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ISSUE: Volume 46, Number 44: June 24, 2009

Contents
Top Stories
UND will focus on new partnerships with two-year community colleges
Attorney general taps UND scholars expertise on key North Dakota corporate farming law case
Events to Note
Doctoral examination set for Wanyi Jiang
Doctoral examination set for Crystal R. Evans
Doctoral examination set for Cheryl L. Stolz
Doctoral examination set for Julie M. Grieves
World Refugee Day celebration is June 23
UND to host MBA open house in partnership with Lake Region State College
June Denim Day Is June 24th
Art & Democracy Film Series to show "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington"
Burgers on the Boulevard is June 25
Doctoral examination set for Robert Johnson
Faculty and staff encouraged to participate in residence hall move-in
Retirement reception honor Doug Helland
Doctoral examination set for Ramesh P. Dhungana
Kimmerle photography to be on display at the museum
University Within the University (U2) lists new classes
Announcements
Hamline Square Apartments still leasing
Enjoy coffee, tea at half-price: UND Bookstore, 8 to 9 a.m.
Law Library announces July 4th weekend hours
Neville Alberto named new UND program director of transitional residency and associate program director of internal medicine residency
July 4 is holiday
Chester Fritz Library 4th of July weekend hours of operation
University letter will not be published next week
New project enhances patient safety at North Dakota hospitals
UND med school inducts first members of Gold Humanism Honor Society
Sponsored project refunds must be reviewed by grants officer
Four digital sirens installed as part of emergency communication system
Alumni Association and Foundation site links may have changed
Beware of laptop thefts on campus
Donated leave sought for Wanda Seyler
Donated leave sought for Andrea Bensen
Research
EERC research finds mercury levels in freshwater and ocean fish not as harmful as previously thought
Remember to use updated IRB forms
In the News
Aerospace dean recognizes UAS team's flood-fighting efforts
UND will focus on new partnerships with two-year community colleges

UND will focus on new partnerships with two-year community colleges in North Dakota and Minnesota as a part of a long-term goal of providing more educational opportunities to communities without a four-year public university.

UND will work with community colleges to develop a "hometown university" that offers residents access to baccalaureate and graduate degrees through online and other distance formats. In this model residents can earn their degree from UND while they continue to live and work in their local community. Students will continue to have the traditional transfer option, attending classes on the UND campus in Grand Forks.

"Between the programs offered by the community colleges, and the online and distance education programs available from UND, these communities will have a wide array of educational opportunities available to them," said UND President Robert Kelley. "The 'hometown university' approach brings UND to communities across North Dakota and Minnesota."

UND already has a strong partnership with Bismarck State College, with an office located on the BSC campus. UND has been providing graduate programs to the Bismarck-Mandan community since 1976. UND is also working with BSC to start the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute in Bismarck this fall. The Osher Institute offers a variety of non-credit courses and activities designed for adults over the age of 50.

UND is also expanding its partnership with Lake Region State College (LRSC), and the two institutions will host an open house for Devils Lake residents interested in UND's online Master of Business Administration (MBA) program. The Open House is slated for Tuesday, June 23, 5 to 6 p.m. in the Heritage Hall at LRSC.

UND will hire a new full-time staff member to be located on the Lake Region campus. The new staff member will assist UND's distance students living in Devils Lake as well as transfer students who want to complete their baccalaureate degree on UND's campus. Lake Region and UND also have a long-standing partnership for TrainND, the state's workforce training system.

As part of the new focus on community college partnerships, UND will close the UND Fargo Outreach Office effective June 30. Since it was established in 2003, it has facilitated the classroom delivery of a master's degree in Elementary Education and a doctoral program in Educational Leadership. The closure of the Fargo office reflects the realignment of UND's strategic goals, and it will not impact current students in those programs. Fargo area residents will continue to have access to more than 40 degree and graduate certificate programs available from UND in an online format.

UND has begun additional partnership conversations with other two-year colleges across North Dakota and into Minnesota, and administration plans to have at least five new partnerships established within the next year.

"This is a win-win for everybody," said Kelley. "UND will strategically grow online and transfer enrollments, the community colleges will be able to attract more students to their campuses through expanded degree options at the bachelor's and graduate level, and most importantly, the residents will benefit from a strong educational system that meets their needs."
-- Peter Johnson, Executive Associate Vice President for University Relations, 777-4317, peterjohnson@mail.und.nodak.edu

Attorney general taps UND scholars expertise on key North Dakota corporate farming law case

UND rural sociologist Curtis Stofferahn is no stranger to research on issues involving rural North Dakota. Stofferahn is well-known in rural sociology circles for, among other things, his many years conducting the North Dakota Rural Life Poll.

Stofferahn was tapped by N.D. Attorney General Wayne Stenehjem to provide expert testimony in the case of State of North Dakota vs. Crosslands. The case involved a nonprofit conservation group founded 20 years ago by a Minneapolis precious metals dealer. Stenehjem contended that the group, Crosslands, had acquired land in several counties in breach of North Dakota’s anti-corporate farming laws.

North Dakota law prohibits corporations from farming, ranching, or owning or leasing farmland. North Dakota family-controlled corporations are exempt from the law. The law does allow nonprofit organizations such a Crosslands to buy agricultural land for conservation purposes, such as wildlife reserves, but only after submitting to an extensive review process and getting an okay from the governor.

Rural social scientists have been called upon as expert witnesses to document the legitimate public purposes that corporate farming laws such as North Dakota’s serve, Stofferahn said. These social scientists-including Stofferahn-draw upon existing research that documents the effects of industrialized farming on communities.

Stofferahn concluded in his review of the literature for this case that-based on the evidence generated by social scientists-there is good reason for the public to be concerned about the negative community impacts of industrialized farming.

This was a great opportunity for me to rediscover the literature on this topic because it had been the primary area of my research as a doctoral student, Stofferahn said. After I posted my report on my Web site, it was quickly distributed across the country. At last count, there were 212 Google citations connecting back to my report.

A North Dakota district judge recently decided that Crosslands could keep some, but not all of, the more than 1,700 acres of wildlife habitat it owns in three North Dakota counties. The judge also upheld the North Dakota's anti-corporate farm law.

Stofferahn and colleague Linda Lobao, a rural sociologist at Ohio State University who provided expert testimony in the challenge to the South Dakota corporate farming law, last year published an article titled “The Community Effects of Industrialized Farming: Social Science Research and Challenges to Corporate Farming Laws in Agriculture and Human Values.”

In that article, Stofferahn and Lobao concluded that social science research supports the position that public concern about industrialized farming is warranted and, in turn, that states have a legitimate public interest in regulating these farms.

This conclusion rests on the consistency of research which has found detrimental effects of industrialized farming on many indicators of community quality of life, particularly those involving the social fabric of communities, Stofferahn and Lobao wrote.

For more information, contact Curtis Stofferahn, professor of sociology, at 777-4418 or curtis_stofferahn@und.edu
-- Juan Pedraza, National Media Relations Coordinator, University Relations, juan.pedraza@mail.und.edu, 777-6571

Doctoral examination set for Wanyi Jiang

The final examination for Wanyi Jiang, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Physical Chemistry, is set for noon, July 7, in 138 Abbott Hall. The dissertation title is: Applications of a Configuration-Driven Unitary Group Approach to Electronic Structure Theory. Prof. Mark Hoffmann (Chemistry) is the committee chair.

The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Cheryl L. Stolz

The final examination for Cheryl L. Stolz, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Counseling Psychology, is set for 11:30 a.m., July 2, 318 Montgomery Hall. The dissertation title is: Supervision Experiences of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Psychologists-in-Training: A Qualitative Study. Dr. David Whitcomb (Counseling Psychology) is the committee chair.

The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Crystal R. Evans

The final examination for Crystal R. Evans, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Clinical Psychology, is set for 10 a.m., July 6, in room 210, Corwin/Larimore Building. The dissertation title is: Depression and Health Among American Indians and Alaska Native Elders. Dr. Justin D. (Doug) McDonald (Psychology) is the committee chair.

The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Julie M. Grieves

The final examination for Julie M. Grieves, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Clinical Psychology, is set for 2 p.m., July 6, in room 210, Corwin/Larimore Building. The dissertation title is: Depression Symptom Changes As A Function of Increased Creative Behavior Over a Two-Week Recording Period. Dr. Alan King (Psychology) is the committee chair.

The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

World Refugee Day celebration is June 23

In recognition of the worldwide event declared by the United Nations High Commission for Refugees, the Global Friends Coalition will be hosting a celebration on Tuesday, June 23. This event will be held both inside and outside Zion United Methodist Church from 7 to 9 p.m. The program will begin at 7:30.

Attendees can learn more about the refugee experience, the refugees living in our community, and volunteer opportunities through cultural displays and performances. Refreshments and children's activities will also be provided. The event is free, but attendees can bring a donation of a new or gently used household item (something to set up an apartment for a refugee family).
-- Robin David, Associate Director, Honors Program, robin.david@und.edu, 777-6185

UND to host MBA open house in partnership with Lake Region State College

UND, in partnership with Lake Region State College, will host an open house Tuesday, June 23 at the LRSC campus for individuals interested in an online Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree program.

A recent study developed by LRSC and UND indicated a growing demand for professional degrees in the Lake Region, so the two schools are partnering to bring more educational opportunities to Devils Lake and the surrounding area.

The open house will be held in Heritage Hall on the LRSC Campus, 1801 College Drive North, Devils Lake from 5 to 6:30 p.m., with a brief presentation at 5:30 p.m. Anyone in Devils Lake or the surrounding area who is interested in the MBA program is welcome to attend.

"The MBA Open House is the beginning of many opportunities we will be offering in partnership with Lake Region State College," said Dr. Philip Parnell, director of online enrollment and community college relations at UND, "Between what Lake Region already offers and what UND can bring into the region through online and distance education, our goal is to provide a 'hometown university' that meets the educational needs of the community without residents needing to travel outside of Devils Lake."

UND offers a large number of online and distance degree programs. The online MBA program prepares individuals to meet real world management challenges at the executive level. Graduates of the MBA program will have enhanced communication, management, and analytical skills.

Individuals interested in the online MBA can attend the June 23 open house to visit with MBA faculty and advisors, review the MBA curriculum and admission requirements, learn how the online program works, and discuss tuition and financial aid options.

For more information, contact UND Online & Distance Education at www.devilslake.und.edu or toll free at 1-800-342-8230.
-- David L. Dodds, Writer/Editor, University Relations, daviddodds@mail.und.edu, 777-5529

June Denim Day Is June 24th

Wednesday, June 24, is the last Wednesday of the month, and that makes it Denim Day. Wear your denim, pay your dollar to your building coordinator, and enjoy going casual.

If you need buttons or posters, call me. All proceeds to charity, as always.
-- Patsy Nies, Special Project Assistant, Enrollment Services, patsynies@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3791

Art & Democracy Film Series to show "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington"

The next installment of the Art & Democracy Film Series will show Frank Capra's "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington," starring James Stewart and Jean Arthur, Wednesday, June 24, 7 p.m. at the Empire Arts Center. Each movie in the series free and open to the public. Come join us for a discussion about assimilation, ethnic heritage, family expectations, comedy in America, and political correctness. The guest for the event is UND professor of political science, Mark Jendrysik.

The "Art & Democracy Film Series" offers us all the opportunity to talk, as a community, about the American experience. What are our values? How do we deal with difference? And, of course, what's art got to do with it? Through fun and accessible movies, audiences will explore, debate, and question, the foundations of our democracy and society. Each film is shown at the Empire Arts Center and is free and open to the public. First the group watches the movie together, then the host, Jack Russell Weinstein, Director of the Institute for Philosophy in Public Life and Associate Professor of Philosophy at UND, and host of the Prairie Public radio show “Why? Philosophical Discussions About Everyday Life,” interviews a guest about the topic of the film. Then the audience gets the opportunity to talk with Weinstein and his guest, as well as to each other. The conversation is light-hearted and fun, but sophisticated and interesting as well. All perspectives are welcome; the series in non-partisan.

The series also provides the opportunity to see how film-makers portray our lives. Is it accurate? Does it exaggerate? Can it help us learn about ourselves or does it interfere with our self understanding. Previous guests have included Clay Jenkinson, who led a discussion on what it means to be a North Dakotan, Crystal Alberts, who discussed the role of protest and sub-cultures in political life, and Paul Gaffney, who discussed the place of sports in our society with special attention to women athletes and the role of equality in competition.

Upcoming movies include (guests will be announced at a later date):
July 29: The Blues Brothers
August 26: Casablanca
September 30: American Beauty
October 28: Let The Right One In
November 25: Dr. Strangelove

More information about the institute and the film series can be found at www.philosophyinpubliclife.org. Questions can be sent to ippl@und.edu

The Art & Democracy films series is sponsored by the Institute for Philosophy in Public Life and the North Valley Arts Council. The Institute is a partnership between The North Dakota Humanities Council and the UND College of Arts & Sciences.
-- Jack Russell Weinstein, Associate Professor, Philosophy and Religion, jack.weinstein@und.nodak.edu, 777-2887

Burgers on the Boulevard is June 25

Burgers on the Boulevard is a quick lunch grill located outside of Stomping Grounds University Place on Thursday, June 25 from 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. (weather permitting). Hamburgers, brats, chicken and veggie burgers will be grilled fresh to order. You may also purchase side salads, beverages and chips. Enjoy patio seating outside or cool air-conditioning inside University Place. Parking available on Stanford Road.

Burgers on the Boulevard will open again next month (July 9, 16, 23 and 30, weather permitting) with some new menu items.

Menu for June 25:
Grilled Hamburger - $1.50
Grilled Cheeseburger - $1.75
Veggie Burger - $1.75
Brat - $1.50
Mesquite Chicken - $1.50
-- Jeff St. Michel, Assistant Director, Dining Services, jeffreystmichel@mail.und.edu, 777-3823

Doctoral examination set for Robert Johnson

The final examination for Robert Johnson, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Counseling Psychology, is set for 9 a.m., June 26, in 318 Montgomery Hall. The dissertation title is: Measuring Supervisor Self-Efficacy: Development and Validation of the Psychotherapy Supervisor Self-Efficacy Scale. Dr. Kara Wettersten (Counseling Psychology and Community Services) is the committee chair.

The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Retirement reception honor Doug Helland

A retirement reception honoring Doug Helland, Facilities Management Building Services Technician, will be held in the Facilities Management Lunchroom on Tuesday, June 30 at 6:15 a.m. Everyone is welcome to attend.
-- Patti Schmidt, HR Assistant, Facilities Management, pattischmidt@mail.und.edu, 777-2595

Faculty and staff encouraged to participate in residence hall move-in

Welcome weekend is coming soon and the Hall Orientation Team (a student organization in the residence halls) is looking for faculty and staff volunteers to meet and greet new families and students as they move into the residence halls. This is a new initiative where faculty and staff will join over 150 returning students to assist families and students move their belongings into the residence halls.

Residence Hall move-in is an exciting time on campus and a great way to meet students and families in a casual setting. A volunteer commitment is only three hours on Friday, August 21, or Saturday, August 22. Shifts include free lunch and a t-shirt.

Shift 1: 9 a.m. – Noon on Friday, August 21 (lunch at noon)
Shift 2: 1 p.m. – 4 p.m. on Friday, August 21 (lunch at noon)
Shift 3: 9 a.m. – Noon on Saturday, August 22 (lunch at noon)

Your time is valuable, especially as fall semester begins, but this is a chance to give our incoming students and families a warm welcome to our incredible campus. Sign up online at www.housing.und.edu/reshalls/hot/facultyform.html.
If you have questions, please contact Rob Trembinski, Assistant Director of Housing.
-- Rob Trembinski, Assistant Director, Housing, roberttrembinski@mail.und.edu, 777-8515

Doctoral examination set for Ramesh P. Dhungana

The final examination for Ramesh P. Dhungana, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Physics, is set for 3:30 p.m., June 30, in room 211, Witmer Hall. The dissertation title is: Josephson Vortex Quantum Bits: Decoherence and Entanglement. Ju H. Kim (Physics) is the committee chair.

The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Kimmerle photography to be on display at the museum

The photography of Chuck Kimmerle, University Photographer, will be on display at the North Dakota Museum of Art beginning June 30. This will be the first solo exhibition for the Grand Forks photographer. The artist reception and gallery talk will be held Tuesday, June 30, 6 p.m. Join us for music, wine and hors d’oeuvres.

Kimmerle was born and raised in Minnesota, and has been a photographer for more than 20 years. He moved to Grand Forks in 1996 while working as a photojournalist. His subsequent travels throughout the rural areas of the plains gave him an appreciation for the intricacy of the landscape, and the motivation for this ongoing project.

The exhibit, titled "The Unapologetic Landscape," explores the unique features, both agricultural and natural, which adorn the northern plains of North Dakota and western Minnesota, giving the place an aesthetic value and unique personality, so easily overlooked. Kimmerle states, “This area, devoid of the natural grandiosity preferred by the majority of destination seekers, is more often traveled through than intentionally visited. At first glance, it looks dull, mundane. However, I have gained an intense appreciation of, and affection for, the unique environmental elements – shelterbelts, crop rows, flat horizons, farmsteads, gravel roadways, and silence – that give this landscape its identity.”

Kimmerle’s photographs are exclusively in black and white. The form and texture of the landscape are the defining characteristics of the photography, instead of the color. This straightforward approach helps to keep with the organized pastoral simplicity of the land.

Kimmerle was a member of the Grand Forks Herald photo staff that was runner-up for the 1998 Pulitzer Prize for Spot News Photography. During that time, he contributed photos to the Museum’s publication, "Under the Whelming Tide," which depicts the devastating effects of the Grand Forks Flood of 1997. Kimmerle has also been a four time recipient of the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) Photographer of the Year from among the 3,000-plus colleges and universities internationally that make up the higher education professional organization.

The North Dakota Museum of Art is located on Centennial Drive on the UND campus. The Museum hours are weekdays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and weekends from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. The Museum Shop is open during these hours. There is no general admission for viewing exhibitions, visiting the Museum Shop or the Museum Café.

University Within the University (U2) lists new classes

Defensive Driving
July 7, 12:30 to 4:30 p.m., Skalicky Tech Incubator, Room 211
This workshop is required by State Fleet for all UND employees who drive State Fleet vehicles on a regular (monthly) basis, received a traffic violation, or had an accident while operating a State Fleet vehicle. Employees are encouraged to bring a family member (spouse and/or dependents). This workshop may also reduce your North Dakota insurance premiums and could possibly remove points from your driving record. Presenter: Eric Pearson

Data Protection & Privacy
July 9, 1 to 3:30 p.m., Upson II, Room 361
This workshop will introduce secure practices for handling and storing sensitive University and personal data. Topics will include a discussion of the types of information to protect and why it needs to be protected; practices and configurations for securing your operating system, Web browser, e-mail, and other software applications; protecting your personal information online; must-have security software for your computer; and encrypting sensitive data. Presenter: Brad Miller
-- Patricia Young, U2 Coordinator, Continuing Education, patriciayoung@mail.und.edu, 777-0720

Enjoy coffee, tea at half-price: UND Bookstore, 8 to 9 a.m.

Stop by the Tower Cafe' in the UND Bookstore Monday through Friday, 8 to 9 a.m. to get a half price Caribou Coffee or hot tea. Also, check out our fresh baked goods and light lunch options.
Coffee special valid until December 31.
-- Michelle Abernathey, Assistant Store Director, UND Bookstore, michelle_abernathey@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2103

Hamline Square Apartments still leasing

Faculty and staff are encouraged to announce to students that units (2, 3, and 4 bedroom) are still available in the new Hamline Square near Ralph Engelstad Arena. Construction is on-track for an August 1 opening. These apartments are managed by UND Housing and are considered student housing. Leaseholders must be 21 years of age by December 31, or be eligible for family housing. Roommates may be younger than 21 years of age.

These spacious apartments include air conditioning, dishwasher, microwave, laundry hook-up and underground heated parking. Find rental rates, floor plans, photos, and the apartment application at http://www.housing.und.edu/apartments/hamline.html
-- Judy Sargent, Director, Residence Services, judysargent@mail.und.edu, 777-4251

Law Library announces July 4th weekend hours

The Law Library will be closed Friday, July 3 through Sunday, July 5, in observance of Independence Day.
-- Jane Oakland, Circulation Manager, Law Library, oakland@law.und.edu, 777-3482

Neville Alberto named new UND program director of transitional residency and associate program director of internal medicine residency

Neville Alberto, MD, has been named to the newly combined position of program director of the UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences transitional residency program, and associate program director of the internal medicine residency program, effective July 1. Alberto has served as the associate program director for internal medicine since 2006. He continues to serve as a hospitalist at MeritCare Health System in Fargo.

“We are pleased to welcome Dr. Alberto to this new position,” says Joshua Wynne, UND senior executive vice president for health affairs and executive dean. “He will provide valuable leadership for the residency programs.”

In his new role, he will oversee the transitional year residency program, which provides a well-balanced program of graduate medical education in multiple clinical disciplines. Conducted almost entirely at MeritCare in Fargo, the program allows residents to explore medical and surgical specialties that they will interact with in the future. As associate program director of the internal medicine residency program, he will assist David Theige in leading the three-year, community-based program. He will continue to see MeritCare patients.

Alberto received his medical degree from Goa Medical College, Goa, India. He was the senior registrar in internal medicine at Princess Margaret Hospital, Nassau, Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Prior to joining MeritCare, he completed his residency in internal medicine and was the chief medical resident in the department of internal medicine at Easton Hospital, Hahneman University, Easton, Pa. He is board-certified in internal medicine and palliative medicine. He was chosen by the current transitional year residents as “Teacher of the Year” in May.
-- Wendy Opsahl, Communications Director, Center for Rural Health, wopsahl@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-0871

July 4 is holiday

In accordance with State Board of Higher Education directives, Friday, July 3, will be observed as Independence Day by faculty and staff members of the University. Only those employees designated by their department heads will be required to work on this holiday.
-- Paul LeBel, vice president for academic affairs and provost, and Diane Nelson, director of human resources.

Chester Fritz Library 4th of July weekend hours of operation

The Chester Fritz Library will observe the following hours of operation for the 4th of July weekend:

Thursday, July 2 - 7:45 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Friday, July 3 - Library Closed
Saturday, July 4 - Library Closed
Sunday, July 5 - 5 to 9 p.m.
-- Karen Cloud, Administrative Assistant, Chester Fritz Library, karencloud@mail.und.edu, 777-2618

University letter will not be published next week

The University Letter will not be published the week of July 4. It will continue the week after the holiday.

New project enhances patient safety at North Dakota hospitals

The North Dakota Critical Access Hospital (NDCAH) Quality Network announces a new effort to enhance patient safety across the state: the Statewide Information Management Project. Participating hospitals collect information related to patient safety at their facility and use it to make improvements; they also share best practices with each other. The web-based management system allows for efficient information gathering and analysis.

The project is supported by the Center for Rural Health at the UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences, and the management system is a product of Chicago-based consulting firm, Clarity Group, Inc. The Quality Network serves as a common place for Critical Access Hospitals to share education and resources to help advance health care quality and safety in the state.

“Last year the Quality Network tested the possibility of working together to collect information that could have a positive impact on patient safety in the rural health care setting,” said Jody Ward, NDCAH Quality Network Coordinator. “We’re excited to roll out this program in 13 of North Dakota’s rural hospitals, with plans to add more participants.”

Participants include:
• First Care Health Center, Park River;
• Heart of America Medical Center, Rugby;
• Hillsboro Medical Center, Hillsboro;
• McKenzie County Memorial Hospital, Watford City;
• Nelson County Health System, McVille;
• Northwood Deaconess Health Center, Northwood;
• St. Aloisius Medical Center, Harvey;
• Sakakawea Medical Center, Hazen;
• Southwest Health Care, Bowman;
• Tioga Medical Center, Tioga;
• Towner County Medical Center, Cando;
• Union Hospital, Mayville; and
• Unity Medical Center, Grafton.

“We have recognized the benefit,” said Coleen Bomber of Northwood Deaconess Health Center. “It’s easy to access information and hospitals can use it to create positive change.”

“This has been an important project because it demonstrates the power of data in supporting safety and quality efforts of rural health care, which is the backbone of the U.S. health care system. We are pleased to be working with North Dakota as they continue with their innovative program,” said Anna Hajek, President and CEO of Clarity Group.
-- Wendy Opsahl, Communications Director, Center for Rural Health, wopsahl@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-0871

UND med school inducts first members of Gold Humanism Honor Society

Eight senior medical students from the UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences were the first members inducted to a new chapter of the Gold Humanism Honor Society on Thursday, June 18. Keynote speaker Stephen Tinguely, M.D. ’78, provided an inspiring commentary on humanism in medicine. An associate professor and chair of pediatrics at the UND school of Medicine and Health Sciences, Fargo, has throughout his career epitomized the qualities of a humanistic physician.

The UND chapter joins 77 other medical school chapters across the country in recognizing senior medical students who demonstrate exemplary humanism and professionalism throughout their medical education. Creation of the chapter was made possible by a grant from the Arnold P. Gold Foundation.

Fifteen percent of the class was selected through a process including peer nomination and subsequent confirmation by the school’s Gold Humanism Honor oversight committee. Each student’s clinical performance and record of community service was considered.
Member of the class of 2009 include:
• Miran Blanchard
• Dan Dixon
• Katrina Gardner
• Chad Hanson
• Erica Martin
• Jennifer Mullally
• Luke Van Alstine
• Stacie Wellman

“We are very pleased to bring this recognition of the importance of humanism to our school,” said Judy DeMers, associate dean for student affairs and admissions. “We congratulate these students on their commitment to patient care and dedication to the medical profession.”
-- Wendy Opsahl, Communications Director, Center for Rural Health, wopsahl@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-0871

Sponsored project refunds must be reviewed by grants officer

Please send all refund/rebate deposits being made on sponsored projects to the Grants and Contracts Office at 100 Twamley Hall, or Mail Stop 7306 rather than Student Account Services. These deposits do need to be reviewed by the Grants Officer. Thank you.

If you have any questions please contact the Grants and Contracts Office at 777-4151.
-- Katrina Landman, Account Tech, Grants & Contracts Administration, katrinalandman@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-4198

Four digital sirens installed as part of emergency communication system

UND has installed an outdoor emergency siren system. They are placed strategically at Tulane Drive (north of Facilities parking lot), Centennial Drive (next to Babcock Hall), Second Avenue (northwest of Memorial Stadium) and Princeton Street (near the Wellness Center). The system complements the Grand Forks system, which doesn't reach all portions of the campus.

The sirens will carry several digital messages which can be used in a variety of situations, such as the sighting of tornadoes or the need to evacuate the campus. The system also can be used as a public address system. Aside from periodic testing, the system will only be used in emergency situations.

UND has been in the process of fine-tuning its emergency communication processes, which also includes using the NotiFind System, which uses cell and regular telephones and text messaging capabilities to deliver messages. UND also makes use of other mass notification tools, such as its web page, e-mail and the mass media.
-- Peter Johnson, Executive Associate Vice President for University Relations, 777-4317, peterjohnson@mail.und.nodak.edu

Alumni Association and Foundation site links may have changed

The UND Alumni Association and UND Foundation have recently changed links within their web site. If you have bookmarked the site or any forms within that site, you will need to go to www.undalumni.org and recreate them. If you have questions email Cindy Filler: cindyf@undalumni.net or Katie Compton: katiec@undalumni.net.
-- Alumni Association and Foundation.

Beware of laptop thefts on campus

The University Police Department has been receiving reports of laptop computers being stolen from various offices on campus. These thefts have occurred during brief periods of time when the offices were unoccupied for just a few minutes. Please lock your office if it not going to be staffed, even if it is just for a short period of time, and please report any suspicious individuals or activities you may observe on campus immediately to the University Police. Thank you.
-- Thomas Brockling, Police Officer, UND Police Department, tombrockling@mail.und.edu, 777-3491

Donated leave sought for Wanda Seyler

We are seeking donated leave for Wanda Seyler, administrative secretary in Atmospheric Sciences. If you wish to donate any leave, please send the donation form to Gary Ebel, Odegard School, PO Box 9007. Donation leave forms can be obtained from the following payroll web address: http://www.und.edu/dept/payroll/webforms/Donated%20Leave%20Form.PDF , or by calling 7-4004 or 7-2913. Thank you.
-- Gary Ebel, Senior HR Manager, UND Aerospace, ebel@aero.und.edu, 777-2913

Donated leave sought for Andrea Bensen

Andrea Bensen is a Facilities Management Building Services Technician in need of donated leave. Anyone interested in helping Andrea can fill out a leave donation form and submit to Patti Schmidt in Facilities at STOP 9032. Thank you.
-- Patti Schmidt, HR Assistant, Facilities Management, pattischmidt@mail.und.edu, 777-2595

EERC research finds mercury levels in freshwater and ocean fish not as harmful as previously thought

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) at UND announced today that after years of extensive research, results of environmental, laboratory, and human studies show that mercury levels in freshwater and ocean fish are not as harmful as previously thought. Current fish advisories may be misleading and should be revised, taking the benefits of selenium into account.

The findings come from two major reports released in the journal on Environmental Science & Technology and in EcoHealth Journal, both indicating that failure to consider selenium in relation to mercury levels in freshwater and ocean fish will result in critical mistakes in interpretation that generate unreliable and potentially inaccurate advice regarding fish consumption and is deterring people from eating a nutritious product. Both reports state that the effects of mercury exposure are entirely dependent on the amount of selenium present in the diet.

“Selenium is an essential nutrient in healthy brain development and protects the brain from oxidative damage,” said Dr. Nick Ralston, an EERC Research Scientist involved with the studies. “More importantly, selenium protects the body from mercury’s negative effects. The more selenium in the tissue, the less mercury toxicity occurs. Since fish in some areas have much higher levels of selenium than mercury, the consumer receives the healthy benefits of selenium and a natural defense against mercury,” he said.

Results from the first study, conducted jointly by the EERC, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Western Ecology Division, and the University of Missouri’s Nuclear Reactor Center, show that an estimated 97% of the freshwater fish from lakes and rivers in the western United States are safe to eat. Conducted in 12 states in the western U.S., it is the only study of this magnitude that has measured both mercury and selenium in fish tissue.

“The study examined 468 freshwater fish representing 40 species and found that fish from most regions of the country contained more selenium than mercury and so consumers are protected against mercury toxicity,” said Ralston.

The study also discovered that a very small fraction of fish contained more mercury than selenium and might pose a greater mercury toxicity threat than otherwise expected. Human and wildlife populations with poor dietary selenium intake will be especially vulnerable to mercury exposure from eating fish from bodies of water with inadequate selenium resources.

Similarly, fear about the potential health risks associated with consuming mercury from ocean fish and shellfish has prompted advisories intended to limit the amount of fish that women eat during pregnancy.

The second major study conducted, funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and EPA, examined a new seafood safety criteria known as the Selenium-Health Benefit Value (Se-HBV), which is specifically designed to be the first step in accurately predicting both the risks and benefits of eating various forms of seafood. Foods that contain large amounts of mercury relative to selenium have negative Se-HBVs, and foods rich in selenium have positive Se-HBVs.

Human studies consistently show that mercury’s toxic effects are directly proportional to mercury-selenium ratios in the foods consumed. Since studies have found that foods with negative Se-HBVs are very dangerous during pregnancy, these foods should be avoided.

Very few seafoods have negative Se-HBVs, but current policies and regulations are based on studies that involved rare types of seafoods, tracking mothers who either ate pilot whales or large sharks, both of which have negative Se-HBVs.

“Most varieties of ocean fish have highly positive Se-HBVs between 20 and 200, and recent studies show that mothers who eat these types of ocean fish improve their children’s IQ by up to 10 points,” Ralston said.

Therefore, seafood safety criteria based on Se-HBV will improve public health by properly restricting consumption of hazardous seafoods such as pilot whale and shark, while at the same time encouraging mothers to eat the right types of fish that optimize their nutrition and enhance the IQs of their children.

“The EERC is recognized as the worldwide leader in research on the impacts of mercury on the environment,” said EERC Director Gerald Groenewold. “The findings from both of these studies are phenomenal. These findings are critical to developing accurate advisories for fish consumption so that people continue to receive the practical health benefits of eating fish.”

Disclaimer:
This release was prepared by the EERC under Award NA08NMF4520492 from NOAA, the U.S. Department of Commerce, and EPA Cooperative Agreement CR 830929. The statements, findings, conclusions, and recommendations are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of NOAA or EPA, and no official endorsement should be inferred.
-- Derek Walters, Communications Manager, EERC, dwalters@undeerc.org, 777-5113

Remember to use updated IRB forms

The Institutional Review Board updates forms on its web site to maintain compliance with federal and state regulations and to ensure ease of use for faculty, staff, and students who submit proposals. Researchers submitting proposals to the IRB are reminded to obtain the most current forms from the forms section of the IRB website:

http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/rdc/regucomm/IRB/Forms.htm

Proposals submitted on outdated forms will be returned to the researcher for re-submission on the correct form. If you have questions, please contact the Institutional Review Board at 777-4279.
-- Michelle L. Bowles, IRB Coordinator, Institutional Review Board, michellebowles@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-4279

Aerospace dean recognizes UAS team's flood-fighting efforts

In honor of Gov. John Hoeven’s Flood Workers Appreciation Day (June 12) Bruce Smith, dean of the UND School of Aerospace Sciences, recognized three people from the UND Center for UAS (Unmanned Aircraft Systems) Research, Education, and Training for their contributions to the 2009 Red River Valley flood fighting efforts.

In an informal ceremony Saturday, UND senior UAS flight instructors Robert Concannon and Michael Nelson, along with U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer Jonathan Johnson, received certificates of recognition for flying the Customs and Border Protection Predator B MQ-9 unmanned aircraft during the 2009 flood fighting efforts.

“We appreciate all the fine work they did,” said Bill Watson, interim director of the UAS Center. “We feel privileged to have them at UND for this recognition of their efforts.” The team, comprising two UND senior flight instructors, a U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer and a pilot from General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., clocked more than 30 hours of flight time.

“We flew between 19,000 and 21,000 feet in Class A airspace, parallel to the Red River,” Nelson said. “We flew as far north as Pembina and to Bismarck-Mandan and Fort Ransom. We also spent a lot of time in the Fargo-Moorhead and Wahpeton-Breckenridge areas.”

Using synthetic aperture radar equipment, the team captured images of the rising river and ice dams, which they sent to the North Dakota and Minnesota Emergency Operations Centers, the National River Prediction Center, the Air Marie Operations Center and FEMA. SAR-which is much smaller than traditional rotating antenna radars-is used for high-resolution mapping of the ground from moving aircraft or spacecraft.

“We took 15 segments of SAR imagery from five miles away looking down on a parallel course along the Red River,” Nelson said. “We tracked 57 bridges and monitored ice flows. There was ice the size of football fields that didn’t melt that could slam into bridges-we almost lost the Thompson bridge.”

As part of a joint effort with U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the UAS team furthers the mission of the UND Center for UAS Research, Education and Training by linking with existing regional and national economic and research engines to create new area economic opportunities and to safeguard area citizens.

“There is a real need for UAS pilots. Under Flight Operations Director Al Palmer, these UND flight instructors were subcontracted out to General Atomics to provide UAS training and support to U.S. Customs and Border Protection,” Watson said.

The UND Center for Unmanned Aircraft Systems has provided premier research and UAS aviation education through funding provided by Sen. Byron Dorgan since 2005. The UAS Center upholds the vision: “From Tradition to Tomorrow-North Dakota Leads the Way.”

For more information, contact Lesli Riskey, UND Flight Operations, at 777-7815 or lriskey@aero.und.edu
-- UND Aerospace