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ISSUE: Volume 44, Number 79: June 27, 2007

Contents
Top Stories
Wilson to chair national med school council
Events to Note
Farewell reception for Cheryl Saunders is today
Farewell reception honors Donna Brown Wednesday
Doctoral examination set for Timothy Beecher
Doctoral examination set for Robert L. Reis II
UNESCO consultant visits campus June 28-29
Note date change for Native America Calling radio show
Retirement ceremony for Master Sgt. David P. Miller is June 29
Retirement reception is July 6 for Mary Butzin
Doctoral examination set for Pamela Ann Walker
Doctoral examination set for Laura Zucca
Doctoral examination set for Lei Ding
Free tobacco cessation classes offered
Doctoral examination set for Jason Douglas Hornbacher
Summer Graduation Expo set for July 10
Doctoral examination set for Christie Lynn Rood
Doctoral examination set for Alexander Azenkeng
Doctoral examination set for Michael Gallo
Alumni hosts Detroit Lakes Pavilion party
Young Scientists and Engineers Academy offered
Announcements
Phil Harmeson named vice president for general administration
Nursing appoints interim associate dean
Applicants sought for Carnegie Scholars opportunity
Note changes to general education course listings
Need help in choosing a new text for your class?
Wednesday, July 4, is holiday
University Letter will be published Thursday, July 5
Chester Fritz Library lists July 4 hours
Library of the Health Sciences lists holiday hours
Fourth of July hours listed for law library
UND program teaches kids to love reading
Reduce the price of textbooks today
Promote your UND summer event for free
Summer at UND Program offers activities, courses
Bronson property apartments now available
Host families sought for international students
Internal job openings listed
In the News
Physical therapy program reaccredited for 10 years
Med students study, train through ROME program
In Remembrance
Remembering Lloyd Blazer
Wilson to chair national med school council

The School of Medicine and Health Sciences, one of the smallest med schools in the country, has made an outsized reputation for its patient-centered curriculum and its family medicine and rural health programs.

Dean H. David Wilson, a pediatric infectious disease specialist, this year assumes the chair of Council of Deans at the Association of American Medical Colleges, the first North Dakota dean to hold this prestigious AAMC office.

In the latest UND faculty Q&A, Wilson explains the med school’s success with its groundbreaking patient-centered curriculum, its family medicine program, and its rural health care focus. Wilson also talks about his own leadership philosophy and the major challenges facing both America’s and UND’s medical education system.

For the full Q&A and an audio clip, go to http://und.edu/faculty_qa/06192007.html

Farewell reception for Cheryl Saunders is today

You are invited to a farewell reception for Cheryl Saunders, director of the University Learning Center, Wednesday, June 27, from 2 to 4 p.m. at the J. Lloyd Stone Alumni Center.

Cheryl has served as director of the University Learning Center for over five years. She has accepted the position of Dean of Counseling, Advising, and Retention with the Minneapolis Community and Technical College. Please join us in thanking Cheryl for her many contributions while at UND. - University Learning Center.

Farewell reception honors Donna Brown Wednesday

A farewell reception for Donna Brown, program coordinator for American Indian Student Services, will be held from 2 to 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 27, at the American Indian Center, 315 Princeton St. Please join us in wishing Donna well. - American Indian Student Services.

Doctoral examination set for Timothy Beecher

The final examination for Timothy Beecher, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Counseling Psychology, is set for 11 a.m. Thursday, June 28, in 318 Montgomery Hall. The dissertation title is "Questioning the Consumer Culture: A Qualitative Study on Voluntary Simplicity." Cindy Juntunen (Counseling Psychology) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Robert L. Reis II

The final examination for Robert L. Reis II, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Counseling Psychology, is set for 1:30 p.m. Thursday, June 28, in 318 Montgomery Hall. The dissertation title is "Men and Therapy: Comparisons of College Men Who Have Sought Therapy and Have Not Sought Therapy." David Whitcomb (Counseling Psychology) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

UNESCO consultant visits campus June 28-29

Clinton Robinson, a consultant in education and development for UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization), will visit UND to talk about a variety of topics Thursday and Friday. Robinson's visit is sponsored by the Summer Institute of Linguistics (SIL). Among Robinson's topics: literacy, sustaining development in developing countries, minority and indigenous languages, and Education for All, a movement to provide basic education for children, youth and adults. Robinson is involved in the coordination and monitoring of "Education for All" programs.

Robinson holds a Ph.D. in sociolinguistics from Reading University. He has published in the areas of literacy, minority language development, and the sustainability of development programs. He worked with Summer Institute of Linguistics, first in Africa and later as an international consultant, and eventually in Paris to represent SIL to UNESCO. Robinson is highly respected for his advocacy work for minority languages. He lives in Paris.

Robinson's talks are free and open to the public.

Thursday, June 28:
* 8 to 11 a.m., "Literacy and Its Place in Educational Development Efforts, International Understandings of Literacy, the UND Literacy Decade," Room 10, Merrifield Hall.
* 8 to 9 p.m., "Education for All: Aims, Progress, Challenges, Links with Development and the Millennium Development Goals," Room 5, Gamble Hall.

Friday, June 29:
* 8 to 11 a.m., "Models of Development, Concern for Africa, Links with Sustainable Development," Room 10, Merrifield Hall.
* 1 to 2 p.m., "Sociolinguistics - Minority and Indigenous Languages in the International System - Conventions, Declarations, Trends and Initiatives," Room 7, Gamble Hall.

Robinson works as a senior programme specialist with UNESCO. Based in Paris, he is part of the coordination team for the Education for All movement and the UN Literacy Decade. He previously worked as an independent consultant in education and development, and prior to that worked with SIL International. He worked in a language project in Cameroon, as branch director and later in training in the United Kingdom. He set up the SIL UK Literacy and Development Liaison Unit (later International Programmes), and developed SIL International’s relationship with the UN system. He holds degrees from Oxford (M.A.), Paris (Licence and Maîtrise) and Reading (M.A. and Ph.D.). His Ph.D. research looked at language use in rural development in Africa. His publications and research interests include sociolinguistics, literacy and basic education, development and international networking.

If you wish to discuss other topics with Robinson, contact Diana Weber, Johnstone 110, 777-8338.

Note date change for Native America Calling radio show

Ric Ferraro, psychology, will be a guest on a radio broadcast about Native Americans and Alzheimer's Disease on Native America Calling. The show date is Friday, June 29, from noon to 1 p.m. Central Time.
A description of the show follows: Experts say Native people are living longer, but more and more elders are showing symptoms of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. And Ric Ferraro, a professor of psychology at the University of North Dakota, says he believes that some health professionals are rushing to diagnose Alzheimer's instead of first ruling out other causes such as a vitamin deficiency in the elderly. Ferraro, who is credited with creating the first assessment test for elderly Native Americans, says more studies need to be done to help serve the Native community. What are your risk factors for developing Alzheimer's?

Retirement ceremony for Master Sgt. David P. Miller is June 29

A retirement ceremony will be held for Master Sgt. David Miller, Air Force ROTC instructor at Detachment 610, University of North Dakota, will be held in the UND Armory Friday, June 29, at 1 p.m. We would appreciate your attendance as the United States Air Force honors and thanks him for over 21 years of dedicated service to the United States.
-- Diane Fugleberg, Admin Asst, Air Force ROTC, dianefugleberg@mail.und.edu, 777-0437

Retirement reception is July 6 for Mary Butzin

The School of Communication invites you to a retirement reception for Mary Butzin, administrative assistant. Mary has served the University for 30 years and the School of Communication for over 11 years. Please join us Friday, July 6, from 1 to 2 p.m. in 200 O'Kelly Hall 200 to wish her well.
-- Shelle Michaels, events, communication, shellemichaels@msn.com, 218-779-7271

Doctoral examination set for Pamela Ann Walker

The final examination for Pamela Ann Walker, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Educational Leadership, is set for 9 a.m. Monday, July 9, in Room 208, Education Building. The dissertation title is "The Perceptions of Proteges Regarding the Impact of the North Dakota Teacher Mentoring Program on K-12 Pedagogy." Larry Klundt (Educational Leadership) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Laura Zucca

The final examination for Laura Zucca, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Teaching and Learning, is set for 9 a.m. Monday, July 9, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "Ready to Fly: Voices of International Graduate Students at the University of North Dakota." Myrna Olson (Teaching and Learning) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Lei Ding

The final examination for Lei Ding, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, is set for 2 p.m. Monday, July 9, in Room 1350, Reed Keller Lecture Hall, School of Medicine and Health Sciences. The dissertation title is "Altered Signaling by Fibronectin Fragments Creates a Potent Chondrolytic State." Gene Homandberg (Biochemistry) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Free tobacco cessation classes offered

Are you ready to quit smoking? The Wellness Center is offering free tobacco cessation classes and nicotine replacement therapy to the campus community. Classes begin Monday, July 9, at 4:45 p.m. in the Wellness Center classroom. For more information or to register for the class, contact Theresa Knox at (701)787-8140 or tknox@grandforksgov.com. To learn more about all that UND has to offer for tobacco cessation, visit http://www.undstudenthealth.com/tobacco.html.
-- Amanda Eickhoff, Assistant Director for Work Well, Wellness Center, amandaeickhoff@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-0210

Doctoral examination set for Jason Douglas Hornbacher

The final examination for Jason Douglas Hornbacher, a candidate for the Ed.D. degree with a major in Educational Leadership, is set for 5 p.m. Monday, July 9, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "Elementary School Administrator Technology Skills and Their Impact on Teacher Technology Integration Competencies." Larry Klundt (Educational Leadership) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Summer Graduation Expo set for July 10

The Summer Grad Expo will be held Tuesday, July 10, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on the main floor of the Memorial Union. A visit to the Expo will be a one-stop information source for students graduating Aug. 3. The Registrar's Office will be on hand with a list of students eligible to graduate and is able to verify addresses for mailing of diplomas. The UND Bookstore and Herff Jones will have regalia, diploma covers, frames, and class rings for purchase and viewing. Financial Aid can answer questions about student loan payments. Career Services will assist with any job search. The Alumni Association will explain services to new graduates. Additional information about UND's Graduate School, photographers, and catering will also be available. Faculty are invited to attend and check out custom regalia that can be ordered through the Barnes & Noble UND Bookstore. If you have any questions about the Expo, contact the Office of Ceremonies and Special Events at 777-6393 or e-mail dawnbotsford@mail.und.nodak.edu. For more information about Summer Commencement 2006, visit this web page at http://commencement.und.edu.
-- Dawn Botsford, Events Coordinator, Office of Ceremonies and Special Events, dawnbotsford@mail.und.nodak.edu, 701-777-6393

Doctoral examination set for Christie Lynn Rood

The final examination for Christie Lynn Rood, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Educational Leadership, is set for 2 p.m. Tuesday, July 10, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "Risk and Protective Factors Related to Female/Male Use of Alcohol in Grades 7-12." Donald Lemon (Educational Leadership) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Alexander Azenkeng

The final examination for Alexander Azenkeng, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Chemistry, is set for 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 11, in 138 Abbott Hall. The dissertation title is "Theoretical Studies of Low-Lying Electronic States of Lithium, Titanium, and Mercury Compounds." Mark Hoffmann (Chemistry) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Michael Gallo

The final examination for Michael Paul Gallo, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Teaching and Learning, is set for 2 p.m. Friday, July 13, in Room 104, Education Building. The dissertation title is "College Students Diagnosed with ADHD: Insights Into Their Experiences." Glenn Olsen (Teaching and Learning) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Alumni hosts Detroit Lakes Pavilion party

UND alumni, faculty, staff and friends are invited to join us Friday, July 27, at the Detroit Lakes Pavilion Party.

Take a step back in time and remember the evenings spent at the Pavilion—dancing, hanging out with friends, and making connections that will last you a lifetime. Even if you didn’t spend summers in the area, we’d love to have you join us to meet and make new UND friends. The band Past Due will perform that night. It will be an evening full of fun!

Detroit Lakes Pavilion, 1361 Washington Ave., Detroit Lakes, Minn. Social/picnic at 6:30 p.m.; dance at 8 p.m. Cost is $25 per person or $15 for kids 12 and under. There are two easy ways to register: online at www.undalumni.org or call Barb Merrill at (701) 777-2611 or (800) 543-8764.

Help us spread the word about this fun event! Not everyone will receive an invitation, as we don’t have addresses for everyone who summers or spends weekends in that area. So share this invite with other UND alumni, family and friends– you’re all invited! This will be a “rockin’ night!” Please help us spread the word. We’ll see you at the Pavilion! -- UND Alumni Association and Foundation.

Young Scientists and Engineers Academy offered

The School of Engineering and Mines is hosting the Young Scientists and Engineers Academy July 30 to Aug. 2 and Aug. 6-10. YSA is designed to provide hands-on learning experiences in the sciences and engineering for youth in grades 7 through 10.

Youth participants will have the opportunity to enhance their mathematics, science, and technological knowledge through classroom discussion, hands-on laboratory experimentation, computer application and field trips. They will also develop problem solving and critical thinking skills, and build effective teamwork and personal collaborative skills.

Participants will learn about science and engineering concepts and how they apply to everyday life through a variety of activities, including:
• recovering and examining crime scene evidence, such as shoeprints or bite marks.
• hunting for treasures with the use of global positioning system (GPS) tools.
• building sensor-driven lighted electronic devices (LED).
• using mathematics to predict the motion of a roller coaster and of a launched ball.

Off-campus field trips will visit the Wastewater Treatment Plant in Grand Forks, and the Irrigation Water Well and the Turtle River Riparian project near Larimore, N.D.

This program is brought to you in part by the School of Engineering and Mines, Summer Programs and Events Council, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Energy and Environmental Research Center, Forensic Science Program, Women’s Center, Distance Engineering Degree Program, Dakota Science Center, and the Grand Forks Public School Career and Technical Education Program.

YSA will be facilitated by Cheryl Osowski, outreach coordinator of the School of Engineering and Mines.

The program will be held from 8 a.m. to noon daily. Participants can attend either one week of academy activities for a $60 fee or both weeks for a $90 fee. The registration deadline is July 13. To register, call the UND Summer Events Office at 777-0841 or visit the web site for the program brochure and registration form at www.summer.und.edu.
-- Julie Bean, Summer Events Program Specialist, Division of Continuing Education, juliebean@mail.und.edu, 701-777-0441

Phil Harmeson named vice president for general administration

Phil Harmeson, who served as the "Senior Associate to the President" for the past six years, is having his position and title upgraded to that of "Vice President for General Administration" by UND President Charles Kupchella. The UND Athletics Department and the Office of Affirmative Action will report to Mr. Harmeson under this new administrative title. Mr. Harmeson will still be responsible for governmental affairs and other special assignments from the President's Office. Also, the Conflict Resolution Center will now report to the Office of the Provost. Mr. Harmeson's appointment and the new reporting lines are effective July 1. "University presidents around the country have to spend more time dealing with external constituent groups and issues, especially in the context of fundraising and development," said Kupchella. "I came to the conclusion - after consulting senior campus leadership - that I had too many direct reports. I am most confident Phil will do an outstanding job in his new role, and it will strengthen the campus as we move forward." - Charles Kupchella, President.

Nursing appoints interim associate dean

The College of Nursing is pleased to announce that Julie Anderson has been appointed to serve as interim associate dean of graduate studies and director of the Ph.D. program. Dr. Anderson will replace Ginny Guido, who has taken a position with Washington State University in Vancouver, Wash.

Dr. Anderson is currently an associate professor of nursing, has chaired and served on several graduate committees, and is a strong advocate for the college’s graduate initiatives. Several letters of commendation were received from graduate students regarding Dr. Anderson's mentorship quality and support for their programs of study.

Dr. Anderson received her B.S.N. in 1979 and M.S.N. in 1996, both from the UND College of Nursing. In 2000 she received her Ph.D. in research methodologies from the UND College of Education and Human Development. She is a practicing nurse at Altru and is a published and noted researcher on issues of wound management and technology.

A search committee will be formed in August to conduct a national search for the permanent associate dean position.
-- Becky Cournia, Alumni & Development Coordinator, College of Nursing, beckycournia@mail.und.edu, 777-4526

Applicants sought for Carnegie Scholars opportunity

The Carnegie Corporation is seeking applicants to the Carnegie Scholars Program, which supports research that “extends the boundaries of knowledge about Islam and Muslim communities.” Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents, and they may be either recent Ph.D.s or established scholars. Suggested topics include Islam in relationship to law, science, banking, property, pluralism, or tolerance; educational systems in Muslim communities; the role of women within Muslim societies; the relation of Islam to the state, including the secular state; the relation of Islam with other religions; Islam and nationalism; Muslim communities within the United States; the appeal of Islam; and the changing nature of Islam within a contemporary context. Applications are due by Aug. 27. For more information about the program and the application process, contact Joan Hawthorne at <joan_hawthorne@und.nodak.edu>.
-- Joan Hawthorne, Assistant Provost, Provost Office, joan_hawthorne@und.nodak.edu, 7-4684

Note changes to general education course listings

As announced at the April meeting of the University Senate by the General Education Requirements Committee, starting with the 2007-2009 Academic Catalog, specific general education courses will not be listed in the hard copy. The general education section of the catalog retains a discussion of the purpose for general education at UND as well as the link to the web page (within the registrar's web site) where the current list of approved courses can be found (http://www.und.edu/dept/registrar/GERcommittee/gerindex.htm). This information is located on Page 32 of the 2007-2009 catalog.

The change has been made to allow for yearly updates to the list of approved courses, consistent with the ongoing work of the GERC. The change also allows more flexibility in the implementation of any changes to the general education program at UND through work of groups such as the GERC or General Education Task Force. Advisors are encouraged to bookmark the above web site and to bring it to the attention of their advisees.
-- Matthew Cavalli, Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering, matthewcavalli@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-4389

Need help in choosing a new text for your class?

Benchmark with faculty across the United States with Barnes & Noble's Faculty Center Network. See what texts other faculty in colleges and universities around the country are using to teach a similar curriculum.

Find out which books are the most popular choices and what your colleagues have to say about them. Get more information to help you choose the best text for you and your students. Go to www.facultycenter.net

Are you ready to give us your book request? Give us a call, send it to us via campus mail, or e-mail und.bncollege.com
-- Michelle Abernathey, General Manager, Barnes & Noble at UND, michelle_aberanthey@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2103

Wednesday, July 4, is holiday

Wednesday, July 4, Independence Day, will be observed as a holiday by faculty and staff members of the University. Only those employees designated by their department heads will be required to work on this holiday. -- Greg Weisenstein, vice president for academic affairs and provost, and Diane Nelson, director, human resources.

University Letter will be published Thursday, July 5

The University Letter will be published Thursday, July 5, because of the Independence Day holiday on Wednesday, July 4.
-- Jan Orvik, Writer/Editor, University Relations, janorvik@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3621

Chester Fritz Library lists July 4 hours

The Chester Fritz Library will be closed Wednesday, July 4, (Independence Day).
-- Karen Cloud, Administrative Assistant, Chester Fritz Library, karencloud@mail.und.edu, 7-2618

Library of the Health Sciences lists holiday hours

The Library of the Health Sciences will close Tuesday, July 3, at 5 p.m., and remain closed Wednesday, July 4, for Independence Day.
-- April Byars, Administrative Assistant, Library of the Health Sciences, abyars@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-3893

Fourth of July hours listed for law library

In observance of the Fourth of July, the law library will be closed Wednesday, July 4.
-- Jane Oakland, Circulation Manager, Law Library, oakland@law.und.edu, 7-3482

UND program teaches kids to love reading

For more than 20 years, the College of Education and Human Development has helped area children find their love of reading through the Summer Reading Program, a tradition that continues this summer.

The College and the Department of Teaching and Learning work in collaboration with the Grand Forks Public School District, and several rural schools in the area. The program is designed to promote the literacy development of young readers and writers. In addition, the program serves as a clinical practicum for undergraduates majoring in elementary education and graduate students enrolled in either the Reading or Elementary Education master's programs. It is designed for children entering the second to seventh grades in the coming fall.

"Each February, faculty in the college contact teachers and principals in the surrounding schools to help identify children who would benefit from participating in the Summer Reading Program," said Shelby Barrentine, professor of teaching and learning, and director of the Reading Program.

"Then, on the recommendation of school professionals, families apply to have their children participate in the program. University students who want to specialize in reading education register for the courses associated with the Summer Reading Program."

In June, undergraduate and graduate students in the college take a course in assessment and instructional methods. In the class students learn to diagnose reading difficulties and to use methods of instruction to help children develop reading skills and strategies. In July the Summer Reading Program takes effect as college students work with one or two children under the supervision of two course instructors.

The program is interactive with the children participating in a four-week quest to become better readers. There is also a variety of fun activities in which the children take part including mini-field trips to interesting sites around campus.

"The children read books, practice word recognition and comprehension strategies, hear guest storybook readers," said Barrentine, "and take a field trip to Barnes & Noble where they may choose a free book. Through these events, college students learn to teach readers with specific needs. Besides benefiting from supportive, summer instruction in reading, the children gain the valuable experience of being on the college campus for academic purposes."

The UND College of Education and Human Development has nearly 1,500 undergraduate and graduate students in six departments, including Counseling Psychology and Community Services, Educational Foundations and Research, Educational Leadership, Physical Education, Exercise Science and Wellness, Social Work, and Teaching and Learning. The mission is fostering healthy human development and learning across the lifespan. The departments employ multi-faceted approaches to education, relying on teaching, research and service in the education of students.

Reduce the price of textbooks today

We need your book order requests prior to the end of this term. Time is running out to help students save money on textbooks. Students will be bringing back unwanted titles at the end of the term. By submitting your book order request prior to this, students can save money. Students in your class this term win if you are using the same book, as we can buy them from your students and pay them up to 50 percent for their current text. Students in your class next term win because we not only buy books from our current students, but we can also get an early start of sourcing books nationally to get the most used text inventory possible. Used books are 25 percent off the new book price.

Are you ready to give us your book request? Give our textbook department a call and we would be happy to take your book information over the phone. Contact Tina Monette at 777-2103, Casey Johnson or Darin Kerr at 777-2748.
-- Michelle Abernathey, General Manager, Barnes & Noble at UND, michelle_aberanthey@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2103

Promote your UND summer event for free

If you would like more publicity for your UND summer event, post your information on the UND summer events calendar by going to the online form at www.summer.und.edu or by calling 777-0841.

We are presently marketing the Summer at UND web site to the Greater Grand Forks Community and beyond, so submit your information now to take part in the prime marketing time.

More reasons to submit your information:
• Post your event brochure
• Link your event web site
• Potential to reach a larger audience
• Free publicity!

The Summer at UND marketing campaign is sponsored by the UND Summer Programs and Events Council.

If you have any questions, please visit www.summer.und.edu or call the wummer events office at 777-0841.
-- Jolene Marsh, Summer Events Office Assistant, Continuing Education, jolenemarsh@mail.und.edu, 777-0841

Summer at UND Program offers activities, courses

The University of North Dakota’s Summer Events program offers a wide range of activities for the community during the summer months, such as cultural or athletic events, youth camps or specialized workshops. Events are typically open to the public.

Here are many of those events happening at UND July 1-15, 2007:

• July 5-6, All Skills Volleyball Camp, Hyslop Sports Center
• July 6, UND Observatory Summer Star Party, at dusk, UND Observatory
• July 7-8, Setter/Hitter Volleyball Camp, Hyslop Sports Center
• July 8-14, Boys and Girls Hockey Camp, Ralph Engelstad Arena
• July 8-15, 24th Annual International Aerospace Camp, Odegard Hall
• July 9-10, Improving Creative Writing Using Six Traits, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Memorial Union*
• July 9-11, Girls Elementary Basketball Camp, Betty Engelstad Sioux Center
• July 9-13, Summer Art Day Camp: Traveling, 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., Hughes Fine Arts Center
• July 9-14, Musical Theatre Program, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Chandler Hall
• July 11-12, How to Reach the Hard to Teach, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Memorial Union*
• July 13, UND Observatory Summer Star Party, at dusk, UND Observatory
• July 14, Musical Theatre Showcase Performance, 7:30 p.m., Burtness Theatre
• July 15-19, Girls Basketball Camp, Betty Engelstad Sioux Center
• July 15-19, Boys Basketball Shooting / Competition Camp, Betty Engelstad Sioux Center
• July 15-21, Boys and Girls Hockey Camp, Ralph Engelstad Arena

*Designed for K-12 educators
**Designed for ages 55+, courses meet two times per week

For more information about the "Summer at UND" program, to register for UND's Summer Sessions, or to view a calendar of events from July 1 to Aug. 31, visit www.summer.und.edu. If you have additional questions on summer credit courses, call the Summer Sessions Office at (701) 777-6284. Or if you have questions on events/activities, contact the Summer Events Office at (701) 777-0841.
-- Jolene Marsh, Summer Events Office Assistant, Continuing Education, jolenemarsh@mail.und.edu, 777-0841

Bronson property apartments now available

Looking for a spacious apartment with a convenient location? Check out the new two- and three-bedroom units now available for immediate occupancy in the latest development on the Bronson property. These units are located above the new retail shopping area at 2855 10th Ave. N. Units are spacious with neutral decor and include microwave and dishwasher, laundry hook-ups, storage and air-conditioning. Residents are responsible for cable, internet, phone and electric heat. A three bedroom/two bathroom unit includes a master bedroom with attached master bathroom and rents for $1,200 per month. A two bedroom/one bathroom unit rents for $850 per month. Residents should be UND students, faculty or staff; students need to be 21 years of age. Call the UND Housing Office at 777-4251 for more information, or to schedule a showing.
-- Judy Sargent, Director of Residence Services, Residence Services, judysargent@mail.und.edu, 777-4251

Host families sought for international students

ELS Language Centers is seeking families in the community interested in opening their homes to host international students. These students are studying in an intensive English language program on the UND campus and would like an American family experience. Host families provide transportation to and from school and provide two meals a day. Remuneration is provided to cover basic costs. For more information, please contact Kristin Pauls at 746-1013 or the center at 777-6785.
-- Jill Shafer, Center Director, ELS Language Centers, jill.shafer@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-6755

Internal job openings listed

The following position vacancies are available only to regular UND staff employees who have successfully completed their six-month probation period, earn annual and sick leave, receive BC/BS health insurance and TIAA-CREF or ND PERS retirement benefits. Current UND faculty, please contact Human Resources for eligibility.

TO APPLY: Please complete UND Application/Control Card form. Send letter of application and resume, referencing position name and number, to: Human Resources, University of North Dakota, Twamley Hall, Room 313, 264 Centennial Drive Stop 8010, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8010. Applications MUST be received by the deadline date.

EXECUTIVE/PROFESSIONAL/ADMINISTRATIVE/ATHLETIC COACHES:

POSITION: Air Traffic Control Associate (variable schedule), #07-353
DEADLINE: (I) 07/02/2007
SALARY: $18,000 - $18,350

POSITION: Lead Instructor/Flight Manager, #07-352
DEADLINE: (I) 7/02/2007
SALARY: $29,126-$35,000

POSITION: Research Specialist, Energy & Environmental Research Center, #07-351
DEADLINE: (I) 7/2/2007
SALARY: $35,000-$55,000

POSITION: Program Coordinator, American Indian Student Services, #07-350
DEADLINE: (I) 7/2/2007
SALARY: $36, 500 or Commensurate with Experience

POSITION: Performance Administrator, ITSS, #07-349
DEADLINE: (I) 7/02/2007
SALARY: $40,000-$50,000

POSITION: Storage Administrator, ITSS, #07-348
DEADLINE: (I) 7/2/2007
SALARY: $40,000-$50,000

POSITION: Environmental Health & Safety Manger/Radiation Safety Officer, Safety & Environmental Health, #07-346
DEADLINE: (I) 6/28/2007
SALARY: Commensurate with Experience

POSITION: Research Specialist, Energy and Environmental Research Center, #07-344
DEADLINE: (I) 6/28/2007
SALARY: $50,000-$60,000

POSITION: Network Analyst, ITSS, #07-347
DEADLINE: (I) 6/28/2007
SALARY: $40,000-$47,500

POSITION: Head, Special Collections, #07-326
DEADLINE: 7/16/2007 or until filled. (Applications received by July 16 will be given first consideration.)
SALARY: $58,000 - $60,000

TECHNICAL/PARAPROFESSIONAL:

Position: Aircraft Dispatcher (Variable schedule), Aerospace, #07-354
DEADLINE: (I) 7/2/2007
SALARY: $20,000-$22,000

OFFICE SUPPORT:

POSITION: Office Assistant & Float Receptionist/Scheduler (M-F, variable 8hr work schedule), Center for Family Medicine - Bismarck, #07-345
DEADLINE: (I) 6/27/2007
SALARY: $16,640-$21,320

CRAFTS/TRADES/SERVICE: No current vacancies.

NORTH DAKOTA UNIVERSITY SYSTEM POSITION OPENINGS:

Junior Applications Analyst
Office Accountant
-- Jan Orvik, Writer/Editor, University Relations, janorvik@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3621

Med students study, train through ROME program

Ten medical students from the School of Medicine and Health Sciences will study and train with practicing physicians in communities throughout North Dakota through the Rural Opportunities in Medical Education (ROME) program during the 2007-08 academic year.

"This is the largest number of medical students to participate in the ROME program since its inception in 1998," said Roger Schauer, program director and associate professor of family and community medicine. He attributes the popularity of the program to "former ROME students who recruit other students by sharing their excitement and positive experiences, as well as how much they learned and enjoyed the program. The program really sells itself."

On July 9, third-year medical students will begin seven months of training in Hettinger, Jamestown and Williston, learning about rural health care firsthand through the ROME program.

The ROME program is an interdisciplinary experience in a rural primary care setting which allows students to live and train under the supervision of physician-instructors in communities throughout North Dakota. Generally, the ROME program places two students in each community. Later in the academic year, other students will begin in Dickinson and Devils Lake.

Students learn about problems commonly encountered in primary care, from routine health maintenance to medical emergencies and rare or unusual diagnoses, according to Schauer. Teaching physicians are board-certified in family medicine, surgery, internal medicine, pediatrics and obstetrics-gynecology, as well as subspecialists who serve that community.

"ROME is an exceptional educational opportunity for the motivated student who wants to experience and learn the practice of medicine in a small-town setting," said Robert Beattie, chair of family and community medicine at the UND medical school. "It is a truly exciting educational environment with more opportunities to learn than there is time to take advantage of them.

One of the many objectives of the ROME program is to allow students to learn about patients in the context of continuous care over seven months, which is proving a popular aspect among students. Another benefit of staying with one organization for seven months is that students become members of the health care team. They also experience the scope of care provided in a rural setting.

"There are two students at the site and the experience is longitudinal," Beattie said. "This allows the students to know the hospital, clinics and community, and the people who work and live there. The community also gets to know them."

The ROME program "is good for the communities where students are placed too," explained Schauer. "The students become part of the community. They may teach Sunday school, assist coaches, become members of musical groups or play on sports teams.

"One of the great advantages for the communities," he said, "is that they have the opportunity to begin the process of recruiting the students to come back and establish their practices once they have finished their medical training."

The students, who will complete their studies through the ROME program in February 2008, are members of the Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) Class of 2009. After earning the M.D. degree, it is expected they will go on for residency training in the specialty of their choice; such training takes three to five years.

Funding for ROME is made possible through the Office of the Dean at the UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences.
-- Shelley Pohlman, Asst. to the Director, Public Affairs, spohlman@medicine.nodak.edu, 701-777-4305

Physical therapy program reaccredited for 10 years

The physical therapy program at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences has been reaccredited for 10 years by the national agency which accredits more than 200 such programs across the United States.

The reaccreditation report from the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education included four commendations for the program and cited no areas of non-compliance, a rare phenomenon. The program offers a Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) degree through the Department of Physical Therapy.

"It is unusual" for a program not to be required to file a progress report to address certain issues as part of the reaccreditation process, said Tom Mohr, professor and chair of physical therapy. UND's program is one of only two, of those reviewed this year, which had no deficiencies and no progress report.

The report gave particular emphasis to the high quality of the faculty, both academic, those teaching at the university, and clinical, those who are affiliated with the program and teach at more than 300 sites in 24 states. It also noted that the program "has made concerted efforts to train clinical faculty in the use of library search and resource opportunities," adding that these efforts are "likely to result in more evidence-based practice in the clinical community..."

The CAPTE report commended the program "for providing continuing education opportunities for clinical educators which has enabled more than 200 physical therapists to become certified clinical instructors, thus improving the quality of clinical education for PT students in the region."

Reviewers commended UND on its "strong clinical program," Mohr said, noting that students spend 36 weeks learning from clinical preceptors, nine weeks each in the areas of acute care, orthopedics, neuro-rehabilitation and a specialty of choice such as pediatrics or sports medicine.

"The outcome assessment program was highly rated," Mohr said. This is an effort by the department to obtain valuable feedback from students, graduates, employers and patients, and clinical instructors that can be used to make improvements in the program.

It also cited the high quality of the students and how well they do, the program and the curriculum, he said. It recognized that the UND program "is a major resource for the PT workforce in North Dakota and the mid-western region."

"I am especially proud of the faculty," Mohr said. "And the school's administration has been very good, in terms of supporting our program.

"I'm also very proud of the students," he said. "Our students, when they come in -- and as graduates -- are really quite positive about the program."

This was the first accreditation visit for the PT program since the Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) degree program was initiated in 2002. The DPT degree takes three and one half years to complete following a pre-physical therapy program of at least three years. The program admits 48 students in each class for a total enrollment of 144 at UND's Grand Forks campus.

The department also offers an online DPT degree that does not require students to come to the UND campus. The program has been completed by 50 students. Another 35 students, all of whom are physical therapists who have been employed for several years and wish to earn an advanced degree in their field, will complete it in December.

In carrying out its role of accrediting PT programs, the CAPTE "has an obligation to assure the public that individuals entering the profession are receiving an education that prepares them to provide competent, safe, effective patient care," said Leslie Portney, CAPTE chair in a letter accompanying the report to President Charles Kupchella. "This decision confirms that the program at the University of North Dakota is doing just that."
-- Shelley Pohlman, Asst. to the Director, Public Affairs, spohlman@medicine.nodak.edu, 701-777-4305

Remembering Lloyd Blazer

Lloyd Oliver Blazer, retired equipment operator in Facilities, died June 19 in Townsend, Mont. He was 80.

Blazer, the son of Oliver and Bonnie (Davidson) Blazer, was born Jan. 3, 1927, in Oakes, N.D. He was raised and received his education in Oakes. He served on the USS Topeka and USS Bremerton in the United States Navy during World War II.

Lloyd and Lois Newark were married June 17, 1951. He worked for Nash Finch in Grand Forks, Groves Kelco in Williston, N.D., and Billings, Mont. They returned to Grand Forks in 1973, where he worked first at Durkin Brothers Excavating, and then as an equipment operator at the University of North Dakota. They moved to Townsend, Mont., in 1998.

Lloyd enjoyed gardening, camping, hunting, fishing, and above all, spending time with his family. He was a lifetime member of the V.F.S. and loved the Sioux hockey at UND.

He was preceded in death by his wife Lois; his parents; two brother-and-sister-in-laws.

Survivors include a son and three daughters: Mark Blazer of Winston, Brenda Blazer (Tom Nehring) of Bismarck, N.D.; Lola Blazer (Ruben Obregon) of Minot, N.D.; and Beth Blazer, White Hall, Ark.; nine grandchildren, one great granddaughter, two brothers, one sisters, and numerous nieces and nephews.

A graveside services with military honors was held June 22 at the Deep Creek Cemetery in Townsend. Memorials in Lloyd's name are suggested to any veteran's organization of the donor's choice.