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ISSUE: Volume 45, Number 2: August 29, 2007

Contents
Top Stories
Tobacco-free policy will be published Sept. 5
U.S. & World Report ranks UND one of best national universities
UND named one of "Best 366 Colleges"
Events to Note
PPT faculty candidate to present seminar Aug. 30
Reception for Marlene Buchner is Aug. 30
Christus Rex hosts listening post Aug. 30
Aerospace book launch set for Sept. 5
University Senate meets Sept. 6; note agenda
Special Denim Day for Northwood
Fall Study Abroad Fair is Sept. 12
UND Aerospace to conduct aircraft accident investigation course
Announcements
President's Leadership Program accepting applications
General education courses now listed electronically
Student Health Services receives full accreditation
Nursing receives two federally funded grants
Graduate School offers new Chautauqua Series
Take care around parking ramp work
Sept. 3 is Labor Day holiday
Labor Day hours listed for Law Library
International Centre lists holiday hours
Note regulated waste policy
IBC lists policy for biohazardous materials
Beware of fraudulent checks
Parking meter fines adjusted
Keep valuables out of your vehicle
Sign & Design Studio vs. Union Services
Subway in Johnstone/Fulton Hall will stay closed
Fall yoga classes begin at Lotus Meditation Center
Ray Richards Golf Course lists fall specials
Volunteers sought for radon study
Internal job openings listed
In the News
Mohr appointed to physical therapy accreditation commission
Medical School neuroscientist receives grant
Fargo physicians assume new roles
Tobacco-free policy will be published Sept. 5

TO: UND Campus

On or about Sept. 5, we will publish a policy establishing UND as a tobacco-free campus beginning in early October. Please be on the lookout for this policy. Its publication in advance of the policy taking effect is meant to elicit suggestions about the details and nuances of the policy. The decision to establish the policy has been made with the support of the Student Senate, University Senate, and the Staff Senate. All of these groups, as requested, were and have been represented in the deliberations leading to the detailed policy. -- Office of the President.

U.S. & World Report ranks UND one of best national universities

The University has once again been named one of the best national universities by U.S. News & World Report, according to rankings released Aug. 17.

UND increased in almost every measure of the U.S. News & World Report rankings, including such areas as peer assessment score (2.6, compared to 2.5 last year), the percentage of faculty who are full time (97 percent, up from 93 percent), and the average alumni giving rate (15 percent, compared to 14 percent). The magazine puts UND among the nation's top 189 public and nonpublic colleges and universities.
"We don't want to put too much stock in these rankings, but they do serve as one kind of indicator of the University's status," said President Charles Kupchella. "It is one 'measure' of our success in achieving our goal: to firmly establish UND as one of the very best public universities in the country and, indeed, the world."

Last year, Washington Monthly listed UND as one of the top 100 public universities in the United States.

UND named one of "Best 366 Colleges"

UND has once again been named one of Princeton Review's "Best 366 Colleges" in the United States. The designation comes on the heels of an announcement that UND has again been named one of the best national universities by U.S. News & World Report.

"We are pleased to be included in the list of America's best so soon after the U.S. News & World Report rankings, which put us in the nation’s top doctoral research universities. The Princeton Review appears to be based on some firsthand testimony which is good and not at all common to all listings of this type," said President Charles Kupchella.

In its academics section, The Princeton Review says: "Outside of its home state, the University of North Dakota is best known for an aviation program that ‘is recognized as the best by most airlines and companies.’ Students note that ‘the aviation department is constantly changing and including advanced technology in the training. Most schools only teach you rules, while here at UND through the use of 360- and 260-degree sims [simulators], you get practical work experience. (The sims are designed to be exactly like that the FAA will use to train and evaluate you.)’ But natives of the Peace Garden State (yes, that is North Dakota’s official nickname) know that there’s more to UND than flying and landing airplanes. There are also the ‘great programs in nursing, law, accounting, and forensic science,’ ‘the only meteorology program in the area,’ ‘a physical therapy program with a good reputation,’ and ‘an awesome honors program.’ In fact, ‘UND is just a great school to go to if you want lots of academic options.’"
"In our opinion, each school in this book is a 'best' when it comes to academics," said Robert Franek, the book's author at The Princeton Review.

Among UND's most popular majors, according to The Princeton Review: several in aviation, nursing/registered nurse training, and psychology.

PPT faculty candidate to present seminar Aug. 30

L. Keith Henry, faculty instructor with the Department of Pharmacology at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, will present a seminar titled, “From Cave Drawings to Rosetta Stone: Exciting New Insights into the Structure-Function Properties of the Human Serotonin Transporter,” at 2 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 30, in the Clifford Haugen Lecture Hall, Room 1360, at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

Dr. Henry is one of five very strong candidates who we have invited to interview at UND for a faculty position in the Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics. All are welcome to attend.
-- Deb Kroese, Administrative Officer, Pharmacology, Physiology & Therapeutics, dkroese@medicine.nodak.edu, 701-777-6221

Reception for Marlene Buchner is Aug. 30

Please join the RAIN program from 2 to 4 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 30, in the College of Nursing Lounge, Room 368, for an open house to honor Marlene Buchner who is leaving to pursue her lifelong dream of owning and operating a Bed and Breakfast and Wellness Center. For additional information, please call Barb Anderson at 777-4323.
-- Barb Anderson, Assistant Program Coordinator, RAIN Program, barbanderson@mail.und.edu, 777-4323

Christus Rex hosts listening post Aug. 30

Christus Rex Lutheran Campus Ministry will host a listening post at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 30. This gathering gives students and community people the chance to have conversation and input on calling a new pastor to Christus Rex. We encourage your participation in this process.

Aerospace book launch set for Sept. 5

UND Aerospace will host a book launch champagne reception celebrating the publication of "Flight of the Odegard" by Patrick A. McGuire, Wednesday, Sept. 5, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., with a 7 p.m. program in the Alerus Center Ballroom.

Featured speakers will be the Honorable Senator Byron Dorgan, (recorded video) and Dean Bruce Smith.

Please RSVP to Chris Naas at 777-3715 or e-mail naas@aero.und.edu by Friday, Aug. 31.

Book signing will be available; business attire. -- UND Aerospace.

University Senate meets Sept. 6; note agenda

The University Senate will meet Thursday, Sept. 6, at 4:05 p.m. in Room 7, Gamble Hall.

AGENDA
1. Announcements:
a. Presidential Search Committee update. Paul LeBel, chair.
2. Minutes of the previous meeting (5/3/07) and business arising from the minutes. These minutes may be viewed at: http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/registrar/senate/senindex.
3. Question period.

CONSENT CALENDAR:
4. Annual report of the Senate Continuing Education Committee, Janet Rex, chair.

BUSINESS CALENDAR:
5. Slate of nominees for Senate officers. Michele Iiams, Committee on Committees.
6. Election of a Senate vice chair/chair elect. Michele Iiams, Committee on Committees.
7. Election of a faculty representative to a two-year term on the Senate Executive Committee. Michele Iiams, Committee on Committees.
8. Election of two Senate faculty members to a two-year term each on the Committee on Committees. Michele Iiams, Committee on Committees.
9. Election of a student representative to the Senate Executive Committee. Michele Iiams, Committee on Committees.
10. Senate orientation. Tom Petros, University Senate chair.
11. Candidates for degrees in August 2007. Suzanne Anderson, University Registrar.
12. Amendment to Senate Bylaws. Tom Petros, chair, Senate Executive Committee.
-- Lori Hofland, Administrative Assistant, Registrars Office, lorihofland@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3892

Special Denim Day for Northwood

President Kupchella has approved Friday, Sept. 7, as a Special Denim Day for Northwood, N.D. We have all seen the results of the tornado Sunday night, Aug. 26. This will be a chance for the University community to support our neighbors. So, Friday, Sept. 7, wear your button with your denim. If you would like to "kick up" your usual contribution, that would be great.
-- Patsy Nies, Special Project Assistant, Enrollment Services, patsynies@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3791

Fall Study Abroad Fair is Sept. 12

The Fall Study Abroad Fair will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 12, at the International Centre, 2908 University Ave. Please announce this to your classes and encourage your students to attend.
-- Melinda McCannell-Unger, Education Abroad Advisor, Office of International Programs, melindamccannellunger@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-4756

UND Aerospace to conduct aircraft accident investigation course

The UND Aerospace Foundation (UNDAF) and the Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA), in a cooperative effort, will conduct a two-and-one-half day aircraft accident investigation course at the Grand Forks International Airport Oct. 9-11. The course is designed to provide an advanced level of instruction to individuals who may participate in aviation accident investigations conducted by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

As unfortunate as they are, aircraft accidents are opportunities for crash investigators to learn more about the errors pilots and organizations may make that result in accidents, said Dana Siewert, UND Aerospaces director of aviation safety. This course develops hands-on skills by recreating an actual aircraft mishap in a learning environment.

Over 30 airline pilots from around the United States and Canada are expected to participate in each course, which will use actual aircraft wreckage donated by a firm in California. The wreckage site will be recreated south of the flight operations facility and used specifically for investigative training techniques.

This course is also offered to a select group of aviation employees and a limited number of aviation students who have completed aviation safety courses at UND. Aviation aircraft manufacturers who have expressed interest in this type of course and training will also be attending.

For further information, contact Dana Siewert at 777-7895 (e-mail: siewert@aero.und.edu ) or visit http://www.aero.und.edu/index.php3 .

President's Leadership Program accepting applications

Applications are now being accepted for the 2007-08 Issues in Higher Education Leadership Seminar. Sponsored by the president and PAC-W, this program is designed for full-time faculty and staff interested in gaining a broader view of leadership in higher education. Six individuals will be selected to participate. The program is open to both men and women, though special emphasis is placed on the importance of developing women for professional leadership roles within the University. The program runs from October 2007 to May 2008 and includes participation in a monthly seminar, attendance at one national higher education conference, and one meeting of the North Dakota State Board of Higher Education. Participants will also be expected to organize a campus forum on a higher education topic of their choosing. Each participant will receive a $250 stipend plus travel and conference expenses. Applications are available from victoriabeard@mail.und.edu and are due back by Friday, Sept. 14.
-- Victoria Beard, Associate Provost, Academic Affairs, victoriabeard@mail.und.edu, 7-4824

General education courses now listed electronically

As was announced at the April 5 meeting of the University Senate, the current list of approved general education courses is no longer listed in the academic catalog. The list of courses approved for the current year can be found at:
http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/registrar/General%20Ed%20Requirements/GERApprovedCoursesbyYear.htm

This link currently contains courses approved for the 2007-2008 academic year, as well as courses from the 1997-2007 academic years. An archive of courses approved for at least the six previous academic years will be maintained on the site for reference by instructors, advisors, and students.

The list of approved courses for the upcoming academic year is finalized by the General Education Requirements (GER) Committee at the end of the preceding spring semester. The list is updated on a yearly basis based on the validation and revalidation requests processed by the GER committee.

The move to an electronic format allows an accurate, up-to-date, publicly available list of general education courses to be maintained without the constraints of the two-plus-year catalog cycle. It also facilitates the implementation of any changes in the general education program by the GER committee itself, or affiliated groups such as the General Education Task Force.
-- Matthew Cavalli, Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering, matthewcavalli@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-4389

Student Health Services receives full accreditation

Student Health Services has achieved accreditation by the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC), according to Robert Boyd, vice president for student and outreach services. Status as an accredited organization means Student Health Services has passed a series of rigorous and nationally recognized standards for providing quality health care. Student Health Services is the first university health clinic in North Dakota to receive this recognition. “Accreditation underscores our long-standing commitment to providing the highest possible levels of quality care to the UND community," said Lillian Elsinga, associate vice president for student services. "We are pleased and proud to have our efforts recognized with this accreditation." "Ambulatory health care organizations seeking accreditation by the AAHC undergo an extensive on-site, peer-based survey of the facilities and services," explained Pat Campbell, Student Health Services health care analyst. "UND Student Health Services is a full-service medical clinic and health promotion program staffed by licensed and certified health professionals," said Mark Christenson, Student Health Services medical director. UND Student Health Services provides comprehensive medical care, including general office visits, physicals, men’s and women’s health exams, x-rays, and laboratory tests. Pharmacy services and over-the-counter medications are also available. Students receive free office calls as part of their fees. A variety of health promotion and prevention services are offered, including: health information, help in accessing services, one-to-one tobacco cessation support, online assessments, presentations, events, and a self-care station.

Nursing receives two federally funded grants

The College of Nursing is the recipient of two grants to support new master’s degree tracks specializing in gerontology and public/community health nursing. The grants are funded through the Health Resources Services Administration (HRSA), a division of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Enrollment for both degree options will begin in the fall of 2007 with options to earn an R.N. to M.S. degree, M.S. degree, or post-nursing master's certificate.

With the addition of these two programs, the College of Nursing now has three federally funded master’s degree grants, the psychology/mental health master’s degree grant was renewed in 2006. “We at the College are thrilled with this news”, shares Chandice Covington, dean of nursing. “Education in the areas of gerontology and public/community health is in high demand in North Dakota and the nation. The faculty directing these programs are dedicated to success and seeing an impact on health in our region. We at the College applaud their hard work and commitment.”

The Gerontological Nurse Practitioner (NP)/Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) program is a an online, five-semester track (51 credits for the NP and 54 credits for the CNS) which will allow graduates to earn their gerontological NP or gerontological CSN certifications through the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC).

Of today’s 2.7 million registered nurses, less than 1 percent are certified in gerontological nursing and only 3 percent of advanced practice RNs have specialized training in this area. Nearly two-thirds of North Dakota’s 39 rural counties have 20 percent or more of their population base 65 years of age or older and that proportion is expected to jump by at least 10 percent by 2020.

“Without enough gerontologically educated advanced practice nurses, our state and our nation’s health care industry remains underprepared to address the complex health care needs of older adults,” shares Marcia Gragert, project director.

The Public/Community Health Clinical Nurse Specialist (P/CHN CNS) program will prepare nurses for advanced practice nursing care of populations in a distance-delivery format. The master’s track will focus on population-based care of vulnerable populations in rural areas and will provide education in the public health sciences.

“In many rural areas, nurses provide the majority of public health services and are often some of the only health professionals in the community,” shares Tracy Evanson, project director. “This demands that these nurses fill many diverse roles and have a high level of competence in the areas of health promotion and disease prevention at the individual, family, community, and systems levels in order to keep rural populations healthy. The new track will prepare nurses for this advance practice role and will enable them to develop effective interventions to meet the needs of vulnerable rural populations.”

This program is greatly needed in North Dakota and region, as it is the only one of its kind between Minneapolis, Boise, Idaho, and Omaha, Neb. The program will serve to improve the public health infrastructure, one of the major focus areas of Healthy People 2010.

Both project directors are faculty within the College of Nursing.

Dr. Gragert has a great deal of experience in adult health and gerontology nursing. She has worked in critical care, medical-surgical and long-term care areas, and her research has focused on chronic health problems and sleep disturbances in the adult and older adult population.

Dr. Evanson has a strong background in public and community health in both practice and research. Her research focuses on developing the role of public health nursing in domestic violence prevention and intervention. Victims of domestic violence are a vulnerable population that is often hidden, unrecognized by health care providers, and difficult to access. Public health nurses, who often work in home settings, may be in the best position to provide effective care to this vulnerable population.
-- Becky Cournia, Alumni Relations & Development, Nursing, beckycournia@mail.und.edu, 777-4526

Graduate School offers new Chautauqua Series

The Graduate School is pleased to announce a new series of meetings offering graduate students and faculty opportunities to engage in semi-formal discussions on academically related matters. A core working group of graduate faculty and students has worked to define a series which is hoped to become an important part of UND academic culture.

The series of workshops, "The Graduate School Chautauqua Series," will occur at three-week intervals throughout the fall and spring. The workshops will begin with a light lunch at 11:30 a.m., followed by the discussion at noon.

The fall series will focus on instruction. Collectively, we will examine topics of who we are as students and instructors, how we assess learning, and the professional boundaries that sometimes limit our ability to truly function as a community of scholars.

The spring series will examine the academic tradition of dissemination of creative scholarship.

Participation by graduate students and faculty is widely encouraged. We hope to develop the Graduate School Chautauqua Series as a forum that is embraced by the UND community of scholars, as a place where we continue to question and to learn.

For venue and workshop details, please visit our web site at www.graduateschool.und.edu
-- Susan Caraher, Marketing & External Relations, The Graduate School, susancaraher@mail.und.edu, 777-2524

Take care around parking ramp work

Work to the parking ramp stair tower on the east side of Columbia Road is in progress and with that we have some traffic issues that should be brought to everyone's attention. Access to the west side of the structure is making it necessary to close off the sidewalk to keep pedestrians out of harms way. Those on foot and bikes should make every effort to avoid the northeast corner of Second Avenue and Columbia Road. -- Craig Swenson, Facilities.
-- Jan Orvik, Writer/Editor, University Relations, janorvik@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3621

Sept. 3 is Labor Day holiday

Monday, Sept. 3, Labor Day, will be observed as a holiday by faculty and staff members of the University. Only those employees designated by their department heads will be required to work on this holiday. -- Greg Weisenstein, vice president for academic affairs and provost, and Diane Nelson, director, human resources.

Labor Day hours listed for Law Library

Labor Day hours for the Law Library follow: Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 1-2, 1 to 5 p.m.; Monday, Sept. 3, 1 to 5 p.m. Regular hours resume Tuesday, Sept. 4.
-- Jane Oakland, Circulation Manager, Law Library, oakland@law.und.edu, 7-3482

International Centre lists holiday hours

The International Centre will be closed Sunday, Sept. 2, for the Labor Day holiday. We will re-open Monday, Sept. 3, at 4 p.m.
-- Tatjyana N. Richards, Office Manager, Office of International Programs, tatjyanarichards@mail.und.edu, 777-6438

Note regulated waste policy

In order to ensure that "regulated waste" is disposed of properly, the Institutional Biosafety Committee requires that all members of the University community who generate "regulated waste" have in place a disposal plan which is in conformity with federal regulations. Regulated waste as defined by the federal government includes, but is not limited to, human body fluids and tissues, and items contaminated with human body fluids or tissues such as needles, syringes, and scalpels, whether generated during medical procedures, research or teaching. Anyone who is generating "regulated waste" within the University and does not have a disposal plan in place or is unsure of whether "regulated waste" is being generated by their activities or is being disposed of properly must contact the Safety Office.
-- Thomas Hill, Ph.D., Chair, Institutional Biosafety Committee, Microbiology and Immunology, tomhill@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-6412

IBC lists policy for biohazardous materials

The Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC) requires that any research, teaching, or other activities which utilize DNA, recombinant DNA or involve the use of biohazardous research material be subject to a University review process, and that these activities must be approved by the IBC prior to their initiation. The IBC is the only authorized University committee which can give approval to projects and activities involving DNA, recombinant DNA and biohazardous research material. The IBC will follow the NIH guidelines for DNA, recombinant DNA and biohazardous material research in determining the suitability of projects and activities and will provide an explanation of any decision not to approve a project or activity. Any project or activity not approved can be revised and resubmitted to the IBC for consideration.

All faculty or staff who plan on using recombinant DNA, biohazardous materials or conducting activities that involve the handling of biological materials in a research setting (live or dead animals, plant or animal pathogens, tissue, blood, bodily secretions, nucleic acids, toxins, etc.), teaching, or other activities must submit a completed, signed application form to the IBC Office, University of North Dakota, Twamley Hall Room 106, 264 Centennial Drive Stop 7134, Grand Forks, ND 58202-7134. The IBC will then consider the application at its earliest convenience.

One copy of all funded grant applications utilizing recombinant DNA or biohazardous materials must be submitted to the IBC. The PI will not be able to access grant funds or begin the project until the IBC has reviewed and approved the project. Any changes to an approved project must receive IBC approval prior to their implementation.

Anyone considering the use of DNA, recombinant DNA, or biohazardous materials should contact the Research Development and Compliance (RD&C) office at the address listed above or call the IBC administrative secretary at 777-4279 for a copy of the NIH guidelines, the IBC application form and other pertinent information. Forms and information are also available on the IBC web site at http://www.und.edu/dept/rdc/regucomm/ibc/ibc.htm.
-- Thomas Hill, Ph.D., Chair, Institutional Biosafety Committee, Microbiology and Immunology, tomhill@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-6412

Beware of fraudulent checks

The Credit Union asks you to be aware of a fraudulent check scam. In this case, a UND student advertised for a roommate. She received a check for much more than the deposit from a relative of the prospective roommate, who requested to deposit the entire check, then return the overpayment to him. The Credit Union instead put a hold on the check, which prevented the student from losing a great deal of money. — University Federal Credit Union and UND Police.

Parking meter fines adjusted

Parking meters are located in convenient locations throughout campus. They are intended to facilitate short-term parking. To deter individuals from considering the current $5 parking meter ticket a reserved parking fee, the fine associated with parking meter tickets was increased to $10 effective Aug. 27. This will make the fine for parking meter violations consistent with the fine for time zones. -- Parking Office.

Keep valuables out of your vehicle

Would you like to give your CDs and other valuables to a complete stranger? It is easy to do. Just leave them in your vehicle! CDs and other valuables that are left in vehicles are often reported stolen. Please help prevent this criminal activity by removing all valuables from your vehicle and by reporting any suspicious activities in the parking lots to the UND Police at 777-3491 immediately. The emergency number is 911 and Campus Escort Service is 777-SAFE. -- University Police.

Sign & Design Studio vs. Union Services

Now that classes are in full swing, Union Services and the Sign & Design Studio would like to provide a little "refresher" on the services they each offer.

UNION SERVICES:
Union Services is a full-service copy center providing duplicating, laminating, binding, and facsimile services, as well as check cashing, discount movie tickets, button making, postage stamp sales, Jefferson Bus Line tickets, and newspaper sales to the students, faculty, staff, and guests of the University. Located on the main level of the Memorial Union. Phone, 777-3643; fax, 777-2415 www.union.und.edu/services/unionServices.cfm

SIGN & DESIGN STUDIO:
The Sign & Design Studio is UND's one-stop-shop for designing and printing banners, posters, canvas, large-format digital prints, and much more. We also do large-format laminating and mounting, and have poster display cases for rental. Our staff of graphic designers are trained to assist you with your designing and printing needs. Located on the Main Level of the Memorial Union. Phone, 777-3810; e-mail, signanddesign@und.edu ~ www.union.und.edu/services/signdesign.cfm

We hope this helps clear up some confusion between the two service areas and what they have to offer. Have a great year!
-- Rebecca Slade, Marketing Coordinator, Memorial Union, rebecca.slade@und.edu, 777-3938

Subway in Johnstone/Fulton Hall will stay closed

Throughout the summer UND officials conducted negotiations to purchase the Subway franchise located on campus. At this time, an agreement has not been reached and the Subway operation located in the Johnstone/Fulton residence hall will not re-open. UND officials had hoped to come to a mutual agreement to keep Subway on campus. If an agreement can be reached in the future, Subway may open at a later date.
-- Orlynn Rosaasen, Director, Dining Services, orlynnrosaasen, 777-3823

Fall yoga classes begin at Lotus Meditation Center

Yoga classes begin on Tuesday and Thursday, Sept. 4, and 6, at the Lotus Meditation Center. Both classes meet from 5:30 to 6:45 p.m. and will continue for a eight-week session. Fees are $65 for one class per week or $95 for two. Drop-in fees are $10. Contact Dyan Rey at 772-8840 for more information.
-- Dyan Rey, Lecturer, Visual Arts, dyanre@aol.com, 701 7728840

Ray Richards Golf Course lists fall specials

The Ray Richards Golf Course lists faculty, staff and students fall golf specials until the close of the course.
* Membership pass - unlimited play, $110
* Membership pass and cart rental - unlimited play, $220
* Membership pass, cart rental and driving range - unlimited play, $250
* Regular green fees, $10 for nine holes, $20 for 18 holes
* Cart rental for one seat, $7 for nine holes, $12 for 18 holes.
-- Dustin Hetletved, Manager, Ray Richards Golf Course, dustin.hetletved@mail.und.edu, 777-4340

Volunteers sought for radon study

A new study will look at and compare the amount of radon exposure in people with multiple sclerosis and those without the disease. This project is headed up by Glenn Lykken (physics) in conjunction with the USDA-ARS Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center.

Fifteen people with multiple sclerosis are needed for this study. Another 15 people who do not have multiple sclerosis are needed to be controls for this study, and they will be matched according to age/gender/body composition.

Participants must be 18 or older. Everyone in the study must be able to change clothes, stand alone, walk a short distance into a room, and lie on a bed without help. As part of the study, participants will bring home a canister to measure radon in their homes for 48 hours, answer questionnaires, have blood drawn, and be measured for radioisotopes in a machine called the Whole Body Scintillation Counter.

Participants can earn up to $50. If you are interested in being part of this study, please call Dorothy Olson, Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center, at (701) 795-8396.
-- Brenda Ling, Information Officer, USDA-ARS Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center, brenda.ling@ars.usda.gov, 795-8300

Internal job openings listed

The following position vacancies are available only to regular UND staff employees who have successfully completed their six-month probation period, earn annual and sick leave, receive BC/BS health insurance and TIAA-CREF or ND PERS retirement benefits. Current UND faculty, please contact Human Resources for eligibility.

TO APPLY: Please complete UND Application/Control Card form. Send letter of application and resume, referencing position name and number, to: Human Resources, University of North Dakota, Twamley Hall, Room 313, 264 Centennial Drive Stop 8010, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8010. Applications MUST be received by the deadline date.

EXECUTIVE/PROFESSIONAL/ADMINISTRATIVE/ATHLETIC COACHES:

POSITION: Reference Librarian/Bibliographer, Chester Fritz Library, #08-016
DEADLINE: Sept. 1, 2007 or until filled. (Applications received by Sept. 1 will receive first consideration)
SALARY: $37,000+/year

POSITION: Head, Special Collections, #07-326
DEADLINE: 7/16/2007 or until filled. (Applications received by July 16 will be given first consideration.)
SALARY: $58,000 - $60,000

TECHNICAL/PARAPROFESSIONAL: No current openings.

OFFICE SUPPORT:

POSITION: Administrative Secretary (32 hours/week, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Tuesday-Friday), Atmospheric Sciences, #08-063
DEADLINE: (I) 8/29/2007
SALARY: $9.75 +/hr

CRAFTS/TRADES/SERVICE:


POSITION: Catering Supervisor (variable schedule), Dining Services, 08-068
DEADLINE: (I) 9/5/2007
SALARY: $9.00+/hour

POSITION: Utility Person (variable schedule), Dining Services, #08-067
DEADLINE: (I) 9/5/2007
SALARY: $8.50+/hour

POSITION: Cook (Variable hours, flexible weekends), Dining Services, #08-066
DEADLINE: (I) 9/05/2007
SALARY: $9.50+/hour

POSITION: Building Services Technician (20 hours/week, M-F, 3 a.m. to 7 a.m.), Facilities/EERC, #08-062
DEADLINE: (I) 8/29/2007
SALARY: $8.50 +/hour

NORTH DAKOTA UNIVERSITY SYSTEM POSITION OPENINGS:

Junior Programmer Analyst
-- Jan Orvik, Writer/Editor, University Relations, janorvik@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3621

Mohr appointed to physical therapy accreditation commission

Tom Mohr, professor and chair of physical therapy at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences, has been appointed as a commissioner on the panel that accredits physical therapy programs nationwide.

Mohr will serve a four-year term on the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) Central Panel. He was appointed to the six-member group by the board of directors of the American Physical Therapy Association.

As a member of the panel, Mohr will be involved in various phases of physical therapist and physical therapist assistant program accreditation, including the ongoing assessment of the overall accreditation process as well as formulation and revision of the accreditation evaluative criteria rules and procedures.

CAPTE Central panel members, who represent physical therapy programs throughout the country, also participate in processing complaints and reconsideration hearings, serve as a liaison to other accrediting agencies, and review CAPTE's effectiveness.

The mission of CAPTE is to serve the public by establishing and applying standards that assure quality and continuous improvement in the entry-level preparation of physical therapists and physical therapist assistants and that reflect the evolving nature of education, research and practice.

The UND physical therapy program recently received 10-year reaccreditation from CAPTE with four commendations and no areas of non-compliance, affirming the quality of the physical therapy program, faculty and staff at UND.

Mohr, who has taught physical therapy at UND since 1978, has served as department chair since 1993. -- School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

Medical School neuroscientist receives grant

A neuroscientist at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences has received a grant totaling nearly $700,000 from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study Alzheimer's disease.

Colin Combs, associate professor of pharmacology, physiology and therapeutics, received an RO1 award from the National Institute on Aging, a division of NIH, to study a particular mechanism in the brain which could play a role in the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

The four-year grant allows Combs to continue research aimed at identifying a target for a specific mechanism he's developed that shows potential to stop or slow the inflammatory changes in the brain which are believed to be involved in Alzheimer's disease.

Combs, who joined the UND medical school in 2000, has been studying the underlying causes of Alzheimer's and other neurogenerative diseases for 18 years. He is a member of an initial group of researchers in the Center of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE), funded through a five-year, $10.3 million grant from the NIH beginning in 2002. The five-year renewal of the COBRE grant, funded with $10.1 million from NIH, was announced by the UND medical school earlier this month.

The goal of the COBRE is to build research infrastructure and support young researchers whose work holds great promise in addressing the causes of neurodegenerative diseases, said Jonathan Geiger, COBRE principal investigator and chair and professor of pharmacology, physiology and therapeutics at the medical school. As the quality of their research begins to attract independent external funding, these researchers move off of COBRE and other young researchers receive COBRE support.

Combs is the first COBRE investigator to secure an RO1 grant, a type of grant through which NIH funds the most competitive research laboratories in the country, Geiger said. He represents how the COBRE program, created by NIH to funnel funding to schools that historically have not received substantial federal support for scientific research, is intended to work.

Combs' work is also supported by the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

It is estimated that Alzheimer's disease affects more than five million Americans. About 411,000 new cases are diagnosed annually in the United States. -- School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

Fargo physicians assume new roles

Two Fargo physicians will assume the duties of Bruce Pitts, who has announced his resignation as associate dean and director of graduate medical education at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences' Southeast Campus, based in Fargo.

Pitts is leaving his part-time position with the school to take on the full-time role of executive vice president for clinical services at MeritCare Health System, where he has served as a senior executive since 1997.

Julie Blehm, an internist and geriatrics specialist, has been appointed associate dean for the Southeast Campus of the School of Medicine and Health Sciences. She will continue her practice with MeritCare Health System in Fargo.

David Theige, a hospitalist with MeritCare Medical Group, will assume the role of assistant dean for graduate medical education at the UND medical school, overseeing residency programs in family medicine, internal medicine, psychiatry and general surgery and a one-year transitional program. He will continue to practice at MeritCare Health System in Fargo.

Blehm, a 1981 graduate of the UND medical school, is board-certified in internal medicine and geriatrics. An associate professor of internal medicine, she directs the school's internal medicine residency outpatient clinic in Fargo.

Originally from Hatton, N.D., Blehm holds a bachelor's degree from Concordia College in Moorhead, Minn. After earning the M.D. degree at UND, she completed residency training in internal medicine at Iowa Methodist Medical Center, in a program affiliated with the University of Iowa.

Theige, a 1985 graduate of the UND medical school, is board-certified in internal medicine and directs the school's internal medicine residency and transitional programs in Fargo. He is an associate professor of internal medicine at the school.

Theige holds an undergraduate degree from UND and, after earning his medical degree, took internal medicine residency training through the UND program based in Fargo. He has been recognized several times for outstanding teaching of medical students and residents. -- School of Medicine and Health Sciences.