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ISSUE: Volume 44, Number 13: October 03, 2006

Contents
Top Stories
Kupchella to give "State of the University" address Oct. 18
Events to Note
Party with a Plan is Oct. 3
Law School panel to discuss death penalty issues
Homecoming events listed
David Marshall to present first faculty lecture Oct. 10
Creating effective writing assignments is topic of next Box Lunch discussion
Brand audit meetings begin
Homecoming pre-game party is Oct. 7
Tibetan monks perform at 7 p.m. today
Philosophy and Religion colloquium is Oct. 4
Former UND student body president to speak Oct. 4
Theology for Lunch continues
Women's Center hosts Meet, Eat and Learn Oct. 4
UND Block Party is Oct. 4 in Wellness Center parking lot
Mellem Telecommunications Symposium set for Oct. 4, 5
Sioux, Leadership Award winners named
North Dakota Supreme Court to hear two cases
Medical School Dean's Hour to focus on drug addiction
UND historian, moviemaker to showcase archeology in Cyprus
Molbert Room to be dedicated Oct. 6
Salaheddin Al-Bashir from Jordan will give Fode Lecture
Homecoming barbeque set for Oct. 6
Students invited to take families to class
Art exhibition of Brusegaard's work opens Oct. 7
Coming Out Week activities listed for Oct. 9-12
Doctoral examination set for Shankar Kumar Karki
CHIP offers healthier lifestyle
STF committee calls for proposals; open meeting set for Oct. 13
Children's Writers Conference set for Oct. 13-14
First Master Chorale concert is Oct. 15
U2 lists workshops
Community research program set for Oct. 18
Announcements
International Programs newsletter now available
Students eligible for $1,000 service learning grant
Submit changes now for 2007-2009 UND academic catalog
Midterm grade rosters available Oct. 5
Separate checks will be used for additional payments to faculty, staff
University debuts new home page
Phi Beta Kappa members sought
Mini-grants available for summer courses, programs
Info sought on academic cooperation with Canada
Student referrals requested for Student Ambassador Program
Sioux fan luncheons begin
Student, faculty, staff directory available soon
SPEC presents courses, programs workshop
30-minute X-press workout now at Wellness Center
Oct. 6 Denim Day proceeds will raise funds for breast cancer research
North Dakota Museum of Art cafe lists specials
Psychology seeks individuals currently taking antidepressants
Internal job openings listed
In the News
Kluenker named chair of Aerospace Foundation board of directors
Pediatrics receives grant to conduct genetics conference
Center for Innovation receives Soft Landings International Incubator designation
Jacqueline Ferraro is photo contest winner
Kupchella to give "State of the University" address Oct. 18

President Charles Kupchella will deliver his annual "State of the University" address at the University Council Wednesday, Oct. 18, 4 p.m. in the Memorial Union Ballroom.

The University Council consists of the following who are employed primarily on the Grand Forks campus: the president, vice presidents, registrar, director of libraries, all deans, department chairs, full-time faculty (instructor, assistant professor, associate professor, and professor); program directors, coordinators, assistant and associate deans who concurrently hold faculty rank; the director of the Counseling Center; professional librarians, and such other academic personnel and administrative officers as the council may designate. The quorum of the council necessary for the transaction of business is 25 percent of the council membership (or 154 of the current 617 members). Council meetings are normally co-chaired by the chair of the Senate and the president of the University. The registrar is ex officio secretary. Council meetings are open to the public, and students, staff and the general public are invited to attend.

Party with a Plan is Oct. 3

Come join Randy Haveson at the Betty Engelstad Sioux Center Tuesday, Oct. 3, at 7 p.m. to learn about an alcohol awareness program that makes sense. Most substance abuse education programs use scare tactics or a "just say no" approach. "Party Time!" does not. Haveson incorporates his professional background to create a program that opens the minds, changes the perspective, and impacts the lives of students in regard to their use of alcohol and other drugs. He is well known for his teach, not preach, approach to this topic. Haveson, who uses a research-based approach for making informed decisions on alcohol use, is a two-time finalist for APCA Speaker of the Year. In 2001 he was named as one of the “Best of the Best” speakers in the 25-year history of the BACCHUS & GAMMA Peer Education Network and in 2002 was named as the Showcase Speaker of the Year.
-- Sandi Geddes, Substance Abuse Prevention Specialist, University Counseling Center and Student Wellness Center, Sandi_geddes@mail.und.nodak.edu, 701-777-4188

Creating effective writing assignments is topic of next Box Lunch discussion

The On Teaching Box Lunch discussion series continues Wednesday, Oct. 11, with a session on “Creating Effective Writing Assignments” from noon to 1 p.m. in the Memorial Room, Memorial Union. Led by Writing Center Director Kim Crowley, the discussion will center on creating writing assignments that help students understand what's expected in their papers, which can also help ease some of the pressure on instructors when it comes to grading those projects.

Student writers generally like having some freedom in their assignments, but they get nervous when they're not sure of the guidelines and expectations. Too many questions on an assignment can seem like a list that needs to be followed. Not enough information can leave writers -- especially inexperienced ones -- feeling frustrated. Providing details about things like page length, documentation styles, and crucial elements of a successful paper can help lessen students' anxiety about a writing assignment.

Attendees are welcome to bring writing assignments they're working on or successful assignments they'd like to share with the group. To register and reserve a free box lunch, call Jana Hollands at 777-4998 by noon Monday, Oct. 9.
-- Libby Rankin, Director, Office of Instructional Development, libby_rankin@und.nodak.edu, 777-4233

Homecoming events listed

Telesis and the Alumni Association present the following Homecoming events.

Tuesday, Oct. 3
* Blood Drive, Bleed Green, UND Armory, 1 to 8 p.m.

Wednesday, Oct. 4
* Telesis Homecoming information table, Memorial Union, Gamble Hall and Wilkerson Hall, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
* Blood Drive Bleed Green, UND Armory, 1 to 7 p.m.
* Ice Cream Social, Memorial Union, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Have a break in between classes? Stop by for some delicious ice cream served up by your very own King and Queen candidates.
* King and Queen Voting, Memorial Union, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Don’t miss your chance to vote for your favorite King and Queen candidate. When voting you must present your student ID.
* Flag Football Tournament, lawn east of Merrifield Hall, 2 to 7 p.m. Grab a group of friends and make that team win the championship. Our first-ever flag football tournament, consisting of teams with five to seven people and a minimum of two women, will compete in 18-minute games for the gold. Be sure to register at the information tables and look for rules and regulations.

Thursday, Oct. 5
* King and Queen Voting, Memorial Union, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
* Blood Drive Bleed Green, UND Armory, 1 to 8 p.m.
* Sioux Search, Memorial Union Ballroom, 7 p.m. The most anticipated talent show is back for another exciting year! As an entertaining show, be ready to enter a skit and enjoy the talents of other fellow students. Prizes will be awarded to top finishers. Please drop off registration forms in the Telesis mailbox in the CISL office, Memorial Union by 4:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 29.

Friday, Oct. 6
King and Queen Voting, Memorial Union, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
* Family Carnival, Multi-purpose Gym, Hyslop Sports Center, 5 to 7 p.m. Round up all of the kids you know and bring them to this event for games, prizes, food, and fun. This is an enjoyable event for those who have young family members.

Saturday, Oct. 7
* 5k/10k Walk/Run. Start the day off on the right foot and join us for some outdoor fun at the Wellness Center. Registration begins at 7 a.m. and the race starts at 8 a.m. Prizes will be awarded to the top three finishers in each division. The registration fee is $15 and includes a free Homecoming T-shirt.
* Parade. A traditional and popular Homecoming event. All students are invited to participate or come and watch. Line up begins at 9 a.m. in the Chester Fritz Auditorium parking lot and the parade begins at 10:30 a.m. Please drop off registration and parade policy forms in the Telesis mailbox in the CISL office, Memorial Union, by noon Tuesday, Oct. 3. Find registration forms online at www.undalumni.org or with questions call (218)731-2633.
* UND Fighting Sioux vs. Mankato State Mavericks. Come cheer on your football team at the Alerus Center. Kickoff is at 1 p.m.
* Coronation Ceremony will take place during halftime.

UND Homecoming 2006 is sponsored by Avant Hair and Sink Care Studios and US Bank.

Law School panel to discuss death penalty issues

A panel discussion on problems with the death penalty will be held Monday, Oct. 9, at 4:30 p.m. in the Baker Court Room, School of Law. The event, “The Ultimate Mistake: Problems of Proof and Inequality with the Death Penalty,” will feature Aundré Herron, a nationally-recognized death penalty expert and attorney, and Tim Schuetzle, warden of the North Dakota State Penitentiary. The program, hosted by the UND Public Interest Law Student Association (PILSA), is free and open to the public.

Aundré Herron is a staff attorney with the California Appellate Project in San Francisco. She has worked for the last 15 years on behalf of death row clients in California who are appealing their sentence. Herron will discuss the work of her agency, the legal and political issues involved in capital cases, and day-to-day capital appellate practice. She has broad perspective on capital punishment, having begun her legal career as a state prosecutor, and is a surviving family member of a murder victim. Herron has won a national award for her commitment and work surrounding the death penalty.

Tim Schuetzle is the director of the North Dakota Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation Prison Division and is the warden of the North Dakota State Penitentiary in Bismarck. He will discuss the history and current status of the death penalty in North Dakota. Schuetzle has worked in the prison system for 30 years and has received national recognition as warden of the year.

The event is PILSA's annual First Monday event, which it hosts near the first Monday of October each year in recognition of the U.S. Supreme Court's new term. PILSA chose the death penalty as this year's topic because of its importance and timeliness in light of the Alfonso Rodriguez Jr. trial and current discussion of death penalty cases throughout the state. PILSA is a student-run organization aimed at informing law students and the community on important legal issues and encouraging the legal representation of underserved communities.

-- Rob Carolin, Director of Alumni and Public Relations, Law School, carolin@law.und.edu, 7-2856

David Marshall to present first faculty lecture Oct. 10

The inaugural talk in the Faculty Lecture Series will be delivered by English and Peace Studies Professor David Marshall Tuesday, Oct. 10. His talk, "Editing: Discovering Windows into the Structure of the Human Mind," is scheduled to begin at 4:30 p.m. at the North Dakota Museum of Art. A 4 p.m. reception will precede the talk, which is free and open to the public.

Language often reflects the cultures and lifestyles of those who employ them. What one may not realize is their language of choice might affect their perception of the world around them. Marshall’s lecture will explore the intricate world of linguistics and reveal how everyday sentences mirror the inner workings of the human mind. “Grammar is not about language only,” said Marshall. “It illustrates how we think and not think, how we grasp ideas and how we miss them.”

“Syntactical structures in our language and minds echo larger structure in society and reality,” explains Marshall, “since all languages are structured hierarchically, we shouldn’t be surprised to see society structured the same way.”

The Faculty Lecture Series is planned by a committee of Chester Fritz Distinguished Professors, who hold UND’s highest faculty honor, and is funded by the Office of the President.

David Marshall’s extensive list of publications, special lectures, and awards offer a mere glimpse into this three-time Fulbright scholar’s stellar accomplishments. He has been noted as the Fulbright Scholarship program’s first professor of linguistics in China, where from 1986-87 he taught grammar, the history of English, semantics, and lectured at many Chinese universities. He also taught courses in politics of language and American culture and civilization from 1993-94 as a Fulbright Professor at Eötvos Loránd University of Hungary in Budapest. While in Hungary, the Fulbright program also sent him on short lecture trips to Berlin and Mainz, Germany and Rabat, Morocco. He was invited back to lecture at the World Fulbright Fiftieth Anniversary Conference in Budapest in 1996.

In 2001, Marshall served his third term as a Fulbright professor in Veliko Turnovo, Bulgaria. In 2002, he was invited back to Bulgaria to teach in the first Fulbright International Summer Institute and to address the fifth Fulbright Commission Conference in Sofia. His talk, “The Fulbright Experience from the Perspective of Three Decades: Unexpected Gains for Freedom,” was later printed in the Fulbright Newsletter. Since completing his Fulbright professorships, Marshall has hosted four foreign Fulbright scholars at UND.

Marshall’s repertoire also includes three terms as a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) visiting scholar. Two of his NEH scholar terms were spent at Stanford University, once in medieval literature and once in sociolinguistics. His third term was served at the University of Wisconsin, Madison in political science. He also completed a term at Duke University as a Lilly Scholar in Chaucer, and a visiting professorship in English at the University of Arizona in Tucson.

Before entering the field of academia, Marshall spent some time as a journalist in New York and then editor-in-chief for Pilgrim Press, where he was responsible for administrative duties and coordinating aspects of production, finance, promotion and sales between Boston, New York, and Philadelphia for more than 12 non-fiction trade books per year. Marshall himself has co-authored two published articles, one with the late UND law professor Randy Lee called “Shooting Themselves in the Foot: Consequences of English-only Supporters Going to Law,” which appeared in Language Ideologies: Critical Perspectives of the English Only Movement. His second article, “Overcoming Minority Language Policy Failure: the Case for Bulgaria and the Balkans” was co-authored by Angel Angelov and published this summer in the International Journal of the Sociology of Language, where he serves on the editorial board.

David Marshall also served with the United States Marine Corps, an experience he often refers to when teaching the poetry of war and peace. He received his undergraduate degree at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, a Master of Divinity from Union Theological Seminary, New York and his Ph.D in linguistics from New York University.

Marshall is married to Ruth Brockert Marshall. Together they have two sons, Michael and Nathan, the latter a UND graduate.

Brand audit meetings begin

We encourage everyone to take part in the brand audit, which is taking place Oct. 3-5. The University has hired the Educational Marketing Group, Inc., (EMG) to conduct a brand audit and image perceptions survey of UND. Once EMG's report is completed, it will enable us to communicate more strategically with our various audiences and stakeholders. EMG is in the first stage of the process which is a situational analysis of the campus. Many different universities around the country have been involved in such a process.

EMG will be on campus Oct. 3-5 to conduct meetings with many different campus individuals and entities. A meeting for department chairs and faculty members is set for 8 to 9 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 5, in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. Faculty members are encouraged to attend this session.

If you have any additional questions, please don't hesitate to contact me. -- Don Kojich, Executive Associate Vice President for University Relations.

Homecoming pre-game party is Oct. 7

The Homecoming Pre-Game Party is Saturday, Oct. 7, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Alerus Center Ballroom. Everyone is welcome. --- Alumni Association.

Tibetan monks perform at 7 p.m. today

The famed multiphonic singers of Tibet’s Drepung Loseling Monastery, whose sellout performances in Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center received national acclaim, will perform Sacred Music Sacred Dance for World Healing in Grand Forks as a part of their international tour of The Mystical arts of Tibet. They will perform in the Chester Fritz Auditorium Tuesday, Oct. 3, at 7 p.m. The performance is free and open to the public. Seating is first come first served.

The Mystical Arts of Tibet tour is co-produced by Richard Gere Productions and Drepung Loseling Institute, the North American Seat of Drepung Loseling Monastery, India. Endorsed by His Holiness the Dalai Lama, the tour has three basic purposes: to make a contribution to world peace and healing; to generate a greater awareness of the endangered Tibetan civilization; and to raise support for the Tibetan refugee community in India.

The performance features multiphonic singing, wherein the monks simultaneously intone three notes of chord. The Drepung Loseling monks are particularly renowned for this unique singing. They also utilize traditional instruments such as 10-foot long dung-chen horns, drums, bells, cymbals and gyaling trumpets. Rich brocade costumes and masked dances, such as the Dance of the Sacred Snow Lion, add to the exotic splendor.

Philosophy and Religion colloquium is Oct. 4

The Tibetan Lamas from Drepung Loseling Monastery will present a lecture, “Opening the Heart: Arousing the Mind of Universal Kindness,” at 5 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 4, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union. The eighth century Indian master Shantideva said, “The mind of universal kindness is like the magical elixir that turns base metals into gold. It transforms an ordinary person into one on the path of growth and happiness.” Love and kindness are mental archetypes that all beings possess. The more we strengthen them, the more beneficial we become to others and ourselves. Buddhism presents numerous contemplative techniques for intensifying and enhancing these archetypes, until they achieve full maturity and universality. For a complete schedule of the Philosophy and Religion colloquium visit: http://www.und.edu/dept/philrel/colloquium.htm or, for more information regarding this lecture, contact Jack Weinstein at jack.weinstein@und.nodak.edu, or 777-2887. -- Jack Weinstein, philosophy and religion.

Former UND student body president to speak Oct. 4

Tom Wosepka, CFO of Douglas Machine Inc., will present "Leadership Through Participation," Wednesday, Oct. 4, at 3 p.m. in the Lecture Bowl, second floor, Memorial Union. Wosepka is an alumnus of UND and former student body president (1986-87). He will present his know-how of taking risks as a leader and the rewards gained from his endeavors, and touch on his view that leaders are not born; they are chosen by their peers. Through his experience at UND and the corporate world with companies like Honeywell and Schneider Logistics, his presentation will be full of vital leadership skills everyone can attain through participation. The presentation is part of the Leadership Series sponsored by the Memorial Union. Faculty, please announce this event to students. This presentation is free and open to the entire University community.

Put the next Leadership Series event on your calendar. Gordon Henry will present “The Art of Caring Leadership” October 11 at 3 p.m. in the River Valley Room, second floor, Memorial Union.

For more information, call 777-3665 or 777-3667 or e-mail leadership@und.nodak.edu
-- Josh Wosepka, Project Coordinator of Leadership Development, Memorial Union, leadershp@und.edu, 7-3665/4200

Theology for Lunch continues

Join Campus Ministry Association, representing Christus Rex, Newman Center, United Campus Ministry, and Wittenberg Lutheran Chapel, for the fall Theology for Lunch series. The topic and presenters for the fall series follow: Oct. 18, Greg Gordon and Tom Lockney, justice within the legal system; and Oct. 25, Mark Buchhop, Biblical justice.

Each presentation will take place at noon at Wittenberg Lutheran Chapel, 3120 Fifth Ave. N. A light lunch will be served, so bring your appetite, a friend, and an interest in sharing your thoughts and ideas. -- Lisa Burger (Student Academic Services), on behalf of Campus Ministry Association.

Women's Center hosts Meet, Eat and Learn Oct. 4

The Women's Center will host a Meet, Eat and Learn , Wednesday, Oct. 4, from noon to 1 p.m. at the International Centre, 2908 University Ave. "From New York to North Dakota…A Young Feminist’s Journey" will be presented by Kristin Sheffield, a counseling graduate student. She will talk about being a feminist activist and what role geography plays in that. -- Patty McIntyre, Program Associate, Women's Center.

UND Block Party is Oct. 4 in Wellness Center parking lot

Join the UND peer educators and various student organizations at the first annual UND Block Party at the new Student Wellness Center parking lot Wednesday, Oct. 4, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. There will be free food and games, along with prizes. XL93 will play music and promote student organizations on the air. Domino's Pizza will provide free pizza. This is a great chance for UND student organizations to promote their organization, show off to visiting alumni, and recruit new members. Our hope is that it will be a UND-only involvement expo.
All are invited. Contact us at 777-4165 with your questions or if your organization would like to participate. See you there.
-- UND Peer Educators, ADAPT Team, University Counseling Center and Student Wellness Center, adapt@mail.und.edu, 777-4165

Mellem Telecommunications Symposium set for Oct. 4, 5

In an age when information, technology and communication are key components in how business and government operate, the College of Business and Public Administration announces the first annual Mellem Telecommunications Symposium Wednesday and Thursday, Oct. 4-5. Free and open to the public, this symposium provides an opportunity for the public and University community to engage in discussion about the telecommunication industry and its impact on how we work within business and government, now and in the future.

The symposium kicks off Wednesday evening, Oct. 4, at 7 p.m. in the Ina Mae Rude Entrepreneur Center. United States Federal Communications Commissioner Michael Copps and Qwest Communication’s Senior Vice President for Government Affairs Steve Davis will speak on issues related to public policy and regulations impacting telecommunications and U.S. commerce in the next decade. The event will be followed by a dessert reception.

The symposium continues Thursday, Oct. 5, with keynote addresses and breakout sessions in Gamble Hall, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Keynote speakers throughout Thursday include: former Gov. Ed Schafer; Ericsson Mobile, Inc. senior executive, Rowland Shaw; Chief Technology Officer of Telcordia Industries, Adam Drobot; and University of California-San Diego Business Dean, Robert Sullivan. Breakout session topics are designed to stimulate discussion among students, alumni, and the greater university and business community in technology, business, government, and telecommunications. Topics range from strategic management and entrepreneurship in telecommunications to investing in telecommunication companies to using telecommunication as a method of economic development in rural communities.

For more information and a full descriptive schedule of events, visit
http://business.und.edu/dept/dean/mellemtelecommevent.pdf or contact CK Braun-Schultz at 701-777-6937. The events are sponsored by the College of Business and Public Administration, UND Foundation, Qwest Communications, Midcontinent Communications, and Polar Communications.

Sioux, Leadership Award winners named

The UND Alumni Association announces the recipients of its highest awards for outstanding service, achievement and loyalty. The Sioux Award Banquet will be held Thursday, Oct. 5, at the Alerus Center. The social begins at 5:30 p.m., with the program beginning at 6:30 p.m. For ticket information contact Barb at 777-4078 or go to www.undalumni.net.

The Sioux Award:
* Karen Bohn, ’75, ’76, is president of Galeo Group, L.L.C., a management consulting practice, which specializes in governance, philanthropy, strategy, and effective management. In addition to her consulting practice, Bohn serves on the boards of directors of Alerus Financial Corporation and OtterTail Corporation, to name a few. She was also on the UND Alumni Association and Foundation board of directors for nine years. She and her husband, Gary Surdel, ’75, live in Edina, Minn. They have two sons, Peter and Matthew.
* B. John Barry, ’63, is owner of MidAmerica Capital Partners, L.L.C. The company provides services for Barry family interests, as well as family members. He started his own banking organization in 1974, and has owned a number of diversified financial service companies, as well as a chemical manufacturing company and an airline. He has three children, Thomas, Michael and Jessica.
* Hal Gershman, ’66, is president and owner of Happy Harry’s Bottle Shops in Grand Forks and Fargo. He is also president of Road King Inn, Gershman Enterprises and Winebuys.com. He is Grand Forks City Council president, chairman of U.S. Senator Byron Dorgan’s re-election campaigns since 1984, and serves on the board of directors for Alerus Financial Corporation and the Energy and Environmental Research Center. He and his wife, Kathy, live in Grand Forks. They have one daughter, Lenora.

Young Alumni Achievement Award:
* Milissa McKee, ’92, is an assistant professor of pediatrics and surgery at Yale University School of Medicine. She is an attending surgeon and director of pediatric trauma services at Yale-New Haven Children’s Hospital, director of pediatric minimally invasive surgery, and surgical co-director of the pediatric intensive care unit at the hospital. She lives in Branford, Conn.
* Jennifer Montgomery, ’92, ’94, ’00, has completed her first year of doctoral studies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, where she is focusing on issues of school reform and professional development. She was previously an English and journalism teacher at Bismarck High School, and was the North Dakota Teacher of the Year in 2003. She resides in Cambridge, Mass.
* Jeff Gendreau, ’90, has worked with Deloitte and Touche in Minneapolis for the last 15 years, and is currently an audit director with the firm. Jeff enjoys recruiting at UND and is a featured speaker for Deloitte at various industry conferences. He and his wife, Cathy (LaLonde), ’89, reside in Andover, Minn. They have two children, Rachel and John.
-- Alumni Association.

North Dakota Supreme Court to hear two cases

The North Dakota Supreme Court will hear two oral arguments Thursday, Oct. 5, in the Baker Court Room, School of Law. At 9 a.m., the court will hear the State of North Dakota v. Kenneth Wayne Oliver. Kenneth Wayne Oliver appeals from the district court’s denial of his motion to suppress evidence and to dismiss after he was charged with possession of a controlled substance with intent to deliver, possession of drug paraphernalia, driving under suspension, and fleeing a police officer. On appeal, Oliver argues the traffic stop was illegal because the officer did not have a reasonable and articulable suspicion to stop him. He argues the stop was pretextual and the evidence found during his arrest should be suppressed.

They will hear a second oral argument, State of North Dakota v. Kenneth Albin Jacob Jr., beginning at 10:10 a.m. Kenneth Albin Jacob Jr. appeals after a jury found him guilty of leaving the scene of an accident involving death, a Class B felony, which carries a maximum penalty of ten years’ imprisonment, a fine of $10,000, or both.

In addition to the two oral arguments, the Supreme Court will judge the finals of the law student Moot Court competition beginning at 2 p.m. in the Baker Court Room.

-- Rob Carolin, Director of Alumni and Public Relations, Law School, carolin@law.und.edu, 7-2856

Medical School Dean's Hour to focus on drug addiction

“Drug Abuse and Addiction Research: An Overview” is the title of the next Dean’s Hour at noon Thursday, Oct. 5, at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences. Donald Vereen Jr. of the National Institute on Drug Abuse will present the talk, which is free and open to the public, in the Reed Keller Auditorium, Wold Center, 501 North Columbia Road. Lunch will be provided for all attendees. As the special assistant to the director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse at the National Institutes of Health in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Vereen oversees the coordination of drug abuse clinical research. From 1998 to 2001, he worked as deputy director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy at the White House, overseeing the National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign, methadone treatment regulations, drug policy and anti-doping in sports.

The presentation will be broadcast at the following video conference sites: Southeast Campus room 225, Southwest Campus conference room A and Northwest Campus office. It can also be viewed on the medical school’s web page at http://www.med.und.nodak.edu/depts/mit/webcast/dean.html and through Internet video-conferencing on desktop computers through the medical school’s CRISTAL Recorder (call 701-777-2329 for details).

The Dean’s Hour Lecture Series is a forum for the discussion of health care, medicine, research, education and related issues of the day. For more information, please contact the Office of the Dean, (701)777-2514.

-- Amanda Scurry, public information specialist, UND SMHS, ascurry@medicine.nodak.edu, 701-777-0871

UND historian, moviemaker to showcase archeology in Cyprus

University historian and archeologist William Caraher and history grad program alum Josiah Patrow will showcase their “Survey in Cyprus” documentary movie at a world premiere at the Burtness Lab Theater Thursday, Oct. 5, at 7 p.m., with a second showing at 9 p.m.

Both Caraher and Patrow, now a California-based documentary filmmaker, will be on hand after the showings to talk about their work. The film engagingly chronicles the meticulous archeology that Caraher and others are doing on Cyprus, the fabled, sun-soaked Mediterranean home of Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of Love. Caraher and colleagues, along with several students, are probing the rocky soil-now part of a British military base-for shards of pottery, tiles, and other artifacts to gather details about the daily life of ancient Cypriot Greek, Roman, and other peoples who once lived, loved, worked, and died on this busy trade crossroads. “For nearly 1000 years, Cyprus was a vital part of a widespread trading network that still exists today,” said Caraher, who’s done several summers on the Cyprus dig as the Pyla Koutsopetria Archeological Project’s (PKAP’s) chief technology officer and codirector of the PKAP.

Patrow, a filmmaker and former UND student, was persuaded to shoot a “reality-show” look at the day-to-day life on an archeological dig. With a lively soundtrack commissioned for the documentary, lots of live footage, and several “special features,” the movie is an intimate inside look at real-world science “as it happens.” It’s also a fascinating and compelling look at how a dedicated group works together to uncover answers about our past.

The movie presentation at the Burtness Lab Theater is free and open to the public. For more information check out Caraher’s web site at www.und.nodak.instruct/wcaraher/Multimedia.html.

Molbert Room to be dedicated Oct. 6

The Molbert Room, 211 Law School, will be dedicated in honor of Ralph Molbert, a 1941 graduate of the School of Law, Friday, Oct.6, as part of Homecoming. A short program will begin at 11:30 a.m. and a reception will follow. The room was renovated in memory of Ralph Molbert, with a generous gift from his wife Beverly (Steele, N.D.); son Lauris, '79, '83, and daughter-in-law Jane Grove (Fargo); daughter Karna (Molbert) Kornkven, ’81, and son-in-law Richard Kornkven, ’74 (Bottineau, N.D.); son Eric Molbert, ’89 (Bismarck); and daughter Kristi (Molbert) Benz and son-in-law Miles Benz (Steele, N.D.). The Molbert Room is equipped with hi-tech instructional technology, provides a more conducive learning environment for its students, and is a dramatic improvement of the law school facility. The public is invited to celebrate the room renovation and dedication.
-- Rob Carolin, Director of Alumni and Public Relations, Law School, carolin@law.und.edu, 7-2856

Salaheddin Al-Bashir from Jordan will give Fode Lecture

Salaheddin Al-Bashir from the Kingdom of Jordan will present the Oscar and Amelia Fode Memorial Law Lecture at the School of Law, Friday, Oct. 6, at 2:30 p.m. in the Baker Court Room. It is free and open to the public. His presentation is titled "Reform, Development and Rule of Law." A reception will follow the keynote address.

Al-Bashir is the former Minister of Justice and Minister of Cabinet Affairs of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. He is the founder and managing partner of the International Business Legal Associates, which is one of the largest and leading law firms in Jordan, with an integral presence in the Kingdom’s dynamic legal developments and commercial expansion. Al-Bashir holds a bachelor’s degree in law from Jordan University, an LL.M from Harvard University and a doctorate from McGill University.

This is the 25th anniversary of the Fode lecture. It was created by family members in loving memory of Oscar and Amelia Fode because of their lifelong interest in education and in the young people of North Dakota. The Fodes were prominent in business in Jamestown, N.D. They began an automobile business known as Midwest Motors in Jamestown in 1929, subsequently establishing Midwest Credit Co., Midwest Machine Co., Midwest Insurance Co., and Dakota Sales and Service, which Oscar continued to operate until his death in 1971. Amelia passed away in 1961.
-- Rob Carolin, Director of Alumni and Public Relations, Law School, carolin@law.und.edu, 7-2856

Homecoming barbeque set for Oct. 6

The College of Arts and Sciences invite all arts and sciences alumni, staff, faculty, and friends to join us for a barbeque and social to celebrate Homecoming weekend. The UND Steel Drum band will provide the entertainment and Famous Dave’s will provide the ribs, chicken, beans, coleslaw, corn muffins and a beverage. It begins at 5:15 p.m. Friday Oct. 6. We will serve until 7 p.m. or until we run out. The cost is $10 for adults, $5 for children. We recommend calling to reserve a ticket, but we will sell at the door as well. Rain site will be the ROTC Armory. To order your ticket, or for more information, please call Tanya Butler at 777-6240.

Students invited to take families to class

As a part of Family Weekend 2006, Friday and Saturday, Oct. 6-7, families of UND students have been invited to attend class with their student. We hope this event will highlight the strong academic environment of the University and give families a real sense of the classroom experience their student enjoys at UND. This year's "Go To Class With Your Student" event will be held Friday, Oct. 6, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. If visitors to your classroom on this date will cause a disruption, please contact Heather Kasowski at 777-6468 or e-mail heatherkasowski@mail.und.edu. We'll be sure to inform families upon check-in for the weekend of all those classes that are not available for this part of their Family Weekend experience. Thanks for welcoming the families of our students during this special weekend event. — Kenton Pauls, director of Enrollment Services.

Art exhibition of Brusegaard's work opens Oct. 7

As part of Homecoming festivities, Third Street Gallery, 28 S. Third St., invites everyone to a free public exhibition opening reception Saturday, Oct. 7, from 8 to 10 p.m. for artist and UND alum Michelle Brusegaard. The exhibition will be open from Oct 7–28.

Michelle Brusegaard graduated with a fine arts degree from UND in 2005. Originally from Grand Forks, Brusegaard recently moved to Minneapolis where she continues to create and exhibit her art. She has shown, exhibited, and sold, work all across the Red River Valley. Her Batik and painted silk scarves have been sold at the North Dakota Museum of Art Gift Shop and for the past several years at Artfest. Her paintings have been included in the North Dakota Museum of Art silent auction and the Hotel Donaldson in Fargo.

“Homebody” is an exhibition in which the artist delves into the concept of obsession and perception. Brusegaard states that “This series of works contemplates the effect of mania on one’s perception of beauty. The pieces represent interiors and exteriors, and the space between, where my fixation lies.” The title for the exhibition comes out of her figurative work where “as a result of these obsessions, the figurative paintings are homebodies. The figures in their habitat can check locked doors all day if they choose. Trapped in domestic bliss and yet in complete control of a tiny universe.” She employs the use of realism in the figures and interiors, but chooses to abstract the exteriors, such as cityscapes and landscapes, showing them as a representation of the world outside of oneself. Brusegaard would like the viewers to use her work as an opportunity to contemplate their own obsessions and the effect it may have on their perceptions.

The exhibition is curated by Rebecca Sefcovic Uglem and Amy Lyste, Directors of the Third Street Gallery. Those wishing group tours, including schools, should contact the Third Street Gallery at (701)775-5055. There is no admission charge but a $2 donation is suggested for adults and change from children.

Third Street Gallery is a non-profit arts organization created by artists for artists to provide exhibits and opportunities for regional and local artists and to revitalize the Greater Grand Forks community through the arts. The gallery will provide a space for local artists to exhibit, in addition to providing the citizens of this community the opportunity to view and purchase original art from emerging artists across the Upper Midwest. For more information call (701)775-5055 or contact www.thethirdstreetgallery.com.

Coming Out Week activities listed for Oct. 9-12

The 10% Society announces activities for its annual Coming Out Week celebration centered around National Coming Out Day, Oct. 11, a day for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and queer (GLBTQ) people to come out to their friends and family and celebrate their lives and experiences, and for straight allies to offer support to those who are in the coming out process. All events are free and open to the public.

Monday, Oct. 9
* 2 p.m., Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union: panel discussion, Sacred Spaces, Safe Places. This panel will feature people of various religious perspectives discussing ways in which religious communities can make their spaces more inclusive of gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and queer (GLBTQ) people.
* 7 p.m., Twamley Quad, Take Back the Night Rally. The 10% Society will show their support for this event held annually by the UND Women’s Center. This event, held in conjunction with the Clothesline Project, raises awareness of experiences of violence.

Tuesday, Oct. 10
* 7 p.m., River Valley Room, Memorial Union, panel discussion: What Makes a Family? We will talk about different types of families that include GLBTQ people as children, parents, and partners. This event is for anyone who works with families, is part of the public school system, or would like more information about different types of family life for GLBTQ people.
* 9 p.m., 10% Society members and friends will chalk the sidewalks around UND to prepare for National Coming Out Day.

Wednesday, Oct. 11, National Coming Out Day
* 2 p.m., Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union.
* 7 p.m., International Centre, 2908 University Ave.
GLBTQ Questions and Answers: What do all of those letters mean? What is it like being gay or lesbian? Do bisexuals really exist? Do drag queens want to have sex changes? Isn’t “queer” a bad word? This light-hearted and lively discussion will be a chance for anyone to ask any question they may have had about the lives and experiences of GLBTQ people. No question, as long as it is asked respectfully, will be ignored.

Thursday, Oct. 12
* 7 p.m., Badlands Room, Memorial Union, panel discussion: Responding to Violence in Our Communities. This session will present a variety of information about services at UND and in Grand Forks for those who experience violence or harassment as well as explore some of the differences in legal protections in North Dakota and Minnesota.

For more information about these events, please contact Chris Stoner at (701)741-3716. The 10% Society's web site is http://www.undtps.com. All events are sponsored by the UND 10% Society. Founded in 1982, the 10% Society is North Dakota’s oldest GLBTQ organization. Open to students, staff and faculty of UND as well as members of the Greater Grand Forks community, the organization provides support for GLBTQ people and their straight allies, provides educational programming for members and for the community at large, and promotes advocacy on a number of political issues related to GLBTQ people.

Doctoral examination set for Shankar Kumar Karki

The final examination for Shankar Kumar Karki, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in engineering, is set for 3:30 p.m. Oct. 11, in 218 Harrington Hall. The dissertation title is "Electricity Sector Reform and its Environmental Implications." Michael Mann (engineering) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Dr. Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

CHIP offers healthier lifestyle

Are you frustrated by rising blood sugars? Have you almost given up on weight loss? How's your cholesterol and your blood pressure? The Red River Valley Coronary Health Improvement Project (CHIP) wants to offer you hope of a healthier lifestyle!

CHIP is a 30-day community-based, lifestyle modification program directed by a local registered dietitian and co-sponsored by Advent Maranatha (UND student organization). For more information, come to the free information/registration meeting Wednesday, Oct. 11, in the President's Room, Memorial Union, second floor. Check out www.tagnet.org/grandforks for more information or call Brenna Kerr, LRD at 701-775-5936. -- Brenna Kerr, registered dietitian, Student Health Services.

STF committee calls for proposals; open meeting set for Oct. 13

The Student Technology Fee Committee is calling for proposals for spring 2007 technology fee dollars. The committee will make recommendations for proposals based on the following:
* Descriptive Criteria: dean's ranking, innovation, student benefit, impact on the curriculum and/or on research, and how does this project address your unit's strategic plan?
* Demographic Criteria: number of students served, number of disciplines served.
* Unit Support: access to equipment, technical support, matching funds from the department/unit, and technology available for redeployment.

Please note that all proposals must be submitted using the spring 2007 (073) STF Request Form. Forms may be accessed at: www.und.edu/org/stf/forms.html or you may request one via e-mail from Carol Hjelmstad at carolhjelmstad@mail.und.edu . Departments/units should submit the proposals to their deans or directors for review and prioritization. Units which answer directly to vice presidents should submit proposals to them for review and prioritization. Vice presidents, deans and directors may have earlier deadlines. The deadline to submit proposals to the Student Technology Committee at Stop 9041 is Friday, Nov. 3.

Proposal writers must consult with the various support offices on campus for costs associated with installation of equipment, accessibility issues, security concerns and adaptive technology. Unless departments are prepared to pay for these out of their own budgets, proposal writers should obtain estimates and include them as a part of the budget for the proposal. In addition, proposal writers must consult with Disability Support Services regarding adaptive technology needed for the proposal and with the Center for Instructional and Learning Technologies regarding the equipment requested for compatibility, installation issues, and ensuing issues.

The STF Committee will hold an open meeting to address questions for those writing proposals for spring 2007 funding. This open meeting is scheduled for Friday, Oct. 13, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Memorial Union, River Valley Room. Presentations will begin at 11 a.m. and again at noon; please feel free to drop by anytime during the two hours as your schedule allows.

If you have any questions or concerns regarding the proposal process, please contact Carol at 777-3172. -- Student technology fee committee.

Children's Writers Conference set for Oct. 13-14

The 27th annual Writers Conference in Children's Literature will be held Oct. 13-14 at the Memorial Union. The opening session is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Friday with a keynote address from author Jim Solheim and a presentation by local author Faythe Thureen. Solheim, the author of poems, stories, and books for children, including "It’s Disgusting-and We Ate It!," will give a talk on finding the extraordinary in everyday writing. Thureen will lead a multimedia presentation with music and dance set to her book "Troll Meets Trickster on the Dakota Prairie."

Saturday’s sessions begin at 8:30 a.m. at the Memorial Union. Alexandra Penfold, editor from Simon & Schuster in New York, will present the session “From Query Letter to Finished Book: How to Make Your Work Stand Out Before and After Publication.” Elaine Marie Alphin, award-winning author of more than 20 books, will speak about writing mysteries for young readers, then will lead participants in an interactive hands-on workshop, “Worse for Your Characters Means Better for Your Plot.”

The Writers Conference in Children’s Literature regularly attracts participants from all over North Dakota, South Dakota and Minnesota, as well as Wisconsin, Iowa, Nebraska, and Manitoba. Throughout the years, distinguished authors, illustrators, educators and agents have visited the UND campus to share their stories, critique manuscripts and share the latest trends and markets in the field of children's literature with area writers. The conference is presented by the Society of Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators (SCBWI) and the Department of English. Local sponsors include the University, Barnes & Noble Bookstore at UND, and the UND Alumni Foundation.

Those interested in attending can visit http://www.und.edu/dept/english/ChildrensLit06.html for more information and a registration form, or contact Jean Patrick, SCBWI Regional Advisor for the Dakotas, at jean@jeanpatrick.com.

First Master Chorale concert is Oct. 15

The Grand Forks Master Chorale will team up with the Fargo-Moorhead Chamber Chorale for two concerts, "Uncommon Choral Masterworks," to kick off the 2006-07 season. The first concert is Sunday, Oct. 15, 7:30 p.m. at United Lutheran Church in Grand Forks. The second is Sunday, Oct. 22, 4 p.m. at Lutheran Church of the Good Shepherd in Moorhead, Minn. More than 60 voices will perform works by master composers. Jon Nero directs the Master Chorale, with accompaniment from Sara Bloom. JoAnn Miller is the artistic director of the Fargo-Moorhead Chamber Chorale. "We're excited about the opportunity to sing again with JoAnn and the Fargo-Moorhead Chamber Chorale. They are a great ensemble," said Peter Johnson, Master Chorale development director.

For the Grand Forks concert, the Master Chorale is incorporating a harvest theme of sorts, said Johnson. Audience members who buy their tickets at the door Oct. 15 can get advance ticket prices if they bring at least two canned goods per ticket. The collected goods will benefit the Grand Forks Salvation Army.

Tickets for the Oct. 15 concert are available in advance at the Chester Fritz Auditorium or via phone at 777-4090. Advance tickets are $12 for general admission, $8 for senior citizens, and $5 for students. Tickets at the door are $15 for general audience, $10 for senior citizens, and $7 for students.

The Grand Forks Master Chorale is supported through grants from the North Dakota Council on the Arts, the Myra Foundation, the City of Grand Forks Regranting Program administered by the North Valley Arts Council, the UND Department of Music through inkind donations, and our many friends and contributors.

U2 lists workshops

Below are U2 workshops for Oct. 17-20. Visit our web site for more.

Mindfulness Goes Mainstream, What it is; What it is not; and How it can Enhance Creativity, Productivity, Ethics, and Relationships at Work: Oct. 17, 9 to 11 a.m., 211 Skalicky Tech Incubator. Fee is $20. "Mindfulness" is an ancient practice that has existed since time immemorial. It is also a practice of "new agers" and taught in many large, small, and Fortune 500 businesses around the globe. It is multigenerational, multidisciplinary, and multifaceted. It is not a spiritual or religious practice, though it can be; it is not "one-size-fits-all" but allows for many forms of practice to fit individual needs; it is not about ignoring the power of the intellect, but in fact harnessing and enhancing the intellect, as well as the mind-body connection. Join us and get acquainted with the practice of mindfulness and how it can be useful in organizations of all kinds. Try some simple, comfortable, and safe exercises to increase your ability to use your mind and other senses. Gain understanding of how mindfulness can slow down a fast-paced world and yet increase productivity, reduce conflict and improve communication and relationships. Presenter: Kristin Paranica.

Defensive Driving: Oct. 18, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., 211 Skalicky Tech Incubator. This workshop is required by state fleet for all UND employees who drive state vehicles on a regular (monthly) basis, received a traffic violation, or had an accident while operating a state vehicle. Employees are encouraged to bring a family member (spouse and/or dependents). This workshop may also reduce your North Dakota insurance premiums and could possibly remove points from your driving record. Presenter: Mike Holmes.

GroupWise 6.5, Beginning: Oct. 18, 1 to 4 p.m., 361 Upson II. Participants will navigate through the GroupWise environment, create and send messages, reply to and forward messages, use the address book, create a personal address book, create a mail group, work with calendar, schedule posted appointments and recurring events, work with junk mail folder and other mail handling features. Presenter: Heidi Strande.

Safe Online Practices - Protecting Your Identity and Securing Your Computer: Oct. 19, 1 to 3 p.m., 361 Upson II. The Internet can provide a wealth of information and give access to valuable financial, business, educational, and entertainment services. However, when connected to the Internet, you and your computer become vulnerable to scammers, identity thieves, viruses, spyware and more. This workshop will provide the information needed to help you protect your identity and computer while online. Presenter: Brad Miller, IT security officer.

The Basics of IRB Review: Oct. 19, 1 to 4 p.m., 16-18 Swanson Hall. All researchers planning to conduct human subject research are required to complete training. The workshop covers research ethics, federal regulations, and UND policies regarding human subject research. It will also review the Institutional Review Board forms and procedures. The workshop will include two case studies, a quiz, with time for questions. Presenter: Renee Carlson.

GroupWise 6.5, Intermediate: Oct. 20, 8:30 to 11:30 a.m., 361 Upson II. Participants will work with advanced message options, set mail properties, customize message headers, use Web Access interface, create and use rules to automate e-mail responses, and set access rights. Work in depth with junk mail folder and archive feature. Presenter: Heidi Strande.

Please reserve your seat by registering with U2 by: phone, 777-2128, e-mail, U2@mail.und.nodak.edu, or online, www.conted.und.edu/U2/. Please Include: (1) workshop title/date, (2) name, (3) department, (4) position, (5) box number, (6) phone number, (7) e-mail, and (8) how you first learned about this workshop. Thank you for registering in advance; it helps us plan for materials and number of seats.
-- Julie Sturges, Program Assistant, U2, U2@mail.und.edu, 777-2128

Community research program set for Oct. 18

What do neighborhoods and communities need to know to map their futures? Faculty and students interested in community research and community members and leaders looking for new ideas are invited to learn how five UND campus-community partnerships used research to find local assets for action. The projects involve faculty and students and the communities of Larimore, Hillsboro, New Town, and Hazen, N.D., as well as a Grand Forks neighborhood.
-- Lana Rakow, Director, Center for Community Engagement, lanarakow@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2287

International Programs newsletter now available

The Office of International Programs monthly newsletter, "Building Bridges," is now available. Information in this month's newsletter includes faculty-directed education abroad, semester-at-sea with Desmond Tutu, new study abroad programs, hiring international employees, and International Education Week. "Building Bridges" can be found at www.und.edu/dept/oip/documents/9-29-06.pdf or accessed from the OIP web page, www.und.edu/dept/oip/index.htm.
-- Ray Lagasse, Director, International Programs, International Programs, raymondlagasse@mail.und.edu, 777-2938

Students eligible for $1,000 service learning grant

Applications are now being accepted from UND students for a $1,000 grant to be used on a service learning project. The Center for Community Engagement announced that the grant from the Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter Partnership Foundation will be awarded to a student whose application indicates the most innovative and promising use of the grant to establish or significantly further a partnership between a UND student and a community non-profit organization.

Applications, which must be received by 4 p.m. Oct. 6 for the Carter Academic-Service Entrepreneur grant (CASE), are available online at www.communityengagement.und.edu and the Volunteer Bridge office in the Memorial Union. The winning applicant will be announced at an awards luncheon Wednesday, Oct. 18, sponsored by the Center. For more information, contact the director, Lana Rakow, at 777-0675.

The award is made possible by The Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter Partnership Foundation and The W.K. Kellogg Foundation. In providing the grant, The Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter Partnership Foundation noted that high standards used in the selection recognizes the best programs and inspires others to achieve the status of a Carter Certified Partnership. More information about the Foundation is available at www.jrcpf.org. The W.K. Kellogg Foundation was established in 1930 “to help people help themselves through the practical application of knowledge and resources to improve their quality of life and that of future generations." More information about the Kellogg Foundation is available at www.wkkf.org.
-- Lana Rakow, Director, Center for Community Engagement, lanarakow@mail.und.nodak.edu, 7-2287

Submit changes now for 2007-2009 UND academic catalog

It is once again a catalog year. Please review your department description and course information carefully and submit changes early to assure inclusion in the new catalog. Oct. 6, is the deadline to turn in requests to the University Curriculum Committee that require approval by the State Board of Higher Education or the Chancellor. These requests include new courses with new programs, title changes, program terminations, and program suspensions. Feb. 9, 2007, is the deadline for all other curriculum changes that require University Senate approval. Feel free to contact Connie Borboa at 777-4852 with any questions. Curriculum information is available online at: http://www.und.edu/dept/registrar/curriculum/curindex.htm
-- Lori Hofland, Admin Assistant, Registrar Office, lorihofland@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3892

Midterm grade rosters available Oct. 5

Midterm grade rosters for fall 2006 will be available for entry of midterm deficiency grades by faculty Thursday, Oct. 5. Midterm deficiency grades for Fall 2006 must be recorded in PeopleSoft by noon on Friday, Oct. 13. At that point, the Registrar's Office will run a process to generate letters to all students for whom deficient grades are recorded (grades of D, F, or U). Any deficiency grades entered after that point will not be included in these notifications to students, and contacting those students becomes the responsibility of the course instructor.

Faculty must review every roster for midterm deficiencies, and change the roster status to "Ready For Review" and save it when they are finished with each roster. This status change signifies that the roster is "official" for midterm purposes. The status needs to be changed even when there are no deficiency grades to be recorded the class.

If faculty members can log in to PeopleSoft but cannot access a roster they are expecting to be able to update, they should contact Patty in the Registrar's Office at either 777-3422 or 777-2150. The cause usually has something to do with how the data is recorded in the PeopleSoft Schedule of Classes.

The instructions for midterm grading can also be accessed on the web at http://www.und.edu/dept/registrar/FacultyStaff/FacultyStaff.htm .
-- Ray Pospisil, Assistant Registrar.

Separate checks will be used for additional payments to faculty, staff

Effective Sept. 29, all non-benefited additional payments to faculty and staff will be paid by separate check (or direct deposit, if employee has requested direct deposit for their primary check). Non-benefited payments include: faculty and staff overloads, distance learning, continuing education, extended day, special projects with no retirement, and awards. Benefited payments will be paid with your regular salary.

A separate check is required to prevent benefits from being charged to these non-benefited funding sources. An attempt was made last pay period to handle this process through setup tables, instead of separate checks, but due to the number and different types of payments employees receive, this method did not work. Therefore, we must continue to use the separate check method, until programmers can fix the benefits allocation in PeopleSoft.

If you receive two checks, due to receiving a non-benefited additional payment, you need to be aware of two issues that you may have to address:

ISSUE: Federal and State Taxes: If you have requested an additional flat amount of federal tax to be withheld from your checks, a separate check will cause that flat amount to be withheld from both checks.
RECOMMENDED SOLUTIONS: Complete a new W-4 and request that an additional percentage be withheld instead of a flat amount or leave as is and just stop your additional withholding prior to year-end.

ISSUE: Direct Deposit: If you have requested a flat amount be deposited into a bank account different than your primary, the separate check will be deposited in the accounts with the flat amount first (up to the flat amount requested) and any remaining balance will then be deposited into your primary account. Example: $100 to savings and the balance to your checking -– if you had a separate check an additional $100 would be deposited to savings (or up to the amount of the check whichever is less) and the remainder would be deposited to your checking.
RECOMMENDED SOLUTION: Complete a new direct deposit form and list your primary bank with a flat dollar amount (use an estimate of what is usually deposited into your primary account for a normal check) and then list your savings or other account as the account for the balance of your check. Example: $900 to checking and the balance to savings -– if you had a separate check -– up to $900 would be deposited in your checking account and the balance would be deposited in savings.

We apologize for any inconvenience that this may cause you. We are hopeful that the need for separate checks will be corrected by the end of the fiscal yYear. -— Payroll.

University debuts new home page

The University has developed a new home page, available at www.und.edu . It features student and faculty spotlights, a new photo album, UND news, events, and news items from across the nation. The student and faculty spotlight "puts a face on the University" to showcase faculty and students, with photos and brief feature stories that will change regularly. When UND makes news across the nation and world, a brief feature lets readers know.

One of the newest features is an RSS feed, which allows users to have UND news delivered directly to their desktops. Podcasts are also offered, as are factsheets about the University. "We are excited about the new direction of the UND home page," said Don Kojich, executive associate vice president for University Relations. "It is a cleaner design and it has the versatility to communicate with our many different audiences. The spotlight and campus scenes features will help us show all the exciting aspects of the University of North Dakota."

The redesign is part of a larger initiative to make the University's web sites more accessible to prospective and current students, as well as the general public. Enrollment Services recently unveiled their new site, www.go.und.edu , and the University Relations office also developed a new site with an improved news feature.

-- Jan Orvik, Writer/Editor, University Relations, janorvik@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3621

Phi Beta Kappa members sought

Members of the UND faculty and staff who, while students here or elsewhere, were elected to membership and were initiated into Phi Beta Kappa are asked to identify themselves to the UND chapter so they may participate in its affairs. Please inform me by phone at 777-4085 or by e-mail at ellen_erickson@und.nodak.edu. The UND chapter of Phi Beta Kappa soon will begin its activities for the year. Initiations will again occur in early December and April. Please watch for further announcements.
-- Ellen Erickson, Assistant Provost and Secretary-Treasurer, UND Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa.

Mini-grants available for summer courses, programs

Are you planning an event at UND next summer but lack funding? Do you plan to develop a new summer course but need financial resources? Consider applying for a mini-grant through the Summer Programs and Events Council (SPEC).

SPEC’s Start-Up Mini-Grant Program will fund deserving proposals for:
1. The expansion of existing 2007 credit or non-credit summer courses/programs.
2. Or the redesign of existing 2007 credit or non-credit summer courses/programs.
3. Or the development of new 2007 credit or non-credit summer courses/programs.

Through the Mini-Grant Program, the Council wants to create positive learning experiences for the citizens of the Red River Valley Region and beyond by extending the resources of the university. The Mini-Grant funds will help cover the development, marketing and start-up costs for courses and programs held at UND during the summer months. Examples include camps for kids, academic classes that can be completed in the summer months, or any special event designed for the community. Quality, creativity and “out of the box” ideas are encouraged when developing new programs.

All interested UND faculty and staff are encouraged to submit proposals. Information can be found at www.summer.und.edu. The application deadline is 4:30 p.m., Friday, Nov. 17, 2006. Recipients will be announced Dec. 19, 2006. For individuals interested in covering the basics of the application and RFP process, an informational meeting session will be held Wednesday, Oct. 11, from 3 – 4 p.m., in the President’s Room of the Memorial Union. Please reserve your seat by registering with U2 by: Phone 777-2128, Email U2@mail.und.nodak.edu, or Online www.conted.und.edu/U2/.

In conjunction with the Mini-Grant Program, SPEC is offering the workshop Turning Ideas Into Courses/Programs on Thursday, Oct. 5, from 3 – 4 p.m., Memorial Room, Memorial Union. Please reserve your seat by registering with U2 by: Phone 777-2128, Email U2@mail.und.nodak.edu, or Online www.conted.und.edu/U2/.

For more information on the Mini-Grant program, contact: Diane Hadden, Director of Summer Sessions (credit activities), 777-6284, dianehadden@mail.und.edu or Dr. Kerry Kerber, Associate Dean Continuing Education (non-credit activities), 777-4264, kerrykerber@mail.und.edu. For operational questions, contact the Summer Events Office at 777-0841.

-- Julie Bean, Summer Events Program Specialist, Division of Continuing Education, juliebean@mail.und.edu, 701-777-0441

Info sought on academic cooperation with Canada

The survey to get a record of exchanges, meetings, academic cooperation of all sorts with Canadian academics continues. Please let us know about your academic ties to Canada so our report to the Vice President for Academic Affairs will be as thorough as possible. Many reported in the Spring of 2006. If you did not report your academic ties to Canada please let us know about them this week. The Canadian Experience Task Force begins its fall series of meetings on October 6. Please send a description of your Canadian ties to virgil.benoit@und.nodak.edu. Thank you. -- Virgil Benoit, Languages.

Student referrals requested for Student Ambassador Program

Enrollment Services is currently accepting applications for student ambassadors for the 2006-2007 academic year. As an integral part of the orientation process, ambassadors work with new students to prepare them for university life. Student ambassadors also talk about UND with students at their high schools, help with recruitment and retention projects, and represent the University at various campus events. The qualities of a good student ambassador include a strong academic background, involvement in campus and community activities, and effective leadership and communication skills. Students reflecting a positive outlook on campus life and displaying a caring attitude toward their fellow students will best serve this program.

I would appreciate your assistance in recruiting qualified leaders. Please submit the names of students you feel would be an asset to the program to: Heather Kasowski / Box 8135 or e-mail your referrals to: heatherkasowski@mail.und.nodak.edu by Oct. 9. I will send these students information about the program. If you have any questions about the program, please call 777-6468.

-- Heather Kasowski, Special Projects Coordinator, Enrollment Services, heatherkasowski@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777.6468

Sioux fan luncheons begin

Sioux Boosters welcome all Sioux fans to attend Sioux fan luncheons at noon in the Alerus Center. The buffet lunch begins at 11:30 a.m. for $8.50 per person, which includes beverage and dessert. Speakers start at noon. Luncheons are held before home games for football, basketball and hockey. Hear the athletes and coaches express their pride of being part of Fighting Sioux athletics. A complete schedule may be found at www.undalumni.org/FSC-letterwinners/sioux-boostersSchedule Come join the fun!
-- Laura Eider, Booster Board Member, CFL, lauraeider@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2189

Student, faculty, staff directory available soon

The UND Directory of Faculty, Students, and Staff will be available the beginning of November, and will offer new features to make it more useful to users.

A new section at the front of the directory lists departments and offices with contact information in one easy-to-find location, rather than forcing users to flip back-and-forth. We also rearranged the contents to make information easier to find, and improved the table of contents. Emergency information will be immediately available, and a new section details offices and units in each building.

For the first time, courtesy of the Payroll Office, faculty and staff information will come from ConnectND information rather than being keyed by hand.

The directory will be available after Nov. 1, and we look forward to hearing your comments. You can purchase your copies at Barnes & Noble Bookstore as well as other areas on campus.
-- Jan Orvik, Writer/Editor, University Relations, janorvik@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3621

SPEC presents courses, programs workshop

Are you interested in learning how to turn your idea into a possible course or program? Learn how at the “Turning Ideas into Courses, Programs” workshop sponsored by the Summer Programs and Events Council (SPEC). The workshop is led by SPEC co-chairs, Diane Hadden, director of Summer Sessions, and Kerry Kerber, associate dean of the Division of Continuing Education, and will be held Thursday, Oct. 5, from 3 to 4 p.m. in the Memorial Room, Memorial Union. The workshop is designed for the person who has an idea and a willingness to fine tune it into a possible academic course or non-credit based program.

Explore the viability of a course/program idea by engaging in a needs analysis process to accurately analyze an idea’s worth in the marketplace. You will work through a process to take an idea and learn how to clarify it, and then develop it into a possible educational course or program. You will also learn about SPEC’s mission and purpose of advocacy for new credit and non-credit programming. The shared results of the SPEC needs assessment surveys will help you look at the topics of high interest expressed by various participant groups. Finally, the basics of business planning process will be reviewed, so you will understand the impact that good business practices have on course/program operational success.

This workshop is planned in conjunction with SPEC’s start-up mini-grant program, which awards deserving proposals mini-grant funds to help cover the development, marketing, and start-up costs for new summer courses and programs. Please reserve your seat by registering with U2 by: phone, 777-2128; e-mail, U2@mail.und.nodak.edu; or online, www.conted.und.edu/U2/.

-- Julie Bean, Summer Events Program Specialist, Division of Continuing Education, juliebean@mail.und.edu, 701-777-0441

30-minute X-press workout now at Wellness Center

Did you know that the Wellness Center now offers a 30-minute X-press workout similar to those other 30-minute workout clubs? On Mondays and Wednesdays from 12:15 to 12:45 p.m., you can get in your cardio and strength training in 30 minutes, all in a fun group environment. Marian Gallager is the instructor, and Laurie Betting was the first one to sign up. To join in the fun, all you need is a membership and purchase as many of the sessions as you like at $2 a time. Call 777-WELL for more information. Hurry, it starts Monday, Oct. 2.

Oct. 6 Denim Day proceeds will raise funds for breast cancer research

President Kupchella has approved UND's participation in Lee National Denim Day, the largest single-day fundraiser for breast cancer, Friday, Oct. 6. Since 1996, Lee National Denim Day has raised more than $61 million. Wearing jeans isn't just comfortable, it's powerful. UND Denim Day is proud to support this event and the fight against breast cancer. The "standard contribution" for Lee National Denim Day is $5, but we'll collect whatever you feel you can afford.

-- Patsy Nies, Special Project Assistant, Enrollment Services, patsynies@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3791

North Dakota Museum of Art cafe lists specials

Specials at the North Dakota Museum of Art cafe follow:
* Oct. 4 – Entrée: Greek Pita Pizza or Dagwood Sandwich, Soup: Fresh Tomato
* Oct. 5 – Entrée: Indian Lamb Curry or Eggplant Wrap, Soup: Cretan Vegetable
* Oct. 6 – Entrée: Caprese Panini or Greek Salad, Soup: Udon Noodle

The Museum Café and Coffee Shop, located in the lower level of the Museum, serves a full luncheon menu from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Coffee is available from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. Take-out is available, UND billing is accepted, and the conference room is available for luncheons. We also cater weekend and evening events, 777-4195. Visit the Museum Cafe online at http://www.ndmoa.com/cafe.html

-- Connie Hulst, Office Manager, North Dakota Museum of Art, chulst@ndmoa, 777-4195

Psychology seeks individuals currently taking antidepressants

Individuals currently taking an antidepressant qualify for a study in the psychology department. The study seeks to determine the effects of antidepressants on everyday tasks. The study takes about 1.5 hours to complete and all participants are paid $15. Participants are asked to complete three questionnaires, a tracking test, and a driving simulator. Please e-mail or call for more information or to sign up.
-- Holly Dannewitz, grad student, Psychology, holly_dannewitz@und.nodak.edu, 777-4775

Internal job openings listed

The following position vacancies are available only to regular UND staff employees who have successfully completed their six-month probation period, earn annual and sick leave, receive BC/BS health insurance and TIAA-CREF or ND PERS rRetirement benefits. Current UND faculty, please contact Human Resources for eligibility.

TO APPLY: Please complete UND Application/Control Cardform. Send letter of application and resume, referencing position name and number, to: Human Resources, University of North Dakota, Twamley Hall, Room 313, 264 Centennial Drive Stop 8010, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8010. Applications MUST be received by the deadline date.

EXECUTIVE/PROFESSIONAL/ADMINISTRATIVE/COACHES:

POSITION: Chief Flight Instructor (variable schedule), Aerospace Sciences, #07-103
DEADLINE: (I) 10/06/2006
SALARY: $50,000 - $60,000

POSITION: Accounting Specialist, Dining Services, #07-101
DEADLINE: (I) 10/06/2006
SALARY: $25,500 - $28,000

POSITION: Air Traffic Control Associate, #07-100
DEADLINE: (I) 10/06/2006
SALARY: $18,000 - $18,350

POSITION: Associate Vice President for Outreach Services & Dean of Outreach Programs, #07-091
DEADLINE: Internal applicants will be considered with the external. Open Until Filled (Review of applications will begin November 15, 2006.)
SALARY: Commensurate with experience

TECHNICAL/PARAPROFESSIONAL:

POSITION: Visual Communications Specialist, John D Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences, #07-096
DEADLINE: (I) 10/04/06
SALARY: $25,000-$30,000

OFFICE SUPPORT:

POSITION: Receptionist/Office Assistant, Television Center, #07-102
DEADLINE: (I) 10/13/2006
SALARY: $18,000 - $20,000

POSITION: Administrative Secretary, Biology, #07-099
DEADLINE: (I) 10/05/2006
SALARY: $20,000 - $20,370

POSITION: Administrative Secretary, Admissions, #07-098
DEADLINE: (I) 10/06/2006
SALARY: $20,000 - $20,700

CRAFTS/TRADES/SERVICE:

POSITION: Service Manager (variable schedule) Dining Services #07-097
DEADLINE: (I) 10/05/2006
SALARY: $12.60 - $13.33

Kluenker named chair of Aerospace Foundation board of directors

Chuck Kluenker has been named chair of the Aerospace Foundation Board of Directors. Kluenker is stepping into the position previously held by Thomas J. Clifford, who served as the chair since the board was founded in 1985. “Chuck has a life-long interest in aviation and a passion for the University of North Dakota and the students at the Odegard School,” said Bruce Smith, president of UNDAF. “He brings a solid base of experience in corporate management that will help lead the Aerospace Foundation into the future.”

Kluenker is a senior vice president of 3D/International, Inc., and has served on its board of directors and executive committee. He has held leadership positions in the construction management industry, serving on the dean’s advisory council for the School of Architecture and Environmental Design at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo, Calif., and as president of the Construction Management Association of America.

He earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from the University of Wisconsin in Madison. He and his wife, Maggie, currently live in Roseville, Calif. The Kluenkers are closely connected to the University through their two sons who graduated from UND with degrees in commercial aviation. Their son, John, was the top collegiate pilot in the United States in 2001.

Pediatrics receives grant to conduct genetics conference

The Department of Pediatrics has received a $10,000 grant from the Dakota Medical Foundation to conduct a conference on genetics and health care next spring in Fargo. The grant will be used to organize and present the conference, "Hearing Hoofbeats and Thinking Zebras: Screening, Testing and Management of Children with Genetic Disorders," set for April 23-24 at the Fargo Ramada Inn.

Sponsored by the Division of Medical Genetics, part of the pediatrics department at the UND medical school, the event is intended for primary health care providers, especially family physicians, pediatricians, nurse practitioners and physician assistants. The focus will be on North Dakota's newborn screening program as well as the diagnosis, treatment and management of infants who have been identified as having Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome (SLOS) or other metabolic disorders.

By law, every infant born in North Dakota is screened for 37 disorders, some of which "are difficult to treat and some must be treated quickly" to avoid sickness or death of the child or potentially serious, lifelong consequences, according to John Martsolf, professor of pediatrics and director of the Division of Medical Genetics at the medical school. "It is important that front-line, primary care health providers know what to do if they have a patient who's been detected with a disorder from the newborn screen," he said. "Proper emergency management of children with metabolic disorders is critical."

Martsolf, North Dakota's only clinical geneticist, says conference participants will also explore "how the state's newborn screening program is working and how the follow-up has gone," he said. The event also will provide "a forum for discussion of the resources available in North Dakota for these children." The title of the conference, "Hearing Hoofbeats and Thinking Zebras," refers to the need for health care providers, when presented with common signs and symptoms, to think of the unusual or uncommon possibilities, Martsolf said.

Organizers plan to offer continuing education credits for physicians, nurses, physician assistants, nurse practitioners and social workers who attend the conference.

For more information or to register, contact Jayne Brown in the Department of Pediatrics at 701-777-4276 or jbrown@medicine.nodak.edu .

The Dakota Medical Foundation, based in Fargo, focuses its efforts on improving access to medical and dental care. Since its inception in 1995, the Foundation has invested over $26.5 million in more than 270 non-profit organizations to help them measurably improve health and access to health care. For more information, see www.dakmed.org .
-- Shelley Pohlman, Public Affairs, UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences, spohlman@medicine.nodak.edu, 701-777-7305

Center for Innovation receives Soft Landings International Incubator designation

The Center for Innovation's two technology incubators have been granted designation as a ‘Soft Landings International Incubator’ from the National Business Incubation Association. Randy Morris, NBIA’s director of membership says, "The Soft Landings designation recognizes outstanding incubators that focus on welcoming non-domestic firms into its domestic market with entrepreneur services, help cutting through governmental red tape, access to capital, domestic market research and demonstrated success in helping firms enter the US market. The designation identifies incubators that provide a ‘soft landing’ to international firms wishing to expand into new markets.”

The Center for Innovation has been working with international clients since 1992 to bring international ventures into the U.S. market by developing export entry plans, conducting market research, locating distribution, manufacturing and development partners and providing a reputable base of operations in the incubator. The Center has partnered with numerous foreign and domestic agencies, most notably entrepreneur centers in Canada and Norway and developing close working relationships with the Royal Norwegian Consulate and Canadian Consulate, both of which sponsor foreign expansion and trade initiatives at the Center for Innovation. In addition, a branch office of the North Dakota Trade Office is located at the Ina Mae Rude Entrepreneur Center, offering in-house international expertise and networks.

“It’s a terrific honor to be one of only six incubators world-wide to be recognized with the Soft Landings designation in 2006, and only eight that have ever received the designation worldwide,” said Bruce Gjovig, director and entrepreneur coach at the Center for Innovation. “I was shocked there were only eight incubators recognized out of 5,000 business incubators worldwide by NBIA, and only three incubators in the United States. I assumed there would be more. We are more on the leading edge in globalizing incubator operations than realized. Tech companies are positioning themselves at an earlier stage to sell internationally, and we need to be prepared and well networked.”

Steinar Opstad, a retired business and communications executive of Sarpsborg, Norway, observed, “Several Norwegian delegations have visited the Center for Innovation over the last decade to learn best practices for entrepreneur centers and incubators. Bruce has visited several communities in Norway to share his expertise. This designation recognizes the high standing he has in Norway. Sarpsborg is developing Campus Borg with a tech park, incubator facilities with an entrepreneur center, and college facilities based the Center for Innovation model.” Opstad has been visiting with Gjovig and others in the Greater Grand Forks area the past couple of weeks. Opstad is the founder of the American College of Norway and retired executive with the Confederation of Norwegian Business and Industry.

Gjovig added, “This designation will let international clients know about our venturing expertise, international offerings and our ability to provide a “soft landing.” We have a proven track record of working with international clients and can offer expertise as companies enter the US market. This designation not only recognizes our expertise, but also sends a message to international entrepreneurs that are looking for a good place to get started in the U.S. market.”

One of the greatest benefits to an international company locating in an incubator is the ability to grow into a presence on U.S. soil without having to go through many of the capital-intensive acquisitions involved with opening a new location. The incubator offers turn key office and lab space for early stage ventures as well as entrepreneur assistance. Companies benefit from collocating with other entrepreneurs and accessing a network of nationwide entrepreneur-minded contacts that have been established over the past 20 years. Some clients also utilize a variety of resources from the University of North Dakota, most often strong talent. Through funding from the Norwegian Consulate General, over 20 Norwegian students have served in internships working with Norwegian companies interested in expanding into U.S. markets, or American companies interested in European markets.

Jacqueline Ferraro is photo contest winner

Jacqueline Ferraro (languages) has been selected as a 2006 North Dakota Governor's photo contest winner. About 500 photos depicting our state, people, seasons and culture were entered, and 10 photographs were chosen as winning photos. Ferraro's photograph, "Border of Peace," will be used in either the 2007 North Dakota travel guide, the Hunting and Fishing guide, or on the North Dakota tourism web site. Visit www.ndtourism.com beginning Oct. 5 for photos and winners.