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ISSUE: Volume 44, Number 25: November 14, 2006

Contents
Top Stories
National Institutes of Health ranks UND College of Nursing 11th nationwide
Events to Note
Shanty Town to raise awareness about homeless tonight
Reception to honor Dr. Munski for Excellence in Teaching Award
Geography department hosts GIS Day talks Nov. 15
Farfan to lecture Nov. 15
Eighth Circuit Judge Myron H. Bright to lecture at Law School
Broedel to speak on animals in Renaissance natural history
Doctoral examination set for Matthew Pearcey
Retired faculty meet Nov. 16
Tuskegee airman, fighter pilot, civil rights pioneer, to visit UND Nov. 16-17
Healthy UND smoke-free campus discussion is Nov. 16
Celebrate International Education Week Nov. 16-17
Volunteers sought for National Homeless Week
Metropolitan opera auditions set for Nov. 18
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology seminar is Nov. 20
Doctoral examination set for Ann Beste-Guldborg
Doctoral examination set for Joel David Deloy
Doctoral examination set for Anita Decker
Doctoral examination set for Linda R. Pettersen
Doctoral examination set for Denise K. Lajimodiere
Doctoral examination set for Thomas Gravel
Doctoral examination set for E. LeAnn Nelson
Holiday Art, Craft Fair is Dec. 1
Start the holiday season with an event of epic proportions!
Summer Aerospace Camp dates set
Announcements
Special offer available for Mannheim Steamroller Christmas concert
Faculty will focus on proposed general education program
Take part in Great American Smoke-Out Nov. 16
University Curriculum Committee to hear program termination
Institutional Review Board attends conference Nov. 14-17
Visit assessment of student learning newsletter
SSAC presents five awards
Studio One features space travel, E-85 setbacks
UND Rehab Club talks through puppets
Friday, Nov. 17, will be special Denim Day
Football playoff tickets on sale now
Watch out for winter driving hazards
Internal job openings listed
In the News
Gilsdorf, Dixon selected as Fulbright Scholars
Mary Ann Sens appointed to national board
National Institutes of Health ranks UND College of Nursing 11th nationwide

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently ranked the College of Nursing 11th among the country's top 100 nursing programs in terms of research funding. It's the first time for UND on this list, which includes leading schools such as Johns Hopkins University, the University of California, and Yale University.

"We are absolutely thrilled with this ranking," says Glenda Lindseth, the College of Nursing's associate dean of research.

These rankings are based on the amount of research grant dollars awarded by NIH to each school; UND scored 11th spot with nearly $4 million in NIH research funding over the 2004-2005 fiscal year. The top school, University of California-San Francisco, received about $12 million. These competitive grants are reviewed by experts at NIH, the single largest supporter of medical research in the nation, for their scientific merit and program relevance. UND nursing dean Chandice Covington emphasizes that research is a top priority at the College of Nursing.

"It's nice to see the fruits of our labor," says Covington, who, in addition to her administrative responsibilities, is still directly involved in research. "Now we must continue those efforts to maintain our position and to rise even higher."

The College of Nursings advancement to top-rated status is a big coup for UND as a whole, says Greg Weisenstein, vice president for academic affairs and provost, and underscores the University's ongoing commitment to research.

"We are delighted with the progress that the College of Nursing has made in developing a research agenda that places it among the most prestigious programs in the nation," Weisenstein says. "Our recent NIH ranking is an indication of the tremendous value that our research in the College brings to health services throughout the state and nation."

-- Becky Cournia, alumni and development coordinator, College of Nursing, 777-4526, beckycournia@mail.und.edu.

Shanty Town to raise awareness about homeless tonight

In honor of National Homeless Week, the Northlands Rescue Mission will hosta mock Shanty Town. Around 50 UND students will sacrifice the comfort of their beds to spend a brisk Tuesday, Nov. 14, evening sleeping in boxes in hopes of raising awareness about a continuing problem -- homelessness. Homeless Week is Nov. 12-18. The Shanty Town will be set up outside Hope Evangelical Covenant Church, located on the corner of 17th Ave. S. and Washington St. The event will run from 6 p.m. to 7 a.m. Those participating in the Shanty Town include the UND honors society, Campus Crusade for Christ, and the College of Nursing students. The Shanty Town will consist of cardboard boxes for shelter and fire pits for warmth. Food will include hot dogs and pastries as well as hot chocolate. The UND nursing students will be present to provide information about the Northlands Rescue Mission and give the community information about ways they can help improve nutrition for the homeless. Visit with nursing students at Shanty Town if you are interested in specific ways to donate to the Mission. For more information, contact Tiffany Baker, College of Nursing, 763-458-1651, tiffany.baker@und.edu.

-- Becky Cournia, College of Nursing.

Geography department hosts GIS Day talks Nov. 15

The geography department Forum for Contemporary Geographic Issues and Gamma Theta Upsilon are sponsoring three lectures to help celebrate GIS Day Wednesday, Nov. 15. Scott Ralston, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, will present “The Use of GIS and GPS in Resource Management” at 9 a.m. in 157 O’Kelly/Ireland Hall. Bill Dando, TCF Bank Inc., will discuss "Using GIS for Site Selection at TCF Bank" at noon in Room 1, Gamble Hall, and Amanda Hancock, Central Grasslands Research Extension Center, NDSU, will discuss "GPS and GIS: Home on the Range?" at 3 p.m. in 157 O’Kelly/Ireland Hall.

Please join us at 2:30 p.m. in 155 O’Kelly/Ireland Hall for a reception prior to Hancock’s talk. We invite you to attend these sessions, and help celebrate GIS Day 2006.
-- Gregory Vandeberg, Assistant Professor, Geography, gregory.vandeberg@und.nodak.edu, 701-777-4588

Reception to honor Dr. Munski for Excellence in Teaching Award

Douglas Munski, professor of Geography, has been selected as the winner of the 2006 UCEA (University Continuing Education Association) Great Plains Excellence in Teaching Award. This award is a great honor and indicates the exemplary contributions that Dr. Munski has made to the field of education and to the University. He received this award in Kansas City at the Annual UCEA Joint Great Plains Mid-America conference on Oct. 20. Nominations were submitted from eight states in this region.

The Excellence in Teaching Award is presented to individuals who have provided outstanding teaching, course development, mentoring of students, and service to continuing education. The award recognizes those who have made significant contributions to credit or non-credit programs and who have provided inspirational teaching to continuing education students.

Please join us at a reception in his honor from 1 to 2:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 28, at the North Dakota Museum of Art. A short program will begin at 1:15 p.m.
-- Connie Bjerk, Special Projects Coordinator, Division of Continuing Education, conniebjerk@mail.und.nodak.edu, 701-777-0887

Farfan to lecture Nov. 15

Penny Farfan, professor of drama and English at the University of Calgary, will present a lecture at 1 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 15, at the Burtness Lab Theatre, to coincide with the theatre arts production of "A Doll's House" by Henrik Ibsen.

The title of Dr. Farfan's lecture is "'These Modern Women, Ill-Used as Daughters, as Sisters, as Wives . . . What Will be the Result': Ibsen and the 'Woman Question'."

For more information, call theatre arts at 777- 3446.
-- Jim Williams, Assistant Professor, Theatre Arts, jimwilliamsb@hotmail.com, 7-2853

Eighth Circuit Judge Myron H. Bright to lecture at Law School

The Honorable Myron H. Bright, senior status judge, from the United States Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals will hold a public lecture at 4:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 16, in the Baker Court Room, School of Law. The lecture is free and open to the public.

He will discuss the criminal case of James Dean Walker., who was twice convicted in Arkansas of murdering a police officer, but through several habeas corpus petitions the case came back to the Eighth Circuit and Judge Bright and was ultimately overturned. In a Minnesota Law Review article, Bright said that this case illustrates the very root principle that has undergirded the writ of habeas corpus since its pre-Constitutional introduction into our body of common law.

Judge Bright was appointed to the Eighth Circuit Court by Lyndon B. Johnson, has served on the federal appellate bench for more than 38 years and has considered more than 6,000 cases. He graduated from the University of Minnesota Law School in 1947 with a J.D. degree and practiced law with the firm of Wattam, Vogel, Vogel, Bright and Peterson in Fargo for 21 years, principally as a trial lawyer, prior to joining the court.

His visit is part of the Law School Speaker Series featuring prominent legal professionals and scholars.

-- Rob Carolin, Director of Alumni and Public Relations, Law School, carolin@law.und.edu, 7-2856

Broedel to speak on animals in Renaissance natural history

As part of the English Department Speaker Series, Hans Broedel (history) will present “'Now I Will Believe That There Are Unicorns': Pondering the Presence of Fabulous Animals in Renaissance Natural History" at 4 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 16, in 116 Merrifield Hall.

Despite changes in scholarly methods, the discovery of New Worlds, and increasing academic skepticism about the received wisdom of the ancients, classically authorized fabulous animals survived and even flourished within the pages of early modern natural histories. Broedel's paper examines three more-or-less representative works, those of Conrad Gesner (1551), John Maplet (1567) and Wolfgang Franzius (1612), and argues that although the meaning of such animals was changing from that of medieval bestiaries and encyclopedias, the shifting epistemological assumptions of these authors perpetuated and even revitalized belief in some fabulous creatures.
-- Rebecca Weaver-Hightower, Assistant Professor, English, rwh@und.edu, 777-6391

Doctoral examination set for Matthew Pearcey

The final examination for Matthew Pearcey, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Teaching and Learning, is set for 11 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 16, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "The Experiences of Heterosexual Women Married to Gay or Bisexual Men." Myrna Olson (Teaching and Learning) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 7-4005

Retired faculty meet Nov. 16

Ken Dawes, Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor and professor emeritus of social work, will lead a discussion on the University's upcoming 125th anniversary, at the Thursday, Nov. 16, meeting of retired faculty. The meeting is set for 7:30 a.m. in the Christus Rex Fireside Room. All retired faculty are welcome to participate. -- Lloyd Omdahl, professor emeritus, convener.

Healthy UND smoke-free campus discussion is Nov. 16

Students, faculty, and staff are invited to attend the Healthy UND Coalition smoke-free campus discussion Thursday, Nov. 16, from noon to 1 p.m. in the Memorial Union River Valley Room. President Kupchella will attend and share his rationale for asking the campus community to consider/discuss a move to a smoke-free campus, both indoors and outdoors. Celebrate the Great American Smoke-out by joining the conversation.
-- Jane Croeker and Robyn Bueling, Healthy UND Co-chairs, Student Health Services, jane_croeker@und.edu, 701-777-2097

Tuskegee airman, fighter pilot, civil rights pioneer, to visit UND Nov. 16-17

Shelby Westbrook, a member of the Tuskegee Airmen, will be at UND for a series of events Thursday and Friday, Nov. 16-17.

A lecture and open forum, “The Tuskegee Airmen: Fighter Pilots and Civil Rights Pioneers,” will kick off events at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 16, in the Memorial Union Ballroom.

Friday’s events will begin with a roundtable discussion, “The Air War Over Europe: One Fighter Pilot’s Perspective,” at 10 a.m. in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl, followed by a reception and showing of Westbrook’s film, “The Tuskegee Airmen” at the Era Bell Thompson Multicultural Center.

All events are free of charge and open to the public.

The Tuskegee Airmen were a group of African American pilots who flew with distinction during World War II. Prior to the Tuskegee Airmen no U.S. military pilots had been African American.

For more information, contact Robert Vandenberg, Air Force ROTC, UND, (616) 283-8995, or M.C. Diop, UND Multicultural Student Services, 777-4362.

Celebrate International Education Week Nov. 16-17

International Education Week is an opportunity to celebrate the benefits of international education and exchange worldwide. This joint initiative of the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Department of Education is part of our efforts to promote programs that prepare Americans for a global environment and attract future leaders from abroad to study, learn, and exchange experiences in the United States. This semester, UND is serving an international population of 772 people from 63 countries. In addition, UND has 27 agreements with institutions for Education Abroad and over 200 students will participate in Study Abroad opportunities during the 2006-2007 academic year.

During International Education Week, the Office of International Programs encourages the UND community to take the opportunity to discuss the values of international education, to take a moment to find out about another country or culture represented on the UND campus or to think about ways that you can participate in promoting international education at UND. In addition we invite you to participate in the following events in honor of International Education Week:

Thursday, Nov. 16: Saudi Arabia Night, International Centre 7 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 17: International Quiz Bowl Semi Finals and Finals, Loading Dock, 5:30 p.m.

For more information about International Education Week visit http://iew.state.gov or call the Office of International Programs, 777-4231.

Volunteers sought for National Homeless Week

For a class project, senior UND nursing students assessed the Northlands Rescue Mission in downtown Grand Forks, and found that nutrition was a primary concern within the homeless population.

The Northlands Rescue Mission has supplied three meals a day to the homeless for many years. The majority of the food is donated by local grocery stores and is greatly appreciated. There are no standards in place, however, regarding the nutritional content in the donations. Because the food is based on excess and the time of season, daily nutritional requirements are not guaranteed to be met.

The nursing students have put together a list of sample menus that organizations or individuals can donate to provide nutritionally adequate meals for 200 members of the homeless population. The goal is to have many different organizations within Grand Forks provide one nutrient-dense meal a year for the Northlands Rescue Mission.

Organizations are being asked to both sponsor a meal and participate in serving the meal. Estimated cost of a nutritious meal is $250 to $300 for 200 people. The estimated time to serve is four hours. The nursing students feel this will be a great way for organizations to work together to give back to the community.

If organizations wish to sponsor a meal for the Mission, or receive a brochure about the event, contact Deb Stinar, volunteer coordinator at the Northlands Rescue Mission, at (701)772-6609 to schedule a date and time. All dates are renewable yearly, biannually, quarterly, and monthly if the organization wishes to participate in this giving in the future.

For more information contact Tiffany Baker, College of Nursing community health student, (763)458-1651, tiffany.baker@und.edu.

Metropolitan opera auditions set for Nov. 18

The 43rd annual North Dakota district auditions of the Metropolitan Opera National Council will take place Saturday, Nov. 18, beginning promptly at noon in the Josephine Campbell Recital Hall, Hughes Fine Arts Center. Marcia Baldwin, formerly with the Metropolitan Opera and the Eastman School of Music, will present a vocal master class following the auditions.

These auditions are open to talented yourg singers between the ages of 20 and 30 interested in an operatic career. The purpose is to assist singers with the greatest potential in the development of their singing career with educational opportunities and to be heard by representatives of the Metropolitan Opera and other opera companies.

G. Paul Larson is in charge of the auditions. Anyone interested in listening to operatic music would find these auditions a joy to attend; they are free and open to the public.

-- G. Paul Larson (economics emeritus), director, North Dakota District of the MONC Auditions. For more information, call 791-2612.

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology seminar is Nov. 20

Gene Ness, professor of molecular mdicine, University of South Florida, College of Medicine, Tampa, will present “Physiological Regulation of Hepatic HMG-COA Reductase” at the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology seminar at 3:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 20, in Room 1306, School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

The molecular mechanisms involved in the physiological regulation of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase will be discussed. Evidence for feedback regulation by dietary cholesterol at the translation level rather than at the transcriptional level will be presented. The possible roles of various elements in the HMG-CoA reductase promoter in mediating transcriptional regulation by insulin and thyroid hormone will be discussed. The use of techniques such as DNA footprinting, ChIP assays, in vivo electroporation, and hydrodynamic tail vein injection of DNA constructs in addressing these mechanisms will be presented. The role of high levels of expression of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase in conferring resistance to dietary cholesterol will be demonstrated.

The public is invited to attend.

Doctoral examination set for Ann Beste-Guldborg

The final examination for Ann Beste-Guldborg, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Educational Leadership, is set for 9 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 22, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "Teacher Preparation Reform Efforts: Perceptions of School Leaders and Teacher Educators." Angela Koppang (Educational Leadership) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Joel David Deloy

The final examination for Joel David Deloy, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Clinical Psychology, is set for 8:30 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 28, in 210 Corwin Larimore Hall. The dissertation title is "Patterns of Relationship Satisfaction and Sexual Behavior as a Function of Pornography Usage Among College Students." Alan King (Clinical Psychology) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Anita Decker

The final examination for Anita Decker, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Educational Leadership, is set for 11 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 22, in Room 104, Education Building. The dissertation title is "North Dakota Dual Credit: Initial Impact From 1997-2004." Angela Koppang (Educational Leadership) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Linda R. Pettersen

The final examination for Linda R. Pettersen, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Teaching and Learning, is set for noon Wednesday, Nov. 22, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "The Experience of Transition by Baccalaureate Nursing Graduates." Myrna Olson (Teaching and Learning) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Denise K. Lajimodiere

The final examination for Denise K. Lajimodiere, a candidate for the Ed.D. degree with a major in Educational Leadership, is set for 9 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 28, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "OGIMAH IKWE: Native Females and Their Path to Leadership." Sherryl Houdek (Educational Leadership) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Thomas Gravel

The final examination for Thomas Gravel, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Educational Leadership, is set for 11 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 28, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "Principal Time Commitment and Job Satisfaction: Before and After an Executive Coaching Workshop." Sherryl Houdek (Educational Leadership) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for E. LeAnn Nelson

The final examination for E. LeAnn Nelson, a candidate for the Ed.D. degree with a major in Educational Leadership, is set for 1 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 28, in Room 104, Education Building. The dissertation title is "Teachers' Perception of Their Technology Integration Skills and Its Relationship to Output Generated by Students." Larry Klundt (Educational Leadership) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Holiday Art, Craft Fair is Dec. 1

The 28th Annual Holiday Art and Craft Fair is set for Friday, Dec. 1, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Memorial Union Ballroom, second level. This fair includes artists and crafters from UND and the surrounding community. Items include wood crafts, soy candles, pottery, holiday decorations, glass art, jewelry, fleece blankets, and more.

Admission is free and door prizes will be awarded. A shuttle van will run between the Memorial Union and the Barnes & Noble Bookstore parking lot throughout the day.

The fair is sponsored by the Memorial Union. For more information contact Bonnie Solberg, associate Director, student development, 777-2898.

Start the holiday season with an event of epic proportions!

The Department of Music presents the annual Madrigal Dinner/Olde English Christmasse Feaste Friday and Saturday, Dec. 1 and 2, at 7 p.m. at the Alerus Center Ballroom.

With a new cast and crew, featuring Dane Froiland as the King and Elizabeth Livingood as the Queen, the show promises to be the best ever. The evening will be under the direction of Dave Adams and produced by conductor Joshua Bronfman. The King and Queen, with their court including jester Natasha Yearwood, preside over this festive evening filled with fun, feast and fascinating entertainment. The feast dates back to the Renaissance era and will include costumed theater and concert put on by the UND Concert Choir. During the event guests will be entertained by a plethora of acts including singing, dancing, acting, juggling and instrumental music, while their taste buds are tingled by a five course feast.

Tickets for the evening are $39.95 for adults and $20 for children. Tickets may be purchased at the Alerus Center box office on 42nd Street, or via any Ticketmaster outlet.

Guests are encouraged to arrive early to be announced upon entry to the feast.
-- Tammy Mulske, Dinner/Olde English Christmasse Feaste, Music, tamara.mulske@und.nodak.du, 7-2644

Summer Aerospace Camp dates set

The John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences is sponsoring the 24th International Aerospace Camp with sessions offered June 17-24 and July 8-15. Students from across the United States will visit UND to experience real-life aviation in conjunction with a taste of college.

This unique camp is open to teenagers (ages 16-17) and offers aviation enthusiasts a chance to attend ground school, log flight time, and learn about the various careers within the aviation industry. The amount of actual flight training makes this summer adventure unique—the sky becomes a college classroom where students fly and log time with flight instructors with six different launches—simulator session, Visual Flight Rules (VFR) flight, Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) flight, cross-country flight, night flight, and an aerobatic flight. They also study flight planning in accordance to a structured college curriculum. They reside in UND residence halls and eat with current UND students at Wilkerson Hall. “This “seminar” really gives the students a realistic taste of the aviation industry and a university,” said Ken Polovitz, Assistant Dean at the Odegard School. “While flying and classroom activities will remain the focus of the curriculum, the campers will be able to experience what our aviation students experience on a daily basis. The campers will be getting a true taste of college.”

For more information about the 24th annual UND International Aerospace Camps, contact Ken Polovitz at 701-777-3561, 800-258-1525, or polovitz@aero.und.edu.

Special offer available for Mannheim Steamroller Christmas concert

Beginning Tuesday, Nov. 14, UND faculty will receive a free Mannheim Steamroller Christmas Celebration CD with every pair of tickets purchased to the upcoming Mannheim Steamroller concert on Nov. 29. Just present your UND faculty ID at the Alerus Center box office when you purchase your tickets to receive your free CD. For more information on the upcoming Mannheim Steamroller concert, please visit our web site at www.aleruscenter.com.

-- Julie Ward, director of sales and marketing, Alerus Center.

Faculty will focus on proposed general education program

The Provost’s General Education Task Force is seeking faculty input on the proposed new general education program. Faculty are encouraged to learn more about the proposed new program, and ask questions and provide feedback at one of two forums. The forums will be held Thursday, Nov. 16, 4 to 5 p.m., and Friday, Nov. 17, 1 to 2 p.m. in the River Valley Room, Memorial Union.

No RSPV is necessary to attend, and coffee and cookies will be served. If you cannot attend, please send questions and comments to one of the task force co-chairs, Anne Kelsch (anne.kelsch@und.edu) or Tom Steen (thomas.steen@und.edu). Faculty input needs to be received before Dec. 1; a final proposal will be delivered to the Provost and University Senate in January.

Below is an updated summary of the proposed new General Education Program, following task Force meetings Oct. 20 and Nov. 3.

What will the Gen Ed Task Force propose?
1. Although we have not yet proposed exact wording for those goals, we have come up with five-six goal categories that gen ed courses would be expected to address. (Not every approved course would address every goal, but each would be expected to address at least two of these goals.)

Proposed gen ed goal categories (wording not determined):
• critical thinking
• written and oral communication
• diversity
• quantitative reasoning
• information literacy

Still under consideration:
• ethical reasoning

2. Whatever program we come up with has to match the state's mandated 36-hour "distribution requirements." That's a given. So one way or another, we will still be requiring AT LEAST nine hours of Comm, six hours of Social Science, six hours of Humanities/Fine Arts, and nine hours of Science/Math/Technology, and six hours of "institution specific" requirements. In addition, our current gen ed program calls for an additional three hours beyond the state mandate, and we would like to keep the new program at a total of 39 hours if we can.

3. The proposed gen ed program features are as follows (details not determined):
• 12 credits of communication, including 6 credits of comp, 3 credits of oral communication (no particular course to be specified), and 3 credits of advanced communication (ideally within the major);
• 3 credits of quantitative reasoning to be required, NOT normally met through a math course but through incorporation of quantitative concepts into another class (could be a course in any field - quantitative concepts can be represented symbolically, visually, numerically, and/or verbally - e.g., in charts, tables, texts);
• 3 credit “gen ed capstone” which can overlap with a “major capstone” as long as gen ed goals (currently described as at least two gen ed goals) are significantly addressed and assessed in the class; intended to pull together general education plus provide a means of integrating gen ed vertically throughout the curriculum; students in the longitudinal study told us that they were addressing gen ed goals in very important ways through their major curriculum, so pulling together these goals (which largely overlap both gen ed and the major) would be the focus of the requirement; students in programs NOT choosing to offer a capstone could take an interdisciplinary capstone offered through a traditional gen ed discipline;
• no specific credit requirements in either critical thinking or information literacy, although it is assumed that those goals would be commonly selected for attention within gen ed courses (and, therefore, assessed as part of revalidation);
• 3 credits in the area of diversity. Courses which meet the diversity requirement must have a 50 percent or more explicit focus on diversity.

4. As important as these specific curricular elements are, we also believe there are very serious needs and considerations for the new gen ed program:
• greater visibility
• more student-friendly language
• a program “home”

We have already made efforts to hear perspectives from others on campus and have incorporated these perspectives into our decisions. We’ve also worked to learn more about what institutions across the nation are doing. Below is a list of some of the events where we have already solicited faculty input and some of the people and departments we have consulted.

Public events for campus-wide education and input follow.
Peggy Maki, specialist on assessment and general education, Gen Ed Summit, 8/26/05.
“Making General Education Matter” keynote.
“Making Assessment Practical” workshop.
On Teaching session, “How are students doing? Findings from the gen ed assessment on writing and critical thinking,” 20 participants, 10/12/05.
On Teaching session, “Re-visiting UND’s gen ed goals: Do we still believe in them? Are we missing something important?” 27 participants, 1/25/06.
On Teaching session, “New ideas for gen ed: Drawn from a ‘best practices’ analysis of other universities’ programs,” 18 participants, 3/7/06.
Ross Miller, AAC&U, Gen Ed Summit II, 8/25/06.
“Teaching Gen Ed Courses as if They Matter” panel presentation.
A Public Conversation with Ross Miller, AAC&U.
On Teaching session, “How well are we helping students develop ‘familiarity with cultures other than their own’?” 22 participants, 9/26/06.

Departments visited by the task force are composition, psychology, chemistry, economics, computer sciences, languages, music, aviation, teaching and learning, physical therapy, communications, marketing/management, School of Engineering and Mines, social work, criminal justice, and integrated studies.
-- Anne Walker, Associate Professor, Teaching and Learning, anne.walker@und.edu, 7-3162

University Curriculum Committee to hear program termination

The University Curriculum Committee will meet at 9 a.m. Friday, Nov. 17, 305 Twamley Hall, to discuss the proposed request to terminate the minor in technology education. All interested parties are invited to attend. -- Connie Borboa (admissions and records) for the University Curriculum Committee.

Take part in Great American Smoke-Out Nov. 16

Whether you use tobacco or not, you are invited to participate in Great American Smoke-Out activities this week.

Want to quit tobacco? Check out this link for information on quit options: http://www.undstudenthealth.com/tobacco.html

Don’t smoke, but care about someone who does? Send a free egreeting card at http://www.egreetings.com/display.pd?bfrom=1&prodnum=3105208&Searchstr=great%20american%20smokeout&path=36012&st=t

Show you care. Support smoke-free air. Join the conversations regarding moving toward a smoke-free/tobacco-free UND at the Healthy UND Coalition meeting, Thursday, Nov. 16, noon to 1 p.m. in the Memorial Union River Valley Room.
-- Cheryl Stolz, Student Health Promotion GSA, Student Health Services, cheryl.stolz@und.edu, 777-2097

Institutional Review Board attends conference Nov. 14-17

The Institutional Review Board, located in the Research Development and Compliance office, will not process proposals from Tuesday, Nov. 14, through Friday, Nov. 17. The IRB staff will be out of the office attending a conference during that time.
-- Jodi Everett, IRB/IBC Administrative Secretary, Research Development and Compliance, jodieverett@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-4279

Visit assessment of student learning newsletter

I grade students all the time, and I put a lot of effort into doing a careful, thorough, accurate job of assigning grades. Why doesn’t this count as “assessment of student learning”?

To learn the answer to this question, or to read about assessment ideas that are working in Electrical Engineering and the Memorial Union, please click on the assessment newsletter at the following address:
http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/datacol/assessment/newsletter/index.htm

-- Joan Hawthorne, assistant provost, provost’s Office, 777-4684, joan_hawthorne@und.nodak.edu

SSAC presents five awards

The Senate Scholarly Activities Committee received two research/creative activity grant applications, requesting a tota1 of $3,778, and three publication applications, requesting a total of $1,895, in response to the October call for proposals. The following awards were made Oct. 27:

Research/Creative Activity Awards:
* Newman, Robert A. (Biology), $2,500, “Population Biology for the Wood Frog in a Rapidly Changing Environment”;
* Pinterits, E. Janie (Counseling), $1,278, “Psychotherapy Using EMDR for Trauma in Telemental Health: A Pilot Study.

Publication Awards:
* Bowden, Randall G. (Teaching and Learning), $595; Weaver-Hightower, Rebecca A. (English), $300.
-- B. P. Bandyopadhyay, Chair, Senate Scholarly Activities Committee, bishubandyo@mail.und.nodak.edu, 701/777-3844

Studio One features space travel, E-85 setbacks

Learn how space travel can affect the human body on the next edition of Studio One. Space travel can affect astronauts before, during and after a mission. They must deal with both physical and psychological changes including muscle deterioration and disputes among crew members. Watch as space studies expert Vadim Rygalov explains how astronauts deal with these issues and more.

Also on the show this week, usage of E-85 gasoline has increased since it was released as a cheaper substitute for gas. However some gas stations have stopped selling the fuel. Learn how various setbacks are affecting its popularity on Studio One.

Studio One is an award-winning news and information program produced at the University of North Dakota Television Center. The program airs live on UND Channel 3 on Thursdays at 5 p.m. Re-broadcasts can be seen at 7 a.m., noon, 7 p.m. and 11 p.m. daily and on Saturdays at 10 a.m. Prairie Public Television airs Studio One on Saturday at 6 a.m. The program can also be seen by viewers in Fargo, Bismarck/Mandan and Minot, N.D.; Minneapolis, Minn.; Denver, Colo.; and Winnipeg, Manitoba.

-- Meghan Flaagan, Director of Marketing, Television Center, meghan.flaagan@und.edu, 777-3818

UND Rehab Club talks through puppets

Students in the University Rehab Club are taking puppets into the classroom to teach children about disabilities. Since 2002, students majoring in rehabilitation and human services wanted to provide disability-related education and service to the local community. The Rehab Club was formed and a new educational tool was created to not only enhance the students’ educational experience, but to teach children, at a very early age, tolerance, understanding, and sensitivity.

“Research has shown us that children’s attitudes are formed at an early age,” said David Perry, professor and co-chair for the Department of Counseling, and coordinator of the rehabilitation and human services program. “We hope to teach them that just because someone has a disability, they are really just like any of us. They like to hang out with their friends, they dance or play an instrument, but yet there is just something unique about them. The earlier a child learns tolerance, the more understanding they will have in an unfamiliar situation.”

The Rehab Club is open to all students, not just those in the major, but anyone interested in working with people with disabilities. The puppeteers have appeared in several schools, mostly working with kindergarten through second or third graders, teaching, talking and learning about what it means to have a disability and how it affects a child’s life.

The half-hour program includes a reading of "A Very Special Critter," from Mercer Mayer's Little Critter series, four different puppet stories and a question and answer period. The current puppets include one without an arm, a puppet with a hearing loss, one who has a visual impairment, and one who uses a wheelchair. Ricky the Raccoon is hearing impaired, but he plays basketball at his high school and will be going to UND next year. He and the others help children to understand that while a disability may make a child different, that child also has talents and interests just like every other child.

“Children are, inherently, so full of life and energy, and the feeling that anything is possible,” said Perry. “This is the best time to teach them, when they are young, and they will grow into young adults who are understanding and tolerant.”

The method of using puppets to teach children about disabilities is being used throughout the country, as part of a national program called Kids on the Block. The Rehab Club has taken the original idea one step further. The students write their own scripts, find their own puppets, and perform the show all on their own. In one instance, a graduate student wrote a rap song, to engage the children.

Anyone interested in learning more about the program is encouraged to contact Dr. Perry at 777-3757 or davidperry@mail.und.nodak.edu.

The rehabilitation and human service program is housed within the Department of Counseling in the College of Education and Human Development, which works to foster healthy human development and learning across the lifespan, and actively embraces human and cultural diversity. The program is designed to prepare students for careers which will enhance the independence and integration of persons with physical, learning, psychiatric, cognitive, and addiction disabilities.

For more information, contact Jena Pierce, director of Alumni Relations and Development, 777-0844 phone, 777-4393 fax, or jena_pierce@und.nodak.edu, College of Education and Human Development.

Friday, Nov. 17, will be special Denim Day

Each year UND's Mortar Board, a national honor society for college seniors that recognizes outstanding achievement in scholarship, leadership, and service, sponsors its Turkey Drive. It distributes full Thanksgiving dinners to families in need within the Grand Forks community. The size of each Thanksgiving basket varies with the number of family members in the household. For a family of four, the basket contains at least a 14 lb. turkey, stuffing, five pounds of potatoes, traditional vegetables, cranberries and pumpkin pie.

Help Mortar Board finish the job by enjoying a special Denim Day Friday, Nov. 17. Pay your dollar to your building coordinator, enjoy casual dress, and know you are supporting a worthy cause.
-- Patsy Nies, Special Project Assistant, Enrollment Services, patsynies@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3791

Football playoff tickets on sale now

Football playoff tickets are now on sale at the Ralph Engelstad Arena Box Office.

Ticket prices are: UND student (with valid student ID): $5 youth (12 and under): $10; UND staff and faculty: $10 (must present valid ID); general admission: $15.

Season tickets holders will have their seats held until 5 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 15. After that time, their seats will be open for sale to the general public. -- Athletics.

Watch out for winter driving hazards

With the arrival of winter to the area, the hazards of winter driving must be taken seriously. There are many simple things that you can do to keep yourself safe and alive.

* Keep your gas tank at least half full. It will prevent moisture condensation and extend your run time should you get stranded.
* Clean all snow and ice off your vehicle before you leave your parking spot. Keep a window scraper and brush in your vehicle.
* Be sure that your vehicle is in good repair. Your brakes, battery, tire tread and inflation, windshield wipers/fluid, exhaust system, and cooling system should all be checked.
* Drive defensively and slow down. Rain, snow, and ice can decrease traction and cause you to skid.
* If you get stranded, remember that it is usually best to stay with your vehicle until help arrives.
* Have winter equipment available in your vehicle, especially if you will be driving out of town. Things to consider include: boots, gloves, hat, and warm clothes; flashlight; battery booster cables; lightweight shovel; candles or heating cans; high energy/non-perishable food; blanket; matches or lighter; flares or bright cloth to signal help; rope; and cellular phone.

* Survival kits are available at Transportation for state vehicles checked out for out-of-town travel.
* Most importantly, if driving conditions are poor, stay off the roads if at all possible.

-- Safety and Environmental Health.

Internal job openings listed

The following position vacancies are available only to regular UND staff employees who have successfully completed their six-month probation period, earn annual and sick leave, receive BC/BS health insurance and TIAA-CREF or ND PERS retirement benefits. Current UND faculty, please contact Human Resources for eligibility.

TO APPLY: Please complete UND Application/Control Cardform. Send letter of application and resume, referencing position name and number, to: Human Resources, University of North Dakota, Twamley Hall, Room 313, 264 Centennial Drive Stop 8010, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8010. Applications MUST be received by the deadline date.

EXECUTIVE/PROFESSIONAL/ADMINISTRATIVE/COACHES:

POSITION: Instructional Design and Support Specialist, Aerospace, #07-135
DEADLINE: (I) 11/14/2006
SALARY: $28,000 - $32,000

POSITION: Associate Vice President for Outreach Services & Dean of Outreach Programs, #07-091
DEADLINE: Internal applicants will be considered with the external. Open Until Filled (Review of applications will begin November 15, 2006.)
SALARY: Commensurate with experience

TECHNICAL/PARAPROFESSIONAL:

POSITION: Community Service Officer (Tues., Thurs., Fri., Sat.,1 p.m. - 11:30 p.m.), Residence Services, #07-137
DEADLINE: (I) 11/20/2006
SALARY: $22,190 - $22,900

OFFICE SUPPORT:

Position: Transfer Clerk, Office of the Registrar, 07-138
DEADLINE: (I) 11/20/2006
SALARY: $20,000 - $21,500

CRAFTS/TRADES/SERVICE:

POSITION: Building Services Technician - LEAD (Custodial, M-F, 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.), Facilities, #07-136
DEADLINE: (I) 11/17/06
SALARY: $18,000 - $22,000

Gilsdorf, Dixon selected as Fulbright Scholars

Two faculty have been selected as Fulbright Scholars for the 2006-07 academic year.

Tom Gilsdorf, professor of mathematics, will be at the Autonomous Technological Institute of Mexico in Mexico City from August 2006 through June 2007. He will lecture and conduct research in cultural and advanced Mexican mathematics, focusing specifically on ethnomathematics and locally convex spaces.

Kathleen Dixon, professor of English, will be at Sofia University St. Kliment Ohridski in Sofia, Bulgaria, from February through July 2007. She will lecture and conduct research on cultural studies, specifically as manifested in television shows, during her time in Bulgaria.

Approximately 800 U.S. faculty and professionals received Fulbright grants to study or conduct research abroad in 2006-07, and similar numbers of faculty and professionals from other nations will be coming to the U.S. to complete research projects. Since the inception of the program in 1946, almost 100,000 scholars have benefited from the intellectual and cultural exchanges, lasting three months to one year, facilitated by the program. In the last 15 years, 19 awards have been made to scholars at UND.

If you are interested in applying for a Fulbright award, the UND campus representative is Will Young, who can be reached at 777-3935. The next round of competitions will open in spring 2007 with an application deadline early in the fall semester.
-- Joan Hawthorne, Assistant Provost, Provost Office, joan_hawthorne@und.nodak.edu, 7-4684

Mary Ann Sens appointed to national board

Mary Ann Sens, chair of pathology, has been appointed to the board of directors of the National Association of Medical Examiners (NAME). She will serve a three-year term on NAME, a professional organization of physician medical examiners, medical death investigators and death investigation system administrators who perform the official duties of the medical and legal investigation of deaths of public interest in the United States.

The role of the 20-member board is to define the priorities within forensic pathology which guide how death investigations are carried out in this country, Sens said. Her appointment is significant because rural areas have not had representation on this board.

In determining causes of death, "what works in large, metropolitan areas does not work in rural areas," she said, citing lack of resources and transportation issues. "We can't take the mold of what works in New York City and think it's going to work here."

People deserve the truth, especially about sudden and suspicious deaths. Without it, families can be put at risk by being unaware of genetic conditions they may have, said Sens who has been active in NAME for about 20 years since focusing her professional interests on forensic medicine.

Sens is a member of the American Society of Clinical Pathology (ASCP), having served on its board of directors, where she currently is on the group's nine-member Fellows Council. She also serves on ASCP's President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Committee which oversees the Bush Administration initiative to establish quality laboratories, primarily in sub-Saharan Africa, to ensure accurate and reliable testing for treating AIDS patients.

Sens is medical coroner for Grand Forks County and Marshall and Red Lake Counties in Minnesota.
-- Shelley Pohlman, Assistant to the Director, Public Affairs, spohlman@medicine.nodak.edu, 701-777-4305