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ISSUE: Volume 44, Number 15: October 10, 2006

Contents
Top Stories
Kupchella to give "State of the University" address Oct. 18
President Kupchella seeks faculty athletic representative
Bismarck is first stop for administrator and deans bus tour
President Kupchella lauds Arena upon its fifth anniversary
Events to Note
BBQ benefit set for Oct. 24
Juana Moreno discusses spintronics at SEM seminar Oct. 13
U2 lists workshops
Law School hosts national conference on pedagogy of American Indian law
All welcome at Healthy UND meeting
Live art auction to be held at Museum
Museum opens new exhibition with Oct. 12 reception
Aerospace to conduct aircraft accident investigation course
Alum, former White House curator will discuss art from Kennedy to Bush eras
David Marshall to present first faculty lecture Oct. 10
Human rights expert will discuss genocide
Global Visions film series continues
Gordon Henry to present at Leadership Series
Benediktson Lecture focuses on science in a troubled world
Doctoral examination set for Shankar Kumar Karki
"Pretty in Pink" celebrates breast cancer awareness
Carolyn Williams to give lecture on "Orientalist" art
IVN sessions will focus on copyright issues
STF committee calls for proposals; open meeting set for Oct. 13
Children's Writers Conference set for Oct. 13-14
Insight meditation retreat is Oct. 13-15
Field trip to French Manitoba set for Oct. 20
"Science or Magic" children's activity is Oct. 24
Doctoral examination set for Glenn Elliott Cockerline
Speaker will discuss action research and teaching scholarship
World Poetry Festival is Nov. 6
Announcements
Watch what you heat
Summer leadership program applications now available
Faculty sought to lead spring student faculty reading groups
Faculty and staff invited to join interest groups
Student technology fee proposals sought
Mini-grants available for summer courses, programs
Barnes & Noble will help select new texts for your class
RSS feeds available for UND news releases
Join your friends for lunch at the Museum of Art Cafe
Internal job openings listed
In the News
Medical school book named "most notable document"
Kupchella to give "State of the University" address Oct. 18

President Charles Kupchella will deliver his annual "State of the University" address at the University Council Wednesday, Oct. 18, 4 p.m. in the Memorial Union Ballroom.

The University Council consists of the following who are employed primarily on the Grand Forks campus: the president, vice presidents, registrar, director of libraries, all deans, department chairs, full-time faculty (instructor, assistant professor, associate professor, and professor); program directors, coordinators, assistant and associate deans who concurrently hold faculty rank; the director of the Counseling Center; professional librarians, and such other academic personnel and administrative officers as the council may designate. The quorum of the council necessary for the transaction of business is 25 percent of the council membership (or 154 of the current 617 members). Council meetings are normally co-chaired by the chair of the Senate and the president of the University. The registrar is ex officio secretary. Council meetings are open to the public, and students, staff and the general public are invited to attend.

President Kupchella seeks faculty athletic representative

Letters of interest are sought by President Kupchella to assume the role of Faculty Athletic Representative (FAR) for the current Division II sports at UND as it transitions to Division I. This call is precipitated by the changed institutional role of the current FAR, Phil Harmeson. Harmeson has had his administrative duties expanded over the years to the point where he is now the full-time senior associate to the president with no faculty-related assignment(s). While the NCAA requires that a FAR “shall be a member of the institution’s faculty or an administrator who holds faculty rank” a determination has been made that the primary FAR duties should be transferred to an individual with a traditional faculty role.

The role of the FAR is to serve as a point of contact between the campus and the NCAA in the regular conduct of intercollegiate athletic programs with an emphasis on student-athlete welfare. The selected individual will be the primary institutional representative charged with ensuring that the athletic department is in compliance with the NCAA constitution and bylaws, as well as other duties. The FAR reports directly to the president and may not hold any administrative or coaching duties in the athletic department. This uncompensated appointment has usually carried with it a one-course load reduction with the agreement of the home department. There is no staff support associated with this position. The limited travel (to NCAA, North Central Conference, and FAR Association meetings) and related expenses are covered by the President’s Office.

Faculty members interested in being considered are asked to send a letter of interest to President Kupchella. All interested parties should feel free to contact the current FAR, Phil Harmeson, senior associate to the president, for more information if needed. Letters of interest should be received in the President’s Office by Oct. 15.

-- Jan Orvik for President Charles Kupchella.

Bismarck is first stop for administrator and deans bus tour

A meeting with the governor's staff Monday, Oct. 9, to talk about issues related to higher education was on the agenda when Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Greg Weisenstein led a busload of UND deans, the University’s top communications officer, and other senior administrators and support staff on a three-day meet-and-greet tour across North Dakota Oct. 9-11.

Weisenstein said the group planned to first stop at the Heritage Center and host a luncheon with local alumni, legislators, mayors, alumni, members of the Chamber of Commerce, local media representatives, the president of United Tribes Technical College, area public school officials, county officials, North Dakota University System Chancellor Eddie Dunn and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Michel Hillman, representatives of Bismarck State College and the North Dakota Humanities Council, and more.

In the evening the UND group planned to head to Hazen for a dinner with civic leaders, local legislators, alumni, and school, hospital and energy representatives to explore ways in which UND can be of more assistance to the community in general and to specific segments within the community.

Other tour stops include breakfast at Dickinson State University, lunch in Watford City and an ice cream social at Williston State University.

The group also is set for a town hall meeting Tuesday, Oct. 10, at 7 p.m. at the Airport International Inn in Williston and meetings and a luncheon Wednesday, Oct. 11, with Fort Berthold Community College administrators, faculty, and students. Minot is the final tour stop, where the UND deans will meet at 3 p.m. for a “coffee with the deans” at Minot State University’s Student Union. Weisenstein will host a dinner with alumni and community leaders at Minot’s Grand International Hotel at 5 p.m.

Weisenstein said such tours -- modeled after the UND president’s annual New Faculty and Administrators Bus Tour -- are essential to keep the state’s flagship university in close touch with the communities that support it. They also provide a vital opportunity for leaders and citizens alike to meet their higher education leaders.

“The deans bus tour is a way for us to continue to connect with people throughout the state of North Dakota,” said Weisenstein, a strong advocate of “being there” as a management philosophy. “It enables us to get out in the communities where they live and have conversations about what their needs and concerns are.”

President Kupchella lauds Arena upon its fifth anniversary

President Charles Kupchella praised the Ralph Engelstad Arena upon its fifth anniversary in the following statement:

“Five glorious years after the inaugural game, the Ralph Engelstad Arena is every bit the amazing facility it was at the beginning. I remember walking into the finished arena for the first time and running out of superlatives to describe this magnificent piece of architecture on the Northern Plains.

“Without question, the Ralph Engelstad Area has been a tremendous asset to the University of North Dakota campus, the city of Grand Forks, and our region. It is everything we envisioned it would be and more.

“We wanted a first-rate hockey arena that would be the envy of every collegiate program, that would showcase in style what we believe is the finest hockey program in the country. We got all of that and more, a venue where all kinds of exciting things -- concerts, international hockey tournaments, bonspiels, even circuses -- could take place.

“Maybe only Ralph himself understood the true level of buzz and sizzle that The Ralph would bring to the region. We will forever be grateful to the Ralph and Betty Engelstad family for this magnificent gift -- a gift that keeps on giving.

“We appreciate the continued interest by Betty, her daughter Kris, and Owen Nitz and Jeff Cooper in making sure that The Ralph remains a highly positive asset for UND and the region.”

Juana Moreno discusses spintronics at SEM seminar Oct. 13

Juana Moreno, assistant professor of physics, will discuss her work, "Modeling of Ferromagnetic Semiconductors: Finding the Optimal Material Parameters for Spintronic Devices," as part of the School of Engineering and Mines Seminar series at noon Friday, Oct. 13, in 218 Harrington Hall.

"Spin-based electronic (spintronic) devices utilize both carrier spin and charge to transmit or store information. Ferromagnetic semiconductors are ideal candidates for spintronic applications. Dr. Moreno's work focuses on developing a reliable theory of the magnetic, transport and optical properties of dilute magnetic semiconductors, such as GaMnAs. Since the successful design of spintronic nanostructures based on ferromagnetic semiconductors must include an understanding and careful analysis of disorder and spatial correlations, she also will discuss how these effects are included by using a new algorithm specific to dilute systems.

Spintronics is one of two research clusters being supported under the current North Dakota EPSCoR Program.

The University community is invited to attend.
-- Wayne Seames, Associate Professor, Chemical Engineering, wayneseames@mail.und.edu, 777-2958

All welcome at Healthy UND meeting

Faculty, staff, and students are invited to attend the Healthy UND Coalition meeting at noon Thursday, Oct. 12, in the Memorial Room, Memorial Union. The mission of Healthy UND is to work in partnership to promote healthy choices by enhancing awareness, building skills, changing social norms, and creating a healthier environment.
-- Jane Croeker, Healthy UND Co-chair - Student Health Promotion Advisor, Student Health Services, jane.croeker@und.edu, 701-777-4817

Aerospace to conduct aircraft accident investigation course

The UND Aerospace Foundation (UNDAF) and the Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA), in a cooperative effort, will be conduct a two and one-half day aircraft accident investigation course at the Grand Forks International Airport Oct. 17-19. The course is designed to provide an advanced level of instruction to individuals who may participate in aviation accident investigations conducted by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

“As unfortunate as they are, aircraft accidents are opportunities for crash investigators to learn more about the errors pilots and organizations may make that result in accidents,” said Dana Siewert, UND director of aviation safety. “This course develops hands-on skills by recreating an actual aircraft mishap in a learning environment.”

Over 30 airline pilots from around the United States and Canada are expected to participate in each course which will use actual aircraft wreckage donated by a firm in California. The wreckage “site” will be recreated south of the flight operations’ facility and used specifically for investigative training techniques.

This course is also offered to a select group of aviation employees and a limited number of aviation students who have completed aviation safety courses at UND. Aviation aircraft manufacturers who have expressed interest in this type of course and training will also be attending.

For further information, contact Dana Siewert at 777-7895 (e-mail, siewert@aero.und.edu) or check out http://www.aero.und.edu/index.php3.

U2 lists workshops

Below are U2 workshops for Oct. 23-27. Visit our web site for additional workshops in October and November.

PowerPoint XP, Intermediate: Oct. 23, 25, and 27, 8:30 to 11:30 a.m., 361 Upson II (nine hours total). Prerequisite: PowerPoint Beginning.
Create custom design templates, create presentation special effects, interface PowerPoint with Excel and Word, publish to the Web, review and broadcast presentations. Presenter: Heidi Strande.

Shipping and Receiving Hazardous Materials: Oct. 23, 10 a.m. to noon, 211 Skalicky Tech Incubator. Find out what your responsibilities are if you ship or receive hazardous material. If you fill out paperwork for a package, put material in a package, hand a package to a delivery person, receive a package from a delivery person, or open a package containing hazardous material, then you must have this training. Presenter: Greg Krause.

Introduction to Dreamweaver 2004 MX: Oct. 24, 25, and 26, 1 to 4 p.m. (limited seating), 361 Upson II. Prerequisite: Basic understanding of computers, mouse and saving/retrieving skills. Learn how to use Dreamweaver’s graphical page-building interface to develop and manage static Web sites that feature text graphics, and navigation. Presenter: Doris Bornhoeft.

Back Safety: Oct. 25, 10 a.m. to noon, 211 Skalicky Tech Incubator. The prevention of work-related back injuries is the primary purpose of this class. Back injuries are the most prevalent work-related injury in the United States. Lecture information will be presented on the anatomy and physiology of the back. The second half of the class will be activities and exercises related to the prevention of back problems. Wear comfortable clothing and shoes. This will be a great class for anyone with work duties that include lifting, pushing carts, cleaning, and other physical activities. Presenter: Claire Moen.

Preparing for a Pandemic: Oct. 26, 9 to 11 a.m., 211 Skalicky Tech Incubator. Table top discussion on preparing for a pandemic. What everyone should know? Presenters: Grand Forks Public Health Department, UND Student Health and UND Campus Safety Security.

Records Disposal Procedures: Oct. 27, 10 to 11 a.m., 211 Skalicky Tech Incubator. During this workshop you will learn more about the process for destroying or transferring records that have passed their retention time limits. We’ll review the system used, discuss why it’s necessary to document, and take part in a hands-on run-through of the entire process. It’s fun to clean out, it’s easier to do than you think, and now’s the time to do it. Presenter: Chris Austin, records manager.

Please reserve your seat by registering with U2 by: phone, 777-2128, e-mail, U2@mail.und.nodak.edu, or online www.conted.und.edu/U2/. Please include: (1) workshop title/date, (2) name, (3) department, (4) position, (5) box number, (6) phone number, (7) e-mail, and (8) how you first learned about this workshop. Thank you for registering in advance; it helps us plan for materials and number of seats.
-- Julie Sturges, Program Assistant, U2, U2@mail.und.edu, 777-2128

BBQ benefit set for Oct. 24

A benefit BBQ supper for Pam Hanley Solseng will be held from 4 to 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 24, at the Knights of Columbus Hall, 601 University Ave., Grand Forks. The supper will be followed by a silent auction. Pam is the daughter of Yvonne Hanley, assistant professor of teaching and learning.

A free will offering will be accepted with proceeds going to the family for expenses associated with her serious illness. If you are unable to attend but wish to contribute, please send your donation to: Pamela Solseng Benefit, Gate City Bank, 3205 S. Washington St., Grand Forks, ND 58201. -- Cec Volden Lambeth, professor of nursing practice and role development.

Live art auction to be held at Museum

The North Dakota Museum of Art, the state's official art museum, will hold its eighth annual Autumn Art Auction Saturday, Oct. 14. This year’s co-chairs are Chris and Penny Wolf. The evening begins at 6:30 p.m. with live music and appetizers donated by the Bronze Boot, Suite 49, Capone’s, the Museum Café, and the Blue Moose. The live auction starts at 8 p.m. Tickets in advance are $30 for members, $35 for non-members, and $40 at the door.

The 44 pieces of art are now on display at the Museum and online at www.ndmoa.com or may be viewed in the catalog. They will be auctioned by Burton Onofrio, who has run art auctions for 26 years in Rochester, Minn. He recently retired as attending neurosurgeon at the Mayo Clinic, and art has long been an important part of his world.

This season the Museum introduced more artists from Winnipeg, the center of a thriving art community. According to Museum Director Laurel Reuter, “I don’t remember a time when as many young, ambitious, insouciant, and talented artists have sprung onto the scene at one time. This year Aganetha Dyck invited artists to bring work by her studio for me to see. Within several hours I met a dozen new artists, many of whom I now introduce to you. You might remember Aganetha’s work with bees that was exhibited in the Museum last summer. You may also remember the cover of last year’s auction catalog, a collaboration between Aganetha and her son Richard. This year Richard has an earlier scan in the auction. To make it he literally placed the lamb on the scanner bed and took its picture.”

The auction is introducing the photography of Katherine Keck, a new member of the Museum Foundation Board of Directors who comes from Los Angeles. Other artists include Guillermo Guardia, a ceramist from Peru who is working on his second master’s degree from the University of North Dakota. Ewa Tarsia, now of Winnipeg, emigrated from Poland. Milena Marinov is a Bulgarian who lives in Fargo and paints traditional icons in the style of the Eastern Orthodox Church.

Zhimin Guan grew up in China as did Aliana Au. And thrown into the mix are artists born and raised in the region. For example, this is the first auction to include the work of Todd Hebert. He grew up in North Dakota, finished his BFA in art at UND, and went on for his MFA at the Rhode Island School of Design where Nancy Friese was his teacher. In 2005 he was named Emerging Artist of the Year by the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Ridgefield, Conn. Friese, also an artist with work in the Auction, serves on the Museum’s Board of Trustees.

Reuter adds, “Our art community has flourished by welcoming ideas and people from around the globe. We also need our museum supporters and art buyers, those who enjoy looking and those determined to live with art.”

Absentee bidding is possible by mail or telephone. Call the Museum at 777-4195 to order tickets ($25 in advance, $30 at the door), receive an Auction Catalog, or register for absentee bidding. The ticket price includes wine and hors d'oeuvres beginning at 6:30 p.m.

The Auction is underwritten by KVLY and KXJB, Merrill Lynch, and Prairie Public Broadcasting.

The Museum is located on Centennial Drive in Grand Forks. Hours are 9–5 weekdays and 11–5 weekends. Call (701) 777-4195 for information on current exhibitions, the Museum Café, of the Museum Gift Shop.
-- Brian Lofthus, Assistant to the Director, North Dakota Museum of Art, blofthus@ndmoa.com, 701 777-4195

Alum, former White House curator will discuss art from Kennedy to Bush eras

White House Curator Emerita Betty Monkman, from Washington, D.C., will give the Elaine McKenzie Memorial Lecture at the North Dakota Museum of Art Thursday, Oct. 12, at 7:30 p.m.

Monkman, in her lecture, "40 Years of Art at the White House: From Jacqueline Kennedy to Laura Bush," will present over 80 images and speak about the beginnings of the White House collection, how the collection has evolved, and provide insights about the personal tastes and collecting habits of past presidents and first ladies. “The objects in the house resonate with meaning, imparting inspiration and a glimpse into past presidential lives and significant White House events for each new family,” says Monkman.

Monkman earned her bachelor’s degree in history from UND in 1964. The Souris, N.D., native, worked in the White House curator’s office starting in 1967, first as museum registrar, then associate curator, and in 1997 became curator. She planned and curated the first exhibition on the White House in 1992 and worked closely on other exhibits at the White House Visitor Center. She has written a number of articles on the White House decorative arts and has lectured throughout the country. Monkman is currently on the Foundation Board of the North Dakota Museum of Art.

In 1990 she returned to campus to speak at the Hultberg Lectureship, an annual event that brings accomplished women graduates back to campus as role models for leadership and career achievements.

The North Dakota Museum of Art is located on Centennial Drive on the UND campus. Hours are from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekends. The Museum Café is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays with lunch from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information please call 777-4195.
-- Brian Lofthus, Assistant to the Director, North Dakota Museum of Art, blofthus@ndmoa.com, 701 777-4195

Law School hosts national conference on pedagogy of American Indian law

The School of Law Northern Plains Indian Law Center is proud to host a national conference, “The Pedagogy of American Indian Law,” Oct. 13-14. The conference will be held in the Baker Court Room at the School of Law beginning at 8:30 a.m. Friday, Oct. 13.

Indian Law scholars from across the country will be presenting. For a complete schedule, please visit www.law.und.edu. There is no charge to attend the conference, and it does qualify for 10.25 Continuing Legal Education credits. For more information or to register for the program, contact Tahira Hashmi, at tahira.hashmi@thor.law.und.edu or (701) 777-2223.

The conference reflects on the pedagogical aspects of American Indian Law. The Indian law teachers look at Lone Wolf v. Hitchcock, Santa Clara Pueblo v. Martinez, and other cases in the Indian law canon in different ways. The teaching methods used by the more experienced Indian law professors who earned their bones in treaty and civil rights cases and in legal aid might vary a great deal from the less experienced professors, more and more of whom are Indians themselves. Professors who became interested in Indian law from their scholarship in constitutional law, property, federal courts, and so on might have yet more views.

The teaching of what is called Indian law to law students is a new art, beginning with Professor Ralph Johnson's first classes at the University of Washington (his teaching materials are still an integral part of many law libraries) and Monroe Price's Native American Law Manual, produced by the California Indian Legal Services in the late 1960s and early 1970s. There are well over 100 teachers of Indian law now.

Unlike the prior, excellent symposia at the Tulsa and New Mexico law schools, this conference would urge Indian law scholars and teachers to speak to each other. There are more teachers and scholars every year and there is still a lot to learn from each other, specifically related to teaching classes. Some of the panel topics are Teaching the Marshall Trilogy and Teaching Treaties. This conference also looks at the Indian law canon from law and literature, multidisciplinary, and clinical perspectives. In other words, it is a chance for Indian law teachers to reflect on the last 30 years and compare notes.
-- Rob Carolin, Director of Alumni and Public Relations, Law School, carolin@law.und.edu, 7-2856

Museum opens new exhibition with Oct. 12 reception

On Oct. 12, from 6:30 – 7:30 p.m., the North Dakota Museum of Art will host an opening reception for the new exhibition, "Introductions: Artists’ Self-Portraits." The reception, which is free and open to the public, will include wine, hors d’oeuvres and informal gallery talks by various artists in the exhibition. The reception will immediately be followed by Betty Monkman’s presentation, "40 Years of Art at the White House: From Jacqueline Kennedy to Laura Bush," starting at 7:30 p.m.

Regional, national and international artists explore the idea of "self.. Using paint, clay, wood, photography and fiber, 35 artists will unveil their self-portraits in the mezzanine of the Museum. They include Walter Piehl of Minot, Carol Hepper and Barton Benes of New York, Memo Guardia of Lima, Peru, and Zhimin Guan of Moorhead. The exhibition continues through Dec. 6.
-- Brian Lofthus, Assistant to the Director, North Dakota Museum of Art, blofthus@ndmoa.com, 701 777-4195

David Marshall to present first faculty lecture Oct. 10

The inaugural talk in the Faculty Lecture Series will be delivered by English and Peace Studies Professor David Marshall Tuesday, Oct. 10. His talk, "Editing: Discovering Windows into the Structure of the Human Mind," is scheduled to begin at 4:30 p.m. at the North Dakota Museum of Art. A 4 p.m. reception will precede the talk, which is free and open to the public.

Language often reflects the cultures and lifestyles of those who employ them. What one may not realize is their language of choice might affect their perception of the world around them. Marshall’s lecture will explore the intricate world of linguistics and reveal how everyday sentences mirror the inner workings of the human mind. “Grammar is not about language only,” said Marshall. “It illustrates how we think and not think, how we grasp ideas and how we miss them.”

“Syntactical structures in our language and minds echo larger structure in society and reality,” explains Marshall, “since all languages are structured hierarchically, we shouldn’t be surprised to see society structured the same way.”

The Faculty Lecture Series is planned by a committee of Chester Fritz Distinguished Professors, who hold UND’s highest faculty honor, and is funded by the Office of the President.

David Marshall’s extensive list of publications, special lectures, and awards offer a mere glimpse into this three-time Fulbright scholar’s stellar accomplishments. He has been noted as the Fulbright Scholarship program’s first professor of linguistics in China, where from 1986-87 he taught grammar, the history of English, semantics, and lectured at many Chinese universities. He also taught courses in politics of language and American culture and civilization from 1993-94 as a Fulbright Professor at Eötvos Loránd University of Hungary in Budapest. While in Hungary, the Fulbright program also sent him on short lecture trips to Berlin and Mainz, Germany and Rabat, Morocco. He was invited back to lecture at the World Fulbright Fiftieth Anniversary Conference in Budapest in 1996.

In 2001, Marshall served his third term as a Fulbright professor in Veliko Turnovo, Bulgaria. In 2002, he was invited back to Bulgaria to teach in the first Fulbright International Summer Institute and to address the fifth Fulbright Commission Conference in Sofia. His talk, “The Fulbright Experience from the Perspective of Three Decades: Unexpected Gains for Freedom,” was later printed in the Fulbright Newsletter. Since completing his Fulbright professorships, Marshall has hosted four foreign Fulbright scholars at UND.

Marshall’s repertoire also includes three terms as a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) visiting scholar. Two of his NEH scholar terms were spent at Stanford University, once in medieval literature and once in sociolinguistics. His third term was served at the University of Wisconsin, Madison in political science. He also completed a term at Duke University as a Lilly Scholar in Chaucer, and a visiting professorship in English at the University of Arizona in Tucson.

Before entering the field of academia, Marshall spent some time as a journalist in New York and then editor-in-chief for Pilgrim Press, where he was responsible for administrative duties and coordinating aspects of production, finance, promotion and sales between Boston, New York, and Philadelphia for more than 12 non-fiction trade books per year. Marshall himself has co-authored two published articles, one with the late UND law professor Randy Lee called “Shooting Themselves in the Foot: Consequences of English-only Supporters Going to Law,” which appeared in Language Ideologies: Critical Perspectives of the English Only Movement. His second article, “Overcoming Minority Language Policy Failure: the Case for Bulgaria and the Balkans” was co-authored by Angel Angelov and published this summer in the International Journal of the Sociology of Language, where he serves on the editorial board.

David Marshall also served with the United States Marine Corps, an experience he often refers to when teaching the poetry of war and peace. He received his undergraduate degree at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, a Master of Divinity from Union Theological Seminary, New York and his Ph.D in linguistics from New York University.

Marshall is married to Ruth Brockert Marshall. Together they have two sons, Michael and Nathan, the latter a UND graduate.

Human rights expert will discuss genocide

Jean Migabo Kalere, professor at the Catholic University Law School in Leuven, Belgium, will present a lecture, "Genocide In The African Great Lakes Region: Challenges for the International Criminal Court in the Democratic Republic of Congo" Tuesday, Oct. 10, at 4:30 p.m. in the Baker Court Room, School of Law.

The lecture will examine whether the International Criminal Court’s (ICC) Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) investigation might ultimately result in genocide charges and, regardless of whether it does, the challenges that will be faced by the ICC in prosecuting this case. It will begin by tracing the origins of the conflict in the DRC and describe its metamorphosis over the past decade. It will examine the Thomas Lubanga case and also consider the ICC’s challenges in the wider DRC investigation, including the complicated regional dynamics and the fact that suspected criminals in the conflict are currently serving as top-level government officials in the DRC. The lecture is free and open to the public.

Kalere is recognized as one of the world’s leading authorities on human rights abuses in the DRC. In the 1990’s, he litigated human rights violation cases in the Congolese Court of Appeal in Bukavu. He served as Executive Secretary for the Commission of Peace and Justice in Bukavu and was then elected by the Congolese Government as President of the Congolese National Commission of Inquiries regarding human rights abuses. Due to his leading role in the fight against human rights violations in the DRC, Professor Migabo Kalere was forced to seek asylum in Belgium.

In addition to his public lecture, Kalere will host a faculty workshop, student workshop, visit in relevant law classes, and hold individual meetings with human rights representatives on campus. Prior to his residence at UND, Professor Migabo Kalere will be lecturing at the law schools at Notre Dame University, Northwestern University and the University of Chicago.

-- Rob Carolin, Director of Alumni and Public Relations, Law School, carolin@law.und.edu, 7-2856

Global Visions film series continues

The Global Visions film series continues with "Moolaade," Tuesday, Oct. 10, at 7 p.m., Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union. It is free and open to the public.

The second film in the series, "Moolaade" is a film by Burkina Fasso filmaker Qusmane Sembene, one of the legendary Senagalese director's defining films. A fascinating study of the clash between pragmatic modern thinking and staunch religious traditionalism in Senegal, the film focuses on the controversial procedure of "purification," in which young girls are forced to undergo genital mutilation to supposedly make them better, more faithful, wives in the future. When six young girls flee the process, four seek refuge with a well-known woman, Collé (Fatoumata Coulibaly), who is viewed with suspicion in the community for her stubborn refusal to adhere to all the societal norms. Collé offers the girls protection (moolaadé), a spell which can only be broken if she herself utters the words which will end the moolaadé. Collé herself had refused to let her daughter be 'purified' and her actions prove to be inflammatory, causing the elders to become increasingly nervy about her failure to conform. Sembene's work is both moving and engaging.

For further information, call Marcia Mikulak 777-4718.
-- Marcia Mikulak, Assistant Professor, Anthropology, marcia.mikulak@und.nodak.edu, 777-4718

Gordon Henry to present at Leadership Series

The Memorial Union Leadership Series continues with Gordon Henry, vice president emeritus of student affairs, who will present "The Art of Caring Leadership," Wednesday, October 11, at 3 p.m. in the River Valley Room, Second floor, Memorial Union. Henry is invited back time and time again to bring his essential message about leadership. His charismatic and enriching approach to presenting leaves every audience thirsting for more information regarding caring leadership. His point of recognizing the power of caring is a message that should be heard by everyone who refers to themselves as a leader.

The presentation is part of the Leadership Series sponsored by the Memorial Union. Faculty, please announce this event to students. This presentation is free and open to the Uiversity community. For more information, call 7-3665/3667 or email leadership@und.nodak.edu

Put next week's Leadership Series event on your calendar. A panel from the Center for Community Envolvement will present “Resources, Tools, and Practical Advice” Oct. 18 at 3 p.m. in the Lecture Bowl, second floor, Memorial Union.
-- Josh Wosepka, Project Coordinator of Leadership Development, Memorial Union, leadershp@und.edu, 7-3665/4200

Benediktson Lecture focuses on science in a troubled world

Science is an integral part of the culture of all developed countries and many developing ones. It is one of our most creative activities. Two trends are worrisome: science has come under assault in the United States; and a partial cause for the assault could be a low level of science literacy. In a democracy, where citizens have the responsibility to decide major issues, and in a culture where nearly every issue has a scientific component, these trends need to be reversed.

George Seielstad, Director of Northern Great Plains Center for People and the Environment at the University, will discuss what science is and how it is conducted on Wednesday, Oct. 11, 4 p.m., in Clifford Hall Auditorium, room 210. The presentation will be webcast live at www.umac.org.

Dr. Seielstad will also present how science’s core values have universal applicability that every modern society should accept. In particular, the process by which science advances, if used in other arenas of society, might offer an alternative means of dispute resolution than forced coercion. Some changes in the ways of science will be suggested. A major question is what will science do? Will it alleviate global humanitarian concerns, or will it deliver more and more, better and better, to fewer and fewer wealthy people?

The presentation is part of the Benediktson Lecture Series, named for Oliver Benediktson, a UND alumnus who generously endowed a Chair of Astrophysics. Dr. Seielstad is the first recipient of the Benediktson Chair. In appreciation, he is presenting public lectures on the wonders of science.

The talk is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served prior to the presentation at 3:30 p.m. For more information, contact me.
-- Karen Katrinak at 777.2482, or, katrinak@aero.und.edu.

Doctoral examination set for Shankar Kumar Karki

The final examination for Shankar Kumar Karki, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in engineering, is set for 3:30 p.m. Oct. 11, in 218 Harrington Hall. The dissertation title is "Electricity Sector Reform and its Environmental Implications." Michael Mann (engineering) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Dr. Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

"Pretty in Pink" celebrates breast cancer awareness

Pretty in Pink! A Celebration of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, will be held Wednesday, October 11, from 5-7 p.m. at Parkwood Place (lower level) 749 S. 30 St., Grand Forks. The schedule follows.

5-6 p.m., social hour and pampering: Enjoy music, refreshments, and door prizes. Wear pink and be entered to win a grand prize. There will also be free hand massages by area massage therapists and free pink nail polish from local cosmetologists.
6 p.m., "Early Detection is the Best Prevention" by Dr. Marshall Winchester, Radiation Oncology, Altru Cancer Center.
6:30 p.m., special guest speaker, Heidi Heitkamp, breast cancer survivor.
7 p.m., door prize drawing.
-- Karen Grabanski, Advisor/Instructor, TRIO, karengrabanski@mail.und.nodak.edu, 701-777-3426

Carolyn Williams to give lecture on "Orientalist" art

The departments of English and art are pleased to announce a lecture on art history by Caroline Williams, visiting professor from The College of William and Mary. The talk, which will be at 4 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 12, in 300 Merrifield Hall, is titled "From Description to Fantasy: 19th Century Painters in Cairo, Egypt."

The European artists who flocked to Egypt during the 19th century came at different times and responded to different aspects of the culture. Viewed collectively, their work provides evidence of varying “Orientalist” points of view, moving at the beginning of the century from portraying “the reality” of a new encounter to “fantasy” at the end of the century which artists painted from recollection and for demand from new patrons. The lecture will focus principally on the work of David Roberts, Jean-Léon Gérôme, John Frederick Lewis and Ludwig Deutsch.
-- Rebecca Weaver-Hightower, Assistant Professor, English, rwh@und.edu, 777-6391

IVN sessions will focus on copyright issues

Five copyright conferences will be held from October 2006 through April 2007, hosted in several Interactive Video Network sites on campuses of the NDUS.

The first of the copyright sessions will be held Friday, Oct. 13, 9 to 10:50 a.m. on the IVN network and through streaming video. The URL for the streaming video will be published prior to the first session.

In addition, the sessions will be delivered to K-12 sites. For those unable to have access to one of these locations, the sessions will be streamed allowing for synchronous or asynchronous participation as well as asynchronous pod casting.

Each session will have a different focus with an overriding theme of Fair Use in the delivery of instruction. This focus encompasses the distance education as well as traditional classroom. For more information, please visit http://www.nduso.org/copyright.htm .

STF committee calls for proposals; open meeting set for Oct. 13

The Student Technology Fee Committee is calling for proposals for spring 2007 technology fee dollars. The committee will make recommendations for proposals based on the following:
* Descriptive Criteria: dean's ranking, innovation, student benefit, impact on the curriculum and/or on research, and how does this project address your unit's strategic plan?
* Demographic Criteria: number of students served, number of disciplines served.
* Unit Support: access to equipment, technical support, matching funds from the department/unit, and technology available for redeployment.

Please note that all proposals must be submitted using the spring 2007 (073) STF Request Form. Forms may be accessed at: www.und.edu/org/stf/forms.html or you may request one via e-mail from Carol Hjelmstad at carolhjelmstad@mail.und.edu . Departments/units should submit the proposals to their deans or directors for review and prioritization. Units which answer directly to vice presidents should submit proposals to them for review and prioritization. Vice presidents, deans and directors may have earlier deadlines. The deadline to submit proposals to the Student Technology Committee at Stop 9041 is Friday, Nov. 3.

Proposal writers must consult with the various support offices on campus for costs associated with installation of equipment, accessibility issues, security concerns and adaptive technology. Unless departments are prepared to pay for these out of their own budgets, proposal writers should obtain estimates and include them as a part of the budget for the proposal. In addition, proposal writers must consult with Disability Support Services regarding adaptive technology needed for the proposal and with the Center for Instructional and Learning Technologies regarding the equipment requested for compatibility, installation issues, and ensuing issues.

The STF Committee will hold an open meeting to address questions for those writing proposals for spring 2007 funding. This open meeting is scheduled for Friday, Oct. 13, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Memorial Union, River Valley Room. Presentations will begin at 11 a.m. and again at noon; please feel free to drop by anytime during the two hours as your schedule allows.

If you have any questions or concerns regarding the proposal process, please contact Carol at 777-3172. -- Student technology fee committee.

Children's Writers Conference set for Oct. 13-14

The 27th annual Writers Conference in Children's Literature will be held Oct. 13-14 at the Memorial Union. The opening session is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Friday with a keynote address from author Jim Solheim and a presentation by local author Faythe Thureen. Solheim, the author of poems, stories, and books for children, including "It’s Disgusting-and We Ate It!," will give a talk on finding the extraordinary in everyday writing. Thureen will lead a multimedia presentation with music and dance set to her book "Troll Meets Trickster on the Dakota Prairie."

Saturday’s sessions begin at 8:30 a.m. at the Memorial Union. Alexandra Penfold, editor from Simon & Schuster in New York, will present the session “From Query Letter to Finished Book: How to Make Your Work Stand Out Before and After Publication.” Elaine Marie Alphin, award-winning author of more than 20 books, will speak about writing mysteries for young readers, then will lead participants in an interactive hands-on workshop, “Worse for Your Characters Means Better for Your Plot.”

The Writers Conference in Children’s Literature regularly attracts participants from all over North Dakota, South Dakota and Minnesota, as well as Wisconsin, Iowa, Nebraska, and Manitoba. Throughout the years, distinguished authors, illustrators, educators and agents have visited the UND campus to share their stories, critique manuscripts and share the latest trends and markets in the field of children's literature with area writers. The conference is presented by the Society of Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators (SCBWI) and the Department of English. Local sponsors include the University, Barnes & Noble Bookstore at UND, and the UND Alumni Foundation.

Those interested in attending can visit http://www.und.edu/dept/english/ChildrensLit06.html for more information and a registration form, or contact Jean Patrick, SCBWI Regional Advisor for the Dakotas, at jean@jeanpatrick.com.

Insight meditation retreat is Oct. 13-15

A non-residential insight meditation retreat will be held Thursday through Sunday, Oct. 13-15, at the Lotus Meditation Center. The teacher is Ajahn Sudanto, a Buddhist monk in the Thai Theravada Forest tradition. Instruction in sitting and walking meditation will be offered. Registration is required and a fee will be charged. Scholarships are available.

For more information contact me at 787-8839.
-- Lora Sloan, Lotus Meditation Center.

Field trip to French Manitoba set for Oct. 20

A field trip to French Manitoba is set for Friday, Oct. 20. Students, faculty, UND staff and community members will visit the Winnipeg Art Gallary’s exhibit of over sixty bronze pieces by the French sculptor Auguste Rodin (1840-1917), meet students at le Collège Universitaire de Saint-Boniface over lunch, and spend the last part of the day in the French language Métis community of Saint-Laurent on the southeast tip of Lake Manitoba. Everyone is welcome to join this field trip by bus to French Manitoba. Students will assist new participants in this intercultural one-day Canadian experience. For further information contact me.
-- Virgil Benoit, Languages, 777-4659, virgil.benoit@und.nodak.edu, or visit: www.ifmidwest.org .

"Science or Magic" children's activity is Oct. 24

Enjoy science fun for the whole family when you attend “Is it Science or Magic?” from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 24, Room 708, Schroeder School.

Learn how to do amazing science activities with your children. These user-friendly activities are guaranteed to “ignite” your family’s interest in science. You will go home with ideas, materials and instructions on how to explore science with your whole family. Who knows? Maybe a future Nobel Prize winner resides at your house.

To register call the Parent Information Center at 787-4216.
-- Laura Munski, Dakota Science Center.

Doctoral examination set for Glenn Elliott Cockerline

The final examination for Glenn Elliott Cockerline, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in teaching and learning, is set for 2 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 25, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "Cognitive Styles in Student Use, Perception, and Satisfaction with Online Learning." David Yearwood (teaching and learning) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-2786

Speaker will discuss action research and teaching scholarship

“Action Research and the Scholarship of Teaching,” a keynote address by Geoffrey Mills, dean of the School of Education at Southern Oregon University, is set for 4 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 25, at the North Dakota Museum of Art. Sonsored by the College of Education and Human Development, Dr. Mills will speak on the scholarship of teaching, and a reception will follow.

His professional interests and teaching responsibilities include action research, anthropology and education, educational change and qualitative research methods. Mills has authored the book, "Action Research: A Guide for the Teacher Researcher," (Merrill/Prentice Hall) and co-edited two books: "Theory and Concepts in Qualitative Research," and "Making Change in Mathematics Education." Mills, a native of Australia, has given invited addresses at conferences in the United States, Canada, England, Mexico, New Zealand, and Australia.

Questions regarding his visit can be referred to me.
-- Margaret Zidon, Associate Professor, Department of Teaching & Learning: 777-3614 or margaret_zidon@und.nodak.edu.

World Poetry Festival is Nov. 6

Do you have a passion for poetry? You are cordially invited to read/perform your favorite poem in the original language at the upcoming "World Poetry Celebration" on Wednesday, Nov. 8, from 6 to 8:30 p.m. at the International Centre, 2908 University Ave.

Let's share the vibrant beauty of as many languages as possible! If you want to add your voice to this international poetry festival, please contact Olaf Berwald at the Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures at your earliest convenience. I am also in search of people who would like to provide musical interludes. Add your voice, your instrument, and/or your ears to an evening of poetic global synergy and send me an e-mail at olaf.berwald@und.nodak.edu ; office phone 7-6435.

-- Dr. Olaf Berwald, Assistant Professor, Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures, olaf.berwald@und.nodak.edu, 777-6435

Watch what you heat

The National Fire Protection Association and fire departments across North America observe Fire Prevention Week each October to mark the anniversary of the 1871 Great Chicago Fire and raise public awareness of fire safety.

This year's theme is "Watch What You Heat." Each year, more than 100,000 home fires involve cooking equipment. The main cause? Not paying attention. Kitchens are the number one place for home fires to start.

Kitchen safety tips:
-- Stay in the kitchen when you are frying, grilling, broiling, or boiling food. If you must leave the room for even a short time, turn off the stove.
-- When you are simmering, baking, or roasting food, check it regularly, stay in the home, and use a timer.
-- When finished cooking, turn off all burners and ovens.

For a copy of the NFPA brochure, "Watch What You Heat," please contact the UND Safety and Security Office with your name and address. It will be mailed via campus mail. Other topics in the brochure include microwaves, grease fires, oven fires, burn protection, and countertop safety.

Additional information is available at www.firepreventionweek.org .
-- Tim Lee, Fire Stafety and Security Coordinator, 777-3655, timlee@mail.und.edu .

Summer leadership program applications now available

The President’s Leadership Program supports up to two administrators each year to participate in a national-level summer professional leadership institute, such as the MLE and MDP programs at Harvard (http://gseweb.harvard.edu/~ppe/highered/index.html), the Summer Institute for Women in Higher Education at Bryn Mawr (http://www.brynmawr.edu/summerinstitute/), and the Frye Leadership Institute Emory University (www.fryeinstitute.org). This funding is for individuals already in administrative roles at UND who want to expand the breadth of their experience in anticipation of moving to another level of responsibility. To apply for summer funding from the President’s Leadership Program, please send a formal application letter expressing your interest, your administrative background, the program you wish to attend and why, to Stop 8176 or victoriabeard@mail.und.nodak.edu by Monday, October 16, 2006.
-- Victoria Beard, Associate Provost, Academic Affairs, victoriabeard@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-4824

Faculty sought to lead spring student faculty reading groups

We are recruiting faculty who are interested in co-leading a one-credit "Student Faculty Reading Group" mini-course during the Spring 2007 semester. These mini-courses, which have been offered for the last two years, are co-led by two faculty on a topic outside the expertise of either, with the overall goal of creating a community in which faculty and students work together as co-learners.

So far, two such mini courses have been identified for the upcoming semester. One is on the topic of culture clash, with course participants reading "The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down" by Anne Fadiman, a story of Hmong immigrants in California, and "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America" by Stephen G. Bloom, a story of a Hasidic Jewish community in rural Iowa.

The second course is on the topic of challenging the conventional wisdom. In that course, participants will read and discuss Malcolm Gladwell’s "Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking," which argues that intuitive judgments can be as effective as carefully researched ones, and Steven Levitt’s "Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything," which explores the hidden incentives behind various kinds of human behavior.

We are seeking faculty to co-lead either of these courses or to propose a mini-course on anther interesting topic outside their areas of expertise. If you are interested, contact either Libby Rankin (libby.rankin@und.nodak.edu) or Jim Antes (james.antes@und.nodak.edu).

The project is funded by the Bush Foundation, and faculty will receive a $500 stipend for their efforts.
-- Libby Rankin, Director, Office of Instructional Development, libby_rankin@und.nodak.edu, 777-4233

Faculty and staff invited to join interest groups

Faculty and staff with an interest in service learning and public scholarship are invited to join interest groups of the Center for Community Engagement.

The Service Learning Interest Group and Public Scholarship Interest Group are informal groups who receive information and invitations to events and participate in discussions and activities as they choose.

If you have not been receiving electronic communication from the Center and would like to be put on a mailing list for one of these groups, please let me know with a phone call or e-mail message.
-- Lana Rakow, Director, Center for Community Engagement, lanarakow@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2287

Student technology fee proposals sought

The Student Technology Fee Committee is calling for proposals for spring 2007 Technology Fee dollars.

The committee will make recommendations for proposals based on the following:

Descriptive Criteria:
-- Dean’s ranking
-- Innovation
-- Student benefit
-- Impact on the curriculum and/or on research
-- How does this project address your unit’s strategic plan?

Demographic Criteria
-- Number of students served
-- Number of disciplines served

Unit Support
-- Access to equipment
-- Technical support
-- Matching funds from the department/unit
-- Technology available for redeployment

PLEASE NOTE: All proposals must be submitted using the spring 2007 (073) STF request form at www.und.edu/org/stf/forms.html or via e-mail from Carol Hjelmstad at carolhjelmstad@mail.und.edu. Departments/units should submit the proposals to their deans or directors for review and prioritization. Units which answer directly to vice presidents should submit proposals to them for review and prioritization. Vice presidents, deans and directors may have earlier deadlines.

The deadline to submit proposals to the Student Technology Committee at Stop 9041 is Friday, Nov. 3.

Proposal writers must consult with the various support offices on campus for costs associated with installation of equipment, accessibility issues, security concerns and adaptive technology. Unless departments are prepared to pay for these out of their own budgets, proposal writers should obtain estimates and include them as a part of the budget for the proposal. In addition, proposal writers must consult with Disability Support Services regarding adaptive technology needed for the proposal and with the Center for Instructional and Learning Technologies regarding the equipment requested for compatibility, installation issues, and ensuing issues.

The STF Committee will hold an open meeting to address questions for those writing proposals for spring 2007 funding Friday, Oct. 13, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Memorial Union, River Valley Room. Presentations will begin at 11 a.m. and again at noon; please feel free to drop by anytime during the two hours as your schedule allows.

If you have any questions or concerns regarding the proposal process, please contact Carol at 777-3171.
-- Carol Hjelmstad, ITSS.
-- Carol Hjelmstad, Administrative Assistant, ITSS, carolhjelmstad@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3172

Mini-grants available for summer courses, programs

Are you planning an event at UND next summer but lack funding? Do you plan to develop a new summer course but need financial resources? Consider applying for a Mini-Grant through the Summer Programs and Events Council (SPEC).

SPEC’s Start-Up Mini-Grant Program will fund deserving proposals for:
1. The expansion of existing 2007 credit or non-credit summer courses/programs.
2. Or the redesign of existing 2007 credit or non-credit summer courses/programs.
3. Or the development of new 2007 credit or non-credit summer courses/programs.

Through the Mini-Grant Program, the Council wants to create positive learning experiences for the citizens of the Red River Valley Region and beyond by extending the resources of the university. The Mini-Grant funds will help cover the development, marketing and start-up costs for courses and programs held at UND during the summer months. Examples include camps for kids, academic classes that can be completed in the summer months, or any special event designed for the community. Quality, creativity and “out of the box” ideas are encouraged when developing new programs.

All interested UND faculty and staff are encouraged to submit proposals. Information can be found at www.summer.und.edu. The application deadline is 4:30 p.m., Friday, Nov. 17, 2006. Recipients will be announced Dec. 19, 2006.

For individuals interested in covering the basics of the application and RFP process, an informational meeting session will be held Wednesday, Oct. 11, from 3 – 4 p.m., in the President’s Room of the Memorial Union. Please reserve your seat by registering with U2 by: Phone 777-2128, Email U2@mail.und.nodak.edu, or Online www.conted.und.edu/U2/.

For more information on the Mini-Grant program, contact: Diane Hadden, Director of Summer Sessions (credit activities), 777-6284, dianehadden@mail.und.edu or Dr. Kerry Kerber, Associate Dean Continuing Education (non-credit activities), 777-4264, kerrykerber@mail.und.edu. For operational questions, contact the Summer Events Office at 777-0841.

Julie Bean, Summer Events Program Specialist

-- Julie Bean, Summer Events Program Specialist, Division of Continuing Education, juliebean@mail.und.edu, 701-777-0441

Barnes & Noble will help select new texts for your class

Barnes & Noble at UND can help you choose a new text for your class. See what texts other faculty in colleges and universities around the country are using to teach a similar curriculum.

Find out which books are the most popular choices and what your colleagues have to say about them. Get more information to help you choose the best text for you and your students.

Go to www.facultycenter.net Contact your store manager at Barnes & Noble, Michelle Aberanthey at 777-2103, or textbook manager, Tina Monette, at 777-2106.
-- Michelle Abernathey, General Manager, Barnes & Noble at UND, michelle_aberanthey@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2103

RSS feeds available for UND news releases

Want UND news downloaded right to your desktop, as it happens? Subscribe to one of UND's newest services, RSS feeds. When you subscribe, you'll receive each news release right on your computer, without any effort on your part. To subscribe, visit http://www.universityrelations.und.edu/resources/podrss.html for step-by-step instructions for this free service.

UND now podcasts video and television spots, which are online at http://www.universityrelations.und.edu/resources/video.html . They can be viewed on your computer or on a portable MP3 player. Look for more on UND's offerings soon.
-- Jan Orvik, Writer/Editor, University Relations, janorvik@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3621

Join your friends for lunch at the Museum of Art Cafe

October 10 – Entrée: Jamaican Jerk Chicken or Spicy Calamari, Soup: Shrimp and Corn

October 11 – Entrée: Thai Pork or Enchiladas, Soup: Moroccan Lamb Stew

October 12 – Entrée: Chicken Marsala or Greek Salad, Soup: Chicken Tortilla

October 13 – Entrée: Lamb Kabobs or Garlic Shrimp, Soup: Cretan Vegetable

The Museum Café and Coffee Shop, located in the lower level of the Museum, serves a full luncheon menu from 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Coffee is available from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Take-out available, UND billing accepted, conference room available for luncheons. We also cater weekend and evening events, 777-4195

Visit the Museum Cafe online at http://www.ndmoa.com/cafe.html

-- Connie Hulst, Office Manager, North Dakota Museum of Art, chulst@ndmoa.com, 777-4195

Internal job openings listed

The following position vacancies are available only to regular UND staff employees who have successfully completed their six-month probation period, earn annual and sick leave, receive BC/BS health insurance and TIAA-CREF or ND PERS retirement benefits. Current UND faculty, please contact Human Resources for eligibility.

TO APPLY: Please complete UND Application/Control Cardform. Send letter of application and resume, referencing position name and number, to: Human Resources, University of North Dakota, Twamley Hall, Room 313, 264 Centennial Drive Stop 8010, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8010. Applications MUST be received by the deadline date.

EXECUTIVE/PROFESSIONAL/ADMINISTRATIVE/COACHES:

POSITION: Student Services Officer, Dean of Student’s Office, #07-110
DEADLINE: (I) 10/17/2006
SALARY: $37,000 - $43,620

POSITION: Director of Technology, College of Business, #07-104
DEADLINE: (I) 10/11/2006
SALARY: $45,000 - $55,000

POSITION: Associate Vice President for Outreach Services & Dean of Outreach Programs, #07-091
DEADLINE: Internal applicants will be considered with the external. Open Until Filled (Review of applications will begin November 15, 2006.)
SALARY: Commensurate with experience

TECHNICAL/PARAPROFESSIONAL:

POSITION: Laboratory Technician, Biomedical Research, #07-107
DEADLINE: (I) 10/13/06
SALARY: $25,000 - $28,000

OFFICE SUPPORT:

POSITION: Complex Secretary, Housing, #07-105
DEADLINE: (I) 10/12/2006
SALARY: $21,000 - $21,500

POSITION: Receptionist/Office Assistant, Television Center, #07-102
DEADLINE: (I) 10/13/2006
SALARY: $18,000 - $20,000

CRAFTS/TRADES/SERVICE:

POSITION: Building Services Technician (Custodial, Sun -Fri 11 p.m. - 7 a.m.) Facilities #07-108
DEADLINE: (I) 10/17/2006
SALARY:$16,640 - $20,000

Medical school book named "most notable document"

The book that captures the 100-year history of the School of Medicine and Health Sciences has been selected by state librarians as the most notable document published in North Dakota in 2005-2006.

"North Dakota, Heal Thyself," by Dr. John Vennes, professor emeritus of microbiology at the UND medical school, Grand Forks, and freelance writer Patrick McGuire of Baltimore, received the Notable North Dakota Documents Award from the Government Documents Roundtable of the North Dakota Library Association. The award was announced recently at the group's annual meeting in Fargo.

Publications issued by agencies of North Dakota state government and intended for public distribution are considered each year for the award. This year, eight documents were nominated in North Dakota, with "North Dakota, Heal Thyself," receiving the highest recognition.

The book will be submitted to the Government Documents Roundtable of the American Library Association to be considered for its Notable Document list. The list recognizes individuals and agencies involved in producing these excellent sources of information and inspiration, according to Lila Pedersen, library director at the UND medical school.

The national list of 2006 Notable Documents will be published in May 15, 2007 issue of the Library Journal. Over the past 25 years the list has been published, 30 North Dakota state documents have been included.

The book "is another recognition of the activities of the UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences and its extraordinary impact on the state and region," Vennes said.

"North Dakota, Heal Thyself," published in 2005 as part of the 100-year celebration of the founding of the medical school, is available at Barnes and Noble bookstore on the UND campus or by contacting Wendy Opsahl, UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences, 701-777-2003 or wopsahl@medicine.nodak.edu , or go on-line to: www.med.und.edu/alumni/merchandise.html
.

-- Shelley Pohlman, Assitant to the Director, Public Affairs, spohlman@medicine.nodak.edu, 701-777-7305