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ISSUE: Volume 47, Number 11: November 04, 2009

Contents
Top Stories
Chemical engineering Ph.D. program enriches student career opportunities
Events to Note
Doctoral examination set for Lori Ann Kalash
Culinary Corner announces upcoming events
Doctoral examination set for Cheryl Lantz
Forums will focus on the profile for the vp/dean position
Nontraditional Student Recognition Week is Nov 1-7
Global Visions Films Series continues with "The Boy in the Striped Pajamas"
Yoga classes will meet at Lotus Meditation Center
Swaziland Night has been canceled
Fire Hall Theatre presents "The Bad Seed"
Campus-wide workshop will focus on feedback
Running clinic is available to novice runners
Contemporary Music Ensemble presents Nov. 5 concert
Special Denim Day donations will support the Mortar Board Turkey Basket Drive
Languages hosts roundtable on "Global Community"
PPT seminar is Nov. 6
Visions for Online and Distance Learning: A Conversation with the Deans is Monday
Faculty invited to online and distance education event
Researcher to speak at Anatomy and Cell Biology fall seminar series
SBHE member Claus Lembke will deliver presentation about his years in Germany
Tech forum to focus on smart classrooms Nov. 10
Doctoral examination set for Eric K. Long
New Big Picture/Help Shape the Future of Technology at UND
Panel discussion will focus on community philanthropy
Clinical Laboratory Science Management Certificate program meeting is Nov. 12
Auditions for Metropolitan Opera are set for Nov. 14
Jodsaas Center Engineering Leadership seminar is Nov. 18
"The Disappeared" exhibition to open at the Museum
Human Rights symposium to be held at Museum
UND presents 31st annual Madrigal Dinner
"On Teaching" lunch seminar will focus on evaluation
Integrated Studies offers all-campus book seminars
Announcements
Insurance open enrollment forms due Nov. 6
Fischer to hired to work with community colleges in North Dakota, Minnesota
Arts, humanities and social science departments may seek funding for research and creative activity
Nominations sought for outstanding individuals for honorary degrees
Nominations sought for Outstanding Faculty Academic Adviser award
ITSS GroupWise BlackBerry Enterprise Server service is available
The Salvation Army seeks local involvement
Grand Forks seeks input on bike racks
Chester Fritz Library announces Veteran's Day hours
Library of the Health Sciences announces Veteran's Day hours
Veteran's Day hours for Law Library
ITSS holiday closing hours listed
Following is the holiday schedule for 2010-11
Internal job openings listed
Museum Cafe announces new menu
Research
New F&A rates established for July 1, 2009 - June 30, 2013
Faculty Research Seed Money applications sought
In the News
UND history professor will be featured in National Geographic program about witch hunting
UND-Casper College partnership seeks to ease the pain of arthritis
In Remembrance
Remembering Amy Lind
Chemical engineering Ph.D. program enriches student career opportunities

UND officially launched a new Ph.D. degree in chemical engineering, a big first for the state’s only chemical engineering program.

Chemical engineering, part of the UND School of Engineering and Mines (SEM), has been steadily building a strong research program to support its traditional strength in teaching. Its new, customizable Ph.D. program will provide students with an advanced understanding of fundamental chemical engineering subjects including thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, and transport phenomena applied to research such as bio-based materials and sustainable energy (UND recently established the country’s first master’s degree program in sustainable energy engineering).

“We are very excited to expand our advanced degree offerings to include the Ph.D. in chemical engineering,” said Graduate School dean Joseph Benoit. "Students entering the program will have the opportunity to study under an internationally recognized faculty. Regional students will no longer have to leave the state for doctoral education in chemical engineering and non-resident students are gaining a high quality option for advanced study.”

SEM professor and dean Hesham El-Rewini said the new doctoral program will offer students exceptional career opportunities. “Graduates of the chemical engineering doctoral degree program will be prepared to take faculty positions at leading universities and senior-level positions at major research facilities where they will create and implement chemical engineering solutions to the energy and environmental problems facing our state, nation, and world,” El-Rewini said.

The chemical engineering doctoral degree is designed to be more research-intensive with greater depth in chemical engineering fundamentals than the existing SEM interdisciplinary engineering doctoral program. A primary goal of the new program is to attract and retain high-quality students who're looking for a chemical engineering-specific doctoral degree program.

“Many of our master’s degree students indicated that they were selecting other institutions for doctoral study because UND did not have a doctoral degree specifically in chemical engineering,” said Michael Mann, professor and chair of chemical engineering. “The students felt that it was important to obtain this degree in order to get the jobs they desired. The formation of the new chemical engineering doctoral program is a direct response to this need.”

For more information about the new Ph.D. in chemical engineering, see http://www.und.edu/dept/sem/che/che_grad.html#chephdprog .
-- Juan Pedraza, Writer/Editor, University Relations, juan.pedraza@und.edu, 777-6571

Doctoral examination set for Cheryl Lantz

The final examination for Cheryl Lantz, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Nursing, is set for 10 a.m., Nov. 12, in room 201B, College of Nursing. The dissertation title is: "The Influence of Spirituality Within Older Adults During Relocation to Long Term Care." Eleanor Yurkovich (Nursing) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, gailholweger@mail.und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Lori Ann Kalash

The final examination for Lori Ann Kalash, a candidate for the Ed.D. degree with a major in Teaching & Learning, is set for 2:30 p.m., Nov. 16, in room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is: "Perspectives of Parents Who Have a Child Diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder." Myrna Olson (Teaching & Learning) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, gailholweger@mail.und.edu, 777-4005

Culinary Corner announces upcoming events

Check out wellness.und.edu to register online for Culinary Corner classes. Check out the calendar for upcoming classes, including:
French Night - Nov. 10
Thai Cooking - Nov. 12
Crock Pot Cooking - Nov. 13

So many good classes to choose from. Why not try them all? Space is limited, so sign up today. For a complete description of classes, go to wellness.und.edu and click on Nutrition and Culinary Corner.
-- Karina Wittmann, Director of Nutrition, Wellness Center, karinawittmann@mail.und.edu , 777-0769

Forums will focus on the profile for the vp/dean position

The UND vice president for Health Affairs and dean of the School of Medicine and Health Sciences Search Committee will hold several forums in Grand Forks, Bismarck, Fargo, Minot and Williston during the next few weeks to gather suggestions for a profile for the vp/dean position. The draft profile is available at www.und.edu/smhssearch .

The UND Search Committee is looking for input from key constituencies affected by the search, such as faculty, staff, students, alumni, medical communities and other members of the community who have an interest and commitment to the success of the School of Medicine and Health Sciences at UND. Numerous sessions have been scheduled over a three-week period to offer every individual an opportunity to provide the committee with information and opinions related to the position profile.

The profile is intended to answer questions such as:
(1) What are the key opportunities for UND and the School of Medicine and Health Sciences – both strategic and tactical?
(2) What are the ideal characteristics and competencies of the preferred VP/Dean candidate?
(3) What are the leadership expectations and goals and objectives of the preferred VP/Dean candidate?

Those interested are encouraged to attend one of the forums listed below:
Grand Forks, Multiple dates, times, locations:
* Tuesday, Nov. 3, 1 to 2 p.m., School of Medicine and Health Sciences building, room 5520, students
* Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2 to 3 p.m., School of Medicine and Health Sciences building, room 5520, staff
* Wednesday, Nov. 4, 4 to 5 p.m., Lecture Bowl, UND Memorial Union, faculty
* Wednesday, Nov. 4, 7 to 8 p.m., Finch - Room #7, Alerus Center, 1200 – 42nd St South Grand Forks, community stakeholders
* Thursday, Nov. 5, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., Altru Hospital Board Room (hospital lower level), 1200 S.Columbia Road, all interested health care stakeholders
* Friday, Nov. 6, 7 to 8 a.m., Altru Hospital Board Room (hospital lower level), 1200 S.Columbia Road, clinical faculty with the School of Medicine and Health Sciences
Fargo, Monday, Nov. 2:
* Noon to 1 p.m., UND Auditorium, Ground Level, South Entrance, UND Medical Education Center, 1919 N. Elm Street (VA Medical Center Campus – 19th Avenue Entrance), all interested health care stakeholders
* 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., Mezzanine 4, Holiday Inn, 3803 – 13th Ave South
Bismarck, Monday, Nov. 9:
* Noon to 1 p.m., VanGogh/Remington Meeting Room Radisson Hotel, 605 E. Broadway Ave, community stakeholders
Dickinson, Monday, Nov. 9:
* 6 to 7 p.m. MT, Dickinson State University (TBD), all medical and community stakeholders
Minot, Thursday, Nov. 12:
* 6 to 7 p.m., UND Center for Family Medicine, 1201 – 11th Ave SW, all medical and community stakeholders
Williston, Friday, Nov. 13:
* 11 a.m. to Noon, Medical Staff Library, Mercy Medical Center, (visitors’ entrance – SE corner of the medical center), 1301 – 15th Ave West, all medical and community stakeholders.
-- Peter Johnson, Executive Associate Vice President for University Relations, 777-4317, peterjohnson@mail.und.nodak.edu

Nontraditional Student Recognition Week is Nov 1-7

In recognition of nontraditional student success on our campus, Nontraditional Student Recognition Week will be celebrated Nov 1-7. Department celebrations and student nominations are encouraged to highlight campus support and to recognize nontraditional student success. Campus departments are encouraged to hold an event or activity for the nontraditional/adult students during the week. Also, nominate a nontraditional student for a recognition award to be presented by First Lady Marcia Kelley at a Nontraditional Student Recognition Award celebration. Submit completed nominations form by Wednesday, Oct. 28 to the Adult Re-entry, Stop 7143, or email to adultre.entry@und.edu Download the nomination form and view events happening during the week at www.ssc.und.edu/reentry .

National Nontraditional Student Recognition Week is an annual event celebrated and encouraged during the first week of November by the Association of Nontraditional Students in Higher Education (ANTSHE) to hightlight campus support. Show your campus support and join in the celebration of nontraditional student success in your department.
-- Sandy Monette, Adult Re-entry Coordinator, Student Success Center, sandymonette@mail.und.edu, 777-3228

Global Visions Films Series continues with "The Boy in the Striped Pajamas"

The department of Anthropology's Global Visions Film Series will play "The Boy in the Striped Pajamas" Tonight (Nov. 3) at 7 p.m. in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl.

"The Boy in the Striped Pajamas" follows a budding friendship between two young boys. One is the son of a high-ranking Nazi officer and the other is a prisoner in a Nazi concentration camp. As their friendship builds, both boys find themselves in a tragic situation that separates them in the end.

"Moviegoers can be forgiven for feeling a little Holocaust fatigue. There have been so many films about the subject, or using it as a backdrop, that there's no shame in feeling a bit numb to it all. And then, 'The Boy in the Striped Pajamas' comes along and brings us fresh eyes and the wounds reopen anew. This is the most heartbreaking film about the Holocaust since Schindler's List. How Mark Herman's film of John Boyne's novel manages such poignancy in 90 compact minutes is nothing short of miraculous." - Roger Moore, Orlando Sentinel

The department of Anthropology's Global Visions Film Series seeks to bring an array of international films to the Grand Forks Community. Two films are presented each month in the Lecture Bowl of the Memorial Union. Attendance is free, but a small donation of $1 is requested.

Upcoming films, all at 7 p.m. in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl, are:
"Sangre De Mi Sangre" - Tuesday, Nov. 17
"Days of Glory" - Tuesday, Dec. 1

Yoga classes will meet at Lotus Meditation Center

The next session of Yoga classes at the Lotus Meditation Center begins Nov. 2 and continues through Dec. 17. Classes meet on Tuesday and/or Thursday from 5:30 to 6:45 p.m. Contact Dyan Rey for more information at 772-8840 or dyanre@aol.com .
-- Dyan Rey, Lecturer, Visual Art, dyanre@aol.com, 701-772-8840

Swaziland Night has been canceled

The Office of International Programs regrets to inform you that Swaziland Night for Thursday, Nov. 5 has been canceled. We apologize for any inconveniences this may cause you and your student groups. We hope you will be able to join us at the next event, which will be Japan Night on Thursday, Nov. 19.
-- Matt Hiller, International Student Advisor, International Programs, matthewhiller@mail.und.edu, 777-2033

Campus-wide workshop will focus on feedback

Are Holen, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway/community faculty member, UND department of Family and Community Medicine, will discuss feedback at two workships Nov. 12 and 16.

Holen has served as the chairperson of the department of Neuroscience and Vice Dean of Education of the Faculty of Medicine at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. He has been central in his university's development of problem-based learning, peer feedback systems and in the establishment of behavioral medicine. He is a highly esteemed lecturer and teacher.

Holen will discuss how a major key to the creation of a productive and positive learning environment is to deliver constructive, specific and timely feedback. Feedback requires a complex set of skills. Without feedback our capacity to grow and influence others is diminished. There are many barriers to giving feedback (time, skills, and fear of consequences to name a few). A major barrier is that people often find it very difficult to give honest feedback. This is due to a range of reasons, including cultural norms, power differences and fear of conflict. Features of this workshop will cover the need to develop essential peer feedback skills for the process to be constructive in any classroom or learning environment, and particularly in a problem-based small group.

You may attend the workshop at one of the following times and places:
1. Thursday, Nov. 12, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. (lunch provided)
Haugen Lecture Hall, UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences
2. Monday, Nov. 16, 3:30 to 5:30 p.m.
United Lecture Hall, UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences

Intended audience: Any UND faculty member or student interested in the topic of giving and receiving feedback is encouraged to attend.

To pre-register: Contact Faye Aker, Office of Medical Education, at 777-3800 or fayker@medicine.nodak.edu .
-- Linda Olson, Special Projects Director, Office Of Medical Education, UNDSMHS, liolson@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-3953

Fire Hall Theatre presents "The Bad Seed"

What do you do when you know your child is, well, just wrong? Meet Little Rhoda Penmark, the well-behaved daughter of Colonel and Christine Penmark. On the surface she is sweet, charming, full of old-fashioned graces, loved by her parents, admired by all her elders. But Rhoda’s mother has an uneasy feeling about her. When one of Rhoda’s schoolmates is mysteriously drowned at a picnic, Mrs. Penmark is alarmed. For the boy who was drowned was the one who had won the penmanship medal that Rhoda felt she deserved.

"The Bad Seed" was a successful and long-running (334 performances) Broadway play by UND alum Maxwell Anderson adapted from the novel of that name by William March, and was in turn adapted by John Lee Mahin into an Academy Award-nominated film of the same name directed by Mervyn Leroy.

Staged by Reginald Denham, it opened Dec. 8, 1954, and starred Nancy Kelly (who won the 1955 Tony Award for Best Actress in the role as the mother), Patty McCormack, Eileen Heckart and Henry Jones, all of whom reprised their roles in the 1956 film and the first three of whom received Oscar nominations for their performances.

Interest in the play was strong enough that Life magazine ran an extensive story on the production a week before it opened. The play was shortlisted for the 1955 Pulitzer Prize for Drama, but Joseph Pulitzer, Jr. pressured the prize jury into presenting it to Cat on a Hot Tin Roof instead.

Directed by Benjamin Klipfel and starring Claire Thompson, Jenny Morris, Jeff Weatherly, Santos Casarez, Mare Thompson, Ralph Swendseid, Joe Bussy, Nicole Quam and Megan Lonski.

Production runs Nov. 5-7, 12-14, 19-21 at 7:30 p.m., with Sunday Matinees Nov. 8 and 15 at 2 p.m. Productions are at the Fire Hall Theatre. Tickets: $15/12 | 777-4090
-- Benjamin Klipfel, Executive Director, Greater Grand Forks Community Theatre, info@ggfct.com, 777-4090

Contemporary Music Ensemble presents Nov. 5 concert

The department of Music is pleased to announce the upcoming performance of the UND Contemporary Music Ensemble at 8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 5, in the Josephine Campbell Recital Hall.

The Contemporary Music Ensemble is made up of artist/faculty from UND, the Grand Forks Public Schools and the Greater Grand Forks Symphony Orchestra. The mission of the CME is to perform a variety of chamber music from the 20th and 21st centuries. Consequently, the instrumentation and personnel are constantly changing, according to the needs of the repertoire.

This concert’s performers are: Sharon Boschee, flute; David Christianson, trumpet; Alejandro Drago, violin; Ronnie Ingle, trumpet; Michelle Lucia-Ingle, bass clarinet; Philip McKenzie, oboe; James Popejoy, conductor; Joel Pugh, trombone; Elizabeth Rheude, clarinet; Peter Schiefelbein, horn; Brian Opdahl, tuba; Naomi Welch, cello; and Michael Wittgraf, bassoon, with guest soloist Mathew Patnode, saxophone professor at North Dakota State University.

Repertoire will include the Paul Hindemith Septet, Alfredo Casella Serenata and Fisher Tull Concerto for Alto Saxophone and Brass Quintet. Admission is $6 for adults, $3 for students and seniors, and $12 for a family pass (two adults, two students).
-- Elizabeth Rheude, Associate Professor, Music, elizabeth.rheude@und.edu, 777-2823

Running clinic is available to novice runners

Do you want to begin running or enter your first race but don't know where to start? This running clinic is for you. Even those with running experience can pick up some advice to advance your running.

Come and learn more about how to begin running, train and prepare for a race, and what type of shoe is best for your running style. Bring your running shoes with you and get feedback on your running style and what type of shoe would best benefit you.

The Clinic will be held at noon Thursday, Nov. 12, in the Memorial Union Prairie Room. Feel free to bring your lunch with you.
-- Mandy Dockendorf, Coordinator of Fitness, Wellness Center, mandydockendorf@mail.und.edu, 777-2943

Special Denim Day donations will support the Mortar Board Turkey Basket Drive

Friday, Nov. 6, will be this year's Special Denim Day for the 30 annual Mortar Board Turkey Basket Drive. Baskets will be distributed to families in the Greater Grand Forks area. Mortar Board is working to meet the needs of approximately 1,000 families who will have signed up ahead of time (Last year's count was 900). Dress casually on Friday, Nov. 6, and pay what you feel you can afford to help those in need. Need more buttons? Contact Patsy Nies.
-- Patsy Nies, Special Project Assistant, Enrollment Services, patsynies@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3791

Languages hosts roundtable on "Global Community"

"Global Community?" an open roundtable discussion about the ways in which the United States and the rest of the world perceive and (mis)understand each other, is set for 1 to 2 p.m. Friday, Nov. 6, in the Badlands Room of the Memorial Union.

Everybody is welcome to participate in the roundtable, which is hosted by the department of Modern & Classical Languages & Literatures. For more information, please contact Sherrie Fleshman (777-3278, sherrie.fleshman@und.edu) and Olaf Berwald (777-6435, olaf.berwald@und.edu).
-- Olaf Berwald, Chair and associate professor, Department of Modern & Classical Languages & Literatures

PPT seminar is Nov. 6

Xianlin Han, associate professor in the department of Internal Medicine at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, will present a seminar titled “Lipid metabolism, lipidomics, and neurodegenerative disease” at 2 p.m. Friday, Nov. 6, in the School of Medicine, room 3933.

This seminar series is sponsored by the Center of Biomedical Research Excellence Pathophysiological Signaling in Neurodegenerative Disorders and the Department of Pharmacology, Physiology & Therapeutics. All are welcome to attend.
-- Deb Kroese, Admin Ofcr, Pharmacology, Physiology & Therapeutics, dkroese@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-6221

Visions for Online and Distance Learning: A Conversation with the Deans is Monday

All UND faculty are invited and encouraged to attend this event to learn about the models and visions of online and distance education in the various colleges:
*What currently exists
*Lessons learned over the past year
*Visions for the future

Join us from noon to 1:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 9, at the Memorial Union, River Valley Room. To reserve a complimentary box lunch, email adminserv@mail.und.edu by Nov. 5. The event is sponsored by the Senate Continuing Education Committee Discovery Series Event.
--Janet Rex, Chair, Senate Continuing Education Committee, janetrex@mail.und.edu, 777-4641

Faculty invited to online and distance education event

All UND faculty are invited and encouraged to attend this event to learn about the models and visions of online and distance education in the various colleges:
*What Currently Exists
*Lessons Learned Over the Past Year
*Visions for the Future

Join us from noon to 1:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 9, at the Memorial Union, River Valley Room. To reserve a complimentary box lunch, email adminserv@mail.und.edu by Nov. 5. The event is sponsored by Senate Continuing Education Committee Discovery Series Event.
-- Janet Rex, Chair, Senate Continuing Education Committee, janetrex@mail.und.edu, 777-4641

Researcher to speak at Anatomy and Cell Biology fall seminar series

Holly Brown-Borg, associate professor in the department of Pharmacology, Physiology & Therapeutics, UND School of Medicine & Health Sciences, will present a seminar at noon Monday, Nov. 9, in the School of Medicine & Health Sciences, room 5510. The seminar is entitled “Role of methionine in stress resistance and aging.” All are welcome to attend.
-- Bonnie Kee, Administrative Assistant, Anatomy and Cell Biology, bkee@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-2102

SBHE member Claus Lembke will deliver presentation about his years in Germany

Claus Lembke, a member of the North Dakota State Board of Higher Education, will deliver a presentation about his early years in Germany at 7:15 p.m., Monday, Nov. 9, in the Community Room of the Grand Forks Herald. The Herald is located downtown Grand Forks at 375 2nd Ave North). Lembke, born and raised in Germany, was appointed by Gov. John Hoeven to the higher ed board last February.

Lembke’s presentation will focus on his early years in Germany, the changes and challenges he encountered when he moved to the United State, and became a U.S. citizen in 1970. He will also compare and contrast the twocultures, their languages, work ethic, and attitudes.

Lembke is a Bismarck realtor who served as Burleigh County commissioner for 20 years, including eight years as chair. From 1979 until 2007, he served as executive vice president of the North Dakota Association of Realtors, and currently serves part-time as the organization's government affairs director. He also served on the North Dakota Committee of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission and the North Dakota Supreme Court Committee for Indigent Rights.

Lembke’s presentation is sponsored by the UND College of Arts and Sciences Department of Languages. The event is free and open to the public.
-- Juan Pedraza, Writer/Editor, University Relations, juanpedraza@mail.und.edu, 777-6571

Tech forum to focus on smart classrooms Nov. 10

An extensive strategic planning process for information technology led by CIO Josh Riedy in Fall 2008 resulted in the identification of critical Core Technology Services. This Fall, the Office of the CIO will again host a series of open forums to develop solutions, cost, sustainability and implementation for these core technology services. In this next phase we again ask for your valuable input as the success of this process requires the active involvement and partnered decision-making from across campus. All forums will be broadcast live and recorded. Please see the UND CIO website http://cio.und.edu for more information. Online surveys will also be available for additional feedback from the campus community.

Please plan to attend the second Smart and Technology-Enhanced Classrooms forum on Tuesday, Nov. 10, from 2 to 3 p.m. in the Badlands Room.
-- Mike Lefever, Project Manager, AVP/Dean of Outreach/CIO Office, michaellefever@mail.und.edu, 777-2030

Doctoral examination set for Eric K. Long

The final examination for Eric K. Long, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics, is set for 2 p.m., Nov. 10, in School of Medicine and Health Sciences, room 3933. The dissertation title is: Trans-4-Hydroxy-2-Hexenal as a Marker of N-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Oxidation in Brain in a Rat Model of Ethanol Withdrawal. Matthew Picklo (Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics) is the committee chair.

The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, gailholweger@mail.und.edu, 777-4005

New Big Picture/Help Shape the Future of Technology at UND

All students, faculty and staff are welcome to the Free Box Lunch series with the Chief Information Officer, Josh Riedy, and members of the Technology Steering Committee. Join us to discuss, share, and brainstorm ideas for the future of technology at UND. Discussions are intended to complement the Technology Forums already in progress.

Box Lunch Discussion 2: Tuesday, Nov. 10, noon to 1 p.m., River Valley Room, Memorial Union
Four main themes:
- Faculty/Staff Unified Communication Services (e-mail, calendar, IM, voice, video)
- Computer Labs
- Learning Management System (Blackboard, eZ, Moodle)
- Smart and Technology-Enhanced Classrooms

To order a complimentary box lunch, please e-mail michaellefever@mail.und.edu by Nov. 5. Make your reservation early, as space is limited.
-- Mike Lefever, Project Manager, AVP/Dean of Outreach/CIO Office, michaellefever@mail.und.edu, 777-2030

Panel discussion will focus on community philanthropy

All are invited to “Giving Back with Purpose,” a panel discussion featuring three local women. The event will be held at the Ina Mae Rude Center at 4:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 12, with a reception following. The panelists are Sarah Heitkamp, co-owner of Porpoura Coffee House and co-founder of Filling the Gap, a program which helps low income Altru Cancer Center patients; Mary Gail Homstad, whose career has focused on making a difference in the lives of special needs children in the East Grand Forks school system; and Kathy Fick, campus minister at Christus Rex Lutheran Campus Ministry.

The event is sponsored by the Women's Fund, a member of the Community Foundation of Grand Forks, East Grand Forks and Region, committed to empowering girls and women from the community to achieve economic, social and political equality. For more information, please contact the Community Foundation office at 701-746-0668.
-- Kathy Sukalski, Associate Professor and Interim Chair, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, sukalski@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-4049

Clinical Laboratory Science Management Certificate program meeting is Nov. 12

The University Curriculum Committee will meet at 3:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 12, in 305 Twamley Hall to review the request from Clinical Laboratory Science to terminate the Clinical Laboratory Science Management Certificate program. Anyone interested in this proposal is invited to attend.
-- Connie Borboa, Admissions and Records Officer, Registrar's Office, connieborboa@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-4852

Auditions for Metropolitan Opera are set for Nov. 14

The North Dakota auditions conducted under the auspices of the Metropolitan Opera National Council will be held this year on Saturday, Nov. 14, beginning at noon in the Josephine Campbell Recital. A public master class follows the auditions. Judging the competition this year are Dr. Christopher Hunt of Indiana University, Doug Nagel of the RimRock Opera Company of Billings, Mont., and MET soprano Margaret Jane Wray.

This marks the 46th year this competition has been held in North Dakota on the UND campus. The auditions and master class are free and open to the public and have always made for an enjoyable afternoon listening experience.

The North Dakota auditions are part of a North American wide system of auditions held throughout the United States and Canada sponsored by the Metropolitan Opera to find exceptionally talented young singers between the ages of 20 and 30 and assist them in their development. Last year, 12 singers from North Dakota, Minnesota and Manitoba competed.

Singers in the North Dakota district auditions compete for prize money and the chance to advance to the Upper Midwest Regional Auditions to be held at the Ordway in St. Paul on Feb. 6, beginning at noon. The winners of the Upper Midwest, and 15 other Regional Auditions held around the country will advance with all expenses paid to the National semi-finals on March 7 and the Audition Finals March 14 on stage at the Met. It is estimated close to one-half million dollars will be given out in prize money in the three levels of competition this year.

The ND auditions are generously supported by the UND Fellows, the department of Music and individual contributors. For more information, contact G. Paul Larson at 791-2612 or www.metopera.org (click on Auditions then the National Council Auditions)
-- G Paul Larson, Director, North Dakota District, Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions, 701-772-4961

Jodsaas Center Engineering Leadership seminar is Nov. 18

The Jodsaas Center for Engineering Leadership & Entrepreneurship within UND Engineering is sponsoring an Engineering Leadership seminar on Wednesday, Nov. 18, from 5 to 6:30 p.m. in the Memorial Union Ballroom.

"Building Successful Teams - How to be a Valuable Team Player," presented by UND Engineering Dean Hesham El-Rewini
In this 90-minute leadership training session, we will learn effective ways for individuals with different backgrounds and personalities to successfully work together as a team to achieve a common goal. We will study different team-player styles and discuss strategies to maximize team effectiveness. The audience will participate in group discussion and share experiences as team players and team leaders.

All students, faculty, and staff are invited to attend. Please register in one of the five engineering department reception areas or in the UND Engineering Dean’s Office. Cookies and refreshments will be served.
-- Richard R. Schultz, Director, Jodsaas Center for Engineering Leadership & Entrepreneurship, UND Engineering, RichardSchultz@mail.und.edu, 777-4429

"The Disappeared" exhibition to open at the Museum

The North Dakota Museum of Art will host an exhibition titled "The Disappeared" between Thursday, Nov. 19, and Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2010. The exhibition will open at 2 p.m. on Nov. 19.

"The Disappeared" contains art by 23 contemporary artists from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Guatemala, Uruguay and Venezuela who, over the course of the last 30 years, have made art about the disappeared. These artists have lived through the horrors of the military dictatorships that rocked their countries in the mid-decades of the 20th century. Some worked in the resistance. Some had parents or siblings who disappeared; others were forced into exile. The youngest were born into the aftermath of those dictatorships. And still others have lived in countries maimed by endless civil war.

The exhibition was organized by the North Dakota Museum of Art and opened in North Dakota in March 2005. Subsequently it toured to Buenos Aires, Argentina; Montevideo, Uruguay; Antigua, Guatemala; Santiago de Chile; and Bogota, Colombia in addition to five sites in the United States including New York City; Washington D.C.; Santa Fe, N.M.; University of Wyoming; and the University of Texas at El Paso. The Museum of Art is bringing an expanded version of the show home in November as the final showing before dispersal.

The North Dakota Museum of Art is located on Centennial Drive, Grand Forks. Hours on weekdays is 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Hours on weekends is 1 to 5 p.m. The Museum Shop is open during these hours as well. The Museum Café is open weekdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with lunch served from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Although the Museum does not charge an admission fee, the suggested donation is $5 for adults and change for children. Wireless internet access available.
-- Brian Lofthus, Assistant to the Director, North Dakota Museum of Art, blofthus@ndmoa.com, 777-4195

Human Rights symposium to be held at Museum

The North Dakota Museum of Art will hold a Human Rights Symposium in conjunction with the upcoming exhibition, "The Disappeared." The symposium will be held Nov. 29 through Dec. 2 and will explore the theme of "How people and countries move forward into a more humane future after great suffering."

Presenters include:
- Ishmael Beah, former boy soldier from Sierra Leone who serves as an international ambassador for children damaged by war. His book, "A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier" was on the New York Times best seller list for months.
- Sarah Cahill, pianist, will perform "A Sweeter Music," works she commissioned by eighteen contemporary composers charged with envisioning peace. She performs against a backdrop of videos created for each work by collaborator John Sanborn.
- Emmanuel Jal, former boy soldier from Sudan who became an international hip-hop artist and composer, human rights spokesman, and author of "War Child."
- Father Jack Davis, pastor among Peru’s poor since 1974, and a North Dakota native who was himself hunted by the Shining Path during the terrible years of Peru’s civil war (see above).
- Kate Doyle, senior analyst for the National Security Archive in Washington, D.C.; has led the Guatemala Project to archive the “death squad dossier,” the molding records of thousands killed during Guatemala’s civil war.
- Representative from the International Center for Transitional Justice founded in 2001 to assist countries pursuing accountability for past mass atrocity or human rights abuse. ICTJ most often works in societies emerging from repressive rule or armed conflict.

Disappeared Symposium Schedule:
Sunday, Nov. 29
4 p.m. – Laurel Reuter, curator of "The Disappeared," will speak about the exhibition
5 p.m. – Father Jack Davis, lecture on life in Peru during the Shining Path movement. Reception to follow.

Monday, Nov. 30
noon – Father Jack Davis moderated discussion by Jack Weinstein
1:30 p.m. – Ishmael Beah talk with school groups: $2 student tickets (School groups may arrange a guided tour of the Museum)
7 p.m. – Ishmael Beah reading/lecture, offsite-Empire Arts Center: $5 students, $10 adults
8:30 p.m. – Reception and book signing

Tuesday, Dec. 1
noon – Kate Doyle moderated discussion by Jack Weinstein
4 p.m. – Laurel Reuter, curator of "The Disappeared," will speak about the exhibition
6 p.m. – Kate Doyle lecture
8 p.m. – Sarah Cahill performance, offsite-Empire Arts Center: $5 students, $10 adults

Wednesday, Dec. 2
10 a.m. – Jack Weinstein radio interview with panelists
noon – War Child screening at Student Union
4 p.m. – Laurel Reuter, curator of The Disappeared, will speak about the exhibition
7 p.m. – Emmanuel Jal performance/lecture, offsite-Empire Arts Center: $5 students, $10 adults
8:30 p.m. – Book signing/reception for Emmanuel Jal
-- Brian Lofthus, Assistant to the Director, North Dakota Museum of Art, blofthus@ndmoa.com, 777-4195

UND presents 31st annual Madrigal Dinner

The UND 31st annual Madrigal Dinner, a festive winter holiday event that’s become a community tradition, takes place Friday, Dec. 4 and Saturday, Dec. 5, at 7 p.m. in the Memorial Union Ballroom.

The Madrigal Dinner features food, music, and entertainment presented in the style of Elizabethan England, a time of castles and Shakespeare. The UND Concert Choir, the Varsity Bards, and the Allegro Women’s Choir lead a tour of the traditional English holiday feast through song, food, and theater.

“This is an interactive event for the entire family that’s at times serious, frequently funny, and occasionally wacky,” said Joshua Bronfman, assistant professor and director of choral studies at UND.

Tickets are on sale at the Chester Fritz Auditorium Box Office 777-4090. General seating is $40 per person; a limited number of front-row seats are available for $45 each. Groups of 10 will receive a discount of $5 per ticket.

The Old English-style dinner includes a five-course meal with a choice of beef, chicken, or vegetarian. Special meal accommodations are also available. The Madrigal Dinner is a combination of theater, a musical, and a holiday choral music concert.

“The performers dress up in Elizabethan costumes and speak in English accents,” Bronfman said. “They joke with the audience while the king, queen and court jester run the show. In a segment called sack theater, a few audience members are brought on stage to act out a small scene described by the jester.” The primary roles in the performance are played by UND Concert Choir members. “The Varsity Bards and Allegro choral groups bring a youthful energy to the show,” Bronfman said. "The annual Madrigal Dinner is a very robust tradition at UND, and easily tens of thousands of people have seen it.”

In addition to being fun and entertaining, the event serves as a fundraiser for a good cause. “All the money goes to fund trips, music, and infrastructure for UND choir students,” Bronfman said.

The Madrigal Dinner is held in the ballroom on the second floor of the UND Memorial Union at 2901 University Ave. Parking on the street around the Union is free, although spaces are limited. For a fee, parking is also available in the UND Parking Garage on the corner of University and Columbia.

For information on group rates, contact Janice Hoffarth, UND Music department, at 777-2646. Also see http://undmadrigaldinner.wordpress.com/ for more detailed information about this year’s event.

For more information about UND’s choral program, including the Concert Choir, the Varsity Bards, and Allegro Women’s Choir, visit http://www.und.edu/dept/choirs/html/ensembles.htm
-- Juan Pedraza, Writer/Editor, University Relations, juan.pedraza@und.edu, 777-6571

"On Teaching" lunch seminar will focus on evaluation

The next "On Teaching" seminar of the semester, “How am I Doing? Rating Yourself as a Teacher,” will take place Wednesday, Nov. 18, from noon to 1 p.m., in the Red River Valley Room of the Memorial Union.

Each semester faculty members in higher education take on teaching duties. For most, this is a recurring task. For the majority, it is the central task of a life-long career. Assuming that no one is perfect and therefore everyone has room for improvement, evaluation is the means by which we try to identify which aspects of our teaching are good (which are working in terms of student learning) and which need to be changed. Evaluating our teaching allows us to document it for others. And many argue that there is also a very human and personal need to evaluate. It is one thing to think or feel that a class went well; it is quite another (and a far more enjoyable experience) to have solid information that tells us that we have taught well and students have learned well, or to have concrete evidence about how to improve our work. That insight is possible only if we do a thorough evaluation. End of the semester USAT forms don’t really provide the kind of information we often want, and they provide it too late in the game to benefit the semester in progress.

Doing good evaluation is like doing good research. In both cases, you are posing questions that you continually re-examine with data. The key to doing both activities well is identifying the right questions to ask and figuring out how best to answer them. Over the lunch hour we will discuss why it is important to ask questions of you own teaching, what questions are valuable to ask, and how to gather information that helps provide sound answers to those questions.

We hope you will come and join the conversation. And if you have developed some effect means of evaluation that have allowed you to improve your practice and student learning in you classes, we would love to hear about them.

Please register by noon Monday, Nov. 16, to reserve a lunch and attend. Visit the Office of Instructional Development online (www.und.edu/dept/oid) to register. For information call Jana Hollands at 777-4998 or email jana_hollands@und.edu .
-- Anne Kelsch, Director, Office of Instructional Development, anne.kelsch@und.nodak.edu, 777-4233

Integrated Studies offers all-campus book seminars

Integrated Studies offers all-campus book seminars. Join the faculty and staff of Integrated Studies for engaging book discussions of the David Auburn play, "Proof" at noon Tuesday, Nov. 24, in 260 O'kelly Hall and/or J.Lawrence and R. Lee's play, "The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail," at noon Tuesday, Dec. 8, in 260 Okelly Hall. Everyone welcome. Bring your lunch and your ideas. For more information, contact Tami Carmichael.
-- Tami S. Carmichael, Associate Professor, Humanities & Integrated Studies, tami.carmichael@und.edu, 777-3015

Fischer to hired to work with community colleges in North Dakota, Minnesota

UND has hired Kyle Fischer as the university’s interim assistant director of Online Enrollment Management, Outreach and Recruitment. Fischer’s position is the result of UND’s long-term goal of providing more educational opportunities to communities without a four-year public university by partnering with two-year community colleges in North Dakota and Minnesota.

Fischer will oversee a team of outreach coordinators who will augment UND’s current recruitment efforts across the region. Fischer and three other outreach coordinators will focus on recruiting traditional transfer and distance students in specific territories in North Dakota and northwestern Minnesota. Currently, UND has an outreach coordinator located on the Bismarck State College campus for south central and western North Dakota as well as an outreach coordinator for northern North Dakota located on the Lake Region State College campus in Devils Lake. A fourth outreach coordinator will be hired to round out the team.

“We are very pleased to have Kyle lead our team,” said Philip Parnell, director of Online Enrollment Management and Community College Relations. “With Kyle’s leadership, UND is assembling an outstanding team of outreach coordinators who will work closely with community colleges to better serve the needs of students and communities across the region. We already are seeing great results with the number of community colleges interested in partnering with UND exceeding our expectations."

In his role, Fischer is also responsible for providing outreach services to all communities in northwestern Minnesota and northeastern North Dakota, including the Grand Forks Air Force Base. Specifically, Fischer will recruit, advise and provide outreach services for students interested in UND’s bachelor’s and graduate programs, including online and on-campus options. He will assist transfer students from community colleges, such as Northland Community & Technical College, Itasca Community College and Hibbing Community College, who want to complete their bachelor’s degrees on the UND campus in Grand Forks. He will also provide assistance to UND’s online students living in the region.

Prior to his position as interim assistant director, Fischer served for three years as the transfer specialist for the UND Office of Enrollment Services. In 2006, he graduated from UND with his bachelor’s degree in psychology and minors in professional flight and aviation management. He will complete his master’s degree in aviation from UND in May 2011.

Fischer’s office is located at the Skalicky Tech Incubator on the UND campus in Grand Forks. For more information, contact Fischer toll free at 1-800-342-8230 extension 0484, e-mail him at kylefischer@mail.und.edu or visit www.distance.und.edu.
-- Jennifer Swangler, Assistant Director of Enrollment Management & Marketing, Continuing Education, jenniferswangler@mail.und.edu, 777-6374

Insurance open enrollment forms due Nov. 6

The annual open enrollment for health, state life, dental and vision insurance will continue through Nov.6. This is the time for employees to enroll in insurance plans they are not currently participating in, add dependents to their current coverage or increase coverage levels. Life insurance increases must be medically approved. Employees should have received a postcard from NDPERS containing open enrollment information prior to Oct. 19. You may obtain coverage information, premiums, enrollment information and forms from the NDPERS website at www.nd.gov/ndpers . Click on the “Annual Enrollment” icon or contact the Payroll Office, 312 Twamley Hall. Enrollment forms must be returned to the Payroll Office by 4:30 p.m., Nov. 6. Late forms will not be accepted.
-- Vicki Robertson, Insurance Specialist, Payroll, vickirobertson@mail.und.edu, 777-2158

Arts, humanities and social science departments may seek funding for research and creative activity

Please note that there no longer is a limit on the amount of funding that can be requested. Also, please note that if the response to calls for applications to this program continues to be low, the program will be discontinued.

Eligibility:
1. Faculty members in the following departments may apply for funding from this program: Anthropology, Art and Design, Criminal Justice, English, History, Indian Studies, Languages, Music, Philosophy and Religion, Theatre Arts (i.e., those that are not eligible for National Science Foundation funding); and the following programs: Communications, Honors, Humanities and Integrated Studies; and Interdisciplinary Studies.

2. Faculty who have previously received funding from this program are not eligible for another award until they have submitted a request for funding to an external funding agency.

3. Faculty who have previously received funding from this program are not eligible for another award until they have submitted a final report for the previously funded project.

4. The following are unallowable budget items: travel to attend conferences, infrastructure, public relations activities, salary of the principal investigator, studies already completed.

5. Although these awards are primarily intended for tenured and tenure-track faculty, temporary faculty may apply as long as creative activity is required in their contract and they are able to complete their proposed activity while employed at UND.

6. According to UND policy, anything purchased with UND funds is the property of UND (e.g., supplies, books, equipment, etc.). See UND Faculty Handbook Section V-8.

Applications should include the following:

I. Cover Page including the following: Principal Investigator's name; department, college; proposal title; amount requested; proposed beginning and ending dates of the project; agency to which extramural proposal will be submitted; list of previous Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences Awards and whether or not a final report and external proposal have been filed for each previous award; signatures of the principal investigator, department chair, and dean of the college.

II. Project Narrative--The narrative text should not exceed three single-spaced pages (approximately 1,785 words). The narrative should clearly convey the ideas, objectives, and methods of the project. It should also communicate the project's substance, potential contribution to the field, overall significance, the intended audience where appropriate, the likely outcome, and your ability to carry out the project successfully. A simple statement of need or intent is insufficient. Because reviewers may not possess specialized knowledge of the proposed field of study, the project description should be free of jargon. There is no formula for writing a successful application. However, applicants may find it helpful to address the following questions where appropriate in their narratives:

A. What are the basic ideas, problems, or questions examined by the study? Explain the planned approach or line of thought. If the area is a new area of research, explain the reasons for working in it, if the area is not a new area describe the significance of the area. If the project is creative activity in one of the arts, describe what you intend to create and/or perform.

B. For what part or stage of your project are you seeking support? Provide an overview of the project and describe what part of the study/creative activity you will undertake during the award period. If you will be working with someone else describe your contributions to the project. If working on a book, provide a tentative chapter outline.

C. What work will be accomplished during the award period? Supply a brief work plan.

D. Will this project be supported by other resources? If so what is the source and amount, and what portion of the project will the other resources cover?

E. How will the project complement, challenge, or expand relevant work in the field? Explain what makes the project distinctive.

F. What contribution will the project make to the field?

G. What is the project’s overall significance in terms of its potential social, cultural, and/or educational benefits?

H. Where will you conduct the study/create and/or perform the work? What materials will you use? Describe access to archives, collections, performance/studio venues, or institutions with the necessary resources.

I. What is the intended audience for the results of the project?

J. What are the intended results of the project? Indicate plans for articles, conference papers, books, recordings, exhibit, or other forms of outcomes.

III. 1-Page Budget and Justification: The budget must be broken down into individual items with each item justified. The following are unallowable budget items: travel to attend conferences (including to present a paper), infrastructure, public relations activities, salary of the principal investigator, studies already completed.

IV. Project bibliography (if appropriate to the proposed work)
The bibliography should not exceed one single-spaced page (4,000 characters, approximately 570 words). The bibliography should consist of primary and secondary sources that relate directly to the project. It is usually advisable to include works that pertain to both the project's substance and its theoretical or methodological approaches. Titles cited in the application narrative do not have to be included in the bibliography. Reviewers often use the bibliography to evaluate your preparation in the subject area and your approach to the topic.

V. 1-Page Academic Résumé: The résumé should include education, employment history, and relevant citations (e.g., publications, presentations, performances, juried exhibitions)

Criteria for award selection:
Reviewers are asked to evaluate an application according to the following criteria:
1. The significance of the contribution that the project will make to knowledge in the specific field and to the humanities or social sciences generally, OR in the case of projects in the arts, the potential: (a) to impact the artistic and/or cultural heritage of the nation, region, or field, and/or (b) to broaden and/or deepen public understanding and appreciation of and access to the arts, and/or (c) to have a positive effect on the development of arts learning for children and youth.

2. The quality or promise of quality of the applicant's work;

3. The quality of the conception, definition, organization, and description of the project;

4. The likelihood that the applicant will complete the project including the appropriateness of the budget, the quality and clarity of the project goals and design, the resources involved, and the qualifications of the applicant;

5. The likelihood that the successful completion of the project will bring some return to the University.

6. Evidence that previous awardees have fulfilled all requirements for their previous award(s).

Deadline and number of copies:
The application, with original signatures of the Principal Investigator, Department Chair, and Dean, and nine (9) copies must be submitted to Research Development and Compliance (105 Twamley) on or before 4 p.m. Friday, Nov. 20.

Process for Award Selection:
Applications will be reviewed and ranked by a committee of arts, humanities, and social sciences faculty, chosen and chaired by the associate vice president for Research. Applications from faculty teams/groups are encouraged.

Award Requirements:
1. All recipients of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences grants are required to submit a final report to Research Development and Compliance within 1 month of the project’s end date or depletion of awarded funds, if that occurs before the project ends. The report should include a brief summary of results of the study, how funds were expended and whether or not the project resulted in publications, external grant proposals/awards, presentations, etc.

2. All recipients of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences grants are required to submit a proposal to an external funding agency within one year of the award’s end date.

3. If an award results in a tangible product such as a book, article, or a video or audio recording, a copy must be provided to the Division of Research.
-- Shirley Griffin, Research Dev & Compliance

Nominations sought for outstanding individuals for honorary degrees

Members of the University Council are invited to nominate outstanding individuals for an honorary degree. The deadline for submitting nominations is Friday, Nov. 27. Qualifications include, but are not limited to, the following State Board of Higher Education criteria (see SBHE, Policy 430.1):
1. The candidate should have had an association with the state of North Dakota. This association may be by virtue of birth, of residence, of education, of service to the state, the Board, or one of the institutions governed by the Board.
2. The candidate must have achieved a level of distinction which would merit comparable recognition in his or her profession or area of excellence.
3. The renown of the candidate should reflect favorably on the Board, the institutions it governs, and the state of North Dakota.

In order to avoid any embarrassment, no suggestion shall be made to any person to be so honored until the State Board of Higher Education has acted on the nomination.

Institutional criteria and standards for the awarding of honorary degrees at UND have been established by the University Senate. It is recommended that the following criteria be used in considering persons for an honorary degree:
1. Achievement of distinction in scholarship, or in comparable professional or creative achievement.
2. Recognized and outstanding service to the nation, to the state, or to UND.
3. Attendance at or graduation from UND, except as the individual is outstanding with reference to the preceding criteria 1 and 2.
4. Non-membership on the faculty of UND.
5. Scholarship specialization in an area in which the university normally grants an earned degree.

Procedures:
1. Nominations may be made by any member of the University Council.
2. Nominations must be accompanied by a factual dossier providing evidence that the nominee meets the criteria and standards established by the University Senate (Nos. 1-5 above). Factual compilation should include the following, in the order listed:
a. A brief biography
b. A list of scholarly writings, research and publications
c. Description of public service and achievements
d. List of offices and positions held
e. Other factual justifications for consideration
3. The nominee’s scholarship will be evaluated by the departmental faculty in the area of the nominee’s specialization, such evaluation to be a part of the dossier presented to the Honorary Degrees Committee.
4. A nominee will not be informed that he/she is being considered until the nomination has been approved at the SBHE level.
5. The titles of honorary degrees shall be distinct from those of earned degrees at UND.
6. No honorary bachelor’s or master’s degrees will be awarded.

On behalf of the Honorary Degrees Committee, nominations and all supporting materials may be sent to the Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs in 302 Twamley Hall. The dateline for submitting nominations is Friday, Nov. 27.
-- Connie Gagelin, Administrative Officer, Provost and VPAA, conniegagelin@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2165

Nominations sought for Outstanding Faculty Academic Adviser award

The Academic Advising Committee is now accepting nominations for the Outstanding Faculty Academic Adviser Award to be presented at Founders Day 2010. To access the nomination form online, go to http://ssc.und.edu/forms/nomination.php.

Paper nomination forms are available at the following locations – Union Info. Center, Student Success Center, Dean’s offices and the Student Government Office. All students, faculty, staff and alumni are eligible to nominate an undergraduate faculty academic adviser for this award. Nominations will be accepted through Jan. 15, 2010.

For more information, please contact Lisa Burger in the Student Success Center, 201 Memorial Union, 777-2117.
-- Lisa Burger, Director, Student Success Center, lisaburger@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-4706

ITSS GroupWise BlackBerry Enterprise Server service is available

ITSS has implemented a BlackBerry Enterprise Server solution for the ITSS Novell GroupWise that provides mobile users with a new level of remote email and calendar access. Many faculty and staff at UND travel frequently and want to make the most of their travel time while in a car or an airport. The cost of the service is $99 per BlackBerry. This one‑time fee covers the cost of purchasing a cal (client access license). Cals can only be purchased through a department; no personal purchases are accepted. The Telecommunications department will handle the purchase and billing of cals.

For more information, including ordering details, please refer to the
web site at www.und.edu/dept/blackberry
-- Craig Cerkowniak, Associate Director, ITSS, craigcerkowniak@mail.und.edu, 777-2385

The Salvation Army seeks local involvement

Many of you are aware that every Christmas season, "the bells are ringing." People stand outside or in the entryways of stores wearing red and ringing bells for donations to The Salvation Army. This Christmas season, The Salvation Army returns, but it needs your help.

We are once again looking for dedicated people eager to bell-ring and serve this Christmas. If you would like to get involved and bell-ring please sign up at www.registertoring.com/grandforks or contact Mike Peterson, Administrative Assistant at 701-775-2597 or mike_peterson@usc.salvationarmy.org and I will get you set up and ready to ring this winter. Your effort and time mean a tremendous amount and is highly appreciated.
-- Carrie Herrig, Assistant Director of Membership and Team Wellness, Wellness Center, carrieherrig@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-4864

Grand Forks seeks input on bike racks

The City of Grand Forks and the Greenway and Trail Users Group would like your help in identifying potential locations for the installation of bicycle storage racks throughout the city of Grand Forks.

The City of Grand Forks plans to install 8 to 10 bicycle racks annually over the next three years. Final location of the racks will be based on strategic locations for maximum use. Factors for consideration of locations will include whether other bicycle storage is located nearby, whether the location is open to the public and the level of bicycle use in the area.

Suggestions for potential locations can be sent electronically by logging on to www.grandforksgov.com/greenway or by mail to Greenway Project, P.O. Box 5200, Grand Forks, N.D. 58206-5200. Deadline for submission is Friday, Nov. 6.

The Greenway and Trail Users Advisory group was formed in 2008 to gather input, ideas and assistance from citizens regarding activities in the Greenway and also the trails in Greater Grand Forks. Meetings are held the second Tuesday of every month at the Grand Forks Park District, 1210 7th Avenue South. Residents from Grand Forks and East Grand Forks are welcome to attend.
-- Kim Greendahl, Greenway Specialist, City of Grand Forks, kgreendahl@grandforksgov.com, 701-738-8746

Chester Fritz Library announces Veteran's Day hours

The Chester Fritz Library will observe the following hours of operation for Veterans Day:
Tuesday, Nov. 10 - 7:45 a.m. to Midnight
Wednesday, Nov. 11 - 1 p.m. to Midnight (Veterans Day)
Thursday, Nov. 12 - 7:45 a.m. to Midnight
-- Karen Cloud, Administrative Assistant, Chester Fritz Library, karencloud@mail.und.edu, 777-2618

Library of the Health Sciences announces Veteran's Day hours

The Library of the Health Sciences will be open from 1 p.m. to midnight on Veteran's Day, Wednesday, Nov. 11.
-- April Byars, Administrative Assistant, Library of the Health Sciences, abyars@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-3893

Veteran's Day hours for Law Library

The Law Library will be open 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Veteran's Day, Wednesday, Nov. 11.
-- Jane Oakland, Circulation Manager, Law Library, oakland@law.und.edu, 777-3482

ITSS holiday closing hours listed

ITSS will close for the Veteran's Day holiday at midnight on Tuesday, Nov. 10, and will reopen at 5 a.m. on Thursday, Nov. 12.
-- David Levenseller, Help Desk Leader, ITSS, david levenseller@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2222

Following is the holiday schedule for 2010-11

Holiday - 2010/2011
New Year’s Day - Jan. 1/Dec. 31, 2010*
Martin Luther King Day - Jan. 18/Jan. 17
President’s Day - Feb. 15/Feb. 21
Good Friday - April 2/April 22
Memorial Day - May 31/May 30
Independence Day - July 5*/July 4
Labor Day - Sept. 6/Sept. 5
Veteran’s Day - Nov. 11/Nov. 11
Thanksgiving Day - Nov. 25/Nov. 24
Christmas Day - Dec. 24*/Dec. 26*

*NDUS HR Policy 19.2: If such holiday falls on Saturday, the preceding Friday shall be the holiday or of the holiday falls on Sunday, the Monday following shall be the holiday.

**NDUS HR Policy 19.3: Institution offices must be closed at noon on Dec. 24, Christmas Eve Day, which is an office closure and not a holiday; however, if Dec. 25, Christmas Day, falls on a Saturday, institution offices must be closed all day on the preceding Friday, which is then a holiday, as indicated in Section 19.2.

Internal job openings listed

The following position vacancies are available only to regular UND staff employees who have successfully completed their six-month probation period, earn annual and sick leave, receive BC/BS health insurance and TIAA-CREF or ND PERS retirement benefits. Current UND faculty, please contact Human Resources for eligibility.

To apply: Please complete UND Application/Control Card form. Send letter of application and resume, referencing position name and number, to: Human Resources, University of North Dakota, Twamley Hall, Room 313, 264 Centennial Drive Stop 8010 Grand Forks, ND 58202-8010. Applications must be received by the deadline date.

Professional/Administrative/Coaches: no vacancies

Technical/Paraprofessional: no vacancies

Office Support: no vacancies

Crafts/Trades/Service:

Position: Baker (midnight to 8:30 a.m./flexible weekends), Dining Services, #10-122
Application deadline: 11/02/2009
Compensation: $10.55 plus/hour
-- Jan Orvik, Writer/Editor, University Relations, janorvik@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3621

Museum Cafe announces new menu

Salads
Museum salad:
Crisp romaine mix with sweet cherry tomatoes, hard-boiled egg, English cucumbers, shredded carrots, and celery; sprinkled with roasted sunflower seeds and served with croutons or toasted Italian bread with your choice of poppy seed or raspberry vinaigrette
Spinach salad:
Baby spinach with sliced hard-boiled eggs and crumbled bacon with a light creamy dressing.

Sandwiches: Served with fruit and chips
Ham & swiss on rye:
Thinly sliced smoked ham with baby Swiss cheese, topped with lettuce and garden tomatoes, and served on your choice of light rye or cottage bread.
Turkey club:
Triple-decker sandwich with layers of thinly sliced roasted turkey, smoked bacon, crisp lettuce, and garden tomato on your choice of light rye or cottage bread.
Vegetarian wrap:
Herbed cream cheese, vine-ripened tomatoes, English cucumber, sweet onions, bell peppers, and sprouts.

Southwestern shrimp/soft tacos:
Marinated shrimp topped with corn relish, marinade or picante sauce, and sprinkled with cilantro and green onions; served with a side of Spanish rice.

Soup
Garden Vegetable

Ask server about dessert. Museum Café hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays, with lunch served from 11 to 2 p.m. Take-out available • UND billing accepted • 777-4195
-- Brian Lofthus, Assistant to the Director, North Dakota Museum of Art, blofthus@ndmoa.com, 777-4195

New F&A rates established for July 1, 2009 - June 30, 2013

Effective October 8, 2009 the University approved an agreement with the Department of Health and Human Services (our cognizant federal agency for facilities and administrative rates) establishing predetermined facilites and administrative (F&A) rates for sponsored programs for the period July 1, 2009 through June 30, 2013. We have been using provisional rates for the period July 1, 2009 through October 8, 2009. The new F&A rates as determined by the agreement are:
Research 38.0%
Research - Off Campus 26.0%
Research Dept of Defense (DOD) Contracts 38.5%
Research DOD Contracts - Off Campus 26.5%
Other Sponsored 36.2%
Other Sponsored - Off Campus 26.0%
Instruction 46.0%
Instruction - Off Campus 26.0%
Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) 49.0%
EERC - Off Campus 26.0%
EERC DOD Contracts 50.0%
EERC DOD Contracts - Off Campus 27.0%
Human Nutrition Research Center(HNRC) 15.0%

These are the F&A rates to be used for all proposals. For awards made prior to July 1, 2009, the F&A rates in effect at the time of award will remain in effect throughout the life of the award. Grants and Contracts will work with departments and Principal Investigators on how to handle awards issued since July 1.

The rates are to be applied against total direct cost less individual items of equipment costing $5,000 or greater, capital expenditures, tuition remission, rental costs of off-site facilities, scholarships and fellowships as well as the portion of each subgrant and subcontract in excess of $25,000.

Questions concerning the use of these rates should be directed to the staff in Grants and Contracts at 777-4151.
-- Dawn Pladson, Cost Manager, Budget Office, dawnpladson@mail.und.edu, 777-6155

Faculty Research Seed Money applications sought

Applications are invited for Faculty Research Seed Money awards. The deadline for submission is 4 p.m., Dec. 4. Program details follow.

Description: The Faculty Research Seed Money Committee distributes funds to support projects by faculty in any department of the University. The goal of the Seed Money Program is to enhance the ability of the faculty to submit successful extramural research grant applications.

Eligibility: Applicants must have a full-time faculty appointment at UND.

Faculty who have previously received funds from the Seed Money Committee must have a final report on file with Research Development and Compliance (Room 105 Twamley; Stop 7134) one month prior to the application date in order to be considered for an award.

Faculty who have previously received funds from the Seed Money Committee and who wish to apply for additional support must present evidence that they have submitted a related extramural research proposal since receiving Committee funds. (An extramural application is one submitted to an agency or foundation "outside UND." Thus, for example, proposals sent to the following are not extramural: UND Instructional Development, NRI, RD&C, SSAC and North Dakota EPSCoR). The new application must describe how the previous Seed Money Award was used and what applications or related publications resulted.

Review criteria: Proposals will be subject to competitive review and ranking by discipline-related subcommittees whose members are appointed by individual departments. Proposals must be clear, of high quality, and be designed to develop a project or provide preliminary data for one or more extramural grant proposals.

Higher priority will be given to:
- Proposals with high potential for producing successful extramural applications
- Applicants who have not received recent funding from the Seed Money Committee
- Applicants with a demonstrated record of research or academic accomplishment
- Projects that can be completed in 12 to 18 months

Lower priority will be given to projects from investigators who have significant and/or continuous funding, unless the request is required to begin a project not currently supported. Projects will not be supported if they were previously submitted to an extramural agency but were declined funding because of lack of scientific, technical or academic merit. However, higher consideration will be given to those projects previously submitted to an external agency if the purpose of the Seed Money Application is to address reviewers’ comments, to improve the chance that a revised extramural application will be successful. Where applicable, a copy of the review summary from the most recent unfunded external proposal should be included.

Application Format:
The application should be prepared to convince and be understood by a general audience, only some of whom may be proficient in the applicant's area. The following headings and page limitations apply:
• Cover Page: Include Target Subcommittee; principal investigator's name; department, college; proposal title; amount requested; proposed beginning and ending dates of the project; agency to which extramural proposal will be submitted; list of previous Faculty Research Seed Money Committee Awards and whether or not a final report and external proposal have been filed; signatures of the principal investigator, department chair, and dean of the college.
• Research or Project Plan: Three pages maximum. Include aims, background, significance, approach, methods
Format: One inch margins, single spaced, not to exceed 6 lines per linear inch. (The three-page limit for the project plan will be strictly enforced. Proposals exceeding the limit will be returned without review. Appendices circumventing this limit will be discarded.) References/Bibliography are not included in the three-page limit.
• Detailed Budget (including justification; indirect costs are not included)

The budget should be for a maximum of 12 to 18 months. Award amounts may range from $1,000 to $40,000. Projected expenditures must be reasonable, justified and directly related to the project.

Unallowable Budget Items: The Committee has ruled that Seed Money funds may not be used for travel and expenses in conjunction with attendance or presentation of materials at a conference. Exceptions to this policy will be considered on a case-by-case basis. If you choose to request travel funds that are later disallowed, please be assured this decision will have no impact upon the selection of the remainder of your proposal for an award.
• Biographical Sketch (two pages maximum)
• Current and Pending Grant Support (title, short description, agency, requested amount)
• Historical Grant Support at UND (including national, private and seed money awards)
• List of Extramural Applications Submitted But Not Funded (include past three years)
• Statement of Intent to Submit Extramural Application (title, agency, time period, funds to be requested). Where support is requested for a project that will not serve as the basis for an extramural application, then potential future sources of external funding should be listed.

Submission:
All applications must be received in Research Development and Compliance (105 Twamley) no later than 4 p.m., Dec. 4.

Submit the original application plus the appropriate number of copies for the Target Subcommittee (see next page) to:
Faculty Research Seed Money Committee
c/o RD&C, Twamley Hall, Room 105
Stop 7134

Note: The subcommittee chair has the option to forward proposals outside the subcommittee expertise to a more appropriate subcommittee.

Award Requirements:
1. All recipients of Faculty Research Seed Money grants are required to submit a final report to Research Development and Compliance within one month of the project’s end date or depletion of awarded funds, if that occurs before the project ends. The report should include a brief summary of results of the study, how funds were expended and whether or not the project resulted in external grant proposals/awards, publications, presentations, etc.
2. All funds should be spent by the ending date of the award. In exceptional circumstances, recipients may request an extension for up to six months to complete a project. No further extensions will be granted.
3. All recipients of Faculty Research Seed Money grants are required to submit a proposal to an external funding agency within one year of the award’s end date.
4. All recipients must present evidence that all work associated with their proposal has been approved by the appropriate compliance committee (IRB, IACUC, IBC, etc.) before the award will be set up.
Target Subcommittees (# Copies to Submit)

Composition of Subcommittees:

Basic Medical Sciences (7)
Anatomy and Cell Biology
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Microbiology and Immunology
Neuroscience
Pathology
Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics

Behavioral Sciences (10)
Communication
Communication Sciences and Disorders
Counseling
Educational Leadership
Educational Foundations and Research
Physical Education and Exercise Science
Psychology
Statewide Psych-Mental Health
Teaching & Learning

Engineering and Technology (8)
Aviation & Aerospace Sciences
Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering
Computer Science
Electrical Engineering
Industrial Technology
Mechanical Engineering

Health Sciences (10)
Community Medicine
Family Medicine
Internal Medicine
Nutrition and Dietetics
Obstetrics-Gynecology
Occupational Therapy
Pediatrics
Physical Therapy
Surgery

Humanities and Fine Arts (8)
Art
English
History
Languages
Music
Philosophy and Religion
Theatre Arts

Mathematics and Natural Sciences (9)
Atmospheric Sciences
Biology
Chemistry
Geography
Geology and Geological Engineering
Mathematics
Physics
Space Studies

Professional Disciplines (7)
Accounting
Finance
Information Systems and Business Education
Management
Marketing
Practice and Role Development (Nursing)

Social Sciences (9)
Anthropology
Economics
Family and Community Nursing
Indian Studies
Law
Political Science and Public Administration
Social Work
Sociology
-- Barry I. Milavetz, Associate Vice President for Research and Economic Development

UND history professor will be featured in National Geographic program about witch hunting

What’s the difference between a witch and a cranky old woman?

The answer to that question got University of North Dakota faculty member Hans Broedel an appearance as a witch hunting expert on a National Geographic Channel television program called “The Witch Hunter’s Bible.” He will be in Washington, D.C., Nov. 16-18, for filming at the Library of Congress.

“The show is about “Malleus Maleficarum” – Latin for ‘the hammer of witches’ – an extremely influential handbook written in 1487 that helped people recognize witches and told them what to do if they spotted one,” said Broedel, assistant professor in the College of Arts and Sciences department of History.

Broedel’s book, "'Malleus Maleficarum' and the Construction of Witchcraft: Theology and Popular Belief," brought him to the attention of Hoff Productions and the National Geographic Channel. The book is based on his doctoral dissertation at the University of Washington. Author Christopher MacKay of the Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies in Toronto, Ontario, will also be featured on the show.

Broedel, a Seattle native in his fourth year of teaching early modern history at UND, says that back in medieval times, the burning question of the day was determining whether someone suspected of being a witch should be put to death. "Malleus Maleficarum” was written as a handy guide for separating problem-causing witches from the rest of the population.

“There weren’t any witches, of course,” Broedel says. “It was a completely imaginary crime. That’s why the book was important because, in a systematic way, it legitimized the practice of hunting and burning witches.”

Initially, the Catholic Church didn’t consider witches a problem. “The church’s position was that if you prayed to God, the devil wouldn’t do anything bad to you,” Broedel explains. “If God let it happen, you had bigger problems than witches. Ultimately, it was because of your sin and that you were being punished.”

But according to Broedel, the church reversed its stance, and the pope officially sanctioned witch hunting and executions, which reached their zenith in Europe and the American colonies between 1550 and 1650. While the Renaissance is considered an age in which philosophy, science, art and religion flourished, it was also the peak time in history for witch hunting. “The end of the middle ages was a time of social upheaval,” Broedel explained. “People don’t like change. It makes them nervous and anxious.”

One of Broedel’s favorite scenes from the 1970s movie “Monty Python and the Holy Grail” occurs when an educated knight from King Arthur’s roundtable uses science, logic and reason to help villagers decide that a woman they dressed up as a witch really is a witch who they could justify burning. Although intended to be humorous, Broedel noted that the scene contains some truth. “People began to take empirical evidence more seriously, and they started to see a lot of evidence of witches,” he said. “They were trying to use their brains to determine who was a witch.”

Witches were thought to be Satan worshippers who caused bad things to happen. “As soon as you believed these people existed, you had to do something about them,” Broedel said. “That’s was the motivating factor of ‘Malleus Maleficarum.’ “The author went to the pope and told him what was going on. The pope authorized him to go out and have witch finders to assist him in his job,” he said.

The book identified most witches as primarily older, poor, cranky women with bad reputations who were disliked by their neighbors. However, that alone couldn’t get someone branded as a witch. “Rumor and suspicion weren’t enough,” Broedel said. “If the suspected witch told parents they had a fine young son and then he got sick the next day, you could associate the coincidence with harm.”

Once the inquisitor convicted the suspected witch, the local authorities were expected to deal with her. “The final judgment was made by the church, and there would be heck to pay if you didn’t do what the church said,” he noted.

Broedel is no stranger to the subject of Halloween. While a visiting professor of medieval history at Hamilton College in Clinton, N.Y., he was frequently interviewed as an expert on Halloween traditions.
-- Patrick Miller, Writer/Editor, University Relations, patrick.miller@und.edu, 777-5529

UND-Casper College partnership seeks to ease the pain of arthritis

Anyone writing the checks for household bills knows how painful it can feel, but for people living with arthritis, the act of writing can be physically painful as well. According to the Centers for Disease Control, one in five U.S. adults (46.4 million) has doctor-diagnosed arthritis. In Wyoming, arthritis affects 109,000 residents, including seniors, adults and even young adults and children.

“The best remedy for arthritis is to stay active, exercise, and keep moving,” according to occupational therapist Carla Wilhite, professor at the UND–Casper College Master of Occupational Therapy Program. However, there are many simple devices and daily living aids that can ease some of the pain of arthritis, as well as conserve energy and protect joints during activity, says Wilhite.

On Oct. 1, the Wyoming Assistive Technology Resources Program at the University of Wyoming’s Wyoming Institute for Disabilities and Casper’s UND Student Occupational Therapy Association collaborated in opening an assistive technology and device demonstration center, with a technology demonstration changing every six weeks.

Funding, program support and devices are provided by Wyoming Assistive Technology Resources. The assistive technology and device demonstration center will be open each week from 4 to 6 p.m. Occupational therapy students will be available to demonstrate the devices, assist people who try the devices and give information about where the devices can be obtained. The program does not sell devices or represent sellers or vendors.

Since 2005, Wyoming Assistive Technology Resource’s aim has been to increase access to and acquisition of assistive technology that helps increase the capability and independence of people who live with conditions of disability.

The UND at Casper College Occupational Therapy program has been in existence for 16 years and represents a unique partnership between Casper College and UND to provide graduate education in occupational therapy.
-- Denis F. MacLeod, Communications Coordinator, Center for Rural Health, dmacleod@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-3300

Remembering Amy Lind

Amy Lind, retired professor emeritus of Occupational Therapy at UND, died on Wednesday, Oct. 28, in Valley Memorial Homes Eldercare Center, Grand Forks, at the age of 92.

Amy Lind was born Jan. 22, 1917 at the farm home of Charles and Agnes (Naseth) Lind, 12 miles north of Melville, Saskatchewan, Canada. She attended Happy Centre, a country school, and Central High School at Melville. In 1936, she earned her teacher’s certificate at Teacher’s College, Regina, Saskatchewan. She taught school in Saskatchewan for 5 years and attended summer school at the University of Saskatchewan.

In 1941, the Royal Canadian Air Force began recruiting women. Amy enlisted, took basic training in Toronto and became a motor transport driver at Service Flying Training School in Saskatoon, Sask. She was in the second group of women who enlisted in the Air Force, and also in the second group to train as Aircraft Recognition Instructors. She graduated with the rank of Sergeant and was posted to training schools in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, where she taught air crews who came from all parts of Canada, Great Britain, Australia, New Zealand, the United States and other countries. These programs were discontinued in 1945, and she was discharged to the Reserve.

Amy attended the University of Toronto 1945-1947, receiving her diploma in occupational therapy. She continued her education at McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, to complete requirements for her BA. She was employed as Director of Occupational Therapy at Mountain, Sanatorium in Hamilton until 1955, with the exception of a year’s leave of absence to work at Huyton College, near Liverpool, England, and to travel in Europe.

In 1955, Amy was employed by Saskatchewan Psychiatric Services as Consultant in Occupational Therapy. In January 1957, she became chairperson of the recently established department of Occupational Therapy at UND in Grand Forks. She had a leave of absence to earn her Ph.D. in Counseling and Guidance at the University of Wyoming. She retired in 1981 with the rank of Professor Emeritus, Occupational Therapy at UND.

Amy continued her involvement in health and rehabilitation and other community services. She was a volunteer at United and later Altru Hospital in Grand Forks for many years. She was an active member of the First Presbyterian Church, especially in mission activities. She enjoyed traveling, gardening, handicrafts, and reading. She is survived by relatives in Melville, Saskatchewan and other parts of Canada.