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ISSUE: Volume 47, Number 13: November 18, 2009

Contents
Top Stories
President Kelley will give State of the University Address Dec. 1
A message from President Kelley on the Great American Smokeout and UND's tobacco-free campus policy
President Kelley, First Lady invite Rugby community to "Coffee With the Kelleys"
Events to Note
Doctoral examination set for Kimberly Crowley
Culinary Corner events listed
UND Global Visions Films Series continues with "Sangre De Mi Sangre"
Theatre Arts presents "Two Rooms"
Honors program will sell BeadforLife jewelry Nov. 17-19
UND to celebrate Geography Awareness Week, GIS Day with Gov. Hoeven's support
November's Denim Day comes early
Doctoral examination set for Jeffrey Stotts
Learn how to use your digital camera at workshop
School lunch politics is the subject of film and discussion
Work Well updates listed
Doctoral examination set for Karen Miller
University Senate agenda items due
"The Disappeared" exhibition to open at the Museum
Lecture on Second Amendment right to bear arms is Nov. 19
Japan Night is Thursday
Discussion on international indigenous human rights is Nov. 19
A Law Conversation with Steve Sanders is Friday
Pharmacology, Physiology & Therapeutics seminar is November 20
Retirement reception will honor Shirley Griffin
Doctoral examination set for Christian Y. Biaku
Physics & Astrophysics colloquium is Nov. 20
Grand Forks Master Chorale concert is Nov. 20
Doctoral examination set for Steven W. Swiontek
Doctoral examination set for Sunita Sharma
UND Jazz Ensembles celebrate big band era
Anatomy and Cell Biology seminar is Nov. 23
Doctoral examination set for Christa J. Grant
Doctoral examination set for David Lo
Tonic Sol-fa will play holiday concert in the Chester Fritz Auditorium
Human rights symposium will take place at Museum of Art
Astronomy public talk is Nov. 24
Aviv String Quartet to Perform at the Museum of Art
Doctoral examination set for Martha Lystad
Doctoral examination set for Elizabeth A. Hughes
Doctoral examination set for Sandra Hazelton
Faculty canidate to present seminar
Essential Studies open house is Dec. 4
Volunteers needed for Winter Commencement
Announcements
100% renewable jet fuel receives Popular Science's Best of What's New award
Flexible benefits open enrollment deadline is Nov. 30
Mini-grants available for summer programs/events
Foundations of Biomedical Science seminar series is Nov. 20
University Within the University (U2) lists new classes
APA Publication Manual was misprinted
How to approach a student you are concerned about
Chester Fritz Library Thanksgiving hours
Library of the Health Sciences lists Thanksgiving hours
Law Library posts Thanksgiving holiday hours
Bookstore seeks temporary employees
International Programs seeks volunteers to serve Thanksgiving dinner
Staff Senate announces November U-Shine award winner
Staff Senate seeks U-Shine award nominations
Order holiday party platters from Campus Catering
UND Students Recognized as Rising Stars
Nominations sought for Outstanding Faculty Academic Adviser award
Museum Cafe announces new menu
Internal job openings listed
International Centre lists holiday hours
Research
NSF program announcement with limited submission restrictions
In the News
Nursing receives $7,500 scholarship grant from Dakota Medical Foundation
UND Receives Two Regional Awards from the University Continuing Education Association
Tony Trimarco receives the Siggelkow-Starr award
In Remembrance
John S. Penn remembered
President Kelley will give State of the University Address Dec. 1

President Kelley will give the State of the University address at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 1, in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. It will be webcast live and archived at http://conted.breeze.und.nodak.edu/stateofu/ . The agenda follows:
1. State of the University Address by President Kelley
2. University Senate Status Report, Wendelin Hume, University Senate Chair
3. Matters arising, Wendelin Hume, University Senate Chair

The University Council consists of the following who are employed primarily on the Grand Forks campus: The President, the Vice Presidents, the Registrar, the Director of Libraries, all deans, all department chairpersons, all of the full time faculty of the rank of instructor, assistant professor, associate professor, and professor; program directors, coordinators, assistant and associate deans who concurrently hold faculty rank; the Director of the Counseling Center; professional librarians, and such other academic personnel and administrative officers as the Council may designate. The quorum of the Council necessary for the transaction of business is 25 percent of the Council membership (or 164 of the current 654 members). Council meetings are normally co-chaired by the chairperson of the Senate and the President of the University. The Registrar is ex officio secretary. Council meetings are open to the public, and students, staff and the general public are invited to attend.

A message from President Kelley on the Great American Smokeout and UND's tobacco-free campus policy

Dear Students, Faculty and Staff:

I would like to invite the entire campus community to join me in celebrating the American Cancer Society’s 32nd Annual Great American Smokeout, which takes place on Thursday, Nov. 19. This will also serve as an excellent opportunity to acknowledge UND’s two year anniversary of the Tobacco-Free Campus Policy . I, along with Student Health Services, the Wellness Center and Work Well, encourage every member of the community to recognize this event by abiding by and respectfully informing others of the policy, sharing information about quit tobacco options and providing support to those who quit for the day and possibly even for life.

Compliance with the tobacco-free campus policy is the responsibility and right of all UND staff, students and faculty members. The success of the policy rests with all of us, and as part of UND’s ongoing commitment to health and wellness, I hope you’ll join me and use this tremendous opportunity for every one of us, user or non-user, to offer others encouragement and support as we continue to strive to promote health and wellness within our community. To help us in this endeavor, you can download business cards to inform others of the policy and available cessation options from the tobacco-free campus website. Print copies are also available at the Student Health Promotion Office in the Memorial Union, at the Wellness Center and in the Office of the President.

UND is a leader in the tobacco-free movement and is frequently used as an example to other colleges and universities seeking to become tobacco-free. The chief purpose of the tobacco-free campus policy is to create a healthy and safe environment for all UND students, faculty and staff. Moreover, its specific mission is to reduce harm from secondhand smoke, provide an environment that encourages persons to be tobacco-free, establish a campus culture of wellness, reduce health insurance and health-care costs, and promote a tobacco free culture. The policy prohibits the use of all tobacco products in university buildings, parking structures, walkways, arenas, in the university or state fleet vehicles, and on university-owned property (to see the UND tobacco-free map click here).

Through the development of comprehensive tobacco prevention and cessation programs over the past 8 years, UND has made tremendous progress in reducing tobacco use on campus. A survey conducted by Student Health Services showed the percentage of UND students who reported smoking cigarettes in the last 30 days dropped from 33% in 2000 to 12% in 2008. In the same time period the daily usage rate dropped from 10% to 2.2% (both of the 2008 usage numbers are below the national average). These are numbers to be proud of, but much more remains to be accomplished to continue to diminish tobacco-related disease and deaths, as smoking is still the most preventable cause of death today.

Finally, any student, staff or faculty member interested in tobacco cessation help is encouraged to visit our tobacco cessation information web page where you’ll find online cessation educational information, contact numbers for cessation counseling and information on where to find self-help materials. You can also visit the Health Promotion Office on the main floor of the Student Union to find tobacco cessation education literature, pick up a “Quit Kit,” or schedule a cessation counseling session.
-- Robert O. Kelley, President

President Kelley, First Lady invite Rugby community to "Coffee With the Kelleys"

President Kelley and First Lady Marcia Kelley invite Rugby and surrounding community members to "Coffee with the Kelleys" Wednesday, Nov. 18, at The Coffee Cottage (located on U.S. 2 in Rugby). The conversation will begin at 3 p.m. Refreshments will be provided.

Bob and Marcia Kelley want to hear from you. Bring your comments and questions and visit in a casual town hall setting. Join us Wednesday, Nov. 18.

Robert Kelley began serving as UND's 11th President July 1, 2008. He had been dean of the College of Health Sciences and professor of medical education and public health at the University of Wyoming since 1999.

Before then, he was associate vice chancellor for research and executive associate dean of the graduate college at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and professor of biological sciences at the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and professor of anatomy and cell biology at the College of Medicine, both at the University of Illinois at Chicago. At the University of New Mexico, he served as chair of anatomy and senior executive associate dean, as well as other faculty capacities. He has also taught at the University of California, Berkeley.

Kelley earned his bachelor's degree in biology and chemistry from Abilene Christian University in Abilene, Texas, in 1965, and his master's degree in 1966 and doctorate in 1969, both in cell and developmental biology from the University of California, Berkeley.

Kelley has served as chair of the Assembly for the Association of American Medical Colleges, chaired the Council of Academic Societies for the AAMC, and was a member of the executive board of the National Board of Medical Examiners, which is responsible for the U.S. medical licensure examination. In addition, he has served the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on several study sections, served on the director's advisory board for NIH strategic planning, and chaired the Minority Biomedical Research Support Program advisory committee in the NIH Division of Research Resources. That program helped support research for historically black universities, tribal colleges, and "minority-majority" institutions. He also served as principal investigator for the University of Wyoming/Northern Rockies INBRE (IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence), an NIH program which promotes biomedical research and connects the state's community colleges with the University of Wyoming.

He and his wife, Marcia Bell Kelley, who was a lecturer in the University of Wyoming cepartment of Communication Disorders, have four children.
-- Peter Johnson, University Relations, 777-4317

Doctoral examination set for Kimberly Crowley

The final examination for Kimberly Crowley, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in English, is set for 1 p.m. Wednesday, Nov 25, Montgomery Hall, room 20. The dissertation title is: "What's So Simple About It? Rural and Urban Women on Television: Watching the Culture Wrestle with Feminism." Kimberly Donehower (English) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, gailholweger@mail.und.edu, 777-4005

Culinary Corner events listed

Sushi II
Nov. 17
5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Cost: $15/person
On the menu for tonight is Miso Soup, caterpillar rolls and hand rolls. See a demonstration, try it yourself, and take home a sample.

Winning Recipe Showcase
Thursday, Nov. 19
6 to 7 p.m.
Class cost: $5/person
Have a great recipe you’d like to share with Culinary Corner? You still have time to send it in. E-mail your favorite healthy recipe to karinawittmann@mail.und.edu by Tuesday, Nov. 17 at noon. The Culinary Corner staff will vote on their favorites, and the top 3 will be showcased in a Culinary Corner Class on Thursday, Nov. 19 at 6 p.m.

Thanksgiving
Friday, Nov. 20 6 p.m.
$10/person
Want to test your skills before preparing the big meal or just can't wait for Thanksgiving? Get the recipes for your Thanksgiving favorites at this Culinary Corner class. Register online for classes at wellness.und.edu . Click on Nutrition and Culinary Corner. Registration closes at noon the day before the class.
-- Karina Wittmann, Coordinator of Nutrition, Wellness Center, karinawittmann@mail.und.edu, 777-0769

UND Global Visions Films Series continues with "Sangre De Mi Sangre"

UND's department of Anthropology's Global Vision Film Series will play "Sangre De Mi Sangre" at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 17, in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl.

"Sangre De Mi Sangre" involves young illegal immigrant Pedro, ruthless ex-con Juan, and a chance for a better life. Juan attempts to escape his past by hopping on a truck full of illegal immigrants travelling to the United States. While on board the truck, Juan manipulates Pedro into building a friendship after learning about Pedro's wealthy father. Juan sees an opportunity for a better life by stealing Pedro's identity and leaving the boy with nothing. Pedro must now struggle to find the man with the keys to his future amidst the turmoil of homelessness and starvation.

"'Sangre De Mi Sangre' brings home what it's like to be illegally in another country. Penniless, speaking no English, robbed of his backpack, he has only the supposed address of his father, whom he has never met. As he cowers, dazed and shivering in the truck depot, the lights of Manhattan's skyscrapers glitter behind him like icy jack-o'-lantern teeth." - Stephen Holden, New York Times

The department of Anthropology's popular Global Visions Film Series seeks to bring an array of international films to the Grand Forks Community. Two films are presented each month in the Lecture Bowl of the Memorial Union at the University of North Dakota. Attendance is free, but a small donation of $1 is requested.

Next Upcoming Film:
Days of Glory - 7 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 1, Memorial Union Lecture Bowl

Theatre Arts presents "Two Rooms"

Americans are willing to die for and have died for freedom, but what happens when that freedom is taken away? What will we do to try and get it back? The play "Two Rooms," written by Lee Blessing, deals with these issues. The play involves the abduction of an American professor teaching at the American University in Beirut, and the story of his wife’s struggle to get him back.

"Two Rooms" is the theatre department’s student show this season. It will take place in Burtness’ Lab Theatre, an intimate space for an intimate show. Audience members will embark on an emotional roller-coaster of pain and hope that will keep them riveted in their seats.

"Two Rooms" is based on actual events. The time period between 1982 and 1991 has become known as the Lebanon Hostage Crisis in the United States. There were 96 hostages taken and tortured throughout those nine years, and ten of them died while in captivity. The character of Michael is a combination of the experiences of several of these hostages, and the play deals with real events, such as the hijacking of TWA Flight 847 where 39 people were held hostage on an airplane for 2 weeks.

Join Lainie as she navigates the line between keeping quiet and learning to speak out. Which one will bring her husband home? The answer to this question will keep you on the edge of your seat until the very end.

Performances of "Two Rooms" at the Burtness Lab Theatre on the UND campus are Nov. 17, 18, 19, 20 and 21. Each performance begins at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $12 for adults and $6 for students with a valid student I.D. Groups of ten or more people receive a $2 discount. Reserved parking will be available. For ticket information and reservations call the Box Office at 777-2587.
-- Alyssa Thompson, Publicity Assistant , Theatre Arts, alyssa.thompson@und.edu, 320-221-0588

Honors program will sell BeadforLife jewelry Nov. 17-19

The UND Honors program will be selling BeadforLife jewelry on the main floor of the Memorial Union from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Nov. 17-19. "BeadforLife eradicates extreme poverty by creating bridges of understanding between impoverished Africans and concerned world citizens. Ugandan women turn colorful recycled paper into beautiful bead jewelry, and people who care open their hearts, homes and communities to buy and sell the beads. The beads become income, food, medicine, school fees and hope." All net profits go directly back into the community from which the beads came.
-- Robin David, Associate Director, Honors Program, robin.david@und.edu, 777-6185

UND to celebrate Geography Awareness Week, GIS Day with Gov. Hoeven's support

If you want to know exactly where you're at, consult a geographer--or at least a geotechnology such as the global positioning system (GPS) or a geographic information system (GIS).

Today's geography is about lots more than maps, though that's still the core of the discipline. But not just your grandpa's road guide.

Now, GIS technology (invented by geographers) is used by just about every profession: police track crime patterns; utility companies track usage; traffic engineers figure out how to time street lights; and politicians use the technology to track voting patterns and other demographics.

These are just some of the things that the University of North Dakota College of Arts and Sciences Department of Geography will celebrate next week with Geography Awareness Week, Nov. 16-20. The festivities will include GIS Day Nov. 18.

Geography students will host an information booth in the Memorial Union all Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

The week-long celebration includes an open house in the Geographic Analysis and Remote Sensing Lab on Wednesday, Nov. 18, from 8:30 am to 4:30 p.m. in 116 O’Kelly Hall to celebrate GIS Day.

UND President Robert Kelley and Grand Forks Mayor Mike Brown have been invited to attend a special proclamation signing for GIS Day at noon in Room 116 O’Kelly Hall. North Dakota Governor Hoeven has signed a proclamation that will be presented at the same time. Stop by for refreshments and see GIS projects by UND students and faculty.

GIS stands for “geographic information system,” a now-ubiquitious family of technologies that incorporate geographical features with information about the feature or location, said Gregory Vandeberg, assistant professor, UND Geography. GIS is used to analyze real-world problems across a number of disciplines. For example, GIS can be used to determine potential flooded areas based on river crest height; another of its multiple uses would be to determine the fastest route to an emergency after a 911 call.

Basically, a GIS is software for capturing, analyzing, and displaying data related to positions on the Earth's surface. With GIS, you can explore the spatial element of data, for example to visualize UND parking patterns, to look at food service usage on campus, to analyze green buildings, to the electrical usage by building, and the like. With GIS you can analyze many types of complex problems, Vandeberg said.

The Geography department also will host a “Careers in Geography” panel discussion on Friday, Nov. 20, in the Red River Valley Room in the Memorial Union from noon to 1 p.m.
-- Juan Pedraza, Writer/Editor, University Relations, juanpedraza@mail.und.edu, 777-6571

November's Denim Day comes early

Denim Day comes early for November. Wednesday, Nov. 18 is Denim Day. Pay your coordinator your dollar, wear your denim and your pin, and enjoy going casual. If you need buttons, just let me know.
-- Patsy Nies, Special Project Assistant, Enrollment Services, patsynies@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3791

Doctoral examination set for Jeffrey Stotts

The final examination for Jeffrey Stotts, a candidate for the Ed.D. degree with a major in Teaching & Learning, is set for 3 p.m., Nov. 18, in room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is: "Stuck on the Rez: Perceptions of Native American Students' Experiences in Non-Reservation Schools." Myrna Olson (Teaching & Learning) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, gailholweger@mail.und.edu, 777-4005

Learn how to use your digital camera at workshop

If you are someone who owns a digital camera but does not know how to use it to create great pictures, this workshop is for you. You will learn about camera operation, common camera modes and their functions, and then learn to apply some tried and true tricks to get those great shots.

The "Learn Digital Photography" workshop will be held at 4 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 18, in 235 Starcher Hall. No registration is required. The free workshop is open to everyone (students, faculty, staff, and the greater Grand Forks community). "Learning Digital Photography" is sponsored by the Graphics and Photography Society, a student organization in the department of Technology.
-- Lynda Kenney, Assistant Professor, Technology, lynda.kenney@und.edu, 777-2197

School lunch politics is the subject of film and discussion

The Educational Foundations and Research Critical Documentary Film Series is proud to present the film "Two Angry Moms," a documentary chronicling two mothers' struggles to change the school food in their communities to something healthier and more sustainable. As the website proclaims, "'Two Angry Moms' shows not only on what is wrong with school food; it offers strategies for overcoming roadblocks and getting healthy, good tasting, real food into school cafeterias. The movie explores the roles the federal government, corporate interests, school administration and parents play in feeding our country's school kids." The film will be shown at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 18, in the Education Building lecture bowl, room 113. An open discussion will follow. This event is free and open to the public.
-- Marcus Weaver-Hightower, Assistant Professor, Educational Foundations and Research, mwh@und.edu, 777-3238

Work Well updates listed

Week two begins for the Work Well Fruit and Vegetable Challenge. The goal this week is to try a new fruit or vegetable.

Turn in your week one forms by Wednesday, Nov. 18, to Kim Ruliffson: workwell@mail.und.edu, kimberlyruliffson@mail.und.edu, fax: 777-6030 or intercampus: Mail Stop 8365.

As always, Tennis Shoe Tuesdays are every Tuesday. Put them on, grab a co-worker and take a walk during your lunch or a break.
-- Kim Ruliffson, Coordinator of Work Well, Wellness Center, kimberlyruliffson@mail.und.edu, 777-0210

Doctoral examination set for Karen Miller

The final examination for Karen Miller, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in English, is set for 3:30 p.m., Nov. 19, in Montgomery Hall, room 20. The dissertation title is: "The Believers: A Novel." Elizabeth Harris Behling (English) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, gailholweger@mail.und.edu, 777-4005

University Senate agenda items due

A meeting of the University Senate will be held at 4:05 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 3, in Gamble Hall, room 7. Agenda items for this meeting are due in the Office of the Registrar by noon Thursday, Nov. 19. They may be submitted electronically to: lorihofland@mail.und.nodak.edu . It is recommended that some detail be included in the agenda items submitted
-– Suzanne Anderson, Secretary, University Senate.

"The Disappeared" exhibition to open at the Museum

The North Dakota Museum of Art will host an exhibition titled "The Disappeared" between Thursday, Nov. 19, and Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2010. The exhibition will open at 4 p.m. on Nov. 19.

"The Disappeared" contains art by 23 contemporary artists from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Guatemala, Uruguay and Venezuela who, over the course of the last 30 years, have made art about the disappeared. These artists have lived through the horrors of the military dictatorships that rocked their countries in the mid-decades of the 20th century. Some worked in the resistance. Some had parents or siblings who disappeared; others were forced into exile. The youngest were born into the aftermath of those dictatorships. And still others have lived in countries maimed by endless civil war.

The exhibition was organized by the North Dakota Museum of Art and opened in North Dakota in March 2005. Subsequently it toured to Buenos Aires, Argentina; Montevideo, Uruguay; Antigua, Guatemala; Santiago de Chile; and Bogota, Colombia in addition to five sites in the United States including New York City; Washington D.C.; Santa Fe, N.M.; University of Wyoming; and the University of Texas at El Paso. The Museum of Art is bringing an expanded version of the show home in November as the final showing before dispersal.

The North Dakota Museum of Art is located on Centennial Drive, Grand Forks. Hours on weekdays is 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Hours on weekends is 1 to 5 p.m. The Museum Shop is open during these hours as well. The Museum Café is open weekdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with lunch served from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Although the Museum does not charge an admission fee, the suggested donation is $5 for adults and change for children. Wireless internet access available.
-- Brian Lofthus, Assistant to the Director, North Dakota Museum of Art, blofthus@ndmoa.com, 701-777-4195

Lecture on Second Amendment right to bear arms is Nov. 19

William G. Merkel, a visiting professor at the UND School of Law, will present a lecture titled, “The Supreme Court, the States, and the Right to Arms: Placing McDonald v. Chicago in Historical Context.” The lecture is on Nov. 19, at 12:15 p.m. in the Baker Courtroom at the School of Law. The lecture is free and open to the public. Continuing legal education credit has been applied for in North Dakota.

In its landmark District of Columbia v. Heller decision in 2008, the Supreme Court for the first time recognized a constitutional right to weapons possession unrelated to service in the lawfully established militia, holding key provisions of the most stringent handgun control laws in the country unconstitutional under the Second Amendment. That case dealt only with weapons restrictions enacted by the federal government or by the government of the District of Columbia. This coming spring, in McDonald v. Chicago and NRA v. Chicago, the Supreme Court will reconsider the Second Amendment as it decides whether to apply the right to arms against the states. Professor Merkel will discuss the constitutional principles that will guide the Court in deciding the cases.

Merkel, an associate professor of law at Washburn University who is visiting this semester at UND School of Law, is the author, with the late Richard Uviller, of The Militia and the Right to Arms, Or, How the Second Amendment Fell Silent (Duke University Press, 2002).
-- Rob Carolin, Director of Alumni & Public Relations, Law School, carolin@law.und.edu, 777-2856

Japan Night is Thursday

The Office of International Programs would like to invite you to Japan Night this Thursday, Nov. 19, at the Loading Dock in Memorial Union. The event will start at 7 p.m. with a sampling of food to follow. The event is free and the food costs $1. So come join us, learn about Japan and try some of their food.
-- Matt Hiller, International Student Advisor, Office of International Programs, matthewhiller@mail.und.edu, 777-2033

Discussion on international indigenous human rights is Nov. 19

An informal talk and open discussion on international human rights and indigenous peoples will be presented at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 19, in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl with collaboration from UND Honors students, students from the UND Law School and the department of Anthropology.

The current fieldwork in Brazil of Marcia Mikulak, associate professor of Anthropology, will be highlighted, and Mikulak, Cacique (Chief) Marcus Xukuru, and other Xukuru tribal leaders will be present via Skype from Brazil.

The evening will consist of discussions about international human rights documents by professor Gregory Gordon from the UND Law School, and a PowerPoint presentation by Joseph Mandala, currently a student in the UND School of Law, and Political Science.

Mandala traveled to Pernambuco, Brazil with Mikulak in September 2009 to meet with Cacique Marcus Xukuru and Non-Governmental human rights organizations involved in assisting Xukuru leaders in legal cases that criminalize their fight for ancestral lands. Mandala continues to assist Mikulak while she continues her human rights work in Brazil.

Films will be screened that present the history of the Xukuru’s decades long fight for the return of their traditional territories and the right to practice their cultural heritage. Discussions about how nation-states have historically created constructions about indigenous peoples that marginalize them and diminish their basic human rights will be explored. An open forum for questions and possible solutions will conclude the evenings discussions. This event is Free and open to the public, and is partially funded by the Multicultural Awareness Committee.
-- Marcia Mikulak, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, marcia.mikulak@und.edu, 701-330-1311

A Law Conversation with Steve Sanders is Friday

A Law Conversation will be held with Chicago attorney Steve Sanders in the Tisdale Lounge (2nd Floor of the Law School) on Friday, Nov. 20 from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. The public is encouraged to stop by at their convenience to meet Steve and visit with him about large firm practice, appellate practice, his Pottawattamie case, his work in LGBT advocacy or other areas you would like to discuss.

Steve is a fourth year associate at the Chicago office of the law firm Mayer Brown. Steve concentrates his practice on appellate litigation and has briefed cases and authored petitions to the U.S. Supreme Court, three state supreme courts, four U.S. courts of appeals, and various federal district courts. He has also presented oral arguments in the U.S. Supreme Court, the Illinois Supreme Court, and the 7th and 8th Circuit Courts of Appeal. Recently, Steve authored a successful petition for certiorari, briefed, and argued in the U.S. Supreme Court the case of Pottawattamie County v. McGhee, which presented novel issues about the scope of immunity for state criminal prosecutors.

Steve is also a prominent advocate for the rights of LGBT Americans. His activities in this regard include extensive writing and lecturing in defense of same-sex marriage, including service as an amicus curiae in Varnum v. Brien, in which the Iowa Supreme Court ruled unanimously that the state's statutory prohibition on same-sex marriage violated the Iowa constitution. Steve also served on the LGBT steering and policy committee for the Obama for America presidential campaign.
-- Rob Carolin, Director of Alumni & Public Relations, Law School, robc@undalumni.org, 777-2856

Pharmacology, Physiology & Therapeutics seminar is November 20

Fernando Gomez-Pinilla, professor in the department of Physiological Science, University of California, Los Angeles, will present a seminar titled “Diet and exercise are not just for fun; they can change your brain” at 2 p.m. Friday, Nov. 20 in the School of Medicine, room 3933. This seminar series is sponsored by the Center of Biomedical Research Excellence Pathophysiological Signaling in Neurodegenerative Disorders and the department of Pharmacology, Physiology & Therapeutics. All are welcome to attend.
-- Deb Kroese, Administrative Officer, Pharmacology, Physiology & Therapeutics, dkroese@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-6221

Retirement reception will honor Shirley Griffin

The Research Development and Compliance (RDC) office welcome all to attend a retirement reception in honor of Shirley Griffin. The reception will be held from 1:30 to 3 p.m. Friday, Nov. 20, at Twamley Hall Snack Bar, room 400. Shirley recently celebrated her 20th year with the University. Her experience and always helpful personality will be greatly missed. Please join us in wishing her well in her retirement.
-- Barry I. Milavetz, Associate Vice President, Division of Research and Economic Development, barrymilavetz@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-4278

Doctoral examination set for Christian Y. Biaku

The final examination for Christian Y. Biaku, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Engineering, is set for 3 p.m., Nov. 20, in room 165, Upson II. The dissertation title is: "A Macroscopic Study of the Electrochemical Modeling Parameters of a 6kW PEM Electrolyzer." Michael Mann (Chemical Engineering) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, gailholweger@mail.und.edu, 777-4005

Physics & Astrophysics colloquium is Nov. 20

Forrest Ames, mechanical engineering, will present a colloquium titled "Effects of Real World Turbulence and Realistic Roughness on Gas Turbine Vane Heat Transfer" at 4 p.m. Friday, Nov. 20, in 215 Witmer Hall. Coffee and Cookies will be served at 3:30 p.m. in 215 Witmer Hall.

Turbulence is an atmospheric phenomenon we are aware of due to the inconvenience it causes when we are flying. We also sometimes encounter turbulent buffeting when passing a large semi truck on the highway. In engineering we become aware of turbulent flow in pipes and on surfaces in fluid mechanics courses and recognize it is a function of Reynolds number. However, in gas turbine engines turbulence is generated in combustion systems to mix reactants of fuel and air with products of combustion in order to sustain the combustion process. This turbulence generated in combustion systems is then convected downstream into turbine passages. This flow field turbulence can cause substantial increases in heat transfer in regions of laminar flow and it can also lead to early transition to turbulent flow.

Another phenomena which can affect heat transfer rates on turbine surfaces is surface roughness. Generally, the surfaces of turbine components are relatively smooth after the manufacturing process. Sometimes these surfaces are polished to enhance surface smoothness to promote aerodynamic efficiency. Inside gas turbine engines, impurities in air and in fuel can soften or melt during the combustion process and these materials can deposit onto turbine surfaces. Generally, surface roughness in gas turbines can be caused by deposition of particulates, erosion of surfaces due to the impact of particulates and corrosion of turbine surfaces due to impurities in fuel. This roughening is expected to be especially prevalent in gas turbine systems which burn syn gas produced from coal. Sometimes turbine surfaces are coated with a thin layer of thermal barrier materials and these surfaces can roughen over time by similar processes. Thermal barrier coatings can also roughen due to spallation, the process of roughening due to the breaking off of a surface coating.

In engineering we are initially exposed to the influence of surface roughness with surface roughness in pipes. Most engineers are aware of Nikaradse’s famous sand grain roughness experiments where pipes were coated with sand particles and the resulting pressure drop was determined. This information has typically been presented using a Moody diagram. Investigators studying the influence of surface roughness on heat transfer and boundary layer development have often used regular roughness features such as sandgrains, sandpaper, or some type of conical or semispherical roughness. Recently, investigators who have used realistic surface, derived from actual engine surface roughness distributions or from deposition rigs.

In this presentation we will look at the impact of turbulence on vane heat transfer and boundary layer development. We will discuss the response of external turbulence to the surface of a vane and the resulting impact on the mixing across the boundary layer. We will also examine the influence of turbulence on vane aerodynamic losses and the resulting time averaged wake. Next, we will look at the additional influence of realistic roughness on vane surface transition and heat transfer. Finally, we will look at the impact of turbulence on stagnation region heat transfer. We will first look a stagnation heat transfer for a conventional situation to compare this with stagnation heat transfer with our very large cylinder rig. The results show how a larger stagnation region affects the augmentation of heat transfer.
-- Connie Cicha, Administrative Secretary, Physics & Astrophysics, connie_cicha@und.nodak.edu, 777-2911

Grand Forks Master Chorale concert is Nov. 20

The Grand Forks Master Chorale will present "Gloria Patri: Sacred Music by Mendelssohn, Kreek and Sisask" at 8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 20, in St. Michael's catholic church. For more information, call 777-3376 or go to http://gfmc.wordpress.com/ .
-- Joshua Bronfman, Assistant Professor, Music, michelleluciaingle@gmail.com, 701-741-1786

Doctoral examination set for Steven W. Swiontek

The final examination for Steven W. Swiontek, a candidate for the Ed.D. degree with a major in Educational Leadership, is set for 11 a.m., Nov. 23, in room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is: "School Emergency Preparedness in North Dakota Public School Districts." Kent Hjelmstad (Educational Leadership) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, gailholweger@mail.und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Sunita Sharma

The final examination for Sunita Sharma, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics, is set for noon, Nov. 23, in the School of Medicine and Health Science, room 3933. The dissertation title is: "Hippocampal Based Spatial Memory, Antioxidant Defense and Neurogenesis in Long-Living Ames Dwarf Mice." Holly Brown-Borg (Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, gailholweger@mail.und.edu, 777-4005

UND Jazz Ensembles celebrate big band era

The UND Jazz Ensembles will be presenting a program entitled “In Full Swing” at 8 p.m. Monday, Nov. 23, in the Memorial Union Ballroom. The event will be a celebration of the big band era of the 30s and 40s, and will feature music by the most popular bands of the era, including Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, Glenn Miller, Count Basie, and Tommy Dorsey to name a few. An authentic, cabaret-style atmosphere will be created, with a bandstand, dance floor, tables, and ballroom lighting.

The UND Jazz Ensemble is an award winning group that has been very successful in recent years. In 2008, the ensemble received a superior rating (the highest given) at the Lionel Hampton International Jazz Festival. The ensemble presents an average of six concerts each year, from featured events with national and international guest artists to in school concerts and presentations.
-- Tammy Mulske, Technology & Marketing Suprv, Music, tamara.mulske@und.edu, 777-2644

Doctoral examination set for Christa J. Grant

The final examination for Christa J. Grant, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Teaching & Learning, is set for 10 a.m., Nov. 24, in room 104, Education Building. The dissertation title is: "The Relationship Between Procrastination and Intrapersonal Intelligence in College Students." Richard Landry (Teaching & Learning) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, gailholweger@mail.und.edu, 777-4005

Anatomy and Cell Biology seminar is Nov. 23

Edward Sauter, associate dean for research at UND School of Medicine & Health Sciences, will present a seminar at noon Monday, Nov. 23, in the School of Medicine & Health Sciences, room 5510. The seminar is entitled “Prevention and Early Detection Breast Cancer Research.” All are welcome to attend.
-- Bonnie Kee, Administrative Assistant, Anatomy and Cell Biology, bkee@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-2102

Doctoral examination set for David Lo

The final examination for David Lo, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Anatomy and Cell Biology, is set for 1 p.m., Nov. 24, in room B-710, School of Medicine and Health Sciences. The dissertation title is: "Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor and its Signal Transduction in the Rat Hypothalamo-Neurohypophysial System." John Watt (Anatomy and Cell Biology) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, gailholweger@mail.und.edu, 777-4005

Tonic Sol-fa will play holiday concert in the Chester Fritz Auditorium

Tonic Sol-fa is coming to Grand Forks to perform a holiday concert. The concert is at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 23, in the Chester Fritz Auditorium. Buy your tickets at the Box office, or www.ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000.

This musical group is a proud supporter of the American Heart Association and Go Red for Woman. The American Heart Association awarded the Work Well (worksite wellness) program Platinum status for being a 2008-2009 Fit Friendly Company.
-- Kim Ruliffson, Coordinator of Work Well, Wellness Center, kimberlyruliffson@mail.und.edu, 777-0210

Human rights symposium will take place at Museum of Art

The North Dakota Museum of Art presents a symposium featuring discussions, lectures, film screenings and performances that address human rights abuses, a central theme of the exhibition, “The Disappeared.” The award-winning exhibition features significant and moving artwork made by contemporary artists personally touched by the horrors of the civil wars in Latin America. The symposium is scheduled Nov. 29-Dec. 2, and “The Disappeared,” which runs from Nov. 19-Jan. 17, 2010, ends its four-year tour across the United States and Latin America at the North Dakota Museum of Art.

At the symposium, leading humanists, musicians and scholars will investigate how people and countries move forward, into a more humane future, after great suffering. The theme of the symposium is ultimately that of hope and recovery in the aftermath of unspeakable horrors. This theme corresponds to that of “The Disappeared,” which features artwork that challenges viewers to learn about and remember victims of atrocities committed by Latin American governments against their own peoples in the mid- to late-twentieth century.

The symposium schedule is listed below. Unless otherwise noted, events will take place at the North Dakota Museum of Art and are free and open to the public.

Sunday, Nov. 29
4 p.m. – Laurel Reuter, curator of "The Disappeared," will speak about the exhibition
5 p.m. – Father Jack Davis will give a lecture on life in Peru during the Shining Path guerrilla movement, followed by a reception.

Monday, Nov. 30
12 p.m. – Father Jack Davis moderated discussion by Dr. Jack Weinstein
1:30 p.m. – Ishmael Beah talk with middle and high school students: $2 student tickets
7 p.m. – Ishmael Beah reading/lecture, followed by a reception and book signing at the Empire Theatre: $5 students, $10 adults

Tuesday, Dec. 1
12 p.m. – Stories from those who live among us: Refugees in North Dakota will share personal stories.
4 p.m. – Laurel Reuter, curator of The Disappeared, will speak about the exhibition
6 p.m. – Cristian Correa lecture
8 p.m. – Sarah Cahill performance at the Empire Arts Center: $5 students, $10 adults

Wednesday, Dec. 2
10 a.m. – Dr. Jack Weinstein radio interview with panelists
12 p.m. – "War Child" screening at UND Memorial Union
4 p.m. – Laurel Reuter, curator of The Disappeared, will speak about the exhibition
7 p.m. – Emmanuel Jal performance/lecture, followed by reception and book signing at the the Empire Arts Center: $5 students, $10 adults
8:30 p.m. – Book signing/reception for Emmanuel Jal

Laurel Reuter, director of the North Dakota Museum of Art and curator of “The Disappeared”, said, “Through creative expression and dedication to their respective causes, presenters in the symposium encourage others to witness how, in the face of extreme horror, individuals can draw upon reserves of strength and hopefulness to overcome oppression”.

A complete schedule of events and other information can be found online at www.ndmoa.com. The North Dakota Museum of Art is open 9 - 5 weekdays, 1 - 5 weekends. Admission is a $5 suggested donation, and change from children. The Museum is located at 261 Centennial Drive stop 7305, Grand Forks N.D., 58202. Please call (701) 777-4195 for further information.
-- Brian Lofthus, Assistant to the Director, North Dakota Museum of Art, blofthus@ndmoa.com, 777-4195

Astronomy public talk is Nov. 24

Physics and Astrophysics will celebrate the International Year of Astronomy 2009 with an astronomy and astrophysics public talk and telescope observing session at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 24, in 116 Witmer Hall. The talk, "Women in Astronomy" will be presented by Tricia Johnson (Math, Science, and Technology, University of Minnesota at Crookston). Following the talk, attendees will be given the opportunity to observe the night sky through a telescope (weather permitting).
-- Wayne Barkhouse, Assistant Professor, Physics & Astrophysics, wayne.barkhouse@und.edu, 777-3520

Aviv String Quartet to Perform at the Museum of Art

As part of the Museum’s ongoing concert series, the Aviv String Quartet will perform at the North Dakota Museum of Art at 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 29. The Museum is located on Centennial Drive on the UND campus in Grand Forks.

The Aviv Quartet has won the Grand Prix and four special prizes at the 3rd Melbourne International Chamber Music Competition (1999, Australia), 1st Prize “Amadeus Prize” at Charles Hennen Competition (Holland, 1999), Schubert Prize at Schubert Competition (2003, Graz, Austria), 2nd Prize (no 1st Prize awarded) and the International Critics Prize at Bordeaux String Quartet Competition (2003, France).

The Aviv Quartet has performed at leading venues throughout the world, including Carnegie Hall and Alice Tully Hall (New York), Kennedy Center and The Library of Congress (Washington), Sydney Opera House, Cologne Philharmonie, Vienna Konzerthaus, Wigmore Hall and Royal Festival Hall (London) , Louvre Auditorium,Theatre du Chatelet and Theatre de la Ville (Paris), Beethovenhaus (Bohn). The Aviv Quartet has performed in Brazil, China, Australia, Ireland, Netherlands, Italy, Sweden, Croatia, Portugal, Spain, South Africa, Canada, Latvia, Estonia, Lithuania and Belgium.

In 1999-2003 The Aviv Quartet was awarded several government prizes, such as Israeli Ministry of Culture Prize (2001), German Ministry of Education Award (1999), Prize of Israeli Lottery Foundation- Mif’al ha Pais (2003)

The Aviv Quartet studied with Gad Kogan, Irina Svetlova and Chaim Taub, then continued its studies with the members of the Alban Berg Quartet at Cologne Hochschule (1998-2000), and Daniel Quartet at Rotterdam Conservatory. During 2002-2003 they collaborated with the Ysaye Quartet at CNR de Paris.

The Aviv Quartet’s repertoire comprises approximately 100 pieces, from Haydn up to contemporary composers.

Tickets for the Concert Series are available by subscription to the series, or available for single concerts at the door or in advance at the North Dakota Museum of Art. Non-member tickets: $70 for the season, $15 per concert at the door. Member tickets: $60 for the season, $13 per concert at the door. Student and military tickets are $20 for the season, $5 per concert at the door. Children middle school and under are admitted free. Help assure the survival of the Concert Series by becoming a Concert Series Sponsor for an additional $50. Order your tickets today by sending a check or calling 777-4195.

The Museum Concert Series is underwritten by a grant from the Myra Foundation, with support from the Performing Arts Fund, a program of Arts Midwest funded in part by the National Endowment for the Arts, which believes a great nation deserves great art, with additional contributions from the North Dakota Council on the Arts, General Mills Foundation, and Land O’ Lakes Foundation. Committed classical music lovers also contribute an additional $50 on top of their season ticket to become sponsors who share in the cost of bringing great music to the community.

The North Dakota Museum of Art is located on Centennial Drive on the UND campus in Grand Forks. Admission is free, although donations are always appreciated. Museum hours are weekdays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and weekends from 1 to 5 p.m. The Museum shop is open during Museum hours. The Museum Café is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., with lunch served from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
-- Brian Lofthus, Assistant to the Director, North Dakota Museum of Art, blofthus@ndmoa.com, 777-4195

Doctoral examination set for Martha Lystad

The final examination for Martha Lystad, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Nursing, is set for 4 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 24, College of Nursing, room 201B. The dissertation title is: "Weight Loss Surgery Decision Process: A Grounded Theory Study." Eleanor Yurkovich (Nursing) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, gailholweger@mail.und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Elizabeth A. Hughes

**Note time, place change**
The final examination for Elizabeth A. Hughes, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Teaching and Learning, is set for 2 p.m. Monday, Nov. 30 in room 104, Education building. The dissertation title is: "Crucial Conversations: Perceptions of Staff and Patient's Families of Their Communication in the Intensive Care Unit. Kathleen Gershman (Educational Foundations & Research) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, gailholweger@mail.und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Sandra Hazelton

The final examination for Sandra Hazelton, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Chemistry, is set for 4 p.m. Monday, Nov. 30, in 138 Abbott Hall. The dissertation title is: "Selenium Determinations, Nanoparticle Sorbent Analysis and Nanoparticle Catalysts for Chemiluminescence." David Pierce (Chemistry) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, gailholweger@mail.und.edu, 777-4005

Faculty canidate to present seminar

Greg Hoch, a candidate for the grassland ecology/wildlife biology faculty position in the UND Biology Department, will present a seminar titled "Fire, Grazing, and Biodiversity in Tallgrass Prairie" at noon Monday, Nov. 30, in 141 Starcher Hall. Everyone is welcome to attend.

Hoch received his Ph.D. in 2000 from Kansas State University, working at the NSF-funded Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site at Konza Prairie Biological Station. His research has examined the expansion of red cedar forests into tallgrass prairie and the interactions of fire, bison grazing, and plant/soil nutrient dynamics. Hoch has initiated a number of research projects in the Red River Valley region in a variety of systems, where he seeks to understand the ecology of grassland plants and animals. He is the president-elect of the Minnesota chapter of the Wildlife Society.
-- Robert Newman, Associate Professor & Search Committee Chair, Biology, robert.newman@und.edu, 777-4290

Essential Studies open house is Dec. 4

To celebrate the start-up of the Essential Studies Office, the campus is invited to an open house event from 3 to 4:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 4, in 113 O'Kelly Hall. A short program, headlined by VPAA/Provost Paul LeBel, will begin at 3:15 p.m. and will include the presentation of the first annual "Essie Awards." Refreshments and office tours included. No rsvp necessary.
-- Tom Steen, Director, Essential Studies, thomassteen@mail.und.edu, 777-4434

Volunteers needed for Winter Commencement

Please consider serving as a green vest volunteer at the Winter Commencement ceremonies Friday, Dec. 18, in the Chester Fritz Auditorium. UND will hold two Commencement ceremonies. One ceremony will be held at 10 a.m. for graduate degrees and a second at 2 p.m. for undergraduate degrees.

Volunteers can assist with helping organize graduates by distributing name cards, greeting campus visitors, attending the ceremonies and directing people to their seats. You will be asked to report to the lower level of the Chester Fritz Auditorium 90 minutes prior to the beginning of the ceremony. We anticipate the ceremonies to be about 90 minutes in length.

If you are able to volunteer for one or both ceremonies, please contact the Office of Ceremonies and Special Events in the Vice President for Student and Outreach Services Office at 777-2724 or e-mail Janice.flatin@mail.und.edu by Wednesday, Dec. 9. Please feel free to call if you have any questions.
-- Dawn Botsford, Events Coordinator, Office of Ceremonies & Special Events, dawnbotsford@mail.und.edu, 777-6393

100% renewable jet fuel receives Popular Science's Best of What's New award

One hundred percent renewable jet fuel developed by the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) at the University of North Dakota and the U.S. Department of Defense's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has won the Best of What's New Award from Popular Science Magazine in the aviation and space category. The awards are announced in the December issue of Popular Science, which is on stands now.

Best of What's New recognizes outstanding innovation, vision, and execution of revolutionary products and technologies from companies, universities, laboratories, and government agencies. The aviation and space category recognizes anything that flies, inside or outside the atmosphere, as well as devices and technologies for exploring those realms. The 11 categories include technologies, computing, gadgets, security, green technologies, and home entertainment, to name a few.

"This is our favorite editorial project of the year because we get to comb through thousands of new products and technologies and then recognize the most outstanding 100 with awards," said Popular Science Editor-in-Chief Mark Jannot.

"We are truly honored and excited to be recognized by Popular Science," said EERC Director Gerald Groenewold. "This is a tremendous example of the type of practical, cutting-edge technologies the EERC is commercializing on a continual basis, as well as a perfect example of our ability to partner with private industry and government entities worldwide," he said.

The EERC's fuel was created from completely renewable crop oils, such as canola and soybeans. Developed through a variety of existing contracts, the fuel was vigorously tested at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and meets all of the screening criteria for jet propellent-8 (JP-8) aviation fuel, a petroleum-based fuel widely used by the U.S. military. One major advantage of the EERC's renewable fuel is that the fuel can be tailored to meet a wide variety of mission-specific requirements.

In July 2009, the EERC's renewable JP-8 was also successfully flown in a rocket in the Mojave Desert, outside of San Diego, Calif. The fuel burn was so successful that the rocket approached Mach 1 (the speed of sound) and reached an altitude of about 20,000 feet. The rocket has previously been tested with standard Jet-A fuel and rocket propellant-1 (RP-1) kerosene, for which the rocket was originally designed.

The EERC is the first enterprise in the world to produce 100 percent renewable jet fuel and diesel from crop oils through its Advanced Tactical Fuels Program, with support from government and private entities. The EERC is working with several commercial entities to commercialize the technology, which would produce billions of dollars worth of alternative fuels annually.
-- Derek Walters, Communications Manager, EERC, dwalters@undeerc.org, 777-5113

Flexible benefits open enrollment deadline is Nov. 30

Just two weeks remain to sign up for 2010 Flexible Benefits. All benefited employees have the opportunity to enroll or re-enroll in this benefit. The program helps employees pay for medical and dependent care expenses with pre-tax dollars instead of after-tax dollars.

Enrollment agreements must be returned to the Payroll Office by 4:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 30. No exceptions will be made for late submissions or for mail delays. If you have questions or need additional information, call Cheryl Arntz, Flex-Comp Specialist, at 777-4423 or e-mail her at cheryl.arntz@mail.und.edu .
-- Jan Orvik, Writer/Editor, University Relations, janorvik@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3621

Mini-grants available for summer programs/events

Are you planning an event at UND next summer but lack funding? Do you plan to develop a new summer course but need financial resources? Consider applying for a mini-grant through the Summer Programs and Events Council (SPEC). SPEC’s Start-Up mini-grant program will fund up to $5,000 in the first year for deserving proposals that fall into these categories:
- The development of new 2010 credit or non-credit summer courses/programs.
- The expansion or redesign of existing 2009 credit or non-credit summer courses/programs.

Through the mini-grant program, the council wants to create positive learning experiences for the citizens of the Red River Valley region and beyond by extending the resources of the University. The mini-grant funds will help cover the development, marketing and start-up costs for courses and programs held at UND during the summer months for up to three years. Examples include camps for kids, academic classes that can be completed in the summer months, or any special event designed for the community. Quality, creativity and “out of the box” ideas are encouraged when developing new programs.

All interested UND faculty and staff are encouraged to submit proposals. Information can be found at www.summer.und.edu. The application deadline is 4:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 23. Recipients will be announced Dec. 21. For more information on the mini-grant program, contact Diane Hadden, director of Summer Sessions, 777-6284. For operational questions, contact the Summer Programs and Events Office at 777-0841.
-- Brenda Dufault, Coordinator, Summer Programs and Events, brendadufault@mail.und.edu, 777-0841

Foundations of Biomedical Science seminar series is Nov. 20

Clint Schmidt, director of research operations for NovaDigm Therapeutics, a Grand Forks biotechnology company, will make this week’s presentation in the Foundations of Biomedical Science seminar series. The title of Schmidt’s talk is “Recent advances in immunization and vaccines.” His presentation begins at 1 p.m. Friday, Nov. 20, in the School of Medicine and Health Sciences, room 5510. For more information on Schmidt or on the seminar series, contact Jon Jackson. All are welcome to attend these seminars.
-- Jon Jackson, Assistant Professor, Anatomy and Cell Biology, jackson@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-4911

University Within the University (U2) lists new classes

GroupWise 7.0: (Intermediate)
Nov. 24, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., Upson II, Room 361
Students will work with advanced message options; set mail properties; customize message headers; use Web Access interface; create and use rules to automate e-mail responses; set access rights; and work in depth with the Junk Mail folder and archive feature. Presenter: Heidi Strande.

Defensive Driving
Dec. 1, 12:30 to 4:30 p.m., Skalicky Tech Incubator, Room 211
This workshop is required by State Fleet for all UND employees who drive State Fleet vehicles on a regular (monthly) basis, received a traffic violation, or had an accident while operating a State Fleet vehicle. Employees are encouraged to bring a family member (spouse and/or dependents). This workshop may also reduce your North Dakota insurance premiums and could possibly remove points from your driving record. Presenter: Tom Brockling

Microsoft Office Excel 2007: (Intermediate)
Dec. 1, 2, & 3, 1:30 to 4 p.m., Upson II, Room 361
Prerequisite: Microsoft Office Excel 2007 Level 1
Upon successful completion of this session, you will be able to; Calculate advanced formulas; organize worksheet and table data using various techniques; create and modify charts; analyze data using PivotTables and PivotCharts; insert objects; and customize and enhance workbooks and the Microsoft Excel environment. Presenter: Heidi Strande
-- Patricia Young, U2 Coordinator, Continuing Education, U2@mail.und.edu, 777-0720

APA Publication Manual was misprinted

Two words widely used Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA) has just been released in its 6th edition (2010). The Chester Fritz Library has recently learned, and has been closely following, discussions and a growing concern among scholars and professionals that the first printing contained so many errors that it was in fact unusable.

The Library had purchased three copies of this manual, all first printings. There were over 29 pages of corrections needing to be made, many involving removal and/or “tipping-in” of replacement pages for example texts.

Under considerable pressure from institutions and individuals who purchased copies, the APA has agreed to replace any 1st printings with a newly-released 2nd printing. The Association recently sent out e-mails to customers who contacted them, addressing these concerns. In part, the letter read:

"Many people have found that the corrections supplement meets their needs; if you find, however, that it doesn’t meet yours, we will send you a replacement copy of the 2nd printing of the Manual at no cost to you. (The 2nd printing corrects all identified errors.) We are making this replacement process available to individuals and institutions who have purchased the manual. In order to receive a replacement manual you must return your current copy of the 6th edition to APA no later than December 15, 2009."

The Chester Fritz Library has already taken advantage of this opportunity, and will be replacing the copies it purchased with corrected 2nd printings. Students, faculty, and staff on campus who may already have purchased copies of the 6th edition of the Publication Manual should check to see what printing they have, and contact the APA before Dec. 15 if they wish to have it replaced. The phone number to call is (800) 374-2721.
-- Victor Lieberman, Reference Librarian, Chester Fritz Library, victor.lieberman@und.edu, 777-4639

How to approach a student you are concerned about

Ongoing research tells us that many college students report experiencing stress related to personal relationships, the death or illness of someone close, or parental conflict. These issues, along with the pressure of midterm and final exams and the approaching holiday season, can lead to diminished academic and job performance as well as reduced participation in the classroom or other activities. If you encounter a student who is struggling and whose behavior raises concerns, there are several things you can do.

1. You can talk privately to the student about your concerns and observations. This can be a helpful first step.
2. If the issue remains unresolved or you would like suggestions regarding how to approach a student who you are concerned about, please contact the Dean of Students Office or the University Counseling Center (UCC).

The UCC has counselors available Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. to assist students on a walk-in basis. Therapists also provide direct consultation to faculty/staff who call with questions or concerns.

The Dean of Students Office staff is available to consult with faculty and staff members on Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.


3. If you are concerned about a student who displays behaviors that may result in self- harm or harm towards others, you should report those concerns to your chairperson or direct supervisor immediately. In the case of an emergency or if you need to contact someone after hours, please call 911 or University Police (UPD) at 777-3491.

For additional information for assisting a student in distress, please contact the Dean of Students office (777-2664) or the Counseling Center (777-2127). Additional information is also available on our websites at www.und.edu/dept/dos/ and www.und.edu/dept/counsel/index.html.
-- Dean of Students office

Chester Fritz Library Thanksgiving hours

The Chester Fritz Library will observe the following hours of operation for Thanksgiving weekend:
Wednesday, Nov. 25 - 7:45 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 26 - Library Closed
(Thanksgiving)
Friday, Nov. 27 - 7:45 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 28 - 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 29 - 1 p.m. to midnight
-- Karen Cloud, Administrative Assistant, Chester Fritz Library, karencloud@mail.und.edu, 777-2618

Library of the Health Sciences lists Thanksgiving hours

The hours for the Library of the Health Sciences over the Thanksgiving break are:
Thursday, Nov. 26 - closed
Friday, Nov. 27 - 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 28 - 1 to 5 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 29 - 1 p.m. to midnight
-- April Byars, Administrative Assistant, Library of the Health Sciences, abyars@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-3893

Law Library posts Thanksgiving holiday hours

Thanksgiving weekend hours for the Law Library are Wednesday, Nov. 25, 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Thursday, Nov. 26, - closed; Friday, Nov. 27, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Saturday, Nov. 28, noon to 5 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 29, noon to 11 p.m.
-- Jane Oakland, Circulation Manager, Law Library, oakland@law.und.edu, 777-3482

Bookstore seeks temporary employees

The UND Bookstore is in the process of hiring temporary associates for the store's Buyback and rush. They are accepting applications right now; and all temporary associates are hired with the possibility of becoming part-time permanent employees. We are hiring in all areas of the store. We are looking for energenic and hard-working applicants. The dates of temporary employment will run from Dec. 1 to approximently Jan. 31, 2010.
-- Lisa Simonson, Customer Service Manager, Bookstore, 1120csm@fheg.follett.com, 777-2116

International Programs seeks volunteers to serve Thanksgiving dinner

Each year the Office of International Programs provides a traditional Thanksgiving dinner for our international students on Thanksgiving Day. We plan to serve about 200 students on this national holiday and seek volunteers to help serve the meal. All the food is prepared, and volunteers are needed to serve the meal on Nov. 26. If you are interested in volunteering, please contact Shannon Jolly at 777-4231 by Thursday, Nov. 19.
-- Shannon Jolly, International Student Advisor, International Programs, shannonjolly@mail.und.edu , 777-4118

Staff Senate announces November U-Shine award winner

UND Staff Senate is proud to announce the November “U Shine Award” recipient is Jim Jerombeck, Facilities. Jim was nominated by Holly Wilson for both the months of October and November for similar circumstances. Jim was presented with a check for $50 and a certificate by Staff Senate President Loren Liepold on Nov. 12.

This award is presented monthly to a UND staff member who went out of his or her way to make UND a better place.
-- Shari Nelson, Assistant Director of Learning Services, Student Success Center, sharinelson@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2117

Staff Senate seeks U-Shine award nominations

The U-Shine award was developed by Staff Senate to recognize and award outstanding staff employees who make a difference on our campus. All benefited staff employees are eligible for nomination. UND faculty, staff and students are encouraged to nominate and recognize that special someone who, they believe, did something extraordinary, or went above and beyond the call of duty in one or more of the following categories: excellent team player; positive attitude; outstanding customer service, innovation and creativity; going the extra mile; magnificent motivator; loyalty and commitment to UND; or a category of the nominator's choosing. Nomination forms are available on the Staff Senate web site at www.und.edu/org/undss/ or printed forms are also available at Dining Services, Facilities and the Memorial Union Post Office. The deadline for submission is the 15th of each month. All nominations received after the 15th will be considered the following month. Each month, Staff Senate Executive Committee will select one award winner from the nominations received and present the award winner with a check for $50.
-- Shari Nelson, Assistant Director of Learning Services, Student Success Center, sharinelson@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2117

Order holiday party platters from Campus Catering

It's time to order your party platters from Campus Catering. As you plan your department or personal holiday functions, remember Campus Catering. Choose from fruit and vegetable trays, cookies and sweetbreads or a silver dollar sandwich platter. Special platters can be delivered or picked up at the Campus Catering Office or at Stomping Grounds Coffee Shop in the Memorial Union. You may charge to Visa, MasterCard or Discover credit cards at the Stomping Grounds location.

Apple Strudel and Petit Fours Platter: one dozen apple strudel and two dozen petit fours (serves approx. 24)
½ Fruit and ½ Vegetable Platter: A variety of fresh fruit and crisp veggies served with both fruit and vegetable dip. (serves approx. 24)
Cranberry Bread, Petit Fours and Tea Cookie Platter: 1 loaf cranberry bread, 1 dozen petit fours, 3 dozen tea cookies (serves approx. 32)
Silver Dollar Sandwich Platter: 2 dozen silver dollar buns, Swiss and Colby cheese, Turkey, Ham and Tangy Salami (serves approx. 12-15)

Campus Catering offers a full selection of cakes (quarter-sheet cakes, half-sheet cakes, full-sheet cakes), meat & cheese platters, fruit & vegetable trays, punch, taco platters, and 2 foot sub sandwiches. See http://www.dining.und.edu/catering.html or 777-2256 for more information.
-- Diane Brenno, Manager, Campus Catering, dianebrenno@mail.und.edu, 777-2256

UND Students Recognized as Rising Stars

Rebecca Grandstrand and Aaron Flynn were recently recognized with Rising Star Awards at the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA) IV-West Conference, in Santa Fe, N.M. on Nov. 3.

The Rising Star Awards were created by NASPA IV-West to recognize achievement, involvement and potential in emerging and future Student Affairs professionals.

Rebecca Grandstrand was awarded the Undergraduate Rising Star award in recognition of her exceptional service to the Greek Judicial Advisory Board and for her many contributions to the Memorial Union as a student employee. Becca is currently pursuing her master's degree in educational leadership and working as a graduate assistant in the Center for Student Involvement.

Aaron Flynn was awarded the Graduate Student Rising Star award for the many contributions he made to students and staff during his tenure as a Graduate Assistant in the Dean of Students Office. Aaron completed his master's degree in educational leadership in May 2009 and is currently working at the University of Mary as a residence hall director and community standards officer.
-- Cassie Gerhardt, Program Director for Student Involvement , Memorial Union, cassiegerhardt@mail.und.edu, 777-3667

Nominations sought for Outstanding Faculty Academic Adviser award

The Academic Advising Committee is now accepting nominations for the Outstanding Faculty Academic Adviser Award to be presented at Founders Day 2010. To access the nomination form online, go to http://ssc.und.edu/forms/nomination.php.

Paper nomination forms are available at the following locations – Union Info. Center, Student Success Center, Dean’s offices and the Student Government Office. All students, faculty, staff and alumni are eligible to nominate an undergraduate faculty academic adviser for this award. Nominations will be accepted through Jan. 15, 2010.

For more information, please contact Lisa Burger in the Student Success Center, 201 Memorial Union, 777-2117.
-- Lisa Burger, Director, Student Success Center, lisaburger@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-4706

Museum Cafe announces new menu

Sandwiches, Served with fruit and chips
Monte Cubano:
Thin slices of ham, turkey, Swiss cheese and dill pickles served Panini style on hearty bread.

Eggplant Parmesan Hoagie:
Eggplant lightly tossed in panko with grated Parmesan cheese and melted mozzarella, served with marinara sauce on toasted Italian bread.

Roast Beef Philly:
Thinly sliced roast beef, caramelized onions and provolone cheese on a toasted hoagie bun. Your choice of horseradish sauce, mayo, ground mustard, or Grey Poupon.

Soup
Fresh Pea Soup

Salads
Tuna White Bean Salad:
Albacore tuna combined with the flavors of olive oil, red wine vinegar, cannellini bean, sweet red onions, chopped tomatoes, basil, and parsley served on a bed of salad greens.

Spinach and Mandarin Orange:
A combination of crisp lettuce greens and spinach tossed with celery, scallions, and Mandarin oranges, topped with almonds and a sweet vinaigrette.

Museum Cultural Special
Vietnamese Salad Rolls:
A traditional Southwest Asian dish consisting of thinly sliced pork, shrimp, vermicelli, leaf lettuce, bean sprouts and a combination of Asian herbs. Your choice of hoisin dipping sauce, ginger-peanut cilantro sauce, or hot mustard. Served with a side of spinach mandarin salad.

Sandwich Special
Salmon Lox Bagel

Ask server about dessert. Museum Café hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays, with lunch served from 11 to 2 p.m. Take-out available • UND billing accepted • 777-4195
-- Brian Lofthus, Assistant to the Director, North Dakota Museum of Art, blofthus@ndmoa.com, 777-4195

Internal job openings listed

The following position vacancies are available only to regular UND staff employees who have successfully completed their six-month probation period, earn annual and sick leave, receive BC/BS health insurance and TIAA-CREF or ND PERS retirement benefits. Current UND faculty, please contact Human Resources for eligibility.

To apply: Please complete UND Application/Control Card form. Send letter of application and resume, referencing position name and number, to: Human Resources, University of North Dakota, Twamley Hall, Room 313, 264 Centennial Drive Stop 8010 Grand Forks, ND 58202-8010. Applications must be received by the deadline date.

Building Services Technician:
Posting Number: #10-140
Closing Date: (I) 11/23/2009
Minimum Salary: $20,000.00 plus/year
Position Status: Full-Time
Hours per week: 40
Benefits Eligibility: Benefitted
Department: Facilities Total
Location: Grand Forks, ND

Administrative Secretary:
Posting Number: #10-141
Closing Date: (I) 11/23/2009
Minimum Salary: $24,000.00 plus/year
Position Status: Full-Time
Hours per week: 40
Benefits Eligibility: Benefitted
Department: Surgery
Location: Grand Forks, ND

PC Network Analyst:
Posting Number: #10-139
Closing Date: (I) 11/20/2009
Minimum Salary: $35,000.00 plus/year
Position Status: Full-Time
Hours per week: 40
Benefits Eligibility: Benefitted
Department: Academic Support Services
Location: Grand Forks, ND

Assistant Cold Food Preparer:
Posting Number: #10-137
Closing Date: (I) 11/18/2009
Minimum Salary: $8.70 plus/hour
Position Status: Full-Time
Hours per week: 40
Benefits Eligibility: Benefitted
Department: Dining Residence
Location: Grand Forks, ND

Shop Supervisor:
Posting Number: #10-138
Closing Date: (I) 11/18/2009
Minimum Salary: $16.80 plus/hour
Position Status: Full-Time
Hours per week: 40
Benefits Eligibility: Benefitted
Department: Transportation
Location: Grand Forks, ND

Mechanical Operations Coordinator:
Posting Number: #10-136
Closing Date: (I) 11/24/2009
Minimum Salary: $55,000.00 plus/year
Position Status: Full-Time
Hours per week: 40
Benefits Eligibility: Benefitted
Department: Facilities Total
Location: Grand Forks, ND

International Centre lists holiday hours

Thursday, Nov. 26 - noon to 4 p.m. Thanksgiving meal will be served; Friday, Nov. 27 and Saturday, Nov. 28 – Centre will be closed; Sunday, Nov. 29 – Centre will resume its regular hours, open from noon to 10 p.m.
-- Tatjyana Richards, Office Manager, Office of International Programs, tatjyanarichards@mail.und.edu, 777-6438

NSF program announcement with limited submission restrictions

The National Science Foundation has issued the following program announcement for the Pre-engineering Education Collaboratives (PEEC) within the Tribal Colleges and Universities Program (TCUP). PEEC provides support for pilot efforts to establish or enhance engineering pipelines in TCUP institutions, alone or in collaboration with other TCUP institutions and colleges of engineering. Pre-proposals for the PEEC track are required and must be submitted through TCUP. Invited proposals submitted through the PEEC track will be co-reviewed by the directorate for Engineering and the directorate for Education and Human Resources. Official UND institutional support must be obtained for any PEEC proposals involving UND faculty. If you are interested in submitting a proposal to NSF for this program, please let me know prior to Dec. 1. (markhoffmann@mail.und.nodak.edu).

Tribal Colleges and Universities Program (TCUP)
http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2010/nsf10501/nsf10501.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25

Available Formats:
HTML:
http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2010/nsf10501/nsf10501.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25

PDF:
http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2010/nsf10501/nsf10501.pdf?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25

TXT:
http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2010/nsf10501/nsf10501.txt?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25
-- Mark R. Hoffmann, Assistant Vice President for Research and Economic Development and ND EPSCoR Co-Project Director, ND EPSCoR, markhoffmann@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2492

Nursing receives $7,500 scholarship grant from Dakota Medical Foundation

The College of Nursing has received a match grant in the amount of $7,500 from Dakota Medical Foundation to support scholarships for nursing students.

The grant award is contingent on the College raising matching dollars. Dakota Medical Foundation will provide a direct match, up to $7,500, for all scholarship dollars donated by alumni and friends. This opportunity allows one donor's gift to have double the impact. To date, more than $4,100 has been raised.

"Dakota Medical Foundation is a true friend to nursing on both the UND campus and across the region," said Julie Anderson, dean of Nursing. "Their leaders are clearly aware of the effect nurses have on the community. Producing one nurse will, over a lifetime, directly affect nearly 1,000 people through the care they provide. Supporting nursing students really is an everlasting scholarship."

Rising tuition and fees make funding a college degree difficult. Students often take part-time jobs to finance college, all the while losing valuable study time. If you would like to support this scholarship opportunity, please contact Becky Cournia at the UND College of Nursing for more information, 777-4526.

Dakota Medical Foundation, Fargo, N.D., focuses its efforts on improving health and access to medical and dental care in the region, with a special emphasis on children. Since 1996, the Foundation has invested over $34 million to over 300 nonprofit organizations in the region. For more information, see www.dakmed.org .

The UND College of Nursing offers both undergraduate and graduate programs of study in nursing, including RN-BSN and RN-MS distance-delivered degrees, and undergraduate programs in dietetics and community nutrition.

The master's program, leading to a Master of Science (M.S.) degree with a major in nursing, boasts six specializations: psychiatric & mental health, family nurse practitioner, advanced public health nursing, nurse anesthesia, nursing education, and gerontological nursing. The master's program is targeted to prepare clinical nurse specialists, nurse practitioners, nurse educators, and nurse administrators. The focus of the master's nursing program is based on scientific knowledge of nursing practice and education through research. The College also offers a Ph.D. program to prepare nurses for roles as nurse scientists and faculty.
-- Becky Cournia, Alumni & Development Coordinator, Nursing, beckycournia@mail.und.edu, 777-4526

UND Receives Two Regional Awards from the University Continuing Education Association

Julie Hjelle, University of North Dakota student, and Becky Rude, program manager for the Division of Continuing Education, were selected out of a seven-state region for awards presented by the University Continuing Education Association (UCEA). They recently were honored at the annual UCEA Joint Great Plains Mid-America Conference held Oct. 29, 2009, in Lacrosse, Wis.

Hjelle received the 2009 Great Plains Region Outstanding Continuing Education Student award. The award is presented to a current student or graduate of either a credit or non-credit program who is over the age of 25, who has met the challenge of an unconventional educational background, and who has become an inspiration to others by effectively managing multiple commitments and responsibilities while engaged in his or her education.

Hjelle, a semi-truck driver whose route runs from the Midwest to Alaska, is pursing her bachelor’s degree in social science from UND through online, independent study courses. Her route takes her along the Alcan Highway through the Yukon, where cell phone, radio and Internet services are non-existent in most places. To complete her online courses, she downloads her assignments at the few truck stops along the way or at her company’s office in Palmer, Ala., and then works offline to complete them while her husband drives.

“I was very honored to receive the UCEA award,” said Hjelle. “Receiving this award has bolstered my desire to continue working toward a degree. It’s sometimes difficult to fit school in with two jobs and life’s obligations at the age of 39, but I shall persevere. To anyone considering going back to school, I encourage you to give it a try. It would have been easier to have done this right out of high school but it means more to me now.”

Becky Rude received the 2009 Great Plains Region Professional Continuing Educator award. The award is presented to a professional who has entered the field within the last five to ten years, who is actively involved in professional organizations at the state, regional or national levels, and who demonstrates excellent leadership, scholarship and contributions to the field of adult and continuing education.

As the manager of Dietetics and Nutrition for the UND Division of Continuing Education, Rude leads the nationally recognized dietary manager certificate program. Throughout her 10-year career in continuing education, Rude has served as a college professor, authored several certificate courses and edited many textbooks. She recently received the 2009 Distinguished Service Award, the highest honor given by the national Dietary Managers Association.

“I am truly honored by this award from UCEA,” said Rude. “My journey as a faculty member has proven to be rewarding beyond belief. I am indebted to the many professional colleagues and educators who have provided wise counsel, support and encouragement to always keep my focus and priority on students, and then allow everything else to fall into place. The opportunities I have had in the Division of Continuing Education have opened doors (and windows) to learning that has not only allowed me to promote lifelong learning, but also to practice it.”

Founded in 1915, UCEA is the primary U.S. organization for continuing higher education, and assists more than 375 institutions of higher learning and affiliated non-profit organizations to increase access to education through a wide array of programs and services. UCEA also provides national leadership in support of policies that advance workforce and professional development.

For more information about the University Continuing Education Association, visit www.ucea.edu or contact the UND Division of Continuing Education at 1-800-342-8230 or www.conted.und.edu.
-- Jennifer Swangler, Assistant Director of Enrollment Management & Marketing, Continuing Education, jenniferswangler@mail.und.edu, 701.777.6374

Tony Trimarco receives the Siggelkow-Starr award

We are pleased to announce that Tony Trimarco was the recipient of the Siggelkow-Starr award at the Association of Colleges Unions International (ACUI) Region 10 conference held recently at the University of Northern Iowa.

The Siggelkow-Starr award is presented to a student or staff member who has made an outstanding contribution to and exhibited exceptional leadership within Region 10. The recipient of this exclusive award is one who has had a significant impact on the development and quality of the Region's programs and activities. The recipient is a role model for others within the Region, inspiring them to do work of comparable significance. Please help us celebrate this great accomplishment with Tony.
-- Cara Halgren, Associate Dean of Students

John S. Penn remembered

Longtime University of North Dakota faculty member John S. Penn, advisor to three former University presidents, passed away in Grand Forks Monday at the age of 95.

Penn served as professor of speech and chairman of the UND Department of Speech from 1948 to 1967. During his long career at the University, he advised UND Presidents John West, George Starcher and Thomas Clifford.

Dave Vorland, retired UND director of University Relations, who knew Penn when he was a student at UND in the 1960s and then worked with him during the next two decades, remembered him as someone with “an unusual sense of what was appropriate for the University.”

Vorland recalled, “He was a very dignified man, a believer in excellence.”

Penn was selected by Starcher to run commencement and special ceremonies at UND. He was also the executive assistant to and a confidant of Starcher. He helped organized visits to the University by President John F. Kennedy in 1963 and Ronald Reagan in 1986.

At UND, he served three terms as chairman of the Faculty Senate and was a representative on faculty committees for the State Board of Higher Education. He was an active member of the Speech Association of America and Central States Speech Association as a presenter and program participant.

In 1980, Penn was awarded the titles of professor emeritus of speech and dean emeritus of summer sessions. He had been listed in “Who’s Who in America,” “Who’s Who in the Midwest,” “Who’s Who in American Education” and the “Dictionary of American Scholars.”

Penn was head of UND’s speech department and served as director and dean of summer sessions, and dean of Continuing Education. Penn was also a leader in the development of educational television.

In a 2003 Grand Forks Herald article, Penn discussed how UND had changed over the past 60 years and his role in shaping University academics and governance.

“I was probably on more committees than anyone – I think,” he remarked in the interview.

Committees he chaired included convocations, exchange lecture and academics policies. Some of the committees on which he served were long-range planning, student affairs, Honors Day, television-radio administration, College of Education and College of Arts and Sciences.
“He had a bit of an edge to him when it came to open debate of various issues, academic and otherwise,” Vorland remembered. “John was always involved in that and always spoke his mind.”

Penn came to the University in 1940 as an assistant professor of speech before leaving temporarily in 1943 to serve two years in the U.S. Navy during World War II. He was stationed in the Pacific Theater aboard command ships that coordinated amphibious invasions.
Penn was proud of his role in shaping UND after the war. He told the Herald that the influx of returning veterans and their families altered the social atmosphere not only of UND but also of higher education nationwide.

“Those GIs were serious and here to go to school,” he said in the interview. “Our institutions wouldn’t be where they are today if it wasn’t for the veterans who entered college after returning from the war.”

From 1945 to 1950, Penn also acted as the commandant’s representative for the Navy’s Ninth Naval District at ceremonial functions in North Dakota and Minnesota.

Born in 1914 in Portage, Wis., Penn attended Carroll College in Waukesha, Wis., where he received a bachelor’s degree in 1935. He earned his master’s and Ph.D. degrees at the University of Wisconsin. Prior to joining the faculty at UND, he taught at the University of Wisconsin, Rockford (Illinois) College and public schools in Wisconsin and Michigan.

An annual scholarship in Penn’s name is awarded to students majoring in speech or theater. It was established by friends and former students to show their appreciation and recognize his many years of service to UND, as well as his involvement and leadership in community service.

He was married to the late Margaret (Hjortson) Penn. They had three children: Stanley, Pamela and Leslie. All preceded him in death, according to Dave Vorland.