, each nomination or application must be accompanied by thorough evidence of the nominee’s qualifications for the award. Nine copies of each nomination and supporting documentation should be received at Research Development and Compliance (RD&C) no later than Wednesday, Jan. 2.

The awardee will be selected by the same committee that selects the Fellows of the University Award for Departmental Excellence in Research recipient. This committee includes the associate vice president for research (chair), the chair of the Senate Scholarly Activities Committee, one faculty member from the Senate Scholarly Activities Committee, three faculty members from the University Research Council, the chair of the Faculty Research Seed Money Committee, and one member of the Faculty Research Seed Money Committee.

Since previous awardees are ineligible for nomination until five years have passed, Michael Gaffey and Wayne Seames (2007), Michael Mann (2006), and F. Richard Ferraro (2005) may not be nominated this year.

If further information is desired, please call Research Development and Compliance at 777-4278.
-- Barry I. Milavetz, Associate Vice President for Research, Research Development and Compliance, barrymilavetz@mail.und.nodak.edu, 701/777-4278

Klosterman family expresses gratitude and establishes aviation scholarship

We wish to express our profound appreciation and gratitude to the Grand Forks, University of North Dakota, and First Presbyterian Church communities for your love and support in the recent loss of our beloved daughter, Annette Lynn Klosterman. We also extend our deepest condolences to the family of Adam Ostapenko.

We have been deeply touched by the numerous affirmations by UND faculty and fellow students of how much love and joy she brought into your lives. We were thrilled as we watched Annette blossom into a wonderful young woman and capable pilot during her four years at UND. The dream of being a commercial pilot had been Annette’s goal since grade school!

And, we are very grateful to the UND John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences for making this dream a reality. We are establishing an Annette L. Klosterman Memorial Aviation Scholarship in the near future. We would request any remembrances be made to this fund in Annette’s honor. The Odegard School will post details about this fund on their web site at a later time.

Sincerely,
James, Janet and Peter Klosterman
Seattle, Washington
-- Karen Ryba, director of communications, aerospace, ryba@aero.und.edu, 777-4761

Nominations invited for departmental research award

Nominations for the Fellows of the University Award for Departmental Excellence in Research, recognizing research, scholarly, and creative productivity, are due at Research Development and Compliance (RD&C), Wednesday, Jan. 2. The winning department will receive a $1,500 award and a plaque at the Founders Day Banquet Thursday, Feb. 28.

Nominations should include information that will allow the selection committee to judge the quantity and quality of the research, scholarly, and creative activities of the department. At a minimum, such nominations should include a listing of published research or other creative or scholarly activities during the period 2002-2007. Additional information for those years, such as a brief synopsis of ongoing research activities, the number and type of active sponsored projects, dissertations or other research papers presented by students, performances or scholarly presentations by faculty, etc., should be included if they contribute to the overall picture of a department’s research, scholarly, and creative activities. A statement of support from the dean is required. To expedite the review process, nine copies of the nomination and supporting documentation should be submitted to RD&C.

The awardee will be selected by the same committee which selects the Thomas J. Clifford Faculty Achievement Award for Excellence in Research recipient. This committee includes the associate vice president for research (chair), the chair of the Senate Scholarly Activities Committee, one faculty member from the Senate Scholarly Activities Committee, three faculty members from the University Research Council, the chair of the Faculty Research Seed Money Council, and one member of the Faculty Research Seed Money Council.

Since previous awardees are ineligible for nomination until five years have passed, the Departments of Chemical Engineering (2005), Microbiology and Immunology (2004), and English and Atmospheric Sciences (2003) may not be nominated this year (departmental awards were not given in 2006 and 2007).

If further information is desired, please call Research Development and Compliance at 777-4278.
-- Barry I. Milavetz, Associate Vice President for Research, Research Development and Compliance, barrymilavetz@mail.und.nodak.edu, 701/777-4278

Information provided on assessment

Dear University Council Member,

I was supposed to read the following message at last week's meeting of the University Council. I forgot to do so. Please read through the text of the message presented below. -- Tom Petros, University Senate Chair.

On behalf of the University Assessment Committee, thank you for all of the work you have done, and continue to do, relative to the assessment of student learning and development.

Through reviews of the departmental assessment plans and annual reports, it is evident that significant progress has been made throughout campus relative to developing plans, identifying goals and objectives, gathering data, analyzing results, and closing the loop on findings. As an institution, we are getting better at asking questions, interpreting findings, and documenting our activities! Through this process, many departments have discovered useful information about students' learning and program curricula. Departments have made decisions to add or delete content, re-sequence offerings, and provide more 'real-world' applications of content, to name a few examples.

The basic message is this: UND has been working hard on the assessment of student learning. We are proud of the progress which has been made thus far. We encourage you to continue your efforts in the upcoming years; UND must keep a high level of attention on student learning, which continues to be at the core of our institutional mission.

Finally, this is a particularly key year given the upcoming focused visit from the Higher Learning Commission (HLC) in April 2008; the team will look closely at the progress the University has made in assessment. The team will visit with faculty from across campus about the assessment activities in which they and their departments have been engaged. The committee encourages ongoing conversations with colleagues and students regarding the purposes, activities, and outcomes of their assessment activities.

Once again, on behalf of the University Assessment Committee, thank you for your ongoing efforts and accomplishments!

Renee Mabey,
Chair, University Assessment Committee
October 2007

Next year will be a transitional year for general education

The transition from the current General Education Program into the new Essential Studies Program, passed by the University Senate last spring, is under way. The new program, to be implemented for entering first-year students in fall 2008, emphasizes a stronger focus on specific learning goals and advocates practices that will help students better understand the value of general education.

Implementation of the Essential Studies Program is under way and is being led by the General Education Requirements Committee, chaired by Ryan Zerr of the mathematics department, and the General Education Steering Committee, co-chaired by Tom Steen, physical education, exercise science and wellness, and Lori Robison, English. The work of implementation is taking many forms: committees are being formed to define the criteria under which the new concentration courses (senior capstones, advanced communication, quantitative reasoning, and global and US diversity) will be validated; visits to departments who want help determining ways of integrating the new Essential Studies requirements into their current programs of study are being scheduled; and many faculty members are in the process of creating new courses that highlight the goals of Essential Studies.

Please contact Ryan Zerr (ryan.zerr@und.nodak.edu ), Tom Steen (Thomas.steen@und.nodak.edu ), or Lori Robison (lori_robison@und.nodak.edu) if you are interested in participating in these activities.

Cross-list women studies courses

Will you be teaching a course in the spring that wholly or in significant part relates to women? Please send a description, with registration details, to consider for cross-listing with Women Studies courses. Either e-mail or phone is fine.
-- Sandra Donaldson, Professor, English & Women Studies, sandra.donaldson@und.edu, 777-4461

Books donated in honor of Elizabeth (Libby) Rankin

In honor of Elizabeth (Libby) Rankin, the President's Advisory Council on Women's Issues (PAC-W) has donated books about Middle Eastern women to the Chester Fritz Library. The books are currently on display by the the Main Reading Room, and they can be checked out from the library.
-- Janet Rex, Librarian, Chester Fritz Library, janetrex@mail.und.edu, 777-4641

Studio One features classroom clickers, ADHD

Learn how some college professors use new technology in the classroom on the next edition of Studio One. Some professors require students to use a special device called a clicker. This small, tv remote-sized tool allows students to answer questions from their desk with a click of a button.

“We take our tests using these clickers in my class. They know their tests scores before I do,” says assistant anatomy professor Jon Jackson. Some students enjoy the immediate feedback when answering quiz or exam questions. However, others say it can add to the stress of test day. Find out why on Studio One.

Also on the show this week, ADHD affects many people. This disorder causes individuals to have problems paying attention, sitting still, and can be distracting for others. Find out how one adult is dealing with this disorder in his late thirties on the next edition of Studio One.

Studio One is an award-winning news and information program produced at the University of North Dakota Television Center. The program airs live on UND Channel 3 on Thursdays at 5 p.m. Re-broadcasts can be seen at 7 a.m., noon, 7 p.m. and 11 p.m. daily and on Saturdays at 10 a.m. Prairie Public Television airs Studio One on Saturday at 6 a.m. The program can also be seen by viewers in Fargo, Bismarck/Mandan and Minot, N.D.; Minneapolis, Minn.; Denver, Colo.; and Winnipeg, Manitoba.
-- Meghan Flaagan, Director of Marketing, Television Center, meghan.flaagan@und.edu, 777-3818

Sign up to participate in International Education Week Quiz Bowl

The second annual International Education Week Quiz Bowl will be held in November. Test your knowledge about geography, language, world cultures and more. Win prizes and celebrate international education. The event is open to the whole University community. Preliminary rounds will be held Nov. 5 and 6, and the finals will be held Friday, Nov. 16, during International Education Week. For more information or to sign up your team of three, call 777-2033 or e-mail anneekkaia@mail.und.edu by Thursday, Nov. 1 (extended deadline).
-- Shannon Jolly, International Student Advisor, International Programs, shannonjolly@mail.und.edu, 777-4118

Sign & Design Studio will be closed Nov. 2-3

The Sign & Design Studio will have limited hours Thursday, Nov. 1, and will be closed Friday and Saturday, Nov. 2-3. It will reopen Monday, Nov. 5, with regularly scheduled hours. The staff will attend an Association of College Unions International Regional Conference in South Dakota. Sorry for any inconvenience.
-- Rebecca Slade, Marketing Coordinator, Memorial Union, rebecca.slade@und.edu, 777-3938

International Programs newsletter available online

The latest issue of the International Programs newsletter, "Building Bridges" is available online at http://www.und.edu/dept/oip/documents/10-15-07.pdf
Featured this month:
* OIP staff changes
* International student advising notes
* Centre hours in November
* International Education Week
* International Quiz Bowl
* Thanksgiving dinner
* Faculty-Directed Study Abroad Workshop
* Study Abroad Referrals
* Pre-departure orientations
* Hiring International scholars/faculty
-- Ray Lagasse, Director, International Programs, raymondlagasse@mail.und.edu, 777-2938

State Fleet rate adjustment effective Nov. 1

The North Dakota State Fleet adjusted their rates effective Nov. 1. The motorpool rates listed below include the UND surcharge rate of .023/mile and .23/hour meter.

VEHICLE TYPE
Sedan - $0.293/mile
Minivan - seven-passenger - $0.413/mile
Van, 12 & 15 passenger - $0.573/mile
Compact 4x4 SUV - $0.493/mile
Suburban, five-passenger - $0.483/mile
Suburban, nine-passenger - $0.573/mile
Compact 4x4 Pickup - $0.483/mile
Cargo Van-Full Size - $0.573/mile
Mini Cargo Van - $0.483/mile
Handicapped Van-6 seats - $41.230/hour - one wheelchair
-- Mary L. Metcalf, Manager, Transportation, marymetcalf@mail.und.edu, 777-4123

Yoga classes begin

Yoga classes began at the Lotus Meditation Center Nov. 1. The seven-week session will continue through Dec. 20. The cost is $57 per session for one class per week, $84 for two classes per week, or $10 for a single drop-in class. Classes meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 5:30 to 6:45 p.m. For information, contact Dyan Rey at 772-8840 or e-mail dyanre@aol.com.
-- Dyan Rey, Lecturer, Visual Arts, dyanre@aol.com, 701 7728840

Please donated to Operation Christmas Child

The Christus Rex Service Learning Ministry Team is sponsoring Operation Christmas Child, a Samaritan's Purse project that has been changing children's lives since 1993. To participate in this project you can pick-up a shoe box and fill with school supplies, toys, and personal items such as toothbrushes and socks. The boxes go to children who otherwise may not receive a gift at Christmas. The boxes are a symbol of love and caring spread throughout the world.

Boxes can be picked up anytime at Christus Rex. They will also be available at the Memorial Union, first floor, on Wednesday, Oct. 31, from 10 a.m. to noon. The filled boxes should be returned to Christus Rex no later than Sunday, Nov. 11, to be mailed before Thanksgiving.
-- Lisa Burger, Director, Student Success Center, lisaburger@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-4706

Have your students bought all required texts?

Barnes & Noble at UND will soon begin returning unsold textbooks. We want to make sure students have the books they need to complete their courses. Please announce to your classes that if students haven't bought their texts, they should do so in the next week.

However, we know there may be titles that should be kept in stock late into the term and we are happy to keep them on the shelves for students to buy. Please let our textbook department know right away if you have titles you would like held. Contact textbook manager Tina Monette at 777-2106 or Casey Johnson at 777-2748.
-- Michelle Abernathey, General Manager, Barnes & Noble at UND, michelle_aberanthey@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2103

Work Well: know your numbers

It's that time again! Work Well is proud to introduce "Know Your Numbers!" This new program is exactly what you need to help you focus on those numbers in your life that really matter: your cholesterol, your blood pressure, and your body mass index. Know Your Numbers is simple to understand, and it's fun with lots of chances to win some great prizes! You get a free shirt, and who wouldn't want the chance to win $500 or even $1,000.

To get involved:
1. Call or e-mail Amanda Eickhoff and invite her to your department, your office, or your staff meeting sometime after Monday, Nov. 5. She will bring all of the information and materials that you and all of your coworkers need to get registered and participate. This really is the best way to get involved because you can get all of your questions answered right away.

2. If inviting Amanda to your department doesn't work out, you can always register online, beginning Nov. 5. Just go to www.workwell.und.edu to get all the details and register. All you will need to know is your Empl ID to get logged in. Once you get registered, your materials will either be sent to you via campus mail or hand delivered.

To Live Well is to WORK WELL, to Show a Good Activity - Saint Thomas Aquinas.
-- Amanda Eickhoff, Assistant Director for Work Well, Wellness Center, amandaeickhoff@mail.und.edu, 701.777.0210

International Programs seeks volunteers for Thanksgiving dinner

Each year the Office of International Programs provides a traditional Thanksgiving dinner for our international students on Thanksgiving Day. We plan to serve about 200 students on this national holiday and seek volunteers to help serve the meal. All the food is prepared, and volunteers are needed to serve the meal. If you are interested in volunteering, please contact Shannon Jolly at 777-4118 by Friday, Nov. 9.
-- Shannon Jolly, International Student Advisor, International Programs, shannonjolly@mail.und.edu, 777-4118

Girls Scout troop seeks Yoplait lids

I have a Girl Scout Cadet Troop (#870) who are collecting Yoplait lids
for breast cancer, and we ask people to send us your washed lids. You can bring them to Room 5914, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stop 9037. Every lid matters, because every lid gets us closer to our donation goal for the Breast Cancer Initiative. During our collection drive, for every lid received, Yoplait will donate 10 cents to Susan G. Komen Initiative. This project will continue through Dec. 31. This initiative comes near and dear to this group of girls, as one member has an aunt who has recently been diagnosed with breast cancer.

Nearly all adult Yoplait products participate in Save Lids to Save Lives. All Yoplait yogurt packaged in either 4- or 6-oz. cups will feature a pink lid during the collection period. This includes cups in multi-packs and fridge packs. It also includes Yoplait beverage products. However, the large size Yoplait Grande® tubs do not contain pink lids and Yoplait Kids® products do not participate in the Save Lids to Save Lives program.

Your help with this project is greatly appreciated. Thank you. -- Jayne Brown, Human Service Information coordinator, Division of Medical Genetics, School of Medicine & Health Sciences Room 5910, 501 N. Columbia Road Stop 9037, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9037, 777-4276,
www.medicine.nodak.edu/genetics .

Internal job openings listed

The following position vacancies are available only to regular UND staff employees who have successfully completed their six-month probation period, earn annual and sick leave, receive BC/BS health insurance and TIAA-CREF or ND PERS retirement benefits. Current UND faculty, please contact Human Resources for eligibility.

TO APPLY: Please complete UND Application/Control Card form. Send letter of application and resume, referencing position name and number, to: Human Resources, University of North Dakota, Twamley Hall, Room 313, 264 Centennial Drive Stop 8010, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8010. Applications MUST be received by the deadline date.

EXECUTIVE/PROFESSIONAL/ADMINISTRATIVE/ATHLETIC COACHES:

POSITION: Family Nurse Practitioner, (three days a week) Center for Family Medicine-Bismarck, #08-125
DEADLINE: (I) 11/05/2007
SALARY: $40.00+/hour

POSITION: Cost/Compliance Analyst, Budget Office, #08-122
DEADLINE:(I) 10/31/2007
SALARY: $40,000+/year

POSITION: Assistant Archivist, Chester Fritz Library, #08-104
DEADLINE: Oct. 31 or until filled. (Applications received by Oct. 31, 2007 will receive first consideration). Internal applicants will be considered along with the external applicants.
SALARY: $37,000+/year

TECHNICAL/PARAPROFESSIONAL: No vacancies.

OFFICE SUPPORT:

POSITION: Gerontology Program Secretary (Re-advertised, salary change) Nursing, #08-092
DEADLINE: (I) 11/06/2007
SALARY: $24,000+/year

CRAFTS/TRADES/SERVICE: No vacancies.

Medical School receives grant funding

Jonathan Geiger, professor and chair of pharmacology, physiology and therapeutics at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences, has received funding from Johns Hopkins University Medical School and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for studies related to the dementia that afflicts patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

The studies, analyzing new methods and mechanisms that may be targeted to help treat HIV-dementia, will be conducted in collaboration with Norman Haughey, principal investigator on the two grants and assistant professor of neurology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Md.

The five-year grants, totaling $2,325,000, from the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and the National Institute of Mental Health will fund studies aimed at deepening scientists’ understanding of the mechanisms which lead to dementia in HIV/AIDS patients. Designated as RO1 grants, they are among the most highly ranked grants awarded by the NIH.

“Due to the increased effectiveness of treatments that have been developed for HIV, patients with this disease are living longer and the incidence of HIV-dementia has decreased,” said Geiger, a co-investigator on these grants.

“However, because people living with HIV/AIDS are living longer and are exposed to a number of other disorders and the ingestion of various drugs of abuse, including alcohol, the prevalence of HIV-dementia is increasing,” he said. “This underscores the importance of studying this form of dementia which is the most common form found in persons under 40 years of age.”

“It’s important to identify new therapeutic interventions designed to improve, or prevent further decline in, brain function because current treatments have had limited success,” he added.

“Our goal is to investigate underlying mechanisms in HIV-dementia and to identify effective interventions against the neurological complications experienced by HIV-infected individuals,” Geiger said.

“We are very pleased and proud of the success that Dr. Geiger and his colleagues have had in this area of brain research that is both important and timely and has earned a significant investment by the NIH,” said H. David Wilson, dean of the UND Medical School. “This is especially impressive, given the highly competitive atmosphere of the federal research funding environment.”

The NIH grant projects are titled “Dysfunctions of Sphingolipid and Sterol Metabolism in HIV-Dementia” and “Interaction of Alcohol with HIV Proteins.” -- School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

UND, NRI receive $110,000 grant for eating disorders study

Researchers in the Department of Clinical Neuroscience at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences and the Neuropsychiatric Research Institute (NRI) in Fargo have received a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to advance the understanding of eating disorders among health professionals.

Stephen Wonderlich and James Mitchell, who each hold the title of Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor of Clinical Neuroscience at UND, have received $110,000 from the National Institute of Mental Health for a project aimed at furthering the scientific understanding of eating disorder diagnoses. Ross Crosby, clinical professor of clinical neuroscience at the UND medical school and director of biomedical statistics and methodology at the Neuropsychiatric Research Institute in Fargo, will also serve as a consulting statistician on the project.

With grant support, they plan to convene a series of meetings of a group of leading researchers in the field. The group will conduct scientific studies to improve the classification of symptoms and characteristics of eating disorders by professionals who treat these very serious mental health and medical disorders.

The group, which begins meeting in early 2008 at Washington, D.C., will invite other scientists to attend and present their research data on particular issues concerning eating disorders.

"Scientists and clinicians from around the world will be invited by our group to present information that will address important diagnostic questions," Wonderlich said. "It provides us with an important and unique opportunity to better understand these disorders."

Eating disorders, which are more prevalent in women than men, are very serious and are sometimes fatal conditions. They include anorexia nervosa, characterized by self-starvation, intense fear of fat and gaining weight, and body image disturbances, and bulimia nervosa, marked by binge eating behaviors accompanied by self-induced vomiting, laxative abuse or excessive exercise.

Patients who suffer from these disorders have high rates of other psychiatric problems such as major depression, anxiety disorders, substance use disorders and personality disorders, Wonderlich said.
Mitchell serves as president of the NRI and chairman of the Department of Clinical Neuroscience at the UND medical school. Wonderlich is director of clinical research at NRI and associate chairman of the Department of Clinical Neuroscience at the UND medical school. Together they serve as co-directors of MeritCare's Eating Disorder Institute.

Both are internationally recognized as authorities in eating disorders research and treatment. -- School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

Vossler's book named one of top 12 North Dakota memoirs

Ronald Vossler's memoir, "Dakota Kraut: Or How I Learned to Love My Accent and Ancestry," has been named by Read North Dakota as one of the top dozen important memoirs/autobiographies of the past century in North Dakota. Other notable authors on that list include Larry Woidwode, Debra Marquart, and Eric Sevareid.

Organizations involved in the Read North Dakota Project selection of Vossler's book include the North Dakota Historical Society, the North Dakota Humanities Council, North Dakota Council on the Arts, Prairie Public Broadcasting, and the North Dakota Library Association.

In addition, Vossler, a senior lecturer in the English Department, has his most recent film, "We'll Meet Again in Heaven," one in a series of national and international award-winning films, currently airing on public television stations across the United States. Most recently it has appeared on San Mateo, Calif., public television, and Missoula, Mont., public television.
-- Ronald Vossler, Senior Lecturer, English, ronald_vossler@und.nodak.edu, 218-779-6835

Flight Training Center in North Carolina opens new hangar

The UND Aerospace Foundation and Robeson Community College (RCC) Flight Training Center in Lumberton, N.C., recently celebrated the opening of a new 8,000-square-foot hangar. More than 100 people attended the unveiling of the new hangar, which has 1,540 square feet of office space, a 560-square-foot classroom, and a state-of-the-art flight simulator. This facility emits the kind of quality, excellence, and safety that UND Aerospace is known for, said Paul Snyder, assistant director for the UND Aerospace extension programs. Snyder further added that the collaboration among the two schools and government is evidence of the healthy can-do attitude needed for a successful program.

In 2006, UNDAF partnered with RCC to provide a collegiate flight training to meet the growing demands in the aviation industry in career fields such as airport management, air traffic control, and commercial aviation. The RCC/UND Flight Training Center in Lumberton intends to use the new facility to educate and prepare young people interested in aviation. Aeronautics education camps will be held at the facility, said David Thompson of the State Aviation Division, with a week-long overnight program for high school students from across the state, and a week-long day program for middle school students.

Robeson Community College is a supporter of the Mid-Atlantic Fly-in and Sports Aviation Convention that takes place at the Lumberton Regional Airport each May. The college is currently working closely with the Lumberton Regional Airport Commission on a $5.0+ million runway improvement project that will give RCC/UND flight training students and other general aviation traffic fresh runway facilities for business endeavors.
-- Jan Orvik, Writer/Editor, University Relations, janorvik@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3621

Campus, community engagement awards announced

Awards for exemplary community and university engagement were announced at a UND Center for Community Engagement program Oct. 17.

The Community Partner Award was given to the Dakota Science Center, the Public Scholar Award went to Marcia Mikulak, anthropology, and the Engaged Department Award was given to the UND Department of Social Work.

The Carter Academic Service Entrepreneurship (CASE) Award went to Santana Dougherty, a communication major, and a special at-large CASE Award was given to Britney Sudmann, majoring in peace studies and theatre arts. The $1,000 CASE grants for service-learning projects are provided by the Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter Partnership Foundation and the W. K Kellogg Foundation.

The UND Multicultural Student Services Office presented the Paul V. Boswell Community Scholar Award to the late Alan Allery, who had been director of UND’s Student Health Services, and Cheryl Saunders, who served as director of the University Learning Center until leaving the University this summer.
-- Fayme Stringer, VISTA, Center for Community Engagement, fayme.stringer@und.edu, 7-2706