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ISSUE: Volume 47, Number 26: February 17, 2010

Contents
Top Stories
UND posts largest-ever spring enrollment
Events to Note
Student Success Center offers Study Skills Help sessions
Global Visions film series continues with "Caramel"
Grand Forks Master Chorale performance set for Feb. 26
Students to tackle global water challenge in JETS TEAMS competition
Medicine holds annual research award reception Wednesday
Biology seminar is Feb. 17
Fischer Integrative Medicine Lecture series continues Feb. 18
Chester Fritz Library hosts public talk Feb. 18
Spring Culture series continues Feb. 18
River restoration expert to give lecture Feb. 26
Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics seminar is Feb. 19
Physics colloquium is Feb. 19
College Goal Sunday is Feb. 21
Writers Conference 101 continues Feb. 21
Anatomy and Cell Biology seminar is Feb. 22
Career Services hosts professional etiquette luncheon Feb. 27
Tax workshop set for international students and scholars
Jodsaas Center sponsors Engineering Leadership seminar
Bookstore Book Club meeting is Feb. 22
Institutional Review Board meeting set for March 5
Dru Sjodin scholarship deadline is Feb. 23
Physics and Astrophysics public talk is Feb. 23
Annual Robinson Lecture will focus on digital archaeology
Staff Senate announces "Regular" and "Special" Denim Days
Doctoral examination set for Jinu Philip John
Help shape the future of technology at UND
Online teaching showcase is March 3
30th annual Frank Low Research Day is April 22
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology to hold remembrance celebration
Announcements
Dean of Students Lillian Elsinga to retire June 30
Funds available for community-based teaching, research projects
NDPERS web site features retirement plan information
NDUS comprehensive IT survey is online
Women Studies to redesign current curriculum
Labor announces new procedures for hiring international employees
Anthropology offers archeological field school
CoBPA, NDTO recognize inaugural export course
Writing Center supports teaching through class visits
Staff Senate welcomes University input
Applications for Staff Senate scholarship available online
Applicants sought for Freshman Getting Started student assistants
Check cashing is no longer available at Union Services
University Within the University (U2) lists new classes
Duplicating Services has paper boxes for giveaway
Staff Senate thanks all who helped with the Emerald and Ice Gala
Denim Day for Haitian relief breaks record
Vote for your favorite "Wear Red for Healthy Hearts" photos
Vending machines identify healthy options
Purchase Office Enterprise for a chance to win Xbox 360 Elite/Beatles Rock Band package
Museum Cafe lists weekly menu (beginning Feb. 17)
Internal job openings listed
Research
ND EPSCoR announces IIP Equipment Awards
ND EPSCoR announces IIP Seed Awards
NSF announces submission requirements for CI-TEAM
UND posts largest-ever spring enrollment

UND has posted its largest-ever Spring Semester enrollment. The 12,733 students for the fourth week final snapshot eclipsed last year's final spring total of 12,076. UND's previous spring high number was 12,376 in 2005.

Last fall, UND had its second-largest final enrollment of 13,172 -- just 17 shy of the all time record of 13,187 in 2004.

Enrollment typically goes down in the spring semester due, among other things, to Winter Commencement. That's not true for UND's Graduate School this year, which has its largest-ever enrollment -- fall or spring -- of 2,351, a total of 189 (8.7 percent) over last year's tally.

President Kelley says that's good news for the University, since a strong research enterprise is predicated in part on a strong graduate school. The Graduate School has shown impressive increases, up nearly 900 (899)students from the 2000-01 academic year, when the enrollment was 1,452. That is consistent with UND's Strategic Plan, which states that graduate students will represent 20 percent of UND's student body. The increase in graduate students also has a significant impact as UND works to increase its research enterprise. UND has recorded about $100 million in sponsored programs and research each of the past three years.

Overall, UND's undergraduate enrollment is 9,915, up 468 (5 percent) over last year's final spring number of 9,447. Leading the undergraduate growth is the College of Arts and Sciences with 2,640 students, 233 (9.7 percent) more than last spring. Another area of significant growth: the number of transfer students is up 115 students (41.5 percent) to 392, compared to 277 in spring 2009.

Robert Boyd, Vice President for Student and Outreach Services, said he is pleased with the enrollment, which showed growth essentially across the board. "Our enrollment picture is a positive one. It is clear an increasing number of high school students selected UND as their choice for furthering their education. At the same time, many undergraduate and graduate students are finding UND's offerings online to be an attractive way to access its programs," said Boyd.

Recent UND Spring Semester final enrollments:
* 2010 -- 12,733
* 2009 -- 12,076
* 2008 -- 11,847
* 2007 -- 12,034
* 2006 -- 12,321
* 2005 -- 12,376

Student Success Center offers Study Skills Help sessions

The Student Success Center will be holding Study Skills Help Sessions to answer many of the questions students have about studying. The sessions are informal and participants are invited to bring their lunch, relax and join in the conversation. All sessions will take place from noon to 12:50 p.m. in Swanson Hall, room 16-18 of the Memorial Union (near the Terrace Dining Center) and are open to the entire campus community, with no reservation required. Sessions include, Reading a Textbook, February 24 and 25, April 14; Studying for and Taking Tests, March 3 and 4, April 29; Time Management, March 24; Notetaking, April 1.
-- Shari Nelson, Assistant Director of Learning Services, Student Success Center, sharinelson@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-0562

Global Visions film series continues with "Caramel"

The University of North Dakota Department of Anthropology Global Visions Film Series will screen Lebanese actor and director Nadine Labaki's "Caramel" at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 16 in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. The film is in Arabic with English subtitles.

"Sukkar banat"—the film's original Arabic title—zeroes in on the lives of several women who frequent a beauty salon in Beirut. They connect with each other over common concerns while enjoying amenities offered by the salon. Though the film reveals a glimpse into Lebanese issues, it focuses on the relationships between others without getting too confrontational.

“The film notes Muslim and Christian double standards in passing, but like the recent Israeli charmer 'The Band's Visit,' it ignores political turbulence to focus on universal humanist values," said Minneapolis Star-Tribune film critic Colin Covert in his recent review of the movie. “The multigenerational cast members have one foot in Western modernity and the other in male-dominated tradition. "Caramel" is a bittersweet treat.”

The Department of Anthropology's popular Global Visions Film Series brings an array of international films to the Grand Forks community. Two films are presented each month in the Lecture Bowl of the Memorial Union at the University of North Dakota. Attendance is free, but a donation of $1 is requested.

Upcoming films, all at 7 p.m. in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl, are:
"Caramel" - Tuesday, Feb. 16
"A Thousand Years of Good Prayers" - Tuesday, Mar. 9
"War Dance" - Tuesday, Mar. 30
"The Stoning of Soraya" - Tuesday, April 6
"Local Color" - Tuesday, April 20
"American Violet" - Tuesday, May 4

Grand Forks Master Chorale performance set for Feb. 26

The Grand Forks Master Chorale will sing Handel's "Dixit Dominus" and Ray's "Gospel Mass" at 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 26, at the First Presbyterian Church in Grand Forks. Tickets at the door are $15 for adults, $10 for seniors and $5 for students. For more information, go to http://gfmc.wordpress.com/ or call 777-3376.
-- Joshua Bronfman, Assistant Professor, Music, michelleluciaingle@gmail.com, 701-741-1786

Students to tackle global water challenge in JETS TEAMS competition

The Haiti earthquake has spotlighted one of the world’s most pressing problems – the global water shortage. This year, American high school students will get the opportunity to help solve the problem as the Junior Engineering Technical Society (JETS) launches its 31st annual TEAMS competition for 2010.

UND Engineering is hosting the annual competition and giving 10 teams from area schools the opportunity to explore and experience engineering. Encouraging students to consider engineering as a major and career is important to UND and connecting local schools to TEAMS gives them a better understanding of how engineers impact and change our world. The competition is being held from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 17, in the UND Memorial Union Ballroom. An engineering design competition will follow the test at 1 p.m.

Themed, “Water, Water Everywhere,” the competition will show students firsthand how engineers in various disciplines, including environmental engineers, civil engineers, and mechanical engineers are involved in the protection and delivery of the world’s water supply.
This year, students will learn that, according to the World Health Organization, nearly one billion people to do not have access to clean, drinkable water, despite the fact that water covers 75 percent of the Earth’s surface. They will be challenged to:
● assess the effectiveness of ceramic pot filters developed by geological, environmental and ceramic engineers in disinfecting water;
● analyze and create processes, known as desalination, that remove salt and other impurities from otherwise undrinkable water sources;
● design technologies that deal with the detrimental effects that land development projects have on communities’ watersheds

JETS is a national non-profit educational organization dedicated to promoting engineering and technology careers to our nation's young people. As a prominent force at the secondary school level, JETS engages students in various engineering education programs that are an essential part of fostering the engineering profession. Students in JETS programs are presented the opportunities to: understand how engineers make a difference in our world (Explore); see how their own talents and skills align to engineering majors and occupations (Assess); and participate in exciting real-world based competitions and activities (Experience). JETS programs touch more than 40,000 students and 10,000 educators from 6,000 high schools across the country every year. JETS participants are a diverse group – more than 50 percent are from groups that are traditionally underrepresented in engineering and technology fields, including one-third who are female. For more information, please visit www.jets.org .

The schools participating are:
- Stephen/Argyle High School, Stephen, Minn.
- Thompson High School, Thompson, N.D.
- Devils Lake High School, Devils Lake, N.D.
- Roseau High School, Roseau, Minn.
-- Cheryl Osowski, Outreach Coordinator, School of Engineering and Mines, cherylosowski@mail.und.edu, 777-3390

Medicine holds annual research award reception Wednesday

The Office of the Dean and the Office of Research Affairs at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences invite faculty, staff and students to attend the research award reception, which will be from 10 to 11 a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 17, in the Vennes Atrium at the School.

The following researchers will be recognized for receiving new national funding in fiscal year 2009: Mary Amundson, Colin Combs, Patricia Conway, Van Doze, Jonathan Geiger, Brad Gibbens, L. Keith Henry, Mary Ann Laxen, Saobo Lei, Barry Milavetz, Eric Murphy, James Porter, Rebecca Quinn, Edward Sauter, Donald Sens, Mary Ann Sens, Brij Singh, Nancy Vogeltanz-Holm and Sharon Wilsnack.
-- Edward Sauter, Associate Dean of Research, Research Affairs, dstramer@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-6226

Biology seminar is Feb. 17

Marissa Ahlering, prairie ecologist with the Nature Conservancy and adjunct assistant professor of biology, will present a seminar titled "Finding a home in a haystack: Habitat use for grassland birds in the Northern Great Plains" at noon Wednesday, Feb. 17, in 141 Starcher Hall. Everyone is welcome to attend.

Ahlering received her Ph.D. in Biology from the University of Missouri. Her research focused on habitat selection and
habitat use questions for two species of grassland songbirds, the Baird's sparrow and the grasshopper sparrow. She conducted this work in the northern Great Plains on sites ranging from central North Dakota up through south central Saskatchewan. After finishing her degree, she began a post-doctoral project with Lori Eggert at the University of Missouri, studying the population dynamics of savanna elephants outside the boundaries of national parks. Her research used non-invasive molecular techniques to address questions about genetic relationships and stress hormones in these populations. She continued and completed this project as a postdoctoral fellow with Jesus Maldonado and Rob Fleischer at the Smithsonian's National Zoo. She is currently working for the Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota chapter of The Nature Conservancy as their Prairie Ecologist in the conservation science division. Her office is in the Biology Department at UND, where she is currently adjunct faculty.

Fischer Integrative Medicine Lecture series continues Feb. 18

Neena E. Thomas-Eapen will give the second Integrative Medicine Lecture at noon Thursday, Feb. 18, in Reed Keller Lecture Hall, room 1350 at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

Thomas-Eapen, interim codirector of integrative medicine for The School of Medicine and Health Sciences, is associate director of The UND Center for Family Medicine in Minot. She is a senior graduate fellow of the Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine at the University of Arizona. Her presentation will explore the philosophy of integrative medicine, its relevance, patient practices, resources and more in relation to current medical practices.

The series is made possible by a grant from John R. Fischer, a 1965 B.S. Medicine graduate of The UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences. The goal of the series is to bring awareness and education of integrative medicine to students, faculty, and others at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences as well as the medical community. The public is invited to attend; lunch will be provided.

The School of Medicine and Health Sciences is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The School designates this education activity for a maximum of one Category-1 Credit toward the AMA Physician's Recognition Award. Physicians should claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

This presentation will be broadcast via videoconferencing to the UNDSMHS Campus Sites and Rural Hospitals (through H.323 and BT-WAN network). Webcast (live and archived) is available at http://www.med.und.edu/webcasts/ . For more information or support, please call 777-5046.
-- Denis F. MacLeod, Communications Coordinator, Center for Rural Health, dmacleod@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-3300

Chester Fritz Library hosts public talk Feb. 18

The Chester Fritz Library invites the campus community and the public to a talk given in conjunction with its current exhibit, "Reading Internationally: Contemporary Literature in German, Norwegian, and Spanish." The exhibit highlights recent acquisitions of contemporary literature in some of the languages taught at UND. Included are authors who are widely read in Germany, Norway and Spain, and often are recognized internationally for their outstanding achievement and popularity. Professors Melissa Gjellstad (Norwegian), Claudia Routon (Spanish), and Olaf Berwald (German), of the UND Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures will each speak about contemporary literary trends and recent library acquisitions in their areas of specialty.

This talk will be held at 4 p.m. Thursday, Feb 18, in the East Asia Room on the 4th floor of the Chester Fritz Library. Coffee and refreshments will be served.
-- Victor Lieberman, Reference Librarian, Chester Fritz Library, victor.lieberman@mail.und.edu, 777-4639

Spring Culture series continues Feb. 18

Office of International Programs continues to celebrate Black History month with another Spring Culture series event. It will be held at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 18, in the Memorial Union Ballroom. It will start with a presentation, and a sampling of food will follow. The event is free and the food costs $1. All are welcome to attend.
-- Matt Hiller, International Student Advisor, Office of International Programs, matthewhiller@mail.und.edu, 777-2033

River restoration expert to give lecture Feb. 26

Geology and Geological Engineering will host a lecture by river restoration expert Luther Aadland at noon Friday, Feb. 26, in 100 Leonard Hall.

Rivers are defined by hydrology, fluvial geomorphology, biology, water quality and connectivity. These components interact and changes in one variable can cause cascading changes in the others. Rivers have been altered by anthropogenic watershed changes, direct channel alterations ("channel improvement") and dam construction. Efforts to restore rivers need to avoid mistakes of past management that lead to impaired systems. Aadland's LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary Science) presentation, titled “The Health of Our Rivers: Reflections of Our Culture,” will touch on the policies that affect stream health and the philosophy of restoration and natural channel design in restoring stream channels, dam removal and fish passage.

Luther Aadland graduated from UND with a Ph.D. in biology and works as a river ecologist and fluvial geomorphologist with the Minnesota DNR. Aadland helped design and implement several major river and stream restoration projects, including removal of the old Riverside Dam in Grand Forks and the conversion of Fargo’s Midtown Dam to rapids. Prior to his work, the Midtown Dam had caused at least 19 drowning deaths, as well as blocked fish migration. Aadland’s new Rock Arch Rapids design eliminated the dam's hydraulic roller, restored fish passage and provided a much safer recreational environment.
-- Phil Gerla, Associate Professor, Geology and Geological Engineering, philgerla@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3305

Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics seminar is Feb. 19

Craig S. Atwood, associate professor of Medicine at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine, will present a seminar titled "Mechanistic Insights into Understanding the Hormonal Etiology and Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease" at 2 p.m. Friday, Feb. 19, in the School of Medicine, room 3933. This seminar is sponsored by the Center of Biomedical Research Excellence Pathophysiological Signaling in Neurodegenerative Disorders and the Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics. All are welcome to attend.
-- Deb Kroese, Administrative Officer, Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics, dkroese@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-6221

Physics colloquium is Feb. 19

Physics will host a colloquium at 4 p.m. Friday, Feb. 19, in 211 Witmer Hall featuring Jian Wei, physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University. Coffee and cookies will be served at 4 p.m. in 215 Witmer Hall.

Abstract: Nonlocal entanglement is crucial for quantum information processes. While nonlocal entanglement has been realized for photons, it is much more difficult to demonstrate for electrons. One approach that has been proposed is to use hybrid superconducting/normal-metal devices. When the distance between two normal-metal electrodes connected to a superconductor is comparable to the superconducting coherence length, theory predicts that two electrons in the normal-metal electrodes with opposite spin are entangled by Cooper pairs, leading to non-local entanglement of electrons. Such entanglement can be understood by a non-local process called crossed Andreev reflection (CAR), in which a Cooper pair splits into two coherent electrons with one in each normal-metal electrode, generating instantaneous current of the same sign and inducing a positive current correlation.

Using both nonlocal resistance measurements and cross-correlation measurements, we find very convincing experimental evidence of such nonlocal entanglement. Moreover, by controlling the energy of electrons at the superconductor/normal-metal interfaces, we find that the amplitude of such entanglement can be maximized, in agreement with theoretical predication.
-- Connie Cicha, Administrative Secretary, Physics and Astrophysics, connie_cicha@und.nodak.edu, 777-2911

College Goal Sunday is Feb. 21

North Dakota College Goal is from 1 to 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 21, on the 2nd Floor of the Memorial Union. The free open house event is taking place in 11 towns, including Belcourt, Bismarck, Dickinson, Fargo, Fort Totten, Fort Yates, Grafton, Grand Forks, Minot and New Town. The goal of College Goal Sunday is to help potential students complete financial aid applications. Financial aid experts from North Dakota colleges and universities will be on-hand to answer questions and help students fill out the FAFSA form. Students also can register to win a $500 college scholarship or laptop computer.
-- Robin Holden, Director, Student Financial Aid, sfa@mail.und.edu, 777-3121

Writers Conference 101 continues Feb. 21

Please join us for Writers Conference 101. The idea is to become familiar with some of the 41st Annual UND Writers Conference authors before they arrive on campus. Events are free and open to the public.

2 to 3:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 21 - Affrilachian poet Frank X. Walker discussion facilitated by Heidi Czerwiec at Porpoura Coffee House, downtown Grand Forks. Focus will be on his most recent collection of poetry, "When Winter Come."

Please go to www.undwritersconference.org for more information.
-- Kathy Coudle-King, Co-director, UND Writers Conference, English, kathleen.king@und.nodak.edu, 777-2787

Anatomy and Cell Biology seminar is Feb. 22

Tim Wilson, professor of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry at the University of Western Ontario (UWO), will present a seminar on digital instructional tool development for anatomy education. Wilson leads a group at UWO called the CRIPT (Corps for Research of Instructional and Perceptual Technologies). The title of his seminar is “Tales from the CRIPT: Digital Anatomy Development & Implications for Education,” and will be at noon Monday, Feb. 22, in the School of Medicine & Health Sciences, room 5510. All are welcome to attend.
-- Bonnie Kee, Administrative Assistant, Anatomy and Cell Biology, bkee@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-2102

Tax workshop set for international students and scholars

Two tax workshops will be held for international students and scholars Monday, Feb. 22, at the River Valley Room in the Memorial Union. The first session will be from 4 to 6 p.m. The second session will be from 7 to 9 p.m.

Representatives from the IRS and the North Dakota State Tax Commission will be present to answer questions and explain the process for completing the non-resident tax paperwork. Emphasis will be on requirements for F, M and J visa holders. Please remember to bring the following: calculator, pencil, W-2 form(s), any other tax information you have received and copies of last year's tax returns (if applicable). Additional international tax information can be found at http://www.und.edu/dept/oip/html/intlstudentstaxes.htm.
-- Matt Hiller, International Student Advisor, Office of International Programs, matthewhiller@mail.und.edu, 777-2033

Career Services hosts professional etiquette luncheon Feb. 27

The Professional Etiquette Luncheon will be held Saturday, Feb. 27, in the Memorial Union and will consist of a presentation by Bruce Gjovig on general professional and meal etiquette. Later, Kim Jordahl will speak on the importance of networking to ensure your success and create new opportunities for yourself in the professional world. The presentation will take place in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl.

Following the presentation, there will be a four course meal in the Memorial Union Ballroom, where you will have the opportunity to apply and practice your new etiquette skills in a professional environment. After the meal, there will be a presentation on dressing for success to help ensure that you always look the part when it counts.

Students interested must register and prepay at Career Services, inside 280 McCannel Hall. Tickets only cost $5 and include the presentation and four course meal. Students will need to pre-register by Feb. 19. Students will need to check in by 11 a.m. on the day of the event.
-- Jordan Storeby, Assistant Marketing/Event Coordinator, Career Services, jordan.j.storeby@und.edu, 612-819-4526

Jodsaas Center sponsors Engineering Leadership seminar

The Jodsaas Center for Engineering Leadership and Entrepreneurship within Engineering is sponsoring an Engineering Leadership seminar from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Monday, Feb. 22, in 100 Leonard Hall. The seminar, titled "Global Energy Challenges Require Leadership from Engineers and Scientists," will be presented by Steve Benson, professor of Chemical Engineering.

Meeting global energy challenges requires the emergence of leaders with the ability to create an atmosphere that inspires highly skilled teams of engineers and scientists to discover and create the next generation of sustainable energy production technologies. Effective management and leadership skills play a critical role in the development of processes and technologies. Excellent leadership is fundamental in building strong, healthy teams and is the secret underlying the most effective organizations. The well-being of an organization is rooted in the well-being of the people -- both the managers themselves and those for whom they are responsible. Being able to motivate and challenge diverse, technically oriented teams to achieve their highest potential is key.

All students, faculty and staff are invited to attend. Please register in one of the five engineering department reception areas or in the Engineering Dean's Office.
-- Richard R. Schultz, Director, Jodsaas Center for Engineering Leadership & Entrepreneurship, Engineering, RichardSchultz@mail.und.edu, 777-4429

Bookstore Book Club meeting is Feb. 22

The Bookstore invites the campus community and the greater Grand Forks area to join the staff of the Bookstore for reading and discussion. The selection for February is "Norwegian Wood" by Haruki Murakami. Copies are available for purchase at the UND Bookstore.

As a special offer to book club participants, we are offering a double punch on your Book Club card (available at the cash register) for each book purchased for our book discussions. All meetings begin at 6:30 p.m. at the Bookstore meeting room (775 Hamline, between the UND Medical Center and the Ralph Engelstad Arena).

Feb. 22 - "Norwegian Wood" by Haruki Murakami
March 15 - "Certain Girls" by Jennifer Weiner
April 19 - "Cutting For Stone" by Abraham Verghese
May 17 - "Cutting For Stone" by Abraham Verghese
-- Maria Northington, Sheri Johnson, Associates, Bookstore, ieditorwrite@gmail.com, 777-4980

Institutional Review Board meeting set for March 5

The Institutional Review Board will meet at 3 p.m. Friday, March 5, in 305 Twamley to consider all research proposals submitted to the IRB Office before Tuesday, Feb. 23. Clinical medical projects must be reviewed by the Clinical Medical Subcommittee before being brought to the Full Board. Proposals for these projects are due in the Institutional Review Board Office before Tuesday, Feb. 16. Minutes from the meeting will be available in the IRB Office approximately one week after the meeting.
-- Kathy Smart, Chair, Institutional Review Board, janetelshaug@mail.und.edu, 777-4279

Dru Sjodin scholarship deadline is Feb. 23

Applications for The Dru Sjodin Scholarship are being accepted through Tuesday, Feb. 23. This full academic scholarship provides assistance for room, board and tuition for the 2010-2011 school year. Eligible applicants are students entering their sophomore, junior or senior years at UND (beginning of the fall 2010 semester), who are highly motivated, academically successful and represent the ideals and/or causes Dru exemplified as a UND student. Beyond the above requirements, preference will be given to a student who is a native of North Dakota or Minnesota, demonstrates a financial need and/or is an active member of Gamma Phi Beta sorority. Applications are available online at www.undfoundation.org/sjodin or at the Strinden Center on campus. For more information, contact Katie Itterman at katiei@undfoundation.org or 740-5568.

On Nov. 22, 2003, Dru Sjodin was abducted from Grand Forks. In the ensuing months, more than 2,000 friends, students, family, community members and even strangers from across the nation gathered in Grand Forks to search for her. On April 17, 2004, volunteers and law enforcement finally brought Dru home to her family. One week later more than 1,500 people paid their respects as Dru was laid to rest in Minnesota.

As a UND student, Dru’s warm and vibrant personality showed itself through her creativity and campus involvement. She pursued a bachelor’s degree in visual art all the while active in The Clothesline Project and other campus activities that promoted women’s safety and violence prevention. Dru was also a member of Gamma Phi Beta sorority. The Dru Sjodin Scholarship was established through the UND Foundation in loving memory of Dru’s vibrant spirit with the intention of turning grief into triumph.
-- Katie Itterman, Director of Gift Planning, UND Foundation, katiei@undfoundation.org, 701-740-5568

Physics and Astrophysics public talk is Feb. 23

Physics and Astrophysics will be holding an astronomy and astrophysics public talk and telescope observing session at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 23, in 116 Witmer Hall. The talk, "Rockets and Modern Day Applications," will be presented by the Frozen Fury Rocket Team (undergraduate students from UND). Following the talk, attendees will be given the opportunity to observe the night sky through a telescope (weather permitting).
-- Wayne Barkhouse, Assistant Professor, Physics & Astrophysics, wayne.barkhouse@und.edu, 777-3520

Annual Robinson Lecture will focus on digital archaeology

The Chester Fritz Library invites all members of the UND community to attend the 19th Annual Elwyn B. Robinson Lecture beginning at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 24, in the East Asian Room of the Chester Fritz Library (fourth floor). William Caraher will speak on "Digital Archaeology: Technology in the Trenches." Don’t miss this fascinating presentation on how advanced computer technology is used in the study of archeological sites.
-- Wilbur Stolt, Director of Libraries, Chester Fritz Library, wilburstolt@mail.und.edu, 777-2189

Staff Senate announces "Regular" and "Special" Denim Days

Wednesday, Feb 24, is "regular" Denim Day. Pay your $1 and enjoy going casual for charity. "Special" Denim Day is Feb. 26. Donations will be given to "Go Red for Women" (as part of February's American Heart Month). Please give what you can. Checks must be made out to "Denim Day."
-- Cheri Williams, Staff Senator, President's Office, cheriwilliams@mail.und.edu, 777-2121

Doctoral examination set for Jinu Philip John

The final examination for Jinu Philip John, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Chemistry, is set for 1 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 25, in 138 Abbott Hall. The dissertation title is: Studies in Organic Synthesis. Part I: Total Synthesis of Plakortethers F and G. Part II: C- H Insertion on Diazosulfones and Diazosulfonates. Alexei Novikov (Chemistry) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, gailholweger@mail.und.edu, 777-4005

Help shape the future of technology at UND

You can help shape the future of technology at UND by taking part in a box lunch forum series. All students, faculty and staff are welcome to the free box lunch series with the Chief Information Officer, Josh Riedy, and members of the Technology Steering Committee. The first is from noon to 1 p.m. Tuesday, March 2, in the River Valley Room. Join us to discuss, share and brainstorm ideas for the future of technology at UND. Discussions are intended to complement the Technology Forums already in progress.

Four main themes:
- Technology Support (Broad Hardware, Software and Application Support)
- Data Storage (Individual, Shared, Research and Archival)
- Research Technology (Infrastructure and Support)

To order a complimentary box lunch, please e-mail michaellefever@mail.und.edu by Feb. 24. Make your reservation early as space is limited.
-- Mike Lefever, Project Manager, AVP/Dean of Outreach/CIO Office, michaellefever@mail.und.edu, 777-2030

Online teaching showcase is March 3

Interested in teaching online? All UND faculty and staff are invited to attend the online teaching showcase to visit with other faculty and instructional support staff about techniques and tools for teaching online. Faculty will be demonstrating their courses, and you can test out the tools at additional stations. Attend this event to:
* View 20 exhibits of current courses and online technologies
* Visit with instructors about online methods in their campus or online courses
Test out technologies, including:
* Adobe Connect and Presenter
* Respondus and Studymate
* Smarthinking 24/7 Online Tutoring
* Wimba Classroom and Voice Tools
* Xenapps (Citrix) Software Access

Join us from noon to 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 3, at the Memorial Union, River Valley Room. To reserve a complimentary box lunch, email adminserv@mail.und.edu by Feb. 25, or call 777-3231. The event is sponsored by the Senate Continuing Education Committee Discovery Series.
-- Janet Rex, Chair, Senate Continuing Education Committee, janetrex@mail.und.edu, 777-4641

30th annual Frank Low Research Day is April 22

The 30th annual Frank Low Research Day will be held Thursday, April 22, in the Memorial Union Ballroom and Lecture Bowl. There will be two keynote speakers, and medical and graduate students will provide oral presentations in the Lecture Bowl.

Students, staff and faculty in all basic science, allied health and clinical departments are encouraged to participate in the poster presentations, which will be displayed in the Ballroom. Awards will be given this year to the student who presents the best poster. Only first authors are eligible to compete for the award(s).

All oral and poster presenters are required to submit an abstract that will be included in this year’s Frank Low Research Day booklet. You need to submit your abstract and information online. Please follow the instructions carefully, especially with regard to authorship. The web address for online submission is https://survey.med.nodak.edu/franklow/.

The deadline for submitting your abstract is March 31. Please print your submission information and submit a hard copy to JoAnn Johnson in the Medical School's Office of the Associate Dean for Research (Room 5928). For more information, call 777-6269.
-- JoAnn Johnson, Administrative Secretary, Office of the Associate Dean for Research, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, joannj@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-6269

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology to hold remembrance celebration

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology will mark the recent deaths of two faculty colleagues with a remembrance celebration at 3:30 p.m. Monday, May 3, in the Reed Keller Auditorium, School of Medicine and Health Sciences. Gene Homandberg passed away on Dec. 21 and Siegfried Detke on Jan. 13. All family, colleagues, students and friends are welcome to attend.
-- Katherine A. Sukalski, Interim Chair and Associate Professor, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, sukalski@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-4049

Dean of Students Lillian Elsinga to retire June 30

Lillian Elsinga, dean of students and associate vice president for student services, will retire June 30.

Born in Zuidhoren, the Netherlands, Elsinga immigrated with her parents to Michigan in 1951. She attended Hope College and then transferred to Grand Valley State College, where she earned a bachelor's degree in German and teaching. She served as an admissions counselor at Grand Valley State from 1968 to 1971. She earned her master's degree from Michigan State University in 1973, and was hired by UND as associate dean of students. She served as interim vice president for student affairs in 1983, and was named dean of students in 1984. In 1998, she was also named associate vice president for student services.

Elsinga has earned numerous awards, including the Native American Programs and the UNDIA awards in 1983; the Grand Valley State College Distinguished Alumni Award in 1986; the Women's Studies Award in 1993; the UND Apartment Community Pride Award in 1995; the National Association for Student Judicial Affairs Award in 1996; the President's Advisory Council on Women Award in 1998; the UND Spirit Award from Athletics in 1998 and 2000; the Era Bell Thompson Award in 2001; the Trio Programs Award; the Stetson Law and Higher Education Conference Award in 2002; the UND Student Government Gordon Henry Dedication to Students and Multicultural Student Services awards in 2005; the Athena Award in 2007; and the UND Greek Life Pillar Award in 2010.

She has served on dozens of committees during her career, including academic and student policy committees, Athletics, and the Community Violence and Intervention Center Domestic Violence Grand Forks Assessment Task Force. She also served as an honorary coach for the UND men's and women's swim teams in 2001.

On the national level, she's been part of the American College Personnel Association Commission for Judicial Affairs and has served as commission chairperson for three years. She's been a presenter at the Stetson Law and Higher Education Conference for six years. In addition, she has taught undergraduate and graduate classes and mentored many graduate interns.

Robert Boyd, vice president for student and outreach services, said:
Lillian Elsinga, Associate Vice President for Student Services and Dean of Students, announced her intent to retire on June 30 of this year. As is often true with such announcements, there are mixed feelings among those receiving them: happy for the individual retiring and sad for the organization that must do without their friendship and service. This is certainly true in Lillian's case.

I suppose it is true that no one individual in an organization is indispensable, but I have always believed that some come closer than others. Indispensable is a word that quickly comes to mind when I think of her leaving us. I know she would be the first to say the word doesn't apply to her, but we know better.

Lillian and I have been friends and colleagues together in one way or another for more than three decades. During that time she has often been my tutor, but just as important she has always challenged me to think of how students might be better served; usually these challenges do not come in verbal exchanges, instead through serving as model - always a more effective way. Anyone who has followed her career has seen a consistent attitude of caring and a common-sense approach to problem solving - both more than likely gained from immigrant parents who worked hard to be successful in the bakery business but never lost sight of their obligation to others.

Many of you may not know that Lillian was born in the Netherlands and English is truly her second language. She often jokes about this and apologizes for a slip of the tongue. In truth, she is extremely articulate and never more so than when she is talking about students and service to them.

Her list of accomplishments while at UND will no doubt be referred to in the time prior to her retirement, and it is long. But I consider her greatest accomplishment to be her genuine, and too often unheralded, friendship to all who she encounters. Her office and her home are equally open to all who need something she has to offer.

I am glad we and our students still have several months of Lillian's service but the announcement already makes us start missing her. We thank her for all she has done.

During retirement, Elsinga looks forward to spending more time with her husband, Boyd Wright, and other family members. She enjoys singing with the Sharon Lutheran Church Choir, gardening, and travel.

Funds available for community-based teaching, research projects

Proposals are now being accepted for support of community-based teaching and research projects through the newly established Stone Soup Fund administered by the Center for Community Engagement. The name and concept of the fund is drawn from the folk tale of hungry travelers who convince a village to contribute to their soup made from a stone, feeding the travelers and the village.

A maximum of $1,000 may be awarded from the fund to a faculty or instructional staff member for a teaching and/or research project that benefits a community and involves at least one community partner. Teaching projects must involve students enrolled in academic credit who are engaged in service-learning. Research projects must produce results that are made publicly available.

Possible eligible expenses include travel to project sites, printing and duplicating, materials, supplies and meeting expenses. Funds cannot be used to substitute for expenses normally covered by academic departments such as usual and customary classroom costs. Up to $5,000 is available for projects to be completed by June 30, and another $5,000 is available for projects to be completed by Dec. 31. Proposals will be accepted at any time until all funds are committed.

The Stone Soup Fund was initiated by the Center’s Community Advisory Board and has benefitted from contributions from the Office of the Vice President of Academic Affairs, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, Bremer Bank, the Greystone Group, Altru Foundation and the North Dakota Mill and Elevator. An application form is available at www.communityengagement.und.edu. For more information or assistance, please feel free to contact me.
-- Lana Rakow, Director, Center for Community Engagement, lanarakow@mail.und.edu, 777-2287

NDPERS web site features retirement plan information

Two web videos discussing the NDPERS retirement plans’ funded status have been produced and are available on the PERS web site at http://www.nd.gov/ndpers/ . In the videos, Sparb Collins, executive director, NDPERS, discusses the challenge facing the PERS retirement plan as a result of the downturn in the financial markets and the various considerations relating to that challenge. Part One discusses the challenge and Part Two discusses the considerations. Part Three (to be produced by the end of March) will review the proposed legislation submitted by the PERS Board to the Legislative Employee Benefits Programs Committee. Go to the PERS web site at http://www.nd.gov/ndpers/ and click on the icon titled “Perspectives Retirement Plan Update Webcast.”

The 2009 comprehensive annual financial report is submitted yearly to the Government Finance Officers Association with an application for the GFOA Certificate of Excellence in Financial Reporting. This report provides information on the financial, investments, actuarial and statistics of the PERS retirement plan. Go to the PERS web site (www.nd.gov/ndpers/ ) and click on the icon titled “2009 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report.”
-- North Dakota Public Employees Retirement System, 701-328-3900, ndpers@nd.gov

NDUS comprehensive IT survey is online

The North Dakota University System wants to provide better information technology (IT) services to you and your institution. Your input is vital to this effort. Please help us by completing a brief survey. The survey is available at: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/2010NDUSSatisfactionSurvey . It will be open through midnight Sunday, Feb. 21. All submissions are anonymous.

This is the first comprehensive survey conducted by the North Dakota University System (NDUS) to assess the enterprise IT services that are provided by System Information Technology Services (SITS). In addition to questions related to system IT services, NDUS institutions have included additional questions about local IT services that are parallel or complementary to system IT services.

The results of this survey will help us and the NDUS institutions chart priorities, allocate resources and plan future direction for information technology. A higher priority for funding and support will be given to services that are important to constituents, satisfy user needs, and support the strategic goals of the NDUS. Thank you for becoming a partner in helping us improve our services to you.
-- Randall Thursby, CIO, North Dakota University System

Women Studies to redesign current curriculum

The Women Studies program is examining its current curriculum in a redesign effort, and would appreciate your input. What courses do you regularly teach that include a focus on issues of women, gender, or sexuality in at least one specific portion of the class? Please discuss how this focus is achieved as well as listing the course information, including prefix, number and average enrollment. Email responses to michelle.m.sauer@und.edu by March 11.
-- Michelle M. Sauer, Associate Professor, English, michelle.m.sauer@und.edu, 777-2783

Labor announces new procedures for hiring international employees

The US Department of Labor (DOL) recently changed its procedures to obtain a prevailing wage determination required for all H-1B employment visa petitions. This includes initial H-1B requests and extensions for UND faculty and staff. The new DOL requirements added two months to the process. It is important for hiring officials to begin the H-1B visa process with the Office of International Programs early in the hiring process. A routine H-1B takes 6.5 to 7.5 months to obtain from the Department of Homeland Security. An expedited H-1B takes up to four months. Homeland Security charges an additional $1,000 for the expedited service. If you have any questions, contact William Young.
-- William Young, Associate Director, International Programs, williamyoung@mail.und.edu, 777-3935

Anthropology offers archeological field school

Anthropology invites students to attend its archeological field school, which is being offered in cooperation with the National Park Service. The field school will be held at the Elbee and Karishta archeological sites, located within the Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site near the town of Stanton, N.D. Field school students will receive hands-on training and experience in the traditional areas of archeological research, such as the use of different kinds of field equipment and techniques for excavation and artifact recovery, site mapping, documentation and record keeping. Students will also be exposed to geophysical survey (remote sensing) studies occurring at the site.

For more information, please visit our web site:
http://www.und.edu/dept/undar/fieldschool/fieldschool.html.
-- Michael A. Jackson, Associate Research Archeologist, Anthropology, michael.jackson@und.edu, 777-4081

CoBPA, NDTO recognize inaugural export course

The College of Business and Public Administration and the North Dakota Trade Office recognized the accomplishments of business students and business leaders who completed the college’s inaugural Export Management training course on Wednesday, Feb. 3.

Students and business leaders received a certificate of achievement for completing the 12-week export management series developed by the CoBPA and the NDTO. The course is designed to prepare business students and business leaders for expansion into the global marketplace. Attendees learn how to identify export business opportunities in foreign markets and how to avoid the common and not-so-common missteps that can create regulatory headaches and strip businesses of customers and profits. Participants were introduced to international business professionals and a peer network that shared real-life experiences regarding the critical elements of operating an export business.

Many skilled instructors participated in the course. For example, Dean Adams, principal brand strategist for Level Brand Inc. of Minneapolis and a former marketing director for 3M Corporation, was a key instructor. Adams shared his expertise in developing a global brand identity. Robert Pelka, vice president of structured trade finance, Wells Fargo HSBC Trade Bank N.A., shared options available to finance export business. About 40 UND business students and 13 business leaders participated in the Export Management Training Course.

“We are pleased with our collaboration with NDTO in this endeavor that started more than a year ago. The course was developed and offered with the idea of a hands-on-approach to learning the fundamentals of managing an export business and was taught by the prominent and experienced business managers at the right time in light of President Obama’s new goal to double our exports over the next five years to create 2 million jobs right here in America, as he elaborated in his State of Union Address last week,” said Fathollah Bagheri, professor of economics, who was the lead faculty member for the course.
-- Laura Dvorak-Berry, External Relations, College of Business and Public Administration, laura.dvorak-berry@business.und.edu, 777-6937

Writing Center supports teaching through class visits

The Writing Center is a writing resource for the university community. Instructors can incorporate Writing Center support in their classes through class visits. One type of visit is a brief introduction to the Writing Center (about ten minutes). A Writing Center staff member will come to the class, talk to students about Writing Center services, answer their questions and distribute brochures. These visits are a great way to encourage students to use our services. The second kind of visit is a mini-workshop, tailored to a particular writing assignment and the instructor's goals. For example, visits might be focused on strategies for research papers or fair use of sources. The first step towards a mini-workshop is to contact Kathleen Vacek, interim coordinator of the Writing Center, at kathleen.vacek@und.edu or 777-6381.
-- Kathleen Vacek, Interim Coordinator, Writing Center, kathleen.vacek@und.edu, 777-6381

Staff Senate welcomes University input

Do you have questions, concerns, issues, ideas or suggestions regarding the University at large, or would like to know more about Staff Senate? You may complete a comment form by going to the Staff Senate web site at http://www.und.edu/org/undss/ and clicking on “Suggestion Box.” A topic may be referred to one of the Staff Senate's standing committees prior to presentation to the full Staff Senate. As your representatives, Staff Senate always welcomes your input, feedback and comments.
-- Shari Nelson, Assistant Director of Learning Services, Student Success Center, sharinelson@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2117

Applications for Staff Senate scholarship available online

In keeping with President Kelley's wish that we "go green," the application for scholarships for dependents of benefited staff will not be mailed out to individuals this year. The application can be found on the Staff Senate web site at http://www.und.nodak.edu/org/undss/ where you will also find the scholarship criteria and important deadline dates. Successful fundraising has enabled the Staff Senate to provide UND student scholarships for the 2010-11 academic year. These student scholarships are now available through the Student Financial Aid Office.

We encourage you to have your dependent children apply for this scholarship. Staff Senate is very proud of its efforts in raising the money for these scholarships. This money was raised by Staff Senate cookbook sales, the 9th Annual "31 Days of Glory Raffle," payroll deductions and donations. Through continued fundraising efforts, we hope to offer these scholarships annually. We thank you for your past support and look forward to your continued support in future endeavors.
-- Linda Neuerburg, Assistant Director, American Indian Student Services, linda.neuerburg@und.edu, 777-2578

Applicants sought for Freshman Getting Started student assistants

The Student Success Center is seeking applicants for student assistant positions for Freshman Getting Started 2010. The dates of employment will be June 1 – July 16. Full- and part-time positions are available. Applicants must be current undergraduate students and enrolled at UND for at least one academic year. Those interested in this on-campus position should apply online at http://www.und.edu/employment/. Contact the Student Success Center (Memorial Union 201) at 777-2117, ssc@mail.und.nodak.edu, for more information. The application deadline is Feb. 26.
-- Lindsay Kuntz, Academic Advisor, Student Success Center, lindsaykuntz@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-6131

Check cashing is no longer available at Union Services

Effective immediately, Union Services, located on the main level of the Memorial Union, will no longer be offering check cashing services. Checks will be for the amount of purchase only.
-- Linda Maszk, Business Manager, Memorial Union, linda.maszk@und.nodak.edu, 777-3927

University Within the University (U2) lists new classes

Lunch With A Dietitian: Focus on Fiber
Feb. 22, 12:10 to 12:50 p.m., Brown Bag Lunch Session. Memorial Union, Badlands Room
Did you know only about half of the US population is consuming the recommended amount of fiber per day? Fiber has many benefits to us: it keeps our digestive system functioning properly, aids in hearts heath, helps reduce the risk of chronic diseases like diabetes, as well as aids in weight management. Fiber is found is many everyday items like whole grain breads and cereals, fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds. Join us as we discuss easy ways to increase your fiber intake and lead a healthier life. Presenter: Karina Wittmann

How to Process Payment Documentation
Feb. 23, 9 to 11 a.m., Memorial Union, Badlands Room
Learn the process for Purchase Orders payments, Blanket Purchase Order payments, and Vouchers. Presenter: Allison Peyton

Supporting International Students during Cultural and Academic Adjustment
Feb. 23, 10 a.m. to noon, International Centre
From differences in University administrative structure and classroom environment to different expectations for social interactions, UND's students from outside the United States face a wealth of new experiences and challenges during their studies. These differences can also provide challenges for faculty and staff who are interacting with international students. This session will address some of the common challenges that international students may face. We will discuss the resources and recommendations that we give to students during international student orientation and related programs. We will also provide faculty and staff with tools for empowering international students who may be struggling with the new environment. Presenters: Shannon Jolly and Bridget Flaherty

GroupWise 8.0: Intermediate
Feb. 23, 1 to 4 p.m., Upson II, Room 361
You will work with advanced message options; set mail properties; customize message headers; use Web Access interface; create and use rules to automate e-mail responses; set access rights; and work in depth with the Junk Mail folder and archive feature. Presenter: Heidi Strande

Student Employment and Staff Development: A Winning Combination
Feb. 24, 8 to 10 a.m., Continental breakfast provided, Memorial Union, River Valley Room
What kind of work experience are you providing student employees? How are the actions of your supervisors affecting morale, productivity and retention? Each school year, students have access to hundreds of employment opportunities on our campuses. Yet, as departments struggle to recruit and retain student workers, are we also overlooking opportunities to develop much needed supervisory skills for our full-time staff? This workshop will show how a work environment can become an integrated part of the education and preparation of the whole student as it relates to their total collegiate experience. It will also identify skill sets that supervisors need to help today’s students develop beyond the practical aspects of their jobs. Learn how to: gain a better understanding of what a learning-outcomes based work environment is and how students and departments can benefit from this type of setting; identify learning outcomes for student employees that meet the requirements of the job description, as well as the expectations of the University and future employers; how positive and constructive feedback techniques are essential in helping student employees make connections between job tasks and learning outcomes; an how mentoring and coaching skills help students learn and develop beyond the practical aspects of their jobs. Presenter: Tony Trimarco

Visa Issues and the Hiring of International Faculty and Staff
Feb. 24, 2 to 4 p.m., Skalicky Tech Incubator, Room 211
Are you hiring international faculty/staff or sponsoring visiting scholars? This session will provide guidance concerning the acquisition of the correct visa for international faculty, visiting scholars, medical residents, and professional staff. It will discuss the difference between J-1, H-1B, and TN visas along with application procedures through the Office of International Programs, U.S. Immigration and Citizenship Service, and U.S. Department of State. Presenter: William Young

Payroll Intermediate
Feb. 25, 8:30 to 10:30 a.m., Swanson Hall, Room 10-12
This Intermediate HRMS session is for employees with departmental HRMS access. Topics covered will include: department budget tables, reports and queries. There will also be a question/answer period at the end of the session. Bring your questions with you or submit them prior to the session at pathanson@mail.und.nodak.edu" target="_blank">pathanson@mail.und.nodak.edu to make sure they will be answered at this session. Presenter: Pat Hanson

Internet Safety for Kids: A Parent’s Guide
Feb. 25, 9 to 11:30 a.m., Upson II, Room 361
The Internet can help kids learn, communicate, and socialize, but it also exposes them to certain risks. Parents will learn how to protect their young children and teens and keep them safe online. Some of the topics include risks associated with popular Internet tools and social networking sites; how to filter objectionable Web content and use parental control software; cyberbullying and how to prevent it; how to educate children about Internet predators; and Web resources for parents to learn and then use to educate their children. Presenter: Brad Miller

Running, Reading, & Reconciling Key Finance Reports in PeopleSoft
Feb. 25, 9 to 10:30 a.m., Gamble Hall, Lanterman Center, Room 9
Prerequisite: Must have previously attended either a “Budgets Overview Inquiry” or “Budget vs. Cash Inquiry” U2 session and must have a PeopleSoft user ID and password for Finance Module. This training provides the tools necessary to navigate through PeopleSoft in order to run, read, and understand PeopleSoft financial reports. Important tips will be provided to help you recognize why, when, and how to reconcile revenue and expense transactions posted to your funds. Troubleshooting tips and tools to help you resolve budgeting errors will also be provided. This session includes hands-on practice activities. Presenter: Tom Swangler
-- Patricia Young, U2 Coordinator, Continuing Education, U2@mail.und.edu, 777-0720

Duplicating Services has paper boxes for giveaway

Duplicating Services has empty paper boxes to give away. For more information, call 777-5088.
-- Duplicating Services

Staff Senate thanks all who helped with the Emerald and Ice Gala

Staff Senate would like to thank the UND campus community for its participation in the Emerald and Ice Gala held on Feb. 6. Attendees, including President and First Lady Kelley, reported having a wonderful time with an evening filled with music, dancing, laughter, good conversation and a bit of "gambling." The Downtown Horns provided "phenomenal" music and the food was described as "fantastic." Over 200 tickets were sold, and as a result of the silent auction, enough money was raised to provide five new scholarships to students. Individuals had the opportunity to use their "gambling" money to bid on over 80 prizes, which were donated by individuals across the campus. As a result of the Gala's success, Staff Senate is already planning next year's event. So, once again, thank you to all who participated by donating, assisting, attending or buying tickets.
-- Shari Nelson, Assistant Director of Learning Services, Student Success Center, sharinelson@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-0562

Denim Day for Haitian relief breaks record

The Special Denim Day for Haitian relief, held Jan. 22, collected $2,875. It is the the highest Denim Day collection to date. Proceeds will be divided between Salvation Army and the Red Cross.
-- Patsy Nies, Special Project Assistant, Enrollment Services, patsynies@mail.und.edu, 777-3791

Vote for your favorite "Wear Red for Healthy Hearts" photos

Thank you for all of the great submissions of "Wear Red for Healthy Hearts" photos from various departments. Voting for the "Most Creative," "Funniest," and "Best Dressed" will occur on the Work Well web site at www.workwell.und.edu from Feb. 15-19. Three fruit and yogurt parfait parties (for up to 20 people) will be given out to the winners Feb. 26.
-- Kim Ruliffson, Coordinator of Work Well, Wellness Center, kimberlyruliffson@mail.und.edu, 777-0210

Vending machines identify healthy options

In an effort to educate consumers and offer more healthy options, Dining Services has recently improved the variety and identification of healthy food options in campus vending machines. Food in the snack machines, as well as the refrigerated and frozen food machines across campus have been color coded and labeled as Healthiest (green), Healthier (yellow) and Least Healthy (red). Criteria used to categorize food include calories, total fat, saturated fat, and percentage of sugar. For more information, see http://www.dining.und.edu/vending.html.
-- Dustin Frize, Dietitian, Dining Services, dustinfrize@mail.und.edu, 777-2702

Purchase Office Enterprise for a chance to win Xbox 360 Elite/Beatles Rock Band package

Microsoft is giving you a chance to win an Xbox 360 Elite/Beatles™ Rock Band™ package. Simply purchase Office Enterprise 2007 (a $499 value) through the Microsoft Home Use Program (HUP) for just $9.95. Then, to top off this incredible deal, we’ll automatically enter you to win one of 10 Xbox 360 Elite/Beatles™ Rock Band™ prize packages.

To purchase your copy of Office Enterprise 2007, go to http://www.microsofthup.com/hupus/home.aspx?culture=en-US. If you need help ordering Office Enterprise 2007, contact your department Software Coordinator. If you do not know who your department Software Coordinator is, call 777-3245.

If you have already purchased a copy of Office Enterprise 2007, you can alternately enter via mail by hand-printing your first and last name, mailing address, city, state, postal code, phone number (including area code) and company e-mail address on a 3x5 piece of paper and mailing it to us as at the following address:
Microsoft Office HUP Sweepstakes
c/o Gage
10000 Highway 55
Minneapolis, M.N., 55441

Hurry. The HUP “Rock the House” promotion ends Feb. 28. This promotion is only open to UND Employees. For full contest rules, go to http://www.hupsweepstakes.com/main/rules.aspx.
-- Craig Cerkowniak, Associate Director, ITSS, craigcerkowniak@mail.und.edu, 777-2385

Museum Cafe lists weekly menu (beginning Feb. 17)

Salads
Curried Chicken and Wild Rice Salad:
This delightful meal is a combination of chicken and wild rice with curry spices, mango and leafy greens.

Chef’s Salad:
A casual salad made up of a combination of several leafy greens, mushrooms, cherry tomatoes, English cucumbers, radishes, scallions, hard-boiled eggs, slices of avocado and sweet apples. Served with herbed vinaigrette.

Sandwiches - Served with fruit and chips
Bagel and Lox:
Smoked salmon on a toasted bagel with a cream cheese dill spread and sprouts.

Pulled Pork Sandwich:
Savory pulled pork on an onion roll, topped with horseradish coleslaw.

Caprese:
Alternate layers of sliced tomatoes and mozzarella cheese and basil pesto served on a toasted baguette.

French Dip:
Layers of thinly sliced roast beef on a toasted baguette, served with a side of au jus.

Entree
Lasagna:
Served with a side salad and garlic toast.

Soup
Fresh Asparagus

Sides
- Hummus:Served with slices of warm pita. Choice of garlic or sweet potato hummus
- French Baguette with Butter
- Pretzel with Honey Mustard

Desserts
- Chocolate Truffle Cake with Raspberry Sauce
- Meringue with Mascarpone Cream and Raspberries
- Lemon Cheesecake Bars

Museum Café hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays, with lunch served from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
-- Jessica Mongeon, Events Coordinator, North Dakota Museum of Art, jmongeon@ndmoa.com, 777-4195

Internal job openings listed

The following position vacancies are available only to regular UND staff employees who have successfully completed their six-month probation period, earn annual and sick leave, receive BC/BS health insurance and TIAA-CREF or ND PERS retirement benefits. Current UND faculty, please contact Human Resources for eligibility.

To apply: Please complete UND Application/Control Card form. Send letter of application and resume, referencing position name and number, to: Human Resources, University of North Dakota, Twamley Hall, Room 313, 264 Centennial Drive Stop 8010 Grand Forks, ND 58202-8010. Applications must be received by the deadline date.

Lead Instructor/Flight Manager
Posting Number: #10-206
Closing Date: 2/22/2010
Minimum Salary: $29,126 plus/year
Position Status: Full-Time
Hours per week: 40
Benefits Eligibility: Benefitted
Department: Flight Operations

Building Services Technician Lead
Posting Number: #10-202
Closing Date: 2/17/2010
Minimum Salary: $22,500 plus/year
Position Status: Full-Time
Hours per week: 40
Benefits Eligibility: Benefitted
Department: Facilities

ND EPSCoR announces IIP Equipment Awards

The North Dakota Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (ND EPSCoR) has announced the IIP Equipment Awards. These awards are designed to foster the competitiveness of North Dakota researchers in areas supported by the NSF by addressing one of the University’s most critical research needs: the acquisition of state-of the-art equipment. Award winners are required to submit a competitive single-PI research proposal to the NSF by June 30.

The awards made were competitively selected from a total of twelve applications. The external reviewers were very impressed by the overall quality of the proposals, and the end result is that we committed to fund five of the proposals.

Award recipients:
- Associate Professor Mark Askelson, Atmospheric Sciences, $37,961 “Using Automotive Collision Risk Radars to Sense Precipitation: An Infrastructure Improvement Programs (IIP) Equipment Grant Initiative Proposal”
- Assistant Professor Sean Hightower, Chemistry, $50,000, “LaserStrobe Time-Resolved Spectrofluorometer”
- Assistant Professor Yun Ji, Chemical Engineering, $38,210, “Continuous Hasterlloy C276 Reactor System for Biocatalysis Research”
- Assistant Professor Alena Kubatova, Chemistry, $45,300, “Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) for Atmospheric Aerosol Chamber Experiments and Renewable Fuels Emission Characterization”
- Assistant Professor Steven Ralph, Biology, $39,435, “Acquisition of Multiple Environmental Chambers for the Study of Adaptation to Environmental stress at UND.”

For additional information concerning ND EPSCoR or IIP Equipment program, please contact Mark. R. Hoffmann, Assistant Vice President for Research and Co-Project Director, ND EPSCoR, Twamley Hall 415, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, N.D. 58201-7093, 777-2492.
-- Mark R. Hoffmann, Assistant VP for Research and Economic Development, Co-Project Director, ND EPSCoR, markhoffmann@mail.und.edu, 777-2492

ND EPSCoR announces IIP Seed Awards

The North Dakota Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (ND EPSCoR) has announced the IIP Seed awards. These Seed awards are designed to foster the competitiveness of North Dakota researchers by providing support to faculty who propose to initiate or substantially expand studies that will lead to merit-based grants in one or more of the areas supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF). Seed award winners are required to submit a competitive single-PI research proposal to the NSF by Feb. 1, 2012.

The awards made were competitively selected from a total of sixteen applications. The external reviewers were very impressed by the overall quality of the proposals, and the end result is that we committed to fund five of the proposals.

Award recipients:
- Assistant Professor Jerome Delhommelle, Chemistry, $38,565, “Molecular Modeling of Phase-Change Materials for Nonvolatile Memories”
- Associate Professor Van Doze, Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics, $40,000, “Adrenergic Regulation of Neurogenesis and Cognition”
- Associate Professor Ju Kim, Physics and Astrophysics, $32,952, “Entanglement of Interacting Josephson Vortex Quantum bits in the Noisy Environment”
- Assistant Professor Nuri Oncel, Physics and Astrophysics, $32,657, “Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopy Studies of IR nanowires on GE (001)”
- Professor Lothar Stahl, Chemistry, $31,356, “Oxidatiave Additions of Organohalophosphines on Group 14 Heterocarbenes”

For additional information concerning ND EPSCoR or the IIP SEED Program, please contact Mark. R. Hoffmann, Assistant Vice President for Research and Co-Project Director, ND EPSCoR, Twamley Hall 415, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, N.D. 58201-7093, 777-2492.
-- Mark R. Hoffmann, Assistant VP for Research and Economic Development & Co-Project Director, ND EPSCoR, markhoffmann@mail.und.edu, 777-2492

NSF announces submission requirements for CI-TEAM

The National Science Foundation has issued the following program announcement, which allows UND to put forward a limited number of submissions. If you are interested in submitting a proposal to NSF for any of the programs, please let us know as soon as possible by email (barrymilavetz@mail.und.edu or juliesolheim@mail.und.edu) or phone (777-4278).

Cyberinfastructure Training, Education, Advancement and Mentoring for our 21st Century Workforce (CI-TEAM), Program Solicitation #10-532, http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2010/nsf10532/nsf10532.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

Available Formats:
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Document Number: nsf10532
As a result of the limited number of proposals that can be submitted, UND will conduct an internal review of preproposals. Preproposals should consist of the following sections:
- Cover page listing the project name, collaborators, contact person, total budget amount
- Instrument(s) to be purchased or developed and its (their) function(s)
- Impact on the research program of the collaborators, department(s), and college(s)
- Impact on the university’s mission as a whole
- Detailed budget

Preproposals should be no more than five pages in length, using a reasonable format (one inch margins, font size of 11, single-spaced). Preproposals are due in Research Development and Compliance (RD&C) by 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 10. Criteria used for reviewing preproposals will include appropriateness to the goal of the program, probability for funding by NSF, reasonableness of budgetary requests and impact of the request on the University and the academic units involved. Investigators will be notified of the review results as soon as possible in order to provide as much time as possible to prepare a final proposal for submission.
-- Barry Milavetz, Associate Vice President for Research, Research Development and Compliance, barrymilavetz@mail.und.edu, 777-4278