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ISSUE: Volume 47, Number 12: November 11, 2009

Contents
Top Stories
US DOE awards UND $3.5 million
Events to Note
EERC documentary on carbon sequestration will premiere on public television
Culinary Corner events listed
Faculty, staff invited to take fruit & vegetable challenge
Culinary Corner announces upcoming events
Campus-wide workshop will focus on feedback
Running clinic is available to novice runners
Center for Innovation hosts Grafton native Joe Keeley at Entrepreneur Forum
Atmospheric Sciences seminar is Nov. 12
Amanda Boyd talk is Nov. 12
Doctoral examination set for Cheryl Lantz
Guest lecturer in Biology is Nov. 13
Geography Forum set for Friday, November 13
Physics & Astrophysics colloquium is Friday
Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics seminar is Nov. 13
Crock pot cooking is at the Culinary Corner
Free health screenings available to community
Auditions for Metropolitan Opera are set for Nov. 14
Ralph Engelstad Arena to celebrate two-millionth hockey fan this weekend
America Recycles Day is Nov. 15
Doctoral examination set for Lori Ann Kalash
Honors program will sell BeadforLife jewelry Nov. 17-19
Theatre Arts presents "Two Rooms"
UND Global Visions Films Series continues with "Sangre De Mi Sangre"
November's Denim Day comes early
"On Teaching" lunch seminar will focus on evaluation
Doctoral examination set for Jeffrey Stotts
School lunch politics is the subject of film and discussion
Learn how to use your digital camera at workshop
American Indian film festival continues
Jodsaas Center Engineering Leadership seminar is Nov. 18
Doctoral examination set for Karen Miller
Lecture on Second Amendment right to bear arms is Nov. 19
Doctoral examination set for Martha Lystad
"The Disappeared" exhibition to open at the Museum
Discussion on international indigenous human rights is Nov. 19
Pharmacology, Physiology & Therapeutics seminar is November 20
Grand Forks Master Chorale concert is Nov. 20
Retirement reception will honor Shirley Griffin
Doctoral examination set for Sunita Sharma
Integrated Studies offers all-campus book seminars
Astronomy public talk is Nov. 24
Human rights symposium will take place at Museum of Art
UND presents 31st annual Madrigal Dinner
Announcements
School of Medicine, national allies educate future physicians about substance abuse
UND professor named Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing
Mini-grants available for summer programs/events
President Obama declares November American Indian Heritage month
2009 National Survey of Student Engagement now available online
APA Publication Manual was misprinted
Essential studies opportunities open for students
University Within the University (U2) lists new classes
Benefited employees are eligible for AFLAC insurance
Services available for entrepreneurial technology commercialization
Center for Community Engagement inaugurates Stone Soup community support fund
International Programs seeks volunteers to serve Thanksgiving dinner
Sign-up for flexible benefits during November
UND Bookstore will be open Nov. 15
Staff Senate seeks U-Shine award nominations
Studio One will feature a philosopher and collision repair
Museum Cafe announces new menu
Internal job openings listed
In the News
UND Receives Two Regional Awards from the University Continuing Education Association
Steel Drum Band celebrates 10 rhythmic years
US DOE awards UND $3.5 million

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently awarded a total of $3,467,728 in two grants to several University of North Dakota (UND) scientists as part of its ongoing geothermal energy development program. The grants to UND will be used to explore electric power generation from geothermal resources in the western part of the state.

Pursuing new frontiers and opportunities
“Pursuing new frontiers in energy research is one of our strategic priorities at UND Engineering,” said Hesham El-Rewini, professor and dean, UND School of Engineering and Mines, home to the three recipients. “These two awards from DOE recognize the quality of the research conducted by our faculty and students. We are determined to continue to explore energy technologies that are economically competitive, reliable, sustainable, and environmentally acceptable.”

The UND School of Engineering and Mines researchers who received the grants—William Gosnold, Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor and chair, Geology and Geological Engineering and principal investigator; Mike Mann, professor and chair, Chemical Engineering, co-principal investigator; and Hossein Salehfar, professor and vice chair, Electrical Engineering, co-principal investigator—are all well-known as researchers in the broad area of alternative energy.

“This is a remarkable opportunity for the state of NorthDakota to lead in developing a sustainable, environmentally sound, domestic energy resource,” said Gosnold, one of the three researchers on the UND geothermal team who will share the grants. “The awards are the result of an outstanding team effort involving the petroleum industry, entrepreneurs, state and federal agencies, and the University of North Dakota. Lorraine Manz (North Dakota Geological Survey) and Rich LeFever, associate professor of Geology and Geological Engineering, provided critical data for identifying and defining the resource.”

Widespread federal geothermal energy initiative
DOE’s grants to UND are part of a $338 million program under the Recovery Act to support the exploration and development of new geothermal fields and research into advanced geothermal technologies. These grants will support 123 projects in 39 states, with recipients including private industry, academic institutions, tribal entities, local governments, and DOE’s National Laboratories. The grants will be matched more than one-for-one with an additional $353 million in private and non-Federal cost-share funds.

“The United States is blessed with vast geothermal energy resources, which hold enormous potential to heat our homes and power our economy,” said Energy Secretary Steven Chu, who was a professor of physics and molecular and cellular biology at the University of California, Berkeley, when President Obama selected him to run DOE. “These investments in America's technological innovation will allow us to capture more of this clean, carbon free energy at a lower cost than ever before. We will create thousands of jobs, boost our economy and help to jumpstart the geothermal industry across the United States.”

These grants are directed towards identifying and developing new geothermal fields and reducing the upfront risk associated with geothermal development through innovative exploration and drilling projects and data development and collection. In addition, the grants will support the deployment and creative financing approaches for ground source heat pump demonstration projects across the country.

Jobs, jobs, and more jobs
Collectively, according to a DoE announcement about the geothermal grant program, these projects will represent a dramatic expansion of the U.S. geothermal industry and will create or save thousands of jobs in drilling, exploration, construction, and operation of geothermal power facilities and manufacturing of ground source heat pump equipment.

UND explores geothermal in North Dakota
The grants to UND are part of the project segment titled “Coproduced, Geopressured, and Low Temperature Projects” and include 11 projects selected for the development of new low-temperature geothermal fields, a vast but currently untapped set of geothermal resources. This includes geothermal heat found in the hundreds of thousands of oil and gas wells around the U.S., where up to ten barrels of hot water are produced for every barrel of oil.

Geothermal project details
UND, Encore Acquisition, Berrendo Geothermal, and the North Dakota Geological Survey have formed a multi-disciplinary team with a primary objective of demonstrating the technologic and economic feasibility of generating electricity from low-temperature geothermal water (water below the boiling point) using binary, organic Rankine cycle (ORC) technology with air as the condensing medium. The team of university and industry engineers, scientists, and project developers will evaluate the power capacity, efficiency, and economics of five commercially available ORC engines in collaboration with the equipment manufacturers.

The geothermal ORC system will be installed at an oil field operated by Encore Acquisition in western North Dakota where geothermal fluids occur in sedimentary formations at depths of 10,000 feet. The power plant will be operated and monitored for two years to develop engineering and economic models for geothermal ORC energy production. The data and knowledge acquire during the research phase can be used to facilitate the installation of similar geothermal ORC systems in other oil and gas settings.
-- Juan Pedraza, Writer/Editor, University Relations, juanpedraza@mail.und.edu, 777-6571

EERC documentary on carbon sequestration will premiere on public television

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) UND has released the fourth of five planned documentaries focused on carbon sequestration and global climate change. Managing Carbon Dioxide: The Geologic Solution will premiere regionwide Tuesday, Nov. 10, at 8 p.m. (CDT) on Prairie Public Broadcasting (check your local listings).

Managing Carbon Dioxide: The Geologic Solution is produced by Prairie Public Broadcasting, in Fargo, North Dakota, in collaboration with the EERC's Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership. The 30-minute documentary explores the story of geologic CO2, enhanced oil recovery, and geologic CO2 sequestration-a 100-year journey from a borehole venting CO2 in the desert of northern New Mexico to a technology for managing carbon dioxide emissions from large industrial sources like power plants.

"Documentaries such as this are an important tool in educating the public on steps being taken to mitigate climate change," said John Harju, Associate Director for Research at the EERC. "The level of CO2 emissions from industrial sources is growing, but the permanent storage of CO2 deep underground is something that can start to make a difference. This documentary provides insight as to how the practice has been developed and the fundamentals of how it works," he said.

The PCOR Partnership-Prairie Public Broadcasting team has already released three other award-winning documentaries. The first, called Nature in the Balance: CO2 Sequestration, was released in May 2005, and introduced audiences to the capture and long-term storage (sequestration) of CO2 in North America. It won a bronze "Telly" Award for excellence in the category of nonbroadcast film or video production. The second, entitled Reducing Our Carbon Footprint: The Role of Markets, was released in April 2008 and provided an introduction to carbon management and the role of carbon markets in helping to finance projects that will lead to a low-carbon world.

The third documentary, Out of the Air-Into the Soil: Land Practices That Reduce Atmospheric Carbon Levels, released on Sept. 26, 2008, won the Gold Aurora Award in the documentary category for nature/environment in 2009. The film discusses the effects that proper landscape management can have on carbon absorption. Both Out of the Air-Into the Soil and Reducing our Carbon Footprint have won 2009 Communicator Awards for their high level of quality and excellence in communications.

The PCOR Partnership represents more than 80 public and private sector partners located in nine states and four Canadian provinces in the heartland of North America. It is one of seven regional partnerships that make up the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program managed within the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy and implemented through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Funding is provided by NETL, the PCOR Partnership members, and the members of Prairie Public. For more information, visit www.undeerc.org/pcor .
-- Derek Walters, Communications Manager, EERC, dwalters@undeerc.org, 777-5113

Culinary Corner events listed

Sushi II
Nov. 17
5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Cost: $15/person
On the menu for tonight is Miso Soup, caterpillar rolls and hand rolls. See a demonstration, try it yourself, and take home a sample.

Winning Recipe Showcase
Thursday, Nov. 19
6 to 7 p.m.
Class cost: $5/person
Have a great recipe you’d like to share with Culinary Corner? You still have time to send it in. E-mail your favorite healthy recipe to karinawittmann@mail.und.edu by Tuesday, Nov. 17 at noon. The Culinary Corner staff will vote on their favorites, and the top 3 will be showcased in a Culinary Corner Class on Thursday, Nov. 19 at 6 p.m.

Thanksgiving
Friday, Nov. 20 6 p.m.
$10/person
Want to test your skills before preparing the big meal or just can't wait for Thanksgiving? Get the recipes for your Thanksgiving favorites at this Culinary Corner class. Register online for classes at wellness.und.edu . Click on Nutrition and Culinary Corner. Registration closes at noon the day before the class.
-- Karina Wittmann, Coordinator of Nutrition, Wellness Center, karinawittmann@mail.und.edu, 777-0769

Faculty, staff invited to take fruit & vegetable challenge

Runs Tuesday, Nov. 10 through Monday, Dec. 7. Register now at http://workwell.und.edu/?page=veggiechallenge . You must register by Tuesday, Nov. 10, to be in the running for the grand prizes.

Track fruits and vegetables for 4 weeks and you may win:
1. $30 Amazing Grains gift cards weekly
2. Grand Prizes: Two $50 Super One gift cards and Two $50 gift cards to Hugos (must complete all four weeks to be eligible)
3. A better understanding of how many fruits and vegetables you eat and the chance to maintain or improve levels.

There are 74 people currently registered. Join them, get your department involved.

Culinary Corner announces upcoming events

Check out wellness.und.edu to register online for Culinary Corner classes. Check out the calendar for upcoming classes, including:
French Night - Nov. 10
Thai Cooking - Nov. 12
Crock Pot Cooking - Nov. 13

So many good classes to choose from. Why not try them all? Space is limited, so sign up today. For a complete description of classes, go to wellness.und.edu and click on Nutrition and Culinary Corner.
-- Karina Wittmann, Director of Nutrition, Wellness Center, karinawittmann@mail.und.edu , 777-0769

Campus-wide workshop will focus on feedback

Are Holen, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway/community faculty member, UND department of Family and Community Medicine, will discuss feedback at two workships Nov. 12 and 16.

Holen has served as the chairperson of the department of Neuroscience and Vice Dean of Education of the Faculty of Medicine at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. He has been central in his university's development of problem-based learning, peer feedback systems and in the establishment of behavioral medicine. He is a highly esteemed lecturer and teacher.

Holen will discuss how a major key to the creation of a productive and positive learning environment is to deliver constructive, specific and timely feedback. Feedback requires a complex set of skills. Without feedback our capacity to grow and influence others is diminished. There are many barriers to giving feedback (time, skills, and fear of consequences to name a few). A major barrier is that people often find it very difficult to give honest feedback. This is due to a range of reasons, including cultural norms, power differences and fear of conflict. Features of this workshop will cover the need to develop essential peer feedback skills for the process to be constructive in any classroom or learning environment, and particularly in a problem-based small group.

You may attend the workshop at one of the following times and places:
1. Thursday, Nov. 12, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. (lunch provided)
Haugen Lecture Hall, UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences
2. Monday, Nov. 16, 3:30 to 5:30 p.m.
United Lecture Hall, UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences

Intended audience: Any UND faculty member or student interested in the topic of giving and receiving feedback is encouraged to attend.

To pre-register: Contact Faye Aker, Office of Medical Education, at 777-3800 or fayker@medicine.nodak.edu .
-- Linda Olson, Special Projects Director, Office Of Medical Education, UNDSMHS, liolson@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-3953

Running clinic is available to novice runners

Do you want to begin running or enter your first race but don't know where to start? This running clinic is for you. Even those with running experience can pick up some advice to advance your running.

Come and learn more about how to begin running, train and prepare for a race, and what type of shoe is best for your running style. Bring your running shoes with you and get feedback on your running style and what type of shoe would best benefit you.

The Clinic will be held at noon Thursday, Nov. 12, in the Memorial Union Prairie Room. Feel free to bring your lunch with you.
-- Mandy Dockendorf, Coordinator of Fitness, Wellness Center, mandydockendorf@mail.und.edu, 777-2943

Center for Innovation hosts Grafton native Joe Keeley at Entrepreneur Forum

The Center for Innovation will host Grafton native and successful entrepreneur, venture director, and franchise developer Joe Keeley at the next Entrepreneur Forum on Thursday, November 12, at 7 p.m. in Gamble Hall, Room 5.

The winner of the 2003 Global Student Entrepreneur Award, Keeley is the president and CEO of College Nannies & Tutors, the franchisor of the nation's largest nanny and tutor company. An Entrepreneur Magazine Franchise 500 Company, College Nannies & Tutors was founded by Keeley in 2001 while earning a degree in entrepreneurship from the University of St. Thomas in St.Paul, MNm and being a nanny ("manny") himself for two boys during school. While a student, Keeley and College Nannies & Tutors earned many accolades including the Minnesota Collegiate Entrepreneur Award, the Great Lakes Collegiate Entrepreneur of the Year, and the Global Student Entrepreneur Award.

Following graduation, Keeley and College Nannies & Tutors earned an investment from Wayzata, MN-based Business Development Group and began franchising the concept. College Nannies & Tutors is now operating locations on both coasts and in the Midwest and has been featured in such media outlets as Newsweek, USA Today, CNN, NPR and others. Keeley has been named as one of the "Top 25 under 25 to Watch" by Business Week Magazine, one of the "20 under 30 Who Will Change the World" by Citizen Culture magazine ,and one of the Minneapolis-St. Paul Business Journal's "40 under 40" by age 27.

Keeley currently serves as President on the board of the Minnesota chapter of the Entrepreneurs' Organization (EO), is a past president of Bizlounge Network (2004 - 2006), and volunteers his time with organizations focused on the advancement of entrepreneurship including CEO, GSEA, BestPrep, Junior Achievement, WomenVenture. He is a frequent guest lecturer and Entrepreneur in Residence at Colleges and Universities across the nation through DORM ROOM Entrepreneurship.

The UND Entrepreneur Forum is a periodic gathering of entrepreneurs and business people who share experiences, strategies, and success stories. The event is sponsored by the Center for Innovation and is free and open to the public.
-- Center for Innovation

Atmospheric Sciences seminar is Nov. 12

Rebecca L. Phillips, Plant Physiologist with the USDA Agricultural Research Service in Mandan, N.D., will present a seminar on “Understanding trace gas exchange between soils, plants, and the atmosphere” at 3 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 12, in 210 Clifford Hall. The seminar is free and open to the public. All faculty, staff and students are invited to attend.

Abstract: Biological mechanisms responsible for production and consumption of radiatively active trace gases, including methane, nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide, will be discussed. This seminar will review trace gas properties, processes, measurement techniques, research results and research needs. Biological processes will be reviewed, including nitrification, denitrification, methanotrophy, methanogenesis, photosynthesis and respiration. Measurement techniques discussed will include gas chromatography, membrane inlet mass spectrometry, acetylene block and eddy covariance systems. Trace gas research needs related to the ecophysiology of plants and soil biota, will be emphasized.
-- Wanda Seyler, Administrative Secretary, Atmospheric Sciences, seyler@aero.und.edu, 777-3884

Amanda Boyd talk is Nov. 12

Amanda Boyd, UND German, will be giving a talk on Thursday, Nov. 12, in Merrifield 116 at 4 p.m. as part of the Humanities Speaker Series. The lecture, entitled "Demonizing Esotericism: European Occultism in the Fiction of Gustav Meyrink."
-- Michelle M. Sauer, English & Women Studies.

Doctoral examination set for Cheryl Lantz

The final examination for Cheryl Lantz, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Nursing, is set for 10 a.m., Nov. 12, in room 201B, College of Nursing. The dissertation title is: "The Influence of Spirituality Within Older Adults During Relocation to Long Term Care." Eleanor Yurkovich (Nursing) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, gailholweger@mail.und.edu, 777-4005

Guest lecturer in Biology is Nov. 13

Michael S. Hedrick from California State University, East Bay, will present a seminar titled "Development and regulation of the frog central respiratory oscillator" at noon Friday, Nov. 13, in 141 Starcher Hall.

Hedrick received his M.S. in Biology from Portland Sate University and his Ph.D. in Zoology from the University of British Columbia. He is currently a professor and the chairman of the department of Biology Sciences at California State University, East Bay. The main project in his laboratory focuses on the development and regulation of respiratory rhythm generation, particularly in anuran amphibians. He uses an in vitro brainstem preparation from bullfrogs to investigate how respiratory rhythm is generated and regulated during devlopment. Everyone is welcome to attend.
-- Dane Crossley, Assistant Professor, Biology, dane.crossley@und.edu, 777-4671

Geography Forum set for Friday, November 13

The Department of Geography invites you to the November Geography Forum on Friday, November 13, from noon to 1 p.m., in O'Kelly-Ireland 157. Dr. Dong Keun Yoon, Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Emergency Management, North Dakota State University, will present "Volunteer Firefighters in Rural Communities: A North Dakota Case Study.” All are welcome.
-- Enru Wang, Assistant Professor, Geography, erwang@und.edu, 7-4590

Physics & Astrophysics colloquium is Friday

Physics & Astrophysics will hold a colloquium at 4 p.m. Friday, Nov. 13 in 211 Witmer Hall. Jianglong Zhang, Atmospheric Sciences, will present. Coffee and Cookies are at 3:30 p.m. in 215 Witmer Hall.

The impact of aerosols remains as one of the largest uncertainties in the current climate change and climate forcing studies. Aerosols, which are suspended particles in air, affect climate directly by reflecting and absorbing solar energy, thus perturbing the earth’s radiation balance, and indirectly by modifying cloud properties. Beside their critical roles in climate studies, aerosols are also known for their importance in a suite of scientific applications such as air quality and visibility forecasts. As a consequence, extensive studies have been conducted to study aerosol optical properties, aerosol and cloud interactions, and aerosol induced climate impact.

In this presentation, we will discuss the role of aerosols in the current climate studies, mention the ongoing aerosol researches that involve ground-based, in situ, and space-borne observations, and show the applications of radiation (such as light scattering by non-spherical particles) in aerosol studies. I will also demonstrate recent achievements in modeling and forecasting of aerosol optical properties by applying 2-D and 3-D satellite observations into numerical models through aerosol data assimilation.
-- Connie Cicha, Administrative Secretary, Physics & Astrophysics, connie_cicha@und.nodak.edu, 7017772911

Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics seminar is Nov. 13

Laurel Grisanti, a graduate student in the department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics, will present a seminar titled “Adrenergic modulation of LPS-induced inflammation in myeloid cells” at 2 p.m. Friday, Nov. 13, in the School of Medicine, room 3933.

This seminar series is sponsored by the Center of Biomedical Research Excellence Pathophysiological Signaling in Neurodegenerative Disorders and the UND department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics. All are welcome to attend.
-- Deb Kroese, Administrative Officer, Pharmacology, Physiology & Therapeutics, dkroese@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-6221

Crock pot cooking is at the Culinary Corner

After a long week, wouldn't it be nice if there was a meal prepared for you and your family at the end of the day? Join us for Crock Pot Cooking at 7 a.m. Friday, Nov. 13. Learn some great recipes that you can prepare by just putting a few things in a crock pot in the morning, leaving it for the day, and coming home to a scrumptious meal. Join us before work (7 a.m.) to create your meal and pick it up at the end of the day. Please supply your own crock pot. Cost: $10/person

To register, go to www.wellness.und.edu click on Nutrition and Culinary Corner. You may also sign up at the Wellness Center Welcome Desk. Please register by noon Thursday, Nov. 12.
-- Karina Wittmann, Coordinator of Nutrition, Wellness Center, karinawittmann@mail.und.edu, 777-0769

Free health screenings available to community

University of North Dakota health professions students will host the annual Health Screening Fair on Saturday, November 14, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Wal-Mart in Grand Forks. Medical students and nursing students will offer free blood pressure checks and blood glucose tests. Physical therapy students will perform posture and balance assessments, also free of charge.

Additionally, lipid panels will be available for $5. Lipid panels include a total cholesterol reading and help determine risk for heart disease. Prior to having a lipid panel drawn, it is recommended to fast for six to eight hours.

This event offers community members the opportunity to learn vital information about their health, said Elizabeth Blixt, president of the UND American Medical Student Association and a second-year medical student at UND. Students are eager to interact with community members and provide a beneficial service.

Screening of blood pressure, blood glucose, lipids and posture and balance can serve as a valuable tool. High blood pressure usually presents no symptoms, yet can cause significant cardiovascular problems. Blood glucose tests can screen for diabetes. Posture adjustments can help improve overall quality of life.

The Health Screening Fair is organized by the American Medical Student Association and made possible by support of students, faculty and staff at the UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences and UND College of Nursing.
-- Tara Mertz, communications specialist, Center for Rural Health, taramertz@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-0871

Auditions for Metropolitan Opera are set for Nov. 14

The North Dakota auditions conducted under the auspices of the Metropolitan Opera National Council will be held this year on Saturday, Nov. 14, beginning at noon in the Josephine Campbell Recital. A public master class follows the auditions. Judging the competition this year are Dr. Christopher Hunt of Indiana University, Doug Nagel of the RimRock Opera Company of Billings, Mont., and MET soprano Margaret Jane Wray.

This marks the 46th year this competition has been held in North Dakota on the UND campus. The auditions and master class are free and open to the public and have always made for an enjoyable afternoon listening experience.

The North Dakota auditions are part of a North American wide system of auditions held throughout the United States and Canada sponsored by the Metropolitan Opera to find exceptionally talented young singers between the ages of 20 and 30 and assist them in their development. Last year, 12 singers from North Dakota, Minnesota and Manitoba competed.

Singers in the North Dakota district auditions compete for prize money and the chance to advance to the Upper Midwest Regional Auditions to be held at the Ordway in St. Paul on Feb. 6, beginning at noon. The winners of the Upper Midwest, and 15 other Regional Auditions held around the country will advance with all expenses paid to the National semi-finals on March 7 and the Audition Finals March 14 on stage at the Met. It is estimated close to one-half million dollars will be given out in prize money in the three levels of competition this year.

The ND auditions are generously supported by the UND Fellows, the department of Music and individual contributors. For more information, contact G. Paul Larson at 791-2612 or www.metopera.org (click on Auditions then the National Council Auditions)
-- G Paul Larson, Director, North Dakota District, Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions, 701-772-4961

Ralph Engelstad Arena to celebrate two-millionth hockey fan this weekend

Ralph Engelstad Arena opened its doors on Oct. 5, 2001 and currently is in its ninth season of UND men's hockey. Ralph Engelstad Arena expects to welcome its two-millionth UND men's hockey fan during the Saturday, Nov. 14 game vs. St. Cloud State University. The two-millionth fan will be selected and recognized during the first period of the game. The lucky fan will be awarded their own premium parking spot at Ralph Engelstad Arena for the remainder of the UND men's hockey season and receive a $100 gift card to the Sioux Shop.
-- Chris Semrau, Director of Events / Media Relations, Ralph Engelstad Arena, semrau@theralph.com, 777-4379

America Recycles Day is Nov. 15

America has designated Nov. 15 as America Recycles Day. It is a day for people to challenge themselves to increase their recycling practices.

Make recycling easier in the office by placing your recycling container conveniently near you and the trash bin further away. You would be surprised how little there is to throw away and just how much can be recycled. If you need more desk side recycling containers, please contact Debbie at 777-4878. Think before throwing anything away. Commit to the challenge.
-- Debbie Merrill, Recycling Coordinator, Facilities Management, debmerrill@mail.und.edu, 777-4878

Doctoral examination set for Lori Ann Kalash

The final examination for Lori Ann Kalash, a candidate for the Ed.D. degree with a major in Teaching & Learning, is set for 2:30 p.m., Nov. 16, in room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is: "Perspectives of Parents Who Have a Child Diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder." Myrna Olson (Teaching & Learning) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, gailholweger@mail.und.edu, 777-4005

Honors program will sell BeadforLife jewelry Nov. 17-19

The UND Honors program will be selling BeadforLife jewelry on the main floor of the Memorial Union from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Nov. 17-19. "BeadforLife eradicates extreme poverty by creating bridges of understanding between impoverished Africans and concerned world citizens. Ugandan women turn colorful recycled paper into beautiful bead jewelry, and people who care open their hearts, homes and communities to buy and sell the beads. The beads become income, food, medicine, school fees and hope." All net profits go directly back into the community from which the beads came.
-- Robin David, Associate Director, Honors Program, robin.david@und.edu, 777-6185

Theatre Arts presents "Two Rooms"

Americans are willing to die for and have died for freedom, but what happens when that freedom is taken away? What will we do to try and get it back? The play "Two Rooms," written by Lee Blessing, deals with these issues. The play involves the abduction of an American professor teaching at the American University in Beirut, and the story of his wife’s struggle to get him back.

"Two Rooms" is the theatre department’s student show this season. It will take place in Burtness’ Lab Theatre, an intimate space for an intimate show. Audience members will embark on an emotional roller-coaster of pain and hope that will keep them riveted in their seats.

"Two Rooms" is based on actual events. The time period between 1982 and 1991 has become known as the Lebanon Hostage Crisis in the United States. There were 96 hostages taken and tortured throughout those nine years, and ten of them died while in captivity. The character of Michael is a combination of the experiences of several of these hostages, and the play deals with real events, such as the hijacking of TWA Flight 847 where 39 people were held hostage on an airplane for 2 weeks.

Join Lainie as she navigates the line between keeping quiet and learning to speak out. Which one will bring her husband home? The answer to this question will keep you on the edge of your seat until the very end.

Performances of "Two Rooms" at the Burtness Lab Theatre on the UND campus are Nov. 17, 18, 19, 20 and 21. Each performance begins at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $12 for adults and $6 for students with a valid student I.D. Groups of ten or more people receive a $2 discount. Reserved parking will be available. For ticket information and reservations call the Box Office at 777-2587.
-- Alyssa Thompson, Publicity Assistant , Theatre Arts, alyssa.thompson@und.edu, 320-221-0588

UND Global Visions Films Series continues with "Sangre De Mi Sangre"

UND's department of Anthropology's Global Vision Film Series will play "Sangre De Mi Sangre" at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 17, in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl.

"Sangre De Mi Sangre" involves young illegal immigrant Pedro, ruthless ex-con Juan, and a chance for a better life. Juan attempts to escape his past by hopping on a truck full of illegal immigrants travelling to the United States. While on board the truck, Juan manipulates Pedro into building a friendship after learning about Pedro's wealthy father. Juan sees an opportunity for a better life by stealing Pedro's identity and leaving the boy with nothing. Pedro must now struggle to find the man with the keys to his future amidst the turmoil of homelessness and starvation.

"'Sangre De Mi Sangre' brings home what it's like to be illegally in another country. Penniless, speaking no English, robbed of his backpack, he has only the supposed address of his father, whom he has never met. As he cowers, dazed and shivering in the truck depot, the lights of Manhattan's skyscrapers glitter behind him like icy jack-o'-lantern teeth." - Stephen Holden, New York Times

The department of Anthropology's popular Global Visions Film Series seeks to bring an array of international films to the Grand Forks Community. Two films are presented each month in the Lecture Bowl of the Memorial Union at the University of North Dakota. Attendance is free, but a small donation of $1 is requested.

Next Upcoming Film:
Days of Glory - 7 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 1, Memorial Union Lecture Bowl

November's Denim Day comes early

Denim Day comes early for November. Wednesday, Nov. 18 is Denim Day. Pay your coordinator your dollar, wear your denim and your pin, and enjoy going casual. If you need buttons, just let me know.
-- Patsy Nies, Special Project Assistant, Enrollment Services, patsynies@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3791

"On Teaching" lunch seminar will focus on evaluation

The next "On Teaching" seminar of the semester, “How am I Doing? Rating Yourself as a Teacher,” will take place Wednesday, Nov. 18, from noon to 1 p.m., in the Red River Valley Room of the Memorial Union.

Each semester faculty members in higher education take on teaching duties. For most, this is a recurring task. For the majority, it is the central task of a life-long career. Assuming that no one is perfect and therefore everyone has room for improvement, evaluation is the means by which we try to identify which aspects of our teaching are good (which are working in terms of student learning) and which need to be changed. Evaluating our teaching allows us to document it for others. And many argue that there is also a very human and personal need to evaluate. It is one thing to think or feel that a class went well; it is quite another (and a far more enjoyable experience) to have solid information that tells us that we have taught well and students have learned well, or to have concrete evidence about how to improve our work. That insight is possible only if we do a thorough evaluation. End of the semester USAT forms don’t really provide the kind of information we often want, and they provide it too late in the game to benefit the semester in progress.

Doing good evaluation is like doing good research. In both cases, you are posing questions that you continually re-examine with data. The key to doing both activities well is identifying the right questions to ask and figuring out how best to answer them. Over the lunch hour we will discuss why it is important to ask questions of you own teaching, what questions are valuable to ask, and how to gather information that helps provide sound answers to those questions.

We hope you will come and join the conversation. And if you have developed some effect means of evaluation that have allowed you to improve your practice and student learning in you classes, we would love to hear about them.

Please register by noon Monday, Nov. 16, to reserve a lunch and attend. Visit the Office of Instructional Development online (www.und.edu/dept/oid) to register. For information call Jana Hollands at 777-4998 or email jana_hollands@und.edu .
-- Anne Kelsch, Director, Office of Instructional Development, anne.kelsch@und.nodak.edu, 777-4233

Doctoral examination set for Jeffrey Stotts

The final examination for Jeffrey Stotts, a candidate for the Ed.D. degree with a major in Teaching & Learning, is set for 3 p.m., Nov. 18, in room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is: "Stuck on the Rez: Perceptions of Native American Students' Experiences in Non-Reservation Schools." Myrna Olson (Teaching & Learning) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, gailholweger@mail.und.edu, 777-4005

School lunch politics is the subject of film and discussion

The Educational Foundations and Research Critical Documentary Film Series is proud to present the film "Two Angry Moms," a documentary chronicling two mothers' struggles to change the school food in their communities to something healthier and more sustainable. As the website proclaims, "'Two Angry Moms' shows not only on what is wrong with school food; it offers strategies for overcoming roadblocks and getting healthy, good tasting, real food into school cafeterias. The movie explores the roles the federal government, corporate interests, school administration and parents play in feeding our country's school kids." The film will be shown at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 18, in the Education Building lecture bowl, room 113. An open discussion will follow. This event is free and open to the public.
-- Marcus Weaver-Hightower, Assistant Professor, Educational Foundations and Research, mwh@und.edu, 777-3238

Learn how to use your digital camera at workshop

If you are someone who owns a digital camera but does not know how to use it to create great pictures, this workshop is for you. You will learn about camera operation, common camera modes and their functions, and then learn to apply some tried and true tricks to get those great shots.

The "Learn Digital Photography" workshop will be held at 4 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 18, in 235 Starcher Hall. No registration is required. The free workshop is open to everyone (students, faculty, staff, and the greater Grand Forks community). "Learning Digital Photography" is sponsored by the Graphics and Photography Society, a student organization in the department of Technology.
-- Lynda Kenney, Assistant Professor, Technology, lynda.kenney@und.edu, 777-2197

American Indian film festival continues

In honor of American Indian Heritage Month Indian Studies Association presents the 4th Annual American Indian Film Festival, running Nov. 4-24. All films are free and open to the public. Films begin at 7 p.m. in the Lecture Bowl of the Memorial Union, with a discussion to follow each film.

The schedule:
Wednesday, Nov. 18: "First Stories, Volume III" - This program invited Aboriginal filmmakers to tell the stories that are important to them and their communities. It is a collection of short documentaries.

"His Guidance" - Some Elders say, "the drum is the heartbeat of Mother Earth." It has a power that captivates and enchants us; it's a sound that few can resist. His Guidance is the story of Rocky Morin, a drummer who first felt the pull of the drum almost 15 years ago. He hasn't looked back since. This stirring short film examines his very personal relationship to the drum, including his first encounter with a powwow drum and how that experience ultimately changed his life. For this proud drum keeper, the drum is like a "kind old man," offering guidance and knowledge. The drummer shows us how he takes care of the drum-both physically and spiritually-and how it takes care of him in return. His Guidance is a powerful reminder of the need to maintain a strong connection to one's roots and that in doing so; we continue to honor the wisdom of the Elders.

"Hooked Up" - For thousands of years, Aboriginal peoples have gathered together on Turtle Island, and today's modern world is no exception because it offers a new way of socializing-the internet. Hooked up is a fresh, inventive look at the net and asks us to consider this question: does the web provide Aboriginal people with a sense of community?

"Two-Spirited" - This is the empowering story of Rodney "Geeyo" Poucette's shattering encounter with prejudice and his journey to overcome it. As a two-spirited person (gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender), Geeyo hasn't always been so readily accepted in some Aboriginal communities. In August 2000, Geeyo registered as a dancer in the Kamloops Powwow under the Jingle Dress category-a category normally reserved for women. After competing, an elder discovered that Geeyo was, in fact, a man and took away his championship.

"Walking Alone" - This is an edgy, searing portrait of an ex-gang member trying to make peace with his past. When Shawn Bernard started a rap group, he never dreamed that it would turn into a gang. But before long, the increasingly notorious Aboriginal gang, which eventually reached a national scale, overshadowed the rap group. In the wake of the rap group's demise, Shawn became a renowned drug dealer, living a high-risk lifestyle that would ultimately lead to tragedy.

Monday, Nov. 23: "Jim Thorpe, The World's Greatest Athlete" - A look at the complex life of Jim Thorpe, the Native American sports icon, beginning with his boyhood in Indian Territory to his athletic stardom at Carlisle Indian Industrial School and the 1912 Summer Olympics, and the tumultuous events that happened afterwards.

Tuesday, Nov. 24: "No More Smoke Signals" - Kili Radio, voice of the Lakota Nation, is broadcast out of a small wooden house that sits isolated on a hill, lost in the vast countryside of South Dakota. It's a place that's long forgotten; lying at the crossroads between combat and hope, between the American dream and daily existence on America's poorest reservation.

For more information contact Amber Annis, Indian Studies Association, 777-4314.

Jodsaas Center Engineering Leadership seminar is Nov. 18

The Jodsaas Center for Engineering Leadership & Entrepreneurship within UND Engineering is sponsoring an Engineering Leadership seminar on Wednesday, Nov. 18, from 5 to 6:30 p.m. in the Memorial Union Ballroom.

"Building Successful Teams - How to be a Valuable Team Player," presented by UND Engineering Dean Hesham El-Rewini
In this 90-minute leadership training session, we will learn effective ways for individuals with different backgrounds and personalities to successfully work together as a team to achieve a common goal. We will study different team-player styles and discuss strategies to maximize team effectiveness. The audience will participate in group discussion and share experiences as team players and team leaders.

All students, faculty, and staff are invited to attend. Please register in one of the five engineering department reception areas or in the UND Engineering Dean’s Office. Cookies and refreshments will be served.
-- Richard R. Schultz, Director, Jodsaas Center for Engineering Leadership & Entrepreneurship, UND Engineering, RichardSchultz@mail.und.edu, 777-4429

Doctoral examination set for Karen Miller

The final examination for Karen Miller, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in English, is set for 3:30 p.m., Nov. 19, in Montgomery Hall, room 20. The dissertation title is: "The Believers: A Novel." Elizabeth Harris Behling (English) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, gailholweger@mail.und.edu, 777-4005

Lecture on Second Amendment right to bear arms is Nov. 19

William G. Merkel, a visiting professor at the UND School of Law, will present a lecture titled, “The Supreme Court, the States, and the Right to Arms: Placing McDonald v. Chicago in Historical Context.” The lecture is on Nov. 19, at 12:15 p.m. in the Baker Courtroom at the School of Law. The lecture is free and open to the public. Continuing legal education credit has been applied for in North Dakota.

In its landmark District of Columbia v. Heller decision in 2008, the Supreme Court for the first time recognized a constitutional right to weapons possession unrelated to service in the lawfully established militia, holding key provisions of the most stringent handgun control laws in the country unconstitutional under the Second Amendment. That case dealt only with weapons restrictions enacted by the federal government or by the government of the District of Columbia. This coming spring, in McDonald v. Chicago and NRA v. Chicago, the Supreme Court will reconsider the Second Amendment as it decides whether to apply the right to arms against the states. Professor Merkel will discuss the constitutional principles that will guide the Court in deciding the cases.

Merkel, an associate professor of law at Washburn University who is visiting this semester at UND School of Law, is the author, with the late Richard Uviller, of The Militia and the Right to Arms, Or, How the Second Amendment Fell Silent (Duke University Press, 2002).
-- Rob Carolin, Director of Alumni & Public Relations, Law School, carolin@law.und.edu, 777-2856

Doctoral examination set for Martha Lystad

The final examination for Martha Lystad, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Nursing, is set for 4 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 24, College of Nursing, room 201B. The dissertation title is: "Weight Loss Surgery Decision Process: A Grounded Theory Study." Eleanor Yurkovich (Nursing) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, gailholweger@mail.und.edu, 777-4005

"The Disappeared" exhibition to open at the Museum

The North Dakota Museum of Art will host an exhibition titled "The Disappeared" between Thursday, Nov. 19, and Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2010. The exhibition will open at 4 p.m. on Nov. 19.

"The Disappeared" contains art by 23 contemporary artists from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Guatemala, Uruguay and Venezuela who, over the course of the last 30 years, have made art about the disappeared. These artists have lived through the horrors of the military dictatorships that rocked their countries in the mid-decades of the 20th century. Some worked in the resistance. Some had parents or siblings who disappeared; others were forced into exile. The youngest were born into the aftermath of those dictatorships. And still others have lived in countries maimed by endless civil war.

The exhibition was organized by the North Dakota Museum of Art and opened in North Dakota in March 2005. Subsequently it toured to Buenos Aires, Argentina; Montevideo, Uruguay; Antigua, Guatemala; Santiago de Chile; and Bogota, Colombia in addition to five sites in the United States including New York City; Washington D.C.; Santa Fe, N.M.; University of Wyoming; and the University of Texas at El Paso. The Museum of Art is bringing an expanded version of the show home in November as the final showing before dispersal.

The North Dakota Museum of Art is located on Centennial Drive, Grand Forks. Hours on weekdays is 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Hours on weekends is 1 to 5 p.m. The Museum Shop is open during these hours as well. The Museum Café is open weekdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with lunch served from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Although the Museum does not charge an admission fee, the suggested donation is $5 for adults and change for children. Wireless internet access available.
-- Brian Lofthus, Assistant to the Director, North Dakota Museum of Art, blofthus@ndmoa.com, 777-4195

Discussion on international indigenous human rights is Nov. 19

An informal talk and open discussion on international human rights and indigenous peoples will be presented at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 19, in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl with collaboration from UND Honors students, students from the UND Law School and the department of Anthropology.

The current fieldwork in Brazil of Marcia Mikulak, associate professor of Anthropology, will be highlighted, and Mikulak, Cacique (Chief) Marcus Xukuru, and other Xukuru tribal leaders will be present via Skype from Brazil.

The evening will consist of discussions about international human rights documents by professor Gregory Gordon from the UND Law School, and a PowerPoint presentation by Joseph Mandala, currently a student in the UND School of Law, and Political Science.

Mandala traveled to Pernambuco, Brazil with Mikulak in September 2009 to meet with Cacique Marcus Xukuru and Non-Governmental human rights organizations involved in assisting Xukuru leaders in legal cases that criminalize their fight for ancestral lands. Mandala continues to assist Mikulak while she continues her human rights work in Brazil.

Films will be screened that present the history of the Xukuru’s decades long fight for the return of their traditional territories and the right to practice their cultural heritage. Discussions about how nation-states have historically created constructions about indigenous peoples that marginalize them and diminish their basic human rights will be explored. An open forum for questions and possible solutions will conclude the evenings discussions. This event is Free and open to the public, and is partially funded by the Multicultural Awareness Committee.
-- Marcia Mikulak, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, marcia.mikulak@und.edu, 701-330-1311

Pharmacology, Physiology & Therapeutics seminar is November 20

Fernando Gomez-Pinilla, professor in the department of Physiological Science, University of California, Los Angeles, will present a seminar titled “Diet and exercise are not just for fun; they can change your brain” at 2 p.m. Friday, Nov. 20 in the School of Medicine, room 3933. This seminar series is sponsored by the Center of Biomedical Research Excellence Pathophysiological Signaling in Neurodegenerative Disorders and the department of Pharmacology, Physiology & Therapeutics. All are welcome to attend.
-- Deb Kroese, Administrative Officer, Pharmacology, Physiology & Therapeutics, dkroese@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-6221

Grand Forks Master Chorale concert is Nov. 20

The Grand Forks Master Chorale will present "Gloria Patri: Sacred Music by Mendelssohn, Kreek and Sisask" at 8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 20, in St. Michael's catholic church. For more information, call 777-3376 or go to http://gfmc.wordpress.com/ .
-- Joshua Bronfman, Assistant Professor, Music, michelleluciaingle@gmail.com, 701-741-1786

Retirement reception will honor Shirley Griffin

The Research Development and Compliance (RDC) office welcome all to attend a retirement reception in honor of Shirley Griffin. The reception will be held from 1:30 to 3 p.m. Friday, Nov. 20, at Twamley Hall Snack Bar, room 400. Shirley recently celebrated her 20th year with the University. Her experience and always helpful personality will be greatly missed. Please join us in wishing her well in her retirement.
-- Barry I. Milavetz, Associate Vice President, Division of Research and Economic Development, barrymilavetz@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-4278

Doctoral examination set for Sunita Sharma

The final examination for Sunita Sharma, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics, is set for noon, Nov. 23, in the School of Medicine and Health Science, room 3933. The dissertation title is: "Hippocampal Based Spatial Memory, Antioxidant Defense and Neurogenesis in Long-Living Ames Dwarf Mice." Holly Brown-Borg (Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, gailholweger@mail.und.edu, 777-4005

Integrated Studies offers all-campus book seminars

Integrated Studies offers all-campus book seminars. Join the faculty and staff of Integrated Studies for engaging book discussions of the David Auburn play, "Proof" at noon Tuesday, Nov. 24, in 260 O'kelly Hall and/or J.Lawrence and R. Lee's play, "The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail," at noon Tuesday, Dec. 8, in 260 Okelly Hall. Everyone welcome. Bring your lunch and your ideas. For more information, contact Tami Carmichael.
-- Tami S. Carmichael, Associate Professor, Humanities & Integrated Studies, tami.carmichael@und.edu, 777-3015

Astronomy public talk is Nov. 24

Physics and Astrophysics will celebrate the International Year of Astronomy 2009 with an astronomy and astrophysics public talk and telescope observing session at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 24, in 116 Witmer Hall. The talk, "Women in Astronomy" will be presented by Tricia Johnson (Math, Science, and Technology, University of Minnesota at Crookston). Following the talk, attendees will be given the opportunity to observe the night sky through a telescope (weather permitting).
-- Wayne Barkhouse, Assistant Professor, Physics & Astrophysics, wayne.barkhouse@und.edu, 777-3520

Human rights symposium will take place at Museum of Art

The North Dakota Museum of Art presents a symposium featuring discussions, lectures, film screenings and performances that address human rights abuses, a central theme of the exhibition, “The Disappeared.” The award-winning exhibition features significant and moving artwork made by contemporary artists personally touched by the horrors of the civil wars in Latin America. The symposium is scheduled November 29 through December 2, and “The Disappeared,” which runs from November 19, 2009 – January 17, 2010, ends its four-year tour across the United States and Latin America at the North Dakota Museum of Art.

At the symposium, leading humanists, musicians and scholars will investigate how people and countries move forward, into a more humane future, after great suffering. The theme of the symposium is ultimately that of hope and recovery in the aftermath of unspeakable horrors. This theme corresponds to that of “The Disappeared,” which features artwork that challenges viewers to learn about and remember victims of atrocities committed by Latin American governments against their own peoples in the mid- to late-twentieth century.

The symposium schedule is listed below. Unless otherwise noted, events will take place at the North Dakota Museum of Art and are free and open to the public.

Sunday, November 29
4 pm – Laurel Reuter, curator of "The Disappeared," will speak about the exhibition
5 pm – Father Jack Davis will give a lecture on life in Peru during the Shining Path guerrilla movement, followed by a reception.

Monday, November 30
12 pm – Father Jack Davis moderated discussion by Dr. Jack Weinstein
1:30 pm – Ishmael Beah talk with middle and high school students: $2 student tickets
7 pm – Ishmael Beah reading/lecture, followed by a reception and book signing at the Empire Theatre: $5 students, $10 adults

Tuesday, December 1
12 pm – Kate Doyle moderated discussion
4 pm – Laurel Reuter, curator of The Disappeared, will speak about the exhibition
6 pm – Kate Doyle lecture
8 pm – Sarah Cahill performance at the Empire Theatre: $5 students, $10 adults

Wednesday, December 2
10 am – Dr. Jack Weinstein radio interview with panelists
12 pm – War Child screening at UND Student Union
4 pm – Laurel Reuter, curator of The Disappeared, will speak about the exhibition
7 pm – Emmanuel Jal performance/lecture, followed by reception and book signing at the The Empire Theatre: $5 students, $10 adults
8:30 pm – Book signing/reception for Emmanuel Jal

Laurel Reuter, Director of the North Dakota Museum of Art and curator of “The Disappeared”, said “Through creative expression and dedication to their respective causes, presenters in the symposium encourage others to witness how, in the face of extreme horror, individuals can draw upon reserves of strength and hopefulness to overcome oppression”.

A complete schedule of events and other information can be found online at www.ndmoa.com. The North Dakota Museum of Art is open 9 - 5 weekdays, 1 - 5 weekends. Admission is a $5 suggested donation, and change from children. The Museum is located at 261 Centennial Drive stop 7305, Grand forks ND, 58202. Please call (701) 777-4195 for further information.

-- Brian Lofthus, Assistant to the Director, North Dakota Museum of Art, blofthus@ndmoa.com, 777-4195

UND presents 31st annual Madrigal Dinner

The UND 31st annual Madrigal Dinner, a festive winter holiday event that’s become a community tradition, takes place Friday, Dec. 4 and Saturday, Dec. 5, at 7 p.m. in the Memorial Union Ballroom.

The Madrigal Dinner features food, music, and entertainment presented in the style of Elizabethan England, a time of castles and Shakespeare. The UND Concert Choir, the Varsity Bards, and the Allegro Women’s Choir lead a tour of the traditional English holiday feast through song, food, and theater.

“This is an interactive event for the entire family that’s at times serious, frequently funny, and occasionally wacky,” said Joshua Bronfman, assistant professor and director of choral studies at UND.

Tickets are on sale at the Chester Fritz Auditorium Box Office 777-4090. General seating is $40 per person; a limited number of front-row seats are available for $45 each. Groups of 10 will receive a discount of $5 per ticket.

The Old English-style dinner includes a five-course meal with a choice of beef, chicken, or vegetarian. Special meal accommodations are also available. The Madrigal Dinner is a combination of theater, a musical, and a holiday choral music concert.

“The performers dress up in Elizabethan costumes and speak in English accents,” Bronfman said. “They joke with the audience while the king, queen and court jester run the show. In a segment called sack theater, a few audience members are brought on stage to act out a small scene described by the jester.” The primary roles in the performance are played by UND Concert Choir members. “The Varsity Bards and Allegro choral groups bring a youthful energy to the show,” Bronfman said. "The annual Madrigal Dinner is a very robust tradition at UND, and easily tens of thousands of people have seen it.”

In addition to being fun and entertaining, the event serves as a fundraiser for a good cause. “All the money goes to fund trips, music, and infrastructure for UND choir students,” Bronfman said.

The Madrigal Dinner is held in the ballroom on the second floor of the UND Memorial Union at 2901 University Ave. Parking on the street around the Union is free, although spaces are limited. For a fee, parking is also available in the UND Parking Garage on the corner of University and Columbia.

For information on group rates, contact Janice Hoffarth, UND Music department, at 777-2646. Also see http://undmadrigaldinner.wordpress.com/ for more detailed information about this year’s event.

For more information about UND’s choral program, including the Concert Choir, the Varsity Bards, and Allegro Women’s Choir, visit http://www.und.edu/dept/choirs/html/ensembles.htm
-- Juan Pedraza, Writer/Editor, University Relations, juan.pedraza@und.edu, 777-6571

School of Medicine, national allies educate future physicians about substance abuse

The rigors of medical training sharpen a doctor's ability to diagnose and treat a wide variety of human afflictions. However, drug abuse and addiction are often insufficiently covered in medical school curricula, despite the fact that drug use affects a wide range of health conditions and drug abuse and addiction are themselves major public health issues.

To improve drug abuse and addiction training of future physicians, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health, today unveiled a series of new teaching tools, through its Centers of Excellence for Physician Information Program (NIDA CoEs), at the Association of American Medical Colleges 2009 Annual Meeting's "Innovations in Medical Education" Exhibit in Boston.

The NIDA CoE program was created through a partnership with the American Medical Association's medical education research collaborative, Innovative Strategies for Transforming the Education of Physicians and includes The UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, the Harvard Medical School/Cambridge Health Alliance, Creighton University School of Medicine, the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and Drexel University College of Medicine.

"Physicians can be the first line of defense against substance abuse and addiction, but they need the resources and the training," said NIDA Director Dr. Nora D. Volkow. "Our long-term goal is for doctors to incorporate screening for drug use into routine practice like they currently screen for other diseases; to help patients that are abusing to stop; and to refer more serious cases to specialized treatment." For example, several CoE resources address prescription drug abuse among chronic pain patients, which presents special issues for physicians, who must balance adequate treatment with the risks of addiction.

"Our goal is to improve the quality of pain treatment and the safety of prescribing opioids by increasing the knowledge and skills of medical providers early in the educational process," emphasized Dr. Jeffrey Baxter of the University of Massachusetts Medical School, developer of one of the CoE resources. By pairing substance abuse expertise with innovations in medical education, these curriculum adjuncts can enhance substance abuse medical education, help to remove the stigma associated with substance abuse, and ultimately improve patient care.

The NIDA CoE program is part of NIDAMED — NIDA's ongoing commitment to the medical community to provide scientifically accurate and useful resources for addressing substance abuse in their patients. NIDAMED offers a variety of tools, including an online interactive screening tool to help doctors accurately assess their patient's substance use.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) — The Nation's Medical Research Agency — includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is the primary federal agency for conducting and supporting basic, clinical and translational medical research, and it investigates the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases.
-- Denis F. MacLeod, Communications Coordinator, Center for Rural Health, dmacleod@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-3300

UND professor named Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing

Eleanor Yurkovich, professor in the UND College of Nursing, has been elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing (AAN), the profession’s highest national honor. Yurkovich, who also is a co-investigator for the Northern Plains Center for Behavioral Research, will be inducted at the 34rd AAN meeting and conference in Atlanta on Saturday.

AAN comprises 1,500 high-achieving nurse leaders. AAN Fellows have been identified by their peers to be the best and the brightest in the nursing discipline. In addition to the prestige of being chosen, the fellowship opens doors for collaboration with colleagues in many areas including leadership, research, and policy.

“I believe that belonging to this organization will put me in touch with colleagues who are engaged in cutting-edge research and development of health policy that will better the existence of many people,” Yurkovich said.

Yurkovich focuses her research on holistic, evidence-based interventions for people with persistent mental illness living in rural communities, prison systems, and on Indian reservations.

“Dr. Yurkovich is very deserving of this award,” said Julie Anderson, dean of nursing. “She is an energetic and respected long-term educator at the College of Nursing. She is enthusiastic in her approach and dedicated to research on psychiatric and mental health issues.”

The UND College of Nursing offers both undergraduate and graduate programs of study in nursing, including RN-BSN and RN-MS distance degrees, and undergraduate programs in dietetics and community nutrition.

Mini-grants available for summer programs/events

Are you planning an event at UND next summer but lack funding? Do you plan to develop a new summer course but need financial resources? Consider applying for a mini-grant through the Summer Programs and Events Council (SPEC). SPEC’s Start-Up mini-grant program will fund up to $5,000 in the first year for deserving proposals that fall into these categories:
- The development of new 2010 credit or non-credit summer courses/programs.
- The expansion or redesign of existing 2009 credit or non-credit summer courses/programs.

Through the mini-grant program, the council wants to create positive learning experiences for the citizens of the Red River Valley region and beyond by extending the resources of the University. The mini-grant funds will help cover the development, marketing and start-up costs for courses and programs held at UND during the summer months for up to three years. Examples include camps for kids, academic classes that can be completed in the summer months, or any special event designed for the community. Quality, creativity and “out of the box” ideas are encouraged when developing new programs.

All interested UND faculty and staff are encouraged to submit proposals. Information can be found at www.summer.und.edu. The application deadline is 4:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 23. Recipients will be announced Dec. 21. For more information on the mini-grant program, contact Diane Hadden, director of Summer Sessions, 777-6284. For operational questions, contact the Summer Programs and Events Office at 777-0841.
-- Brenda Dufault, Coordinator, Summer Programs and Events, brendadufault@mail.und.edu, 777-0841

President Obama declares November American Indian Heritage month

U.S. President Barack Obama recently proclaimed the month of November as American Indian Heritage month. To help us recognize and celebrate, we encourage campus community members to visit the American Indian Center (315 Princeton Street) to meet the staff, learn more about the valuable programming provided, mingle with our students who represent many different tribal nations and take a tour of the facility.

Staff at the American Indian Center would be happy to show visitors the marvelous collection of Indian art displayed in the center. The UND Art department has collaborated with other departments and individuals to publish a book of UND’s Indian art collection that will be available soon. The amount and variety of American Indian artwork housed across the UND campus may surprise you and is very impressive.

We hope to see an increase in visitor traffic throughout American Indian Heritage Month; however, if you don’t make it over for a visit and/or tour in the coming weeks, please know that our outstanding student support services are open to all UND students and guests are always welcome.
-- Linda Neuerburg, Assistant Director, American Indian Student Services, linda_neuerburg@und.edu, 777-2578

2009 National Survey of Student Engagement now available online

Freshmen and seniors were invited to participate in the 2009 National Survey of Student Engagement during spring semester. The results of the survey are now posted online at http://www.und.edu/dept/datacol/reports/subFolder/NSSE2009/NSSE2009.htm . This survey, administered every two to three years, focuses on assessing student engagement of freshmen and seniors, in the areas of academic challenge, active and collaborative learning, student-faculty interaction, enriching educational experiences, and campus environment. This is a national survey with comparative data from other four-year colleges and universities. This is the fifth time that UND has conducted this survey. If you have any questions about this survey, please contact Sue Erickson at 777-2265.
-- Carmen Williams, Director, Institutional Research, carmenwilliams@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2456

APA Publication Manual was misprinted

Two words widely used Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA) has just been released in its 6th edition (2010). The Chester Fritz Library has recently learned, and has been closely following, discussions and a growing concern among scholars and professionals that the first printing contained so many errors that it was in fact unusable.

The Library had purchased three copies of this manual, all first printings. There were over 29 pages of corrections needing to be made, many involving removal and/or “tipping-in” of replacement pages for example texts.

Under considerable pressure from institutions and individuals who purchased copies, the APA has agreed to replace any 1st printings with a newly-released 2nd printing. The Association recently sent out e-mails to customers who contacted them, addressing these concerns. In part, the letter read:

"Many people have found that the corrections supplement meets their needs; if you find, however, that it doesn’t meet yours, we will send you a replacement copy of the 2nd printing of the Manual at no cost to you. (The 2nd printing corrects all identified errors.) We are making this replacement process available to individuals and institutions who have purchased the manual. In order to receive a replacement manual you must return your current copy of the 6th edition to APA no later than December 15, 2009."

The Chester Fritz Library has already taken advantage of this opportunity, and will be replacing the copies it purchased with corrected 2nd printings. Students, faculty, and staff on campus who may already have purchased copies of the 6th edition of the Publication Manual should check to see what printing they have, and contact the APA before Dec. 15 if they wish to have it replaced. The phone number to call is (800) 374-2721.
-- Victor Lieberman, Reference Librarian, Chester Fritz Library, victor.lieberman@und.edu, 777-4639

Essential studies opportunities open for students

Advisers, if you have students who need Humanities and Social Science Essential Studies credits, consider the new Integrated Studies Lite option. This spring (2010) Integrated Studies will offer two linked courses, HUM 102 (Intro to the Humanities II) (4 cr.) and HUM 225 (Advanced Integrative Social Science) (3 cr). The courses are integrated around the central theme "Turning Points," and as with all Integrated Studies courses, the classes will be student-centered and discussion based and will focus on critical thinking skills and communication skills. Both classes fulfill E.S. requirements (Humanities and Social Science). HUM 225 also fulfills the Global Diversity requirement. Classes meet M and W 1-3:30 in O'kelly 260 with outside event participation required. Contact Tami Carmichael for information on how to have students register

University Within the University (U2) lists new classes

Nov. 16, 12:10 to 12:50 p.m., Memorial Union, Badlands Room or;
Nov. 17, 5 to 5:40 p.m., Wellness Center, Room 121
Did you know that a person can gain almost 10 pounds during the holiday months if they’re not careful? All those holiday hors d-oeuvres, drinks, added stress, and inactivity can really make a difference. Join us as we learn how to savor the flavors of the season, without overdoing it. We’ll also share tips on how to reduce stress and increase physical activity, even when it’s cold outside. Hopefully you’ll enjoy winter like you did when you were a kid. MyHealthCenter points will be given for participating in this session. Presenter: Karina Wittman

Microsoft Office Access 2007 (Intermediate)
Nov. 16, 17 and 19, 1 to 4 p.m., Upson II, Room 361
Prerequisite: Microsoft Access 2007 Level 1
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Modify the design and field properties of a table to streamline data entry and maintain data integrity; Retrieve data from tables using joins; Create flexible queries to display specified records, allow for user-determined query criteria, and modify data using queries; Enhance the capabilities of a form; Customize reports to organize the displayed information and produce specific print layouts; Share data across different applications. Presenter: Heidi Strande.

Budgets Overview Inquiry
Nov. 17, 2 to 4 p.m., Gamble Hall, Lanterman Center, Room 9
Prerequisite: PeopleSoft user ID and password for Finance Module, a local fund number, and/or an appropriated fund number.
This training provides the tools necessary to navigate through PeopleSoft to find your department's budget and cash balance; utilize PeopleSoft to track your department's budget, cash, revenue, and expenditures; and complete a budget journal. The session also includes hands-on practice activities. Presenter: Shannon Smidt.

Freedom from Smoking/Chewing
Nov. 16, 23 and 30, Dec. 2, 7, 14 and 21, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Grand Forks County Office Building - 3rd Floor: Public Health, 151 South 4th St., Grand Forks, N.D.
Develop the skills and abilities to quit smoking or chewing tobacco. You will learn how to quit, set a quit date, learn from others who have quit and work on techniques to prevent you from starting again. Need to attend all sessions in the series. Presenter: Theresa Knox

Transitional Work: Guidelines to Work Restrictions
Nov. 17, 11 a.m. to noon, EERC, Thompson Conference Room
The primary purpose of this class is to present ND State Risk Management guidelines relating to temporary job restrictions. The content is built around the role of the supervisor. Employee expectations and injured worker guidelines, will be reviewed. Instructions needed to file an incident report will be covered. It is essential supervisors enroll in this class in order to provide information needed by their staff members. Injured employees need accurate information in order to receive all benefits they are entitled to. Presenter: Claire Moen

Defensive Driving
Nov. 18, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Skalicky Tech Incubator, Room 211
This workshop is required by State Fleet for all UND employees who drive State Fleet vehicles on a regular (monthly) basis, received a traffic violation, or had an accident while operating a State Fleet vehicle. Employees are encouraged to bring a family member (spouse and/or dependents). This workshop may also reduce your North Dakota insurance premiums and could possibly remove points from your driving record. Presenter: Jeff Misialek

Running, Reading, and Reconciling Key Finance Reports in PeopleSoft
Nov. 19, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Gamble Hall, Lanterman Center, Room 9
Prerequisite: Must have previously attended either a “Budgets Overview Inquiry” or “Budget vs. Cash Inquiry” U2 session and must have a PeopleSoft user ID and password for Finance Module. This training provides the tools necessary to navigate through PeopleSoft in order to run, read, and understand PeopleSoft financial reports. Important tips will be provided to help you recognize why, when, and how to reconcile revenue and expense transactions posted to your funds. Troubleshooting tips and tools to help you resolve budgeting errors will also be provided. This session includes hands-on practice activities. Presenter: Tom Swangler.
-- Patricia Young, U2 Coordinator, Continuing Education, U2@mail.und.edu, 777-0720

Benefited employees are eligible for AFLAC insurance

Benefited employees at UND are eligible to purchase AFLAC policies through payroll deduction. Aflac is different from health insurance; it's insurance for daily living. Aflac is an extra measure of financial protection in a time of injury or sickness. Aflac also pays you cash benefits for you to use as you see fit.

Judy Ingvalson 701-741-4841 and Shari Hanson 218-791-8667 will be available to meet with you to explain policies and your options. Just stop in at one of the following times (Thursday, Nov. 12, 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4 p.m. at the Memorial Union Memorial Room). If you want to meet with them and cannot make these time frames, feel free to call. Or if you would like them to come to your department just give them a call.
-- Payroll

Services available for entrepreneurial technology commercialization

The Center for Innovation, through a grant from the Dakota Foundation, is able to assist faculty and staff at the University of North Dakota in the entrepreneurial commercialization of their research. Center for Innovation interns are employed to conduct marketability studies, develop business plans, create financial models, apply for grant assistance, and generally assist in the development of a business based off of University developed technology. The Center for Innovation provides all of the necessary administrative and technical support (payroll, policies, NDA agreements, etc.) and assists with any work that requires additional expertise above the capabilities of the intern. The time required by the inventor is minimal and only at the beginning phases of the project when information about the invention or technology is needed. Please contact Jordan@innovators.net if you feel a technology you are working on could benefit from this program or for more information.
-- Jordan T. Schuetzle, Dir Entrepreneurial Tech Comm, Center for Innovation, jordan@innovators.net, 777-3132

Center for Community Engagement inaugurates Stone Soup community support fund

A unique Stone Soup Fund to support community-university projects was launched today at the UND Center for Community Engagement annual awards luncheon and program. Greg Hoover, director of the Grand Forks Office of Urban Development and Kelly Greenlees-Kraigbaum, nonprofit resource specialist with Otto Bremer Foundation in Grand Forks, made the announcement on behalf of the Center’s Community Advisory Board.

“Having watched some of these projects in action in the community, we know it takes a lot of hard work, skill, motivation and some financial support to carry them out,” Hoover said. Exhibits of sample projects involving community partners and UND faculty and students were on display at the awards program, and recognition was given to a number of communities, organizations, and individuals involved in projects.

The Stone Soup Fund will be used to support community-university projects with expenses of printing, supplies, travel and other expenses that go beyond the cost of normal classroom activities and most grant-sponsored opportunities, according to Lana Rakow, director of the UND Center for Community Engagement. The collaborative fund is named after the legend of stone soup, in which two hungry travelers start with soup from a stone and convince the townspeople to contribute what they can, resulting in plenty of soup for all.

Bremer Bank in Grand Forks took the lead as a corporate sponsor with a $1000 contribution. UND is supporting the fund with a $5000 commitment from the Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs. Other contributions have been received from Altru Health Systems and the North Dakota Mill. Contributions will be accepted at the Center for Community Engagement, 317 Cambridge St., Grand Forks, ND 58203. Checks should be made to UND.

Other members of the Center’s Community Advisory Board are Pat Berger, president and CEO, Grand Forks-East Grand Forks area United Way; Grand Forks Mayor Michael Brown; Sheila Bruhn, chief operating officer, Community Foundation of Grand Forks, East Grand Forks, and Region; Kris Fehr, executive director, Western Wellness Foundation & Best Friends Mentoring Program, Dickinson; Cher Hensrud, donor services associate, Fargo-Moorhead Area Foundation; Mike Jacobs, editor and publisher, Grand Forks Herald; Paul LeBel, provost and vice president, UND Academic Affairs, ex-officio; Cynthia Lindquist, president, Cankdeska Cikana Community College; Sandi Marshall, CEO, Development Homes, Inc.; Duke Wm. Rosendahl, executive director, Hazen Community Development; Jason Schaefer, community member, UND alum; Bob Valeu, government affairs, Kadrmas, Lee & Jackson; and Bill Wilfahrt, president & CEO, The Chamber, Grand Forks-East Grand Forks.
-- Juan Pedraza, Writer/Editor, University Relations, juan.pedraza@und.edu, 777-6571

International Programs seeks volunteers to serve Thanksgiving dinner

Each year the Office of International Programs provides a traditional Thanksgiving dinner for our international students on Thanksgiving Day. We plan to serve about 200 students on this national holiday and seek volunteers to help serve the meal. All the food is prepared, and volunteers are needed to serve the meal on Nov. 26. If you are interested in volunteering, please contact Shannon Jolly at 777-4231 by Thursday, Nov. 19.
-- Shannon Jolly, International Student Advisor, International Programs, shannonjolly@mail.und.edu , 777-4118

Sign-up for flexible benefits during November

Sign-up for 2010 Flexible Benefits during the month of November. All benefited employees have the opportunity to enroll or re-enroll in this benefit. The program helps employees pay for medical and dependent care expenses with pre-tax dollars instead of after-tax dollars.

Enrollment agreements must be returned to the Payroll Office by 4:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 30. No exceptions will be made for late submissions or for mail delays. If you have questions or need additional information, call Cheryl Arntz, Flex-Comp Specialist at 777-4423 or email her at cheryl.arntz@mail.und.edu .
-- Payroll

Staff Senate seeks U-Shine award nominations

The U-Shine award was developed by Staff Senate to recognize and award outstanding staff employees who make a difference on our campus. All benefited staff employees are eligible for nomination. UND faculty, staff and students are encouraged to nominate and recognize that special someone who, they believe, did something extraordinary, or went above and beyond the call of duty in one or more of the following categories: excellent team player; positive attitude; outstanding customer service, innovation and creativity; going the extra mile; magnificent motivator; loyalty and commitment to UND; or a category of the nominator's choosing. Nomination forms are available on the Staff Senate web site at www.und.edu/org/undss/ or printed forms are also available at Dining Services, Facilities and the Memorial Union Post Office. The deadline for submission is the 15th of each month. All nominations received after the 15th will be considered the following month. Each month, Staff Senate Executive Committee will select one award winner from the nominations received and present the award winner with a check for $50.
-- Shari Nelson, Assistant Director of Learning Services, Student Success Center, sharinelson@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2117

UND Bookstore will be open Nov. 15

Due to Inventory reasons, the UND Bookstore will be open from 2 to 7 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 15. We will also be closing the textbook area on Saturday, Nov. 14, all day. Please send this information out to the campus, faculty and staff members. If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to let us know.
-- Lisa Simonson, Customer Service Manager, UND Bookstore, 1120csm@fheg.follett.com, 777-2116

Studio One will feature a philosopher and collision repair

Jack Weinstein, associate professor at UND and author, says philosophy is asking about things people take for granted and looking for an explanation. He says he wants to spread the word about philosophy and travels to communities speaking on thought and reason. He also has a radio show to educate others about how philosophy can impact everyone. Weinstein explains that even the economy has an effect on people’s philosophy because they tend to be more pessimistic and take fewer risks. Find out more about Weinstein’s views on how philosophy can influence everyday life.

Also on the show, spend a day in the life of Bryan Renner, an auto collision repairman. He says he enjoys his job because “it’s something different; every collision is unique, there’s no two the same.” Even the way customers show their appreciation for Renner’s work is unique. Learn how Renner uses his skills when working with collisions and customers on this week’s episode of Studio One.

Studio One is an award-winning news and information program produced at the UND Television Center. The program airs live on UND Channel 3 on Thursdays at 5 p.m. Re-broadcasts can be seen at 7 a.m., noon, 7 p.m. and 11 p.m. daily and on Saturdays at 10 a.m. Prairie Public Television airs Studio One on Saturday at 6 a.m. The program can also be seen by viewers in Fargo, Bismarck, Mandan and Minot, N.D.; Minneapolis, Minn.; Denver, Colo.; and Winnipeg, Manitoba.
-- Suzanne Irwin, Director of Marketing, Studio One, suzanne.irwin@und.edu, 777-3818

Museum Cafe announces new menu

Grilled Chicken Ratatouille Provencale with Balsamic Sauce
- This ratatouille is inspired by the lush flavors of France.

Salmon BLT
- Salmon lox with brown sugar maple bacon, aioli sauce, lettuce and tomato.

Italian Meatball
Italian meatballs in a marinara sauce with mozzarella cheese on a toasted hero bun.

Asian Wild Rice Salad
- Wild rice with diced scallions, bean sprouts, and cranberries tossed in slightly sweet, slightly spicy rice vinaigrette on top of romaine lettuce and sprinkled with your choice of sunflower seeds or sliced almonds.

Vegetarian Sandwich
- Roasted pepper hummus with roasted zucchini, eggplant, assorted mushrooms, caramelized onions, and sliced tomatoes on a hearty bread.

Gyros
- A Grecian delight with thins strips of beef and lamb, sweet onions and a taziki spread served on pita bread.

Soup: Greek Lemon Chicken

Ask server about dessert. Museum Café hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays, with lunch served from 11 to 2 p.m. Take-out available • UND billing accepted • 777-4195
-- Brian Lofthus, Assistant to the Director, North Dakota Museum of Art, blofthus@ndmoa.com, 777-4195

Internal job openings listed

The following position vacancies are available only to regular UND staff employees who have successfully completed their six-month probation period, earn annual and sick leave, receive BC/BS health insurance and TIAA-CREF or ND PERS retirement benefits. Current UND faculty, please contact Human Resources for eligibility.

To apply: Please complete UND Application/Control Card form. Send letter of application and resume, referencing position name and number, to: Human Resources, University of North Dakota, Twamley Hall, Room 313, 264 Centennial Drive Stop 8010 Grand Forks, ND 58202-8010. Applications must be received by the deadline date.

Professional/Administrative/Coaches: no vacancies

Technical/Paraprofessional: no vacancies

Office Support: no vacancies

Crafts/Trades/Service: no vacancies

UND Receives Two Regional Awards from the University Continuing Education Association

Julie Hjelle, University of North Dakota student, and Becky Rude, program manager for the Division of Continuing Education, were selected out of a seven-state region for awards presented by the University Continuing Education Association (UCEA). They recently were honored at the annual UCEA Joint Great Plains Mid-America Conference held Oct. 29, 2009, in Lacrosse, Wis.

Hjelle received the 2009 Great Plains Region Outstanding Continuing Education Student award. The award is presented to a current student or graduate of either a credit or non-credit program who is over the age of 25, who has met the challenge of an unconventional educational background, and who has become an inspiration to others by effectively managing multiple commitments and responsibilities while engaged in his or her education.

Hjelle, a semi-truck driver whose route runs from the Midwest to Alaska, is pursing her bachelor’s degree in social science from UND through online, independent study courses. Her route takes her along the Alcan Highway through the Yukon, where cell phone, radio and Internet services are non-existent in most places. To complete her online courses, she downloads her assignments at the few truck stops along the way or at her company’s office in Palmer, Ala., and then works offline to complete them while her husband drives.

“I was very honored to receive the UCEA award,” said Hjelle. “Receiving this award has bolstered my desire to continue working toward a degree. It’s sometimes difficult to fit school in with two jobs and life’s obligations at the age of 39, but I shall persevere. To anyone considering going back to school, I encourage you to give it a try. It would have been easier to have done this right out of high school but it means more to me now.”

Becky Rude received the 2009 Great Plains Region Professional Continuing Educator award. The award is presented to a professional who has entered the field within the last five to ten years, who is actively involved in professional organizations at the state, regional or national levels, and who demonstrates excellent leadership, scholarship and contributions to the field of adult and continuing education.

As the manager of Dietetics and Nutrition for the UND Division of Continuing Education, Rude leads the nationally recognized dietary manager certificate program. Throughout her 10-year career in continuing education, Rude has served as a college professor, authored several certificate courses and edited many textbooks. She recently received the 2009 Distinguished Service Award, the highest honor given by the national Dietary Managers Association.

“I am truly honored by this award from UCEA,” said Rude. “My journey as a faculty member has proven to be rewarding beyond belief. I am indebted to the many professional colleagues and educators who have provided wise counsel, support and encouragement to always keep my focus and priority on students, and then allow everything else to fall into place. The opportunities I have had in the Division of Continuing Education have opened doors (and windows) to learning that has not only allowed me to promote lifelong learning, but also to practice it.”

Founded in 1915, UCEA is the primary U.S. organization for continuing higher education, and assists more than 375 institutions of higher learning and affiliated non-profit organizations to increase access to education through a wide array of programs and services. UCEA also provides national leadership in support of policies that advance workforce and professional development.

For more information about the University Continuing Education Association, visit www.ucea.edu or contact the UND Division of Continuing Education at 1-800-342-8230 or www.conted.und.edu.
-- Jennifer Swangler, Assistant Director of Enrollment Management & Marketing, Continuing Education, jenniferswangler@mail.und.edu, 701.777.6374

Steel Drum Band celebrates 10 rhythmic years

The UND Steel Drum Band is now celebrating its 10th anniversary, which still surprises founder and professor, Mike Blake. “It’s hard to believe—we started in the summer of 1998 literally with an idea on the back of an envelope,” said Blake, director of jazz studies and a prime-time fixture in academic percussion circles who’s been teaching full-time in the College of Arts and Sciences Department of Music since 1979.

"In the summer of 1998, (Grand Forks Red River High School music teacher) Brad Sherwood and (Red River High School theater and speech instructor) Dean Opp approached me because I was teaching jazz improvisation in the Summer Performing Arts (SPA) program, in which they’re both involved,” Blake said.

“They were looking for ideas for something besides another voice group,” Blake said. “So I suggested a steel pan band because I’d really fallen in love with the music after doing a steel band camp. Also I got to like it from listening many times to the steel band playing at Walt Disney World’s Pirates of the Caribbean.”

That idea took off with funding from the Myra Foundation and about $15,000 in steel drums. Th SPA musical team agreed to store the drums at UND in the off-season. So Blake put them to use with a group of his top percussionists as the UND Steel Drum Band. They’ve been knocking ‘em out every fall semester since, with groups averaging 14 players (this year’s group at 16 is the largest ever).

Today's ensemble still plays on that original set of pans made from the historically accurate steel 50-gallon oil drums, Blake said. “Today, pans aren’t made from oil drums anymore—they’re very technically engineered out of specialty steel. A full set of top-end pans today would run you close to $70,000 plus all the stands, playing equipment, and instrument cases.”

The Steel Drum Band is actually part of the Music Department’s Percussion Ensemble. “The Band comprises our most talented percussionists, and they perform a variety of styles including calypso, latin, popular, and traditional Carribbean music,” said Blake, whose Jazz Ensemble has twice been invited to participate in the celebrated Swiss Montreux Festival.

The biggest cost associated with a steel drum band using the traditional oil-drum pans is tuning, said Blake, who's also in demand nationally as a clinician/performer. “It costs about $2500 every two years to bring in an expert to retune these complex instruments,” said Blake, who has played in backup bands for the likes of Bob Hope, Martin Short, The Smothers Brothers, Della Reese, Jack Jones, Vicki Carr, and many more. "We raise the money by playing several extra gigs a year, for example, at the big CAPPA conference at the Alerus in September."

The steel drum as a musical instrument originated in the Caribbean island nation of Trinidad just after World War II, and quickly spread throughout the region. It’s now popular worldwide. The steel drum is a toned (musical notes) percussion instrument. The pan is struck with a pair of rubber-tipped sticks, Blake said.

While some bigger schools (such as the University of Akron, where the college-based steel drum band started more than 30 years ago) have ensembles numbering a couple of dozen or more people, there are about 14 players in the UND steel pan ensemble. That includes eight pan players playing three lead pans, six bass pans, two sets of trios, two sets of double seconds. The remaining players are in the so-called “engine room,” home to the drum set, the big congas, cowbells, the shekeres—a big gourd with beads on it—and other noisemakers.

“We actually start out a lot of pieces with the brake drum—yes, it’s a real automotive brake drum,” Blake said. “It’s what sets the pulse for a lot of calypso pieces.”

Monday’s UND Steel Drum Band concert starts at 8 p.m. at the Chester Fritz Auditorium. Ticket prices at the door are $3 for students and seniors; $6 for adults; and $12 for a family pass (two adults, two students).
-- Juan Pedraza, Writer/Editor, University Relations, juanpedraza@mail.und.edu, 777-6571