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ISSUE: Volume 46, Number 34: April 15, 2009

Contents
Top Stories
Open Budget Forum set for April 15
Volunteers sought for spring commencement May 16
UND, Lake Region State College sign Launch! Program
UND student-built camera to be activated aboard International Space Station
Events to Note
15th annual McNair Forum is April 28
Dining centers go trayless for Earth Day
Doctoral examination set for Darcie Sell
Honors Heifer Nacho Feed (with sheep!) is April 23
Arts and Sciences Speaker Series to host talk on architects in film
Staff Recognition Luncheon tickets on sale now
Theatre Arts presents "Tartuffe" April 21-25
Denim Day is Wednesday, April 29
Donations of costume jewelry sought for children's art programs
Stanford professor to give Abbott lectures
Global Visions presents double feature April 14
Glenn Allen Paur Lecture Series Wednesday features snow geese
Visiting artist presentation is April 15
UND to unveil unique new space flight simulator
Jackson Katz to speak on sexual, domestic violence April 15
Patti Alleva to present next Faculty Lecture April 16
Retirement reception honoring Cadence Youngberg is April 16
Conflict Resolution Center director to keynote Minnesota conference
Cultural Nights resume April 16 featuring Nigeria and African Diaspora
Entrepreneurship Bootcamps set for April 16-18
SUNY Distinguished Professor to speak at geography forum
Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics Seminar is April 17
Reading by NorthWord is April 17
National Day of Silence for Safer Schools is April 17
Center for Community Engagement to co-host free forum
Hands-On Learning Fair is April 18
Super Science Saturday is April 18
Enjoy high tea in the Culinary Corner
Doctoral examination set for Ann Marie Sorteberg
Doctoral examination set for Elizabeth Iva Bjerke
Doctoral examination set for Louella L. Lofranco
Researcher to speak at Anatomy and Cell Biology spring seminar series
Honors Program Undergraduate Research Conference to be held Monday, April 20
University Within the University (U2) lists new classes
Doctoral examination set for Garth Kruger
Ask the Lab community education event is April 22
Pre-retirement seminars offered this spring
Technology Trends Forum is April 29
On Teaching session explores using video projects to promote student learning
Wellness Center lists events
Donations sought for Adelphi book/media sale
Doctoral examination set for Michael G. Nygaard
Nursing hosts Visiting Scholar Lecture April 23
President's Advisory Council on Women (PAC-W) present "Let's Do Lunch"
Faculty-directed study abroad workshop is April 23
Forensic science candidate seminar is April 23
Regional Brain Bee is April 23
Scouts prepare for annual food drive
Farewell party for Mary Cutler is April 24
Friday Night Cabaret Series presents "Maura Does Judy"
Gordon Henry, Larry Klundt, other graduates receive alumni achievement awards from departments
Children's Center benefit is April 25
Building a veteran-friendly campus Webcast is April 29
University Senate meets May 7; agenda item deadline is April 23
Unmanned Aircraft Systems Action Summit is May 27-28
International Climate Stewardship Conference is June 29-30
cScibot Robot summer camp dates announced
Announcements
Note 2008 employer satisfaction survey results
Grants and contracts administration produces departmental user guide
University Curriculum Committee to hear program termination
University Senate elections announced
Center for People and the Environment releases Red River Valley flood images
EERC Foundation receives patent application approval
Student government positions open for application
Museum Cafe Weekly Menu
University of North Dakota Bookstore seeks employees
Adelphi Literary Society seeks book donations
Internal job openings listed
Research
Lead time increased for grant proposals
In the News
Pamela Kalbfleisch named American Council on Education Fellow
MeritCare Network receives Making a Difference Award
Rural, public health awards presented
April U-Shine Award winner announced
Open Budget Forum set for April 15

President Robert Kelley and Alice Brekke, interim vice president for finance and operations, will host an Open Budget Forum from 11 a.m. to noon Wednesday, April 15, in the North Ballroom at the Memorial Union.

The presentation will include discussion of the UND budget in legislative process and anticipated budget process for next fiscal year. Time will be provided for questions. All faculty, staff, and students are invited to attend this informational session.

The forum will also be webcast live, courtesy of Online and Distance Education, at http://conted.breeze.und.nodak.edu/budgetforum/ . To test your computer prior to the event, go to http://conted.breeze.und.nodak.edu/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm . To join the forum online, log in as a guest to enter the webcast.

Volunteers sought for spring commencement May 16

We invite you to serve as a “Green Vest" volunteer at UND’s spring commencement Saturday, May 16, at the Alerus Center. Volunteers assist by seating guests, helping organize graduates in the assembly room, and by greeting visitors.

Commencement begins at 1:30 p.m. and all volunteers are asked to report to the Alerus Center Ballroom by noon. Most volunteers will be able to leave shortly after the ceremony begins, by approximately 2 p.m. We anticipate that commencement will conclude by about 4 p.m.

Please contact the Office of Ceremonies and Special Events in the vice president for student and outreach services office at 777-2724 or send an e-mail message to Terri Machart at terrimachart@mail.und.nodak.edu to let us know if you will be able to participate or if you have any questions. Thanks in advance for your help.
-- Fred Wittmann, Director, Office of Ceremonies and Special Events, fredwittmann@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2724

UND, Lake Region State College sign Launch! Program

A new partnership between the University of North Dakota and Lake Region State College will expand opportunities for individuals to earn a college degree.

That program, Launch!, was established to serve students who are not yet eligible for admission to the University of North Dakota but meet eligibility requirements for Lake Region State College.

President Robert O. Kelley and LRSC President Mike Bower signed a memorandum of understanding April 13 to officially unveil the Launch! Program.

Students who choose to participate in the Launch! Program will enroll as full time students of LRSC, but will also take a limited number of UND classes. They will be able to participate fully in the student life, housing, services, organizations, facilities, and activities available to every degree-seeking UND student.

LRSC will hire instructional staff and a resident coordinator to administer the program on the UND campus. UND Student Success Center will provide academic advisor support and training for the LRSC resident coordinator. To the extent possible, students will participate in a living/learning community in UND residence halls, as developed and implemented by the LRSC resident coordinator. LRSC will develop courses taught at UND using a cohort model with enrollment limited to program students.

LRSC will remain the students’ home institution, but UND academic standing requirements will apply to each student. Students who successfully complete 24 transferable credits may be considered for degree-seeking transfer student admission to UND.

“Lake Region State College and UND have a long history of working together. The Launch! Program is simply one more way UND and LRSC can partner together for student success. Programs like this emerge as the result of a cohesive university system that fosters such partnership between institutions,” said LRSC President Mike Bower.

“This is an outstanding program that will benefit students who want to experience the kind of vibrant campus life we have at the University of North Dakota. This type of cooperation, between a two-year school like Lake Region State College and the doctoral research institution that is UND, underscores the value of the North Dakota University System and exemplifies the kind of service to the citizens of the state that is the hallmark of our institutions and the University System, not unlike the partnership we share with Lake Region State College in Workforce Development,” said President Dr. Robert O. Kelley.

For more information, contact Sue Sholes, assistant director of Enrollment Services, at 777-4463 or e-mail suzannesholes@mail.und.edu.

UND student-built camera to be activated aboard International Space Station

The University of North Dakota’s Agricultural Camera (AgCam), designed and built by UND students and faculty from several departments and delivered to the International Space Station last November, is set to become operational next week.

ISS astronaut Michael Barratt is scheduled to assemble and activate AgCam Tuesday, April 14, in a process that will take several hours and should be completed by about 3 p.m. Central time (see this National Astronautics and Space Administration [NASA] site about AgCam: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/science/experiments/AgCam.html).

“Tuesday will be a big day for UND and the Red River Valley Research Corridor,” said Senator Byron Dorgan. “AgCam has been a partnership between UND and NASA that will give a boost to the reputation of our region and help farmers and ranchers across the Upper Great Plains. That should be a source of pride for our entire state.”

Through his position on the Senate Appropriations Committee, Dorgan secured $16.1 million for UND’s Upper Midwest Aerospace Consortium (UMAC), which created the AgCam. Dorgan last year included additional funding in an appropriations bill for UMAC to develop the AgCam mission control center at UND and make the images captured by AgCam available to the public through UMAC’s Web page (see http://www.umac.org/).

“The UND interdisciplinary effort that has produced the AgCam is a remarkable story,” said UND President Robert O. Kelley. “Faculty and students from several colleges and centers on campus have produced an instrument that will analyze the composition of agricultural and other materials on the surface of the earth from the International Space Station.”

“The consolidation of multiple technologies into a single instrument will add tremendous economic value to the agricultural industry in North Dakota and around the world,” Kelley said. “UND and NASA have forged a very productive partnership in this initiative.”

AgCam will take visible light and infrared images of crops, rangeland, grasslands, forests, and wetlands in the northern Great Plains and Rocky Mountain regions of the United States, said Doug Olsen, an electrical engineer who is program director at UMAC’s Center for People and the Environment and AgCam project manager.

AgCam will be operated from the student-run Science Operations Center (SOC) on the UND campus. From SOC, students will send commands to AgCam to take images and transmit them to SOC, where they’ll be processed and delivered to end users. AgCam system operators are working with NASA on the integration of SOC with NASA command centers, Olsen said.

“AgCam was an ambitious project that was more than a classroom exercise. It was intended to deliver a practical benefit,” said George Seielstad, an astrophysicist and director of the UND Center for People and the Environment. “About 50 students from eight UND departments worked to make it a reality.”

“By working within tight deadlines, with a limited budget, and within NASA’s complicated procedures, students were excellently prepared to enter the workforce immediately upon graduation,” Seielstad said.

AgCam is a multi-spectral camera loaded aboard the ISS as a payload of the Window Observational Research Facility (WORF). Primary AgCam system components include imaging and pointing assemblies, a power/data controller, cabling and support items, and a NASA-supplied A31p laptop computer and power supply.

AgCam allows operators on the ground to choose specific geographical areas of interest. It can be pointed sideways not just straight down; this enables frequent imaging of a requested area, dramatically improving the chances of obtaining cloud-free images. These images will be downlinked to, and processed at, UND and delivered to the requesting end users within two days.

Farmers using variable-rate application and other precision agriculture techniques will be able to dynamically delineate management zones as the crop conditions change during the growing season; this can result in more effective use of fertilizer and other chemical inputs and reduce negative environmental effects and operational costs.

Most of AgCam’s design, engineering, and construction-which required working to exacting NASA standards and tight ISS tolerances-was carried out by a team of students led by Richard Schultz, professor and chair of electrical engineering in the UND School of Engineering and Mines (SEM) and William“Will” Semke, a mechanical engineer in SEM.

In development since 2001, AgCam will take frequent images for use as a decision support system resource by farmers, ranchers, tribal resource managers, researchers, and K-12 teachers for classroom use.

AgCam links: http://www.umac.org/sensors/agcam/eng.html; http://www.und.edu/agcam/; http://www.und.edu/agcam/dorgan.html; and http://www2.und.nodak.edu/our/news/story.php?id=2260

For more information, contact Doug Olsen, AgCam project manager, Center for People and the Environment, at 777-3543 or olsen@aero.und.edu.

15th annual McNair Forum is April 28

The McNair Scholars will present their research at the 15th annual McNair Forum Tuesday, April 28, from 9:40 a.m. to noon and 1 to 3:40 p.m. The event will take place at the Loading Dock, Memorial Union. Everyone is welcome. Please join us. The schedule follows.

9:40 a.m. -- Arlene Brown, “Social Costs of Methamphetamines to the Individual”; 10 a.m. -- Andrea Bancroft, “Reducing Recidivism Rates through Reentry Programs”; 10:20 a.m. -- Abdulmalik Mussa, “Comparative Analysis of Ribosomal Modification Mutants in Escherichia Coli”; 10:40 a.m. -- Robert ‘BJ’ Rainbow, “Music and Healing: American Indian Songs and Their Uses in Medicine”; 11 a.m. -- Sierra Abe, “GoodHealth TV as a Tool for Health Education”; 11:20 a.m. -- Elizabeth Luger, “α1A Adrenergic Receptor Activation Reduces Anxiety and Depression in Mice”; 11:40 a.m. -- Kyle Gustafson, “Skeletochronological Assessment of the Wood Frog (Lithobates = Rana sylvatica)”, noon to 1 p.m. -- Lunch (on your own); 1 p.m. -– Ryan Reopelle, “Breast Phantoms for Medical Imaging”; 1:20 p.m. -- Dale Brunelle, “Using Forward Genetics to Identify Novel Insect Resistance Genes in Poplar Trees”; 1:40 p.m. -- Renee Beausoleil, “Effects of Cofilin Knockdown on Actin and Growth Cone Motility”; 2 p.m. -- David W. Cookman III, “Impact of Prairie Fragmentation and Native Plants on Endemic Orthoptera”; 2:20 p.m. -- Ahmed Elmi, “Fuel Cell: A Brief History and its Dynamic Performance”; 2:40 p.m. -- Mohamud Ahmed, “Developing Bio-Based Polyvinyl Acetate From Short Chain Fatty Acids Generated From Cracked Soy/Canola Oil”; 3 p.m. -- Jonna Korpi, “Factors Influencing Behavior Toward the Environment”; 3:20 p.m. -- Andrea Estling, “Mayan Gods and Religious Beliefs.”
-- Jill Teters, Program Coordinator, TRIO/McNair, jillteters@mail.und.edu, 777-4931

Arts and Sciences Speaker Series to host talk on architects in film

The College of Arts and Sciences Interdisciplinary Speaker Series and the Department of English will host Elizabeth Birmingham, associate professor of English, North Dakota State University, who will present "Architects in Film: What Americans Always Think They Know About Architects, Even if They Don’t Know Much about Architecture," at 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 29, in 116 Merrifield Hall.

Popular film does much to shape our cultural perceptions of professions. As Stuart Hall writes, “popular culture, commodified and stereotyped as it often is, is not at all . . . the arena where we find who we really are, the truth of our experience. It is an arena that is profoundly mythic . . . .where we are imagined, where we are represented, not only to audiences out there who do not get the message, but to ourselves, for the first time.” Film presents viewers with not a profession of architecture as a career path open to anyone, but as a mythic category—one that is raced, classed, and gendered. Using film clips as a place to begin conversation, this presentation examines the mythic features of architects in film, guiding the audience through a discussion of five well-known films featuring architects: The Fountainhead, Fearless, The Towering Inferno, Indecent Proposal, and There’s Something About Mary. This presentation asks us to consider the power of these representations to shape cultural beliefs about gender, race, and class, and how we might both enjoy movies and develop a critical framework to question the assumptions they promote.

All are welcome!
-- Rebecca Weaver-Hightower, Assistant Professor, English, rwh@und.edu, 7-6391

Theatre Arts presents "Tartuffe" April 21-25

The hilarious 17th century comedy, "Tartuffe," is set to open at Burtness Theatre April 21-25.

Arguably Moliere’s greatest play, Tartuffe is a hysterical look at what might come of the house of the wealthy lord Orgon when overrun by the lustful con man, Tartuffe. When Tartuffe was originally performed in 1664 it was very controversial with a number of church officials in France. Soon after Tartuffe opened in Versailles, the play was banned, putting Moliere and his theatre troupe out of a work. Moliere, desperate for the money that a new hit play would bring in, wrote three petitions to King Louis XIV to allow the play to be performed. Eventually the request was granted and Tartuffe opened with great success.

Though officials originally wanted to censor Tartuffe deeming it offensive and heretical, it was not so. Moliere’s "Tartuffe" is a satire on religious hypocrisy. Tartuffe was truly the Bernie Madoff of his time, conning Orgon out of his estate and his son’s inheritance while hiding behind religion to accomplish his deception. "Tartuffe" shows through comedy the troubles a family would endure under the rule of a hypocrite and a criminal, and is sure to delight audiences.
"Tartuffe" features Jeff Weatherly as Tartuffe, Julia Porter as Elmire, Derek Jefferson as Orgon, Nicole Quam as Madame Pernelle, Emily Elisabeth as Mariane, Terese Nyberg as Dorine, Megan Lonski as Clarissa, Andrew Markiewicz as Damis and Andrew Scott as Valére. "Tartuffe" is directed by the Theatre Arts Department Chair Kathleen McLennan.

Tuesday through Saturday performances of "Tartuffe" begin at 7:30 p.m. For more information and ticket reservations, please call the Burtness Theatre box office at 777-2587. All tickets are $15 or $8 with a student ID. Free reserved parking is available on campus.
-- Christopher Olsen, Publicity Assistant, Theatre Arts, christopher.olsen.1@und.nodak.edu, 218-341-8588

Staff Recognition Luncheon tickets on sale now

The 2009 Recognition Ceremony for Staff Personnel will be held at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, May 19, at the Memorial Union Ballroom. Employees will be recognized for years of service in five-year increments, 10 Meritorious Service Award winners will be presented, and the winner of the Ken and Toby Baker UND Proud Award will be announced. Tickets may be purchased in Human Resources, 313 Twamley Hall, for $4 each or from the human resources manager in your department. Tickets must be purchased no later than Wednesday, May 13. All members of the University community are invited.

Anyone wishing to participate in the luncheon that may require an accommodation should contact me at 777-4367 or e-mail joyjohnson@mail.und.nodak.edu.
-- Joy Johnson, Human Resources Officer, Human Resources, joyjohnson@mail.und.edu, 777-4367

Doctoral examination set for Darcie Sell

The final examination for Darcie Sell, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in counseling psychology, is set for 1 p.m. Friday, April 24, in 318 Montgomery Hall. The dissertation title is "The Development and Initial Validation of a Relational Health Scale." Kara Wettersten (counseling psychology) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Denim Day is Wednesday, April 29

April 29 is the last Wednesday of the month, and that means it's Denim Day. Pay your coordinator your dollar, wear your Denim Day button and enjoy going casual, and know all proceeds go to charity. Need more buttons or 2009 posters? Just let me know.
-- Patsy Nies, Special Project Assistant, Enrollment Services, patsynies@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3791

Donations of costume jewelry sought for children's art programs

The North Dakota Museum of Art is continuing to collect your old or unwanted costume jewelry for the annual Antique to Chic Costume Jewelry Sale and Raffle on Sunday, May 3. If you have any inexpensive or unwanted jewelry to donate, please bring it to the Museum across from Twamley Hall, or call to have it picked up by April 30. All proceeds will go toward scholarships, supplies, and artists' fees for children's art camps and year round art programs.
-- Sue Fink, Director of Education, North Dakota Museum of Art, sfink@ndmoa.com, 777-4195

Dining centers go trayless for Earth Day

To recognize Earth Day, all Dining Services residential dining centers will go trayless for all meals Wednesday, April 22.

In an effort to raise awareness of food consumption and reduce food waste, Dining Services will remove trays from the three dining centers for one day. Students will be asked to carry their plate, utensils and glassware directly to tables, without the use of a tray. The hope is to make students more conscious of the amount of food taken while going through the serving line and reduce the amount of uneaten food that ends up in the landfill.

“Schools that have gone trayless have seen up to a 30 percent reduction in food waste,” says Orlynn Rosaasen, Director of Dining Services. Going trayless also saves up to a half gallon of water per tray, leading to an overall reduction in hot water and energy consumption. Rosaasen emphasizes, “We are using the trayless day as an educational tool, and there are no plans to eliminate trays on a permanent basis at UND, however, we will study the results carefully.”

Based on the plate waste study done in 2008, and the number of board meals served, 204,500 pounds of food were wasted in the residential dining centers last year. An advertising campaign is currently under way in the dining centers to raise awareness of food waste, and promote the benefits of trayless dining. In an all-you-care-to-eat dining setting, there is a greater tendency to fill a tray with more food than can actually be eaten. As students become more aware of the environmental footprint they are leaving on the earth, dining centers are perfect settings to raise awareness and allow students to make a difference. Dining Services has asked students to e-mail ideas and feedback on reducing waste to reducewaste@mail.und.edu .

Dining Services’ employees have been measuring all edible plate waste for several weeks already, and will also measure the waste generated on trayless day. Plate waste data will be compared and shared with students after Earth Day.
-- Orlynn Rosaasen, Director, Dining Services, orlynnrosaasen@mail.und.edu, 7-3823

Honors Heifer Nacho Feed (with sheep!) is April 23

The Honors Program is raising money for Heifer International as part of its current service theme of poverty, and has raised close to $1,000 so far this year.

To put us over the top, we'll host an all-you-can-eat nacho feed from 4 to 7 p.m. Thursday, April 23, at Robertson/Sayre Hall. The cost is $5. At 5 p.m., Sherry O'Donnell (English) will make an appearance with her sheep to talk about raising animals.

For more information, see the Facebook event “Honors Heifer Nacho Feed.”
-- Robin David, Associate Director, Honors Program, robin.david@und.edu, 777-6185

Stanford professor to give Abbott lectures

Richard Zare, Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor in Natural Science and chair of the chemistry department at Stanford University, will give two Abbott lectures. The first one, "Cars: Chemistry in Motion," is a public seminar at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 14, in 101 Abbott Hall. The second lecture, "Supercritical Fluid Precipitation: A New Modality for Drug Delivery," will be at noon Wednesday, April 15, in 138 Abbott Hall. All interested persons are invited. For more information, visit http://www.und.edu/dept/chem/seminars.htm . -- Julia Zhao, Department of Chemistry.

Global Visions presents double feature April 14

The Global Visions Film Series continues its sixth year at UND this spring. The Global Visions Film Series (GVFS) is a forum that promotes diversity in North Dakota through screening award winning national and international films. The GVFS is sponsored by the students of the Anthropology Club in the Department of Anthropology, and is partially funded by the Multicultural Awareness Committee. Their goal is to provide the University and the Grand Forks community with the opportunity to experience films of exceptional quality from around the world, providing a broader understanding of and appreciation for the breadth, variety, and commonality of the human family.

A double feature will be shown Tuesday, April 14, with screenings of “The Kite Runner,” and “Innocent Voices.” The scheduled film for Tuesday, March 10, (Innocent Voices) was shown as scheduled, but due to the blizzard “Coyote,” few people were able to attend. Films will be screened between 7 and 10 p.m. The following films are scheduled to complete this semester’s film series:
• "Mark Sienkiewicz, Live From Bethlehem" 2008 (Israel - documentary), April 21
• "Times of Harvey Milk" 2008 (USA), May 5

All films are shown in the Lecture Bowl, second floor, Memorial Union. The series is free and open to the public. Suggested donations are encouraged, but not required. For further information call 777-4718.

Review, "The Kite Runner"
By David Ansen | NEWSWEEK
From the magazine issue dated Dec. 17, 2007

If "Atonement" hadn't already been taken, Khaled Hosseini could have used it as a title for his novel, "The Kite Runner," whose protagonist, a privileged 12-year-old Afghan boy named Amir, grievously betrays his childhood friend Hassan. Only years later, as an adult, will he be able to atone through an act of considerable courage.

The story begins in San Francisco in 2001. The adult Amir (Khalid Abdalla) is now a novelist, having fled Afghanistan with his father after the Soviet invasion. He's a man haunted by his past, and Forster's movie soon transports us back to Kabul in 1978, before the city was decimated, first by the Russians and then by the Taliban. The young Amir (Zekiria Ebrahimi) has grown up in the comfortable, cultured home of his secular, militantly anti-mullah father, Baba (the marvelous Iranian actor Homayoun Ershadi). They are Pashtun, part of the ruling elite, and Hassan (sad-eyed Ahmad Khan Mahmoodzada), the son of the family servant Ali, is of the Hazara tribe. The two young friends may be servant and master, but they are inseparable until the day Hassan is beaten up and raped by teenage Pashtun bullies, a horror Amir witnesses and does nothing to prevent. Converting his guilt into enmity, he turns on his friend.

"The Kite Runner" isn't subtle, but it allows us to see a country and a culture from the inside: it puts a human face on a tragedy most of us know only from headlines and glimpses on the nightly news. It helps that the Afghan scenes are played in Dari, not English. Forster's solid, unpretentious movie hits its marks squarely, and isn't afraid to wear its heart on its sleeve. Only a mighty tough viewer could fail to be moved.

Innocent Voices
October 14, 2005
Review
"Fallout From a Ruinous Civil War Seen Through a Child's Eyes"
By STEPHEN HOLDEN
Published: October 14, 2005

In the most wrenching scene from Luis Mandoki's film "Innocent Voices," Salvadoran army troops storm into a school in the heart of an impoverished rural village, bark out a list of names and forcibly conscript any boy over 12 into the military. As the dazed, terrified children are herded into the back of a truck and carted away, their stricken parents look on in horrified silence; to interfere would be to risk being shot to death.

This scene is one of several in the film, set in the 1980s during El Salvador's 12-year civil war, that break your heart. During those years, the Farabundo Martí National Liberation Front, or the F.M.L.N., waged an armed struggle against the right-wing government, which responded by attacking villages and massacring inhabitants suspected of sympathizing with the left-wing guerrillas. The United States, fearing a Communist takeover of the country, backed the government and dispatched American soldiers to train the government troops, who eventually prevailed.

These events are viewed through the eyes of Chava (Carlos Padilla), a spirited 11-year-old boy and the oldest of three children who live with their mother, Kella (Leonor Varela), a seamstress struggling to provide for her family. Chava's father has left El Salvador for the United States, and there is no word as to his whereabouts.
Because this is history viewed through the eyes of a child, "Innocent Voices" gives you feelings and impressions, but few facts. The only people seen in the village are women, children, the elderly and the disabled cowering in fear and uncertainty. In one brief scene, American soldiers are shown handing out chewing gum to children whose parents warn them that the kindly soldiers are really their enemies. In another, Chava witnesses the kidnapping off the street of two girls who are dragged away to be raped; the heroic local priest (Daniel Giménez Cacho), the film's most eloquent voice, refuses to tell the boy what will happen to them.

The film is based on the real-life childhood experiences of Oscar Torres, who co-wrote the screenplay with the Mexican director Mr. Mandoki. "Innocent Voices" is rated R (Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian). It has harrowing scenes of war.
-- Marcia Mikulak, Assistant Professor, Anthropology, marcia.mikulak@und.nodak.edu, 777-4718

Glenn Allen Paur Lecture Series Wednesday features snow geese

Robert F. "Rocky" Rockwell will present two seminars Wednesday, April 15, as the guest lecturer for the 2009 Glenn Allen Paur Lecture Series.

At noon in 141 Starcher Hall, he will discuss "The Early Bear Gets the Goose: Climate Change, Polar Bears and Lesser Snow Geese." At 7 p.m. in 100 Leonard Hall, he will consider "Lesser Snow Geese: Ecoterrorists of the Tundra?"

Robert "Rocky" Rockwell grew up on small farms in the hill country of southern Ohio and south Missouri. He obtained his Ph.D. from Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, in 1975. He currently holds a joint position as a research scientist at the American Museum of Natural History and a biology professor at the City University of New York. His specialty is population dynamics, a field that tries to understand and predict how the survival and reproductive output of wild populations dictates their abundance. He has worked in the Canadian Arctic, near Churchill, Manitoba, for more than 40 years.

Glenn Allen Paur was a Pisek, N.D., native who graduated cum laude with a B.S. in fisheries and wildlife management from UND, where he was a member and also served as president of the Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Club, and was a member of the Wildlife Society. Glenn drowned while assisting a UND professor with his research on Leech Lake, Minn. The Lecture Series and the Glenn Allen Paur Memorial Scholarship were established by his family in his honor and memory.

The event is hosted by the Student Chapter of the Wildlife Society.

Visiting artist presentation is April 15

Bunky Echo-Hawk, visiting artist at the Department of Art & Design from April 14–18, will give a presentation at 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 15, in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. It is free and open to the public. The presentation will be followed by a reception for the artist.

Bunky Echo-Hawk (Pawnee/Yakama) is an artist whose work spans media and lifestyle. A graduate of the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, he is a fine artist, graphic designer, photographer, writer, and a nonprofit professional. He is also a traditional singer and dancer.

Echo-Hawk defines himself as a “proactive ARTist” whose goal is to “truly exemplify the current state of Native America.” Merging traditional values and art while blending popular culture with Native culture, Echo-Hawk challenges art assumptions and notions of American Indian people and issues. His work has been exhibited throughout the United States including New York, Chicago, Denver, and Santa Fe; and internationally in Frankfurt, Germany, and London, England.

A co-founder of NVision, a nonprofit collective of Native American artists, musicians, community organizers, and nonprofit professionals focusing on Native American youth empowerment through multimedia arts, Echo-Hawk currently serves as its executive director. He defines himself as a “proactive ARTist” whose goal is to “truly exemplify the current state of Native America.”

Echo-Hawk has dedicated his life to using his art as a means to advance the lives of Native American people. He has been invited to speak and give “live art performances” at Columbia University, Brown University, the University of Arizona, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of California, Irvine. He has been featured in Native Peoples Magazine, Colorlines Magazine, and Native Voice. In addition, Echo-Hawk is a 2008 First Peoples Fund Business in Leadership Fellow and a United States Artist Fellow nominee.

While at UND, Echo Hawk will conduct workshops for students and will produce a fine art print in the Department of Art and Design’s printmaking facilities.

The April 15 presentation by the artist and other events related to his visit are co-sponsored by the Department of Art & Design and the Indian Studies Association. Major funding is provided by the Myers Foundations.

For more information, contact Lucy Ganje, Department of Art & Design
Lucy_Ganje@und.nodak.edu, 777-2670.
-- Lucy Ganje, Associate Professor, Department of Art & Design, lucy_ganje@und.nodak.edu, 777-2670

UND to unveil unique new space flight simulator

The University of North Dakota-based North Dakota Space Grant Consortium and the Department of Space Studies will unveil a SpaceShip One-based space flight simulator, the second of two unique-to-UND training units, at 2 p.m. Wednesday, April 15, in the Spacecraft Simulator Facility, 162 Ryan Hall.

“This is a really terrific day for us,” said Pablo de Leon, an aerospace engineer from Argentina who is research associate in the Department of Space Studies, and principal investigator of the space flight simulator project.

“Now we are doubly unique in the country in being the only university having two fully operational space flight simulators available for students. Before, we had the only space flight training simulator. That one was based on the U.S. Apollo program space capsule,” said de Leon, who also leads the University’s path-finding ND-X space suit research, design, and building program. “This opportunity will pave the way for UND to have training for private spaceflight crews in the future.”

The simulator to be unveiled Wednesday is based on the design of SpaceShip One, which rocketed into history in 2004. It was the first private manned spacecraft to exceed an altitude of 328,000 feet and claimed that year’s $10 million X-Prize. De Leon, who designed Argentina’s internationally renowned Gauchito suborbital rocket, was invited to participate in an earlier X-Prize competition.

“I have followed the Burt Rutan-designed SpaceShip One story with considerable interest,” said President Robert O. Kelley. “And it is with great pride that I have followed the work of UND students and faculty in the design and manufacture of a flight simulator that can train pilots to fly in space using innovations in design of traditional, horizontal launch vehicles.”

“This is a creative application of existing and new technologies for flight simulation,” Kelley said. “It also represents considerable initiative in connecting university research and development with industrial manufacture of the final instrument.”

This UND space flight simulator was made possible by the generous cooperation of Cirrus Design Corp., which donated all of the materials, the work space, and much of the engineering know-how behind the project. The simulator, the first SpaceShip One-style horizontal space flight simulator based at a university, is also funded in part by the North Dakota Space Grant Consortium.

Jackson Katz to speak on sexual, domestic violence April 15

The Association of Residence Halls (ARH) Programming Board is hosting speaker Jackson Katz Wednesday, April 15, at 7:30 p.m. in the Memorial Union Ballroom. His groundbreaking work in gender violence prevention education with men and boys, particularly in the sports culture and the military, is internationally recognized. Faculty, staff and students are invited to attend the program.

An educator, author and filmmaker, Katz is co-founder of the Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) program at Northeastern University's Center for the Study of Sport in Society. MVP is the most widely utilized sexual and domestic violence prevention program in professional and college athletics. It has been implemented by seven NFL teams, including the New England Patriots, as well as the Boston Red Sox and several other Major League Baseball clubs. Katz also directs the first worldwide gender violence prevention program in the history of the United States Marine Corps.

His award-winning educational video "Tough Guise," his featured appearances in the films, "Wrestling With Manhood," and "Spin The Bottle," and his nationwide lectures have brought his insights into masculinity and gender violence to millions of college and high school students. He is also the author of an influential new book, titled “The Macho Paradox: Why Some Men Hurt Women and How All Men Can Help,” published by Sourcebooks in 2006. Since 1990, he has lectured at over 950 colleges, prep schools, high schools, middle schools, professional conferences and military installations in 44 states. Katz holds academic degrees from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and Harvard University, and is currently a doctoral student in cultural studies and education at UCLA.
-- Karina Stander, Assistant Director, Housing, karinastander@mail.und.edu, 7-2770

Patti Alleva to present next Faculty Lecture April 16

“Stirring the Mix: Using Literary Works to Explore the Elements of Judicial Decision-Making” will be the next topic in the Faculty Lecture Series. Patti Alleva, professor of law, will deliver the presentation Thursday, April 16, at the North Dakota Museum of Art. A reception starts at 4 p.m., followed by the lecture at 4:30 p.m.

Alleva will talk about her work using the self-reflective power of literature as a platform for examining the decisional factors which may influence judges and the importance of broadening the traditional legal framework for understanding the nature of judicial judgment.

The UND Faculty Lectures have been held regularly on campus since 1997, cultivating a stronger academic atmosphere by showcasing the scholarly lives of several faculty members, selected across the disciplines. The lectures present the scholarly questions and goals of individual faculty members. In presenting their scholarship, the lecturers share the enthusiasm and dedication that sustains their creative efforts.

The UND Faculty Lectures are free and open to the public.

Alleva is the Rodney & Betty Webb Professor of Law at the UND School of Law. Born and raised in New York City, she graduated summa cum laude from Hofstra University with a bachelor's degree in American history and membership in Phi Beta Kappa. She received her juris doctor from Hofstra Law School, where she was Articles Editor of the Hofstra Law Review. After graduation, she clerked for Chief Judge Clarkston Fisher of the U.S. District Court of New Jersey. She practiced law in New York City at Proskauer Rose in the firm's litigation department for six years before coming to North Dakota in 1987.

Alleva teaches civil procedure, federal courts, and advanced civil litigation. She also teaches “Professional Visions: Law, Literature, and the Role of Lawyers in the Social Order,” an innovative capstone course that she designed to explore professional identity and judgment. She has taught in the Emory University School of Law’s Trial Techniques Program.

Alleva is a two-time recipient of UND’s Lydia & Arthur Saiki Prize for Graduate/Professional Teaching Excellence (1989, 2006). She also is a Bush Teaching Scholar and a three-time winner of UND’s outstanding student organization adviser award. She has presented regionally and nationally on the scholarship of teaching and learning as well as on legal education reform.

On the judicial side, Alleva has been a featured presenter at the National Workshop for U.S. Magistrate Judges, sponsored by the Federal Judicial Center (the Congressionally created education agency for the federal courts). She also served as the reporter for the Civil Justice Reform Act Advisory Group for the District of North Dakota, which is charged by Congress to improve the federal civil litigation process.

Alleva also has been a member of the executive committee of the Association of American Law Schools’ Section on Federal Courts and has published in the area of federal jurisdiction. She was a member of the North Dakota Supreme Court’s Commission on Gender Fairness in the Courts and is now a Master of the Bench in the local chapter of the American Inns of Court, a national organization bringing together judges and lawyers in order to enhance the professionalism and skills of bench and bar.

Alleva has served UND on various committees and promoted interdisciplinary and cross-cultural dialogue, including spearheading creation of the law school’s Northern Plains Indian Law Center; serving on the UND Presidential Advisory Council on Diversity; helping to improve the faculty advancement process campus-wide as a member of the Joint Provost/Senate Committee on Promotion and Tenure; coordinating the recent visit of psychologist Carol Gilligan as the law school’s Inaugural Distinguished-Scholar-in-Residence; serving on UND's PEW Charitable Trusts Higher Education Roundtable; and moderating a Writers Conference panel which included author Louise Erdrich.

Retirement reception honoring Cadence Youngberg is April 16

Dean Hesham El-Rewini, UND School of Engineering and Mines invites you to attend an open house reception honoring Cadence Youngberg for her 33 years of outstanding service to the School of Engineering and Mines and the University of North Dakota. The reception will be held Thursday, April 16, in the Jodsaas Center, 100 Harrington Hall, and will begin with a brief presentation at 2 p.m. Refreshments will continue until 4 p.m.

She joined UND in November 1976, working in the College of Business and Public Administration’s Department of Accounting and Business Law for three years. She then moved on to the Office of Research and Program Development where she remained for 10 years. For 20 years, Youngberg served as chair of the Supervisory Committee at the University Federal Credit Union, exactly the same amount of time she has been at the School of Engineering and Mines as assistant to the dean/financial coordinator.

It is our pleasure to invite the campus community to join us in honoring Youngberg upon her retirement.
-- Deb Austreng, Development Officer, School of Engineering and Mines, debaustreng@mail.und.edu, 777-4249

Conflict Resolution Center director to keynote Minnesota conference

Conflict Resolution Center Director Kristine Paranica will be the keynote presenter at the Conflict Resolution Minnesota annual conference Thursday, April 16, at the University of Minnesota Continuing Education and Conference Center in St. Paul.

Paranica’s presentation is titled “Relational Connections in Chaos and Conflict.”

“I’m going to highlight that in times of chaos and conflict, we tend to lose sight of our connectedness as feelings of isolation and despair move in,” said Paranica, who is an attorney and adjunct professor in alternative dispute resolution at the UND School of Law.

“I’m going to share insights from a relational world view through the practice of transformative mediation, working with emotional intelligence, non-violent communication, and spiritually-based mindfulness practices to support myself, our mediation clients, and the people I work with,” Paranica said.

For more information about this year’s Conflict Resolution Minnesota conference, see http://www.conflictresolutionmn.org/

Cultural Nights resume April 16 featuring Nigeria and African Diaspora

The Thursday Night Cultural Series resumes at 7 p.m. Thursday, April 16, at the Loading Dock, Memorial Union, with a special combined program featuring the culture of Nigeria, as well as a cultural presentation on the African Diaspora presented by the Black Student Association. The program is free and will be followed by an opportunity to sample a range of cultural cuisine for $1.
-- Shannon Jolly, International Student Advisor, International Programs, shannonjolly@mail.und.edu, 777-4118

Entrepreneurship Bootcamps set for April 16-18

The Jodsaas Center for Engineering Leadership and Entrepreneurship is sponsoring Entrepreneurship Bootcamps by Stephen A. Szygenda from the Southern Methodist University School of Engineering.
* Students: Thursday, April 16, 12:30 to 1:45 p.m., 324 Harrington Hall
* Faculty and staff: Friday, April 17, noon to 2 p.m., 218 Harrington Hall
* Discussion for all: Saturday, April 18, 9 a.m. to noon, 108 Harrington Hall

One-on-one meetings: contact RichardSchultz@mail.und.edu to schedule.

Lunch will be served Thursday and Friday; refreshments will be served Saturday.

Although the Thursday bootcamp will be dedicated to student ventures, and the Friday bootcamp will be dedicated to faculty ventures, please come to any and all sessions when you are available.

Dr. Szygenda is the former dean of the School of Engineering at Southern Methodist University and The University of Alabama-Birmingham. He has held the position of chair of the electrical and computer engineering department at the University of Texas–Austin, where he also held the Clint Murchison Jr. Chair of Free Enterprise, and was the founding director of the Texas Center for Technology Development and Transfer. During his academic endeavors, Dr. Szygenda has graduated more than 100 M.S. and 40 Ph.D. students, acquired extensive government and industry research funding, received numerous awards, consulted for more than 50 international companies and universities, served on the board of directors of a number of companies, and published more than 150 papers. He received his Ph.D. degree from Northwestern University.

In industry and entrepreneurship, Dr. Szygenda has served as president of SBI Inc., COMSAT General Integrated Systems, the Rubicon Group (an incubator to nurture 10 high tech start-up companies, simultaneously), and Comprehensive Computing Systems and Services Inc. (This was the first multi-product simulation and test company producing very large CAD software and hardware systems. This company was acquired by The Communications Satellite Corporation of America and subsequently by The General Electric Corporation). He was also a member of technical staff at Bell Telephone Laboratories during the 1960s, where he was part of the group that developed the first electronic switching system, No. 1 ESS.

Dr. Szygenda is a pioneer in the areas of Simulation, CAD, fault tolerant computing, telecommunications, software engineering, entrepreneurship, academic strategic planning, technology transfer, business management, and economic development.
-- Richard R. Schultz, Interim Director, Jodsaas Center for Engineering Leadership & Entrepreneurship, RichardSchultz@mail.und.edu, 777-4429

SUNY Distinguished Professor to speak at geography forum

The Department of Geography invites you to the April Geography Forum from noon to 1 p.m. Friday, April 17, in Gamble Hall Room 7. David M. Mark, SUNY Distinguished Professor, Department of Geography, University at Buffalo, will present "Ethnophysiography: Cultural and Linguistic Variation in the Conceptualization of Landscape." Everyone is welcome. For questions, please contact Enru Wang, Department of Geography, at 777-4590.
-- Enru Wang, Assistant Professor, Geography, erwang@und.edu, 7-4590

Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics Seminar is April 17

Mark M. Rasenick, Distinguished Professor of Physiology and Biophysics and Psychiatry, and director of the Interdisciplinary Neuroscience Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago, will present a seminar titled “Lipid Raft Modulation of G Protein Signaling and the Cell Biology of Depression” at 2 p.m. Friday, April 17, in Room 3933 in the School of Medicine.

This seminar is sponsored by the Center of Biomedical Research Excellence Pathophysiological Signaling in Neurodegenerative Disorders and the Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics. All are welcome to attend.
-- Deb Kroese, Administrative Officer, Pharmacology, Physiology & Therapeutics, dkroese@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-6221

Reading by NorthWord is April 17

Members of the public and the campus community are invited to a reading by NorthWord, the University of North Dakotas undergraduate reading series. NorthWord is a group of students dedicated to helping UNDs undergraduate creative writers share their work.

This month's reading will feature writers Lorenzo Serna, Ryan Langerud, and Jenna Rendall at 4 p.m. Friday, April 17, in 300 Merrifield Hall, followed by a reception.

National Day of Silence for Safer Schools is April 17

Get ready for the campus to be a little quieter. On Friday, April 17, students at the University of North Dakota will join students across the nation in a Day of Silence to protest the discrimination, harassment and abuse, in effect the silencing, faced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students and their allies in schools.

The Day of Silence, a project of the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN), will be held during school hours. The day will begin at 8:30 a.m. with members of the GLSEN Red River Valley chapter and others wishing to participate in the Day of Silence, meeting at the Soaring Eagle statue behind the Chester Fritz Library on the UND campus. Participants will be silent throughout the day, wearing stickers and passing out "speaking cards" that read:

"Please understand my reasons for not speaking today. I am participating in the Day of Silence, a national youth movement protesting the silence faced by lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people and their allies in schools. My deliberate silence echoes that silence, which is caused by harassment, prejudice, and discrimination. I believe that ending the silence is the first step toward fighting these injustices. Think about the voices you are not hearing today. What are you going to do to end the silence?"

At 2 p.m. there will be a "Breaking the Silence" debriefing to be held in the Badlands Room at the Memorial Union.

"The Day of Silence," according to local organizer, David Whitcomb, "is especially relevant to the students in North Dakota schools, as our elected state representatives voted earlier this month not to require equal rights in North Dakota on the basis of sexual orientation or gender expression." Dr. Whitcomb hopes that the event will work towards empowering the voices and reducing the hatred directed toward students.

GLSEN's 2003 National Climate Survey found that more than four out of five LGBT students report verbal, sexual or physical harassment at school and 29 percent report missing at least a day of school in the past month out of fear for their personal safety. The Day of Silence is one way students and their allies are making anti-LGBT bullying, harassment and name-calling unacceptable in America's schools.

The Day of Silence, a project of GLSEN, is a nationwide, student-led event during which hundreds of high schools and colleges protest the oppression of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth. For more information contact local organizer Sandy Grissom, at glsenrrv@yahoo.com.

For more information and a complete collection of organizing materials, visit www.dayofsilence.org.

GLSEN, or the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network, is the leading national education organization focused on creating safe schools for all lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students. Established nationally in 1995, GLSEN envisions a world in which every child learns to respect and accept all people, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity/expression. For more information on our educator resources, public policy agenda, student organizing programs or development initiatives, visit www.glsen.org.

Center for Community Engagement to co-host free forum

The Center for Community Engagement will co-host a free Community Connect Forum in Rugby, N.D., April 17-18. “Focus on Community Entrepreneurship” will feature discussions about funding for community projects, community planning and evaluation, community information gathering, promoting community arts, and youth and senior citizens as assets for North Dakota communities. Exhibits of community-university projects and resources, as well as opportunities for networking will be available.

Registration for the forum and related events is at the Hub Motel, Rugby, N.D., Friday, April 17, from noon to 4:45 p.m.; and Saturday, April 18, 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Registration and forum materials are free.

To register, contact Lana Rakow, director of the Center for Community Engagement, at 777-2287, lanarakow@mail.und.edu, or visit www.communityengagement.und.edu .

Lunch will be available for $7.50 each day. Lodging is available at the EconoLodge on Highway 2 in Rugby. Transportation will be available Friday evening for guided tours of Rugby and area attractions.

Community Connect Forum is a community-university public media project that also includes a Web site and journal to be premiered at the forum. Community members from across the state are encouraged to attend this second UND—community forum. The forum is open to the public and will bring a substantial number of UND students, faculty, and staff to Rugby. The forum is being planned by a team of community partners and university representatives, co-chaired by Dallas Knudson, Towner, N.D., and Janet Moen, professor, UND sociology, Social Science Research Institute, and peace studies.

The event is sponsored by the Community Connect Project, hosted by the UND Center for Community Engagement.

Hands-On Learning Fair is April 18

Children, birth through age 7 and their families, are invited to attend the Hands-On Learning Fair, a free family event that is part of the Month of the Young Child and Child Abuse Prevention Month celebrations in April. The 18th annual Hands-On Learning Fair will be held from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, April 18, at the Purpur Arena in Grand Forks. The fair features an exciting variety of learning activities for children age birth to 7 and their families, as well as parent information displays. The mayor’s proclamation will kick off the event at 9:45 a.m. "Bring Communities Together for Children —Children Bring Communities Together" is this year’s national theme, emphasizing how critical early education is to the vitality of each community. Sponsors of the event are the Northeast Chapter of the North Dakota Association for the Education of Young Children and Prevent Child Abuse North Dakota. Its purposes include:
* To provide an exciting way for children ages birth to 7 and their families in the Grand Forks and East Grand Forks area to celebrate this special month.
* To underscore the importance of parent involvement to healthy development and optimal early learning in children.
* To create awareness of learning as a process that begins at birth and continues lifelong, with the most rapid brain development occurring during early childhood.
* To highlight the nature of appropriate early education as hands-on, or experiential, building on children's inborn curiosity and motivation to understand their world.

Creative art, language, science, math, sensory exploration, dramatic play, music, games, and stories are among the many choices of age-appropriate activities for children attending the Hands-On Learning Fair. There is also a parent/infant interaction area designed for the very young. Emphasis is on active involvement in the learning process, rather than entertainment, with learning as its own reward. Adults guide children in their explorations, allowing the youngsters to experience the joy of discovery. There are also informational exhibits for parents.

Local early childhood programs, including the University Children’s Center and many other entities involved in early education and development, provide these learning activities. These professionals plan and carry out the educational experiences on a voluntary basis, applying the same commitment and expertise with which they engage in their regular early care and education responsibilities. In the spirit of working together for children, Dakota Science Center’s Super Science Saturday and the annual Scout Show will be in the adjacent Gambucci Arena.

Community partners for this year’s Hands-On Learning Fair are Grand Forks County Social Services, Tri-Valley Child Care Resource & Referral, Healthy Families, Northland Community & Technical College Early Childhood Program, Safe Kids Grand Forks, Lakes & Prairies Child Care Resource & Referral, Dakota Science Center, and Boy Scouts of America. Many area businesses, institutions, and individuals donate goods and services for the celebration. These include the Grand Forks Park District, UND, retail businesses, and service clubs. Their support and the hundreds of hours contributed by early childhood educators have helped to achieve seventeen years of success for this family event, and to keep it free of charge.
-- Jo-Anne Yearwood, Director/Instructor, University Childrens Center, joanneyearwood@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3947

Super Science Saturday is April 18

Super Science Saturday will take place at the Gambucci Arena, 1122 7th Ave. S., Saturday, April 18, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Dakota Science Center and the Parent Information Center have joined together for this free family event featuring hands-on science activities and informational exhibits for children in grades 1-6. The Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts will hold their Scout Shows in the Gambucci Arena for children of all ages. Families with children will enjoy hands-on activities designed to spark an interest in the sciences during Super Science Saturday.

The Hands-On Learning Fair, for children birth to age 7, will be held in the Purpur Arena sponsored by the Northeast Chapter of the North Dakota Association for the Education of Young Children (NDAEYC) and Prevention Child Abuse North Dakota. Families with children will enjoy hands-on activities at this event.

Governor Hoeven has signed a proclamation making April 12-19, Environmental Education Week. Super Science Saturday is part of National Environmental Education Week. Greater Grand Forks residents will be able to bring their ink cartridges, laser cartridges, laptops, cell phones, pda's, iPods, DVD movies, video systems and games, and digital cameras for recycling to the event. The Dakota Science Center uses the Cartridges for Kids program to raise money for hands-on science activities in our community. A technotrash box will also be available for residents to recycle electronic media such as videos, cassettes, computer disks, CDs and DVDs. The GreenDisk Company began on Earth Day 1993 to provide a secure way to dispose of intellectual property in an environmentally responsible manner.

Bring your used eyeglasses to donate to those in need. Drop off your used eyeglasses at the Lions Club booth and get a free bag of popcorn. -- Laura Munski, Dakota Science Center.

Enjoy high tea in the Culinary Corner

Ever dreamed of attending high tea at a fancy restaurant? Well, the fancy restaurant is coming to the UND Wellness Center at 2 p.m. Saturday, April 18. In this hands-on class, participants will not only learn what goes into the creation of high tea delicacies such as scones, tea sandwiches, and small pastries, but we will set up a high tea setting for all the participants to enjoy at the end of the class! More details will be posted closer to the class date, so keep watching! The cost is $15 per person.

To register: www.wellness.und.edu- click on Nutrition and Culinary Corner
-- Karina Wittmann, Coordinator of Nutrition Services, Wellness Center, karinawittmann@mail.und.edu, 701-777-0769

Doctoral examination set for Ann Marie Sorteberg

The final examination for Ann Marie Sorteberg, a candidate for the Ed.D. degree with a major in teaching and learning, is set for 9 a.m. Monday, April 20, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "Post-National Reading Panel Literacy Practices in a Head Start Classroom." Kari Chiasson (teaching and learning) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Elizabeth Iva Bjerke

The final examination for Elizabeth Iva Bjerke, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in educational leadership, is set for 11:30 a.m. Monday, April 20, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "Utilizing Student Pre-entry Attributes and Academic Integration to Predict Academic Success and Persistence to the Second Year in a Collegiate Aviation Program." Margaret Healy (educational leadership) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, gailholweger@mail.und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Louella L. Lofranco

The final examination for Louella L. Lofranco, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in communication and public discourse, is set for 3 p.m. Monday, April 20, in 200 O'Kelly Hall. The dissertation title is "The Meaning of Development for Filipinos by Filipinos in Diaspora: Rhetorical Vision in Participatory Communication." Lana Rakow (communication) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Researcher to speak at Anatomy and Cell Biology spring seminar series

James Foster, research assistant professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, will present a seminar titled “Lipid Modification and Regulation of Dopamine Transporters” at noon Monday, April 20, in Clifford Haugen Room 1360, School of Medicine and Health Sciences. All are welcome to attend.
-- Bonnie Kee, Administrative Assistant, Anatomy and Cell Biology, bkee@medicine.nodak.edu, 7-2102

Honors Program Undergraduate Research Conference to be held Monday, April 20

The University of North Dakota Honors Program will present its 11th annual Undergraduate Research Conference (URC) Monday, April 20, in the Memorial Union. The conference will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., and is free and open to the public.

At this year’s URC, 30 seniors will present the results of multi-semester independent research projects. During their research, each student works closely with a faculty mentor who serve as chairs of the resulting senior thesis. The senior thesis process is overseen by the Honors Committee, whose membership consists of faculty appointed by the University Senate and students elected by the Honors Program.
-- Brian Schill, Undergraduate Research Coordinator, Honors Program, brian.schill@und.edu, 777-4402

University Within the University (U2) lists new classes

University Within the University (U2) lists the following new classes.

Microsoft Office Excel 2007 Level 2(Intermediate)
April 20, 1 to 3:30 p.m., 361 Upson II
Prerequisite: Basic understanding of computers, mouse, and file saving and retrieving skills.
Upon successful completion of this course, participants will be able to calculate advanced formulas, organize worksheet and table data using various techniques, create and modify charts, analyze data using PivotTables and PivotCharts, insert objects, and customize and enhance workbooks and the Microsoft Excel environment. Presenter: Heidi Strande.

Bicycle Commuting 101
April 21, noon to 1 p.m., Wellness Center, Spin Room
Beat high fuel prices, get excercise, and have fun! We'll show you how easy it is to commute to work by bicycle through looking at equipment, safety, techniques, weather, and also some local programs and statistics. You'll find out how little effort is required to start and how versatile a tool your bicycle can be. Presenter: Joseph Vacek.

Pre-Retirement Seminar-TIAA-CREF
April 21, 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., Swanson Hall, Room 10-12
For those near retirement, find answers to questions about your TIAA-CREF retirement. How much income will you need? Where will it come from? What income options best fit your needs? TIAA-CREF can help you identify your goals and develop a strategy to achieve them. This session will also cover wills, estates and supplemental retirement annuities. Employees on NDPERS may also find this session beneficial. Presenter: Christine White, TIAA-CREF.

Beyond Regulations: Supporting International Students During Cultural and Academic Adjustment
April 22, 10 a.m. to noon, International Centre
From differences in university administrative structure and classroom environment to different expectations for social interactions, UND's students from outside the United States face a wealth of new experiences and challenges during their studies. These differences can also provide challenges for faculty and staff interacting with international students. This workshop will address some of the common challenges that international students may face. We will discuss the resources and recommendations that we give to students during international student orientation and related programs. We will also provide faculty and staff with tools for empowering international students who may be struggling with the new environment. Presenters: Anne Ekkaia and Shannon Jolly.

Go Green When You Clean
April 22, 6 to 7 p.m., Wellness Center, Culinary Corner Kitchen
Today’s household cleaners can be very toxic and harmful if not used properly, as well as expensive. Commercial and chemical-based products are tough on your wallet as well as your health. Join us in the Culinary Corner as we learn how to make our own non-toxic cleaning products that will help transform your home into a non-toxic and healthy haven. Cost is $5; pay at the Wellness Center when you arrive for the session. Presenter: Karina Wittman.
-- Patricia Young, U2 Coordinator, Continuing Education, patriciayoung@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-0720

Doctoral examination set for Garth Kruger

The final examination for Garth Kruger, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in teaching and learning, is set for 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, April 21, in Room 308, Education Building. The dissertation title is "Recruitment Factors Affecting Nurse Recruitment in Northwest Minnesota." Steven LeMire (educational foundations and research) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Pre-retirement seminars offered this spring

Please note the pre-retirement seminars offered this spring:

April 21, 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., TIAA-CREF income options presented by TIAA-CREF
For those near retirement, find answers to questions about your TIAA-CREF retirement. TIAA-CREF can help identify your goals and develop a strategy to achieve them. This session could also be beneficial to those employees on NDPERS as they will discuss supplemental retirement annuities and estate planning.

April 28, 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., Social Security and Medicare presented by Howard Kossover, public affairs specialist for North Dakota and Northwest Minnesota
This seminar will provide information regarding the many questions you may have about Social Security and Medicare at retirement.

May 6, 1 to 4:30 p.m., NDPERS – Health, Life Insurance and Retirement presented by Diane Heck, NDPERS benefit program specialist
Information regarding NDPERS health insurance and Medicare supplement for retirees will be discussed. This session is for both NDPERS and TIAA-CREF participants who are interested in staying on the NDPERS health insurance during retirement. Insurances will be discussed from 1 to 2:45 p.m., and NDPERS retirement will be covered from 3 to 4:30 p.m.

Please contact the U2 Office for registration and location for seminars listed above.

Phone: 777-4316, e-mail: U2@mail.und.nodak.edu,
or online: www.U2.und.edu
-- Katie Douthit, Retirement Specialist, Payroll, katie.douthit@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2157

Ask the Lab community education event is April 22

Altru Health System and the North Dakota Chapter of the American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science invite you to become a savvy medical consumer. The Ask the Lab Community Education Event will be held at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 22, at the Clarion Inn (1210 N. 43rd St.). As part of the ASCLS-ND annual meeting, this community event will provide information on (1) reading your lab work; (2) quality measures used in providing accurate results; (3) consumer costs associated with lab work; (4) careers in the clinical laboratory field; and (5) Q&A opportunity. It is free and open to the public.
-- Mary Coleman, Asst. Professor, Pathology, mcoleman@medicine.nodak.edu, 7-2652

Technology Trends Forum is April 29

The Center for Instructional and Learning Technologies will host a Technology Trends Forum from 2:30 to 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 29, in 10/12 Swanson Hall. Brenda Kallio, associate professor of educational leadership, will present information on Second Life. Staff from the Center for Instructional and Learning Technologies will also provide information.

This forum will cover:
* Holding class in a virtual world
* Using the virtual world to promote group discussions
* Sending students on a virtual scavanger hunt
* Touring the virtual UND campus

This forum is open to faculty, staff and students. To register, please call Diane Lundeen at 777-2129 or send an e-mail to dianelundeen@mail.und.edu .

-- Diane Lundeen, Instructional Technology Coordinator, Center for Instructional & Learning Technologies, dianelundeen@mail.und.edu, 777-2129

On Teaching session explores using video projects to promote student learning

In our Teaching with Technology Series this year we are exploring some of the work faculty on campus are doing in effectively introducing technology into their courses in ways that enhances student learning. Patrick Schultz (management) and Andrew Quinn (social work) have been working together in cooperation with the Center for Instructional Technology (CILT) to develop an "authentic" (a pedagogical term used to mean "in a real world context") project for courses on organization theory in which students can present their findings in a video format. The assignment asks student groups to do research on a local non-profit and then develop a storyline that illustrates the organizations' management principles. Students write interview questions and then videotape the interviews they conduct with the organization's management and staff. They then present their research to the class as a finished video, which they have edited and narrated.

In this session of On Teaching, from noon to 1 p.m. Wednesday, April 22, in the Red River Valley Room, Memorial Union, Patrick and Andrew will share insights they have gained from creating and implementing this authentic collaborative video project. If you are interested in trying a project like this, or you have also used video narratives to enhance student learning and would like to share your experiences, we hope you will join us for a thoughtful discussion of the pros and cons of this kind of assignment. To register and reserve your lunch call Jana Hollands at 777-4998 or e-mail jana_hollands@und.edu by noon Monday, April 20.

The On Teaching Seminar Series is co-sponsored by the Office of Instructional Development and Writing Across the Curriculum.
-- Anne Kelsch, Director, Office of Instructional Development, anne.kelsch@und.nodak.edu, 7-4233

Wellness Center lists events

Wellness Center lists the following events.

* Earth Day 2009, Wednesday, April 22
A whole line-up of events to celebrate Earth Day.

Nike ReUSE A Shoe, all month long. Worn out. Play on. Turn your old sports shoes into places to play. Drop off your old athletic shoes for recycle into sports and playground surfaces through Nike’s Reuse-A –Shoe program. Drop-Off point located at the Wellness Center.

Bicycle Communting 101 w/ Joe Vacek, Wellness Center, Tuesday noon to 1 p.m. Register through U2. Beat high fuel prices, get exercise, and have fun! We'll show you how easy it is to commute to work by bicycle. We'll cover equipment, safety, techniques, weather, and look at some local programs. You'll find out how little effort is required to start and how versatile a tool your bicycle can be.

Trayless Dining, all Earth Day long, UND Dining Centers.

Earth Fair, Wellness Center Atrium, Wednesday 2 to 6 p.m. These businesses will display the efforts they are making in order to stay green and reduce their carbon footprint.

B - Clean Products, City of Grand Forks and Public Works, Arbonne International, storm water and UND recycling, Safety Environmental Office, Sustainability & Energy Conservation, waste management, Ski & Bike Shop.

Earth Day 1.5 Mile Walk/Run, Wednesday 5 p.m. Registration begins at 4:30 p.m. Event starts and finishes at the Wellness Center. The event is free! Door prizes will be given out to random participants.

Go Green When You Clean, Culinary Corner, Wednesday, 6 p.m. $5 - register through Work Well. Today’s household cleaners can be very toxic and harmful if not used properly, as well as expensive. Commercial and chemical based products are tough on your wallet as well as your health. Join us in the Culinary Corner as we learn how to make our own non-toxic cleaning products that will help transform your home into a non-toxic and healthy haven.

Culinary Corner events for April 20-25:
All demonstrations take place in the Culinary Corner kitchen located on the first floor of the Wellness Center.

Food trivia for the week, good luck! (answers are at the bottom)
1. Who is the Tootsie Roll named after?
2. There are 17 different animals found in a animal cracker box, name them:
3. What instant drink owes its success to NASA?

Cheap, Fast and Healthy
Monday, April 20, 5:30 p.m.
Are you on a hectic schedule and tight budget? Are you sick of going through the drive thru and ordering unhealthy food just because it’s convenient? Come join us Monday nights for Cheap, Fast, and Healthy!

Each 30-minute session will feature tips on shopping for fresh and healthy ingredients, easy to prepare recipes, and cost comparisons. Class participants will see the recipe being prepared, enjoy a sample, and leave with a recipe card and nutrition information to make the meal themselves! The class is free and no need to pre-register, just show up!

Start Right Breakfast
Tuesday, April 21, and Wednesday, April 22, 7:15 a.m.
Who said Wheaties is the only breakfast of champions? Come join us bright and early in the Culinary Corner and start your day off right! Learn healthy breakfast options that are easy, delicious, and made for champions. The cost is $5 per person.

Faculty and staff: Register http://u2.und.edu/sessions/
Students: register www.wellness.und.edu, click on Nutrition and Culinary Corner

Sweet Treats: Cupcake II Edition
Thursday, April 23, 6 p.m.
Missed our last cupcake class? No worries, it's back again!
Come to this hands-on class to learn more easy, delicious, and healthier cupcake and icing recipes. Further emphasis on icing and decorating cupcakes will be highlighted. Participants will decorate and take home their own creations.

Cost: $15
To register: www.wellness.und.edu, click on Nutrition and Culinary Corner.

**Please pre-register by noon the day before each class. Class cancellations must be made at least 24 hours in advance for full refund option. **

For questions please contact Karina Wittmann, Coordinator of Nutrition Services at karinawittmann@mail.und.edu

Trivia Answers:
1. The creator’s daughter
2. Bear (sitting), bear (standing), bison, camel, cougar, elephant, giraffe, gorilla, hippopotamus, hyena, kangaroo, lion, monkey, rhinoceros, seal, sheep, tiger, and zebra.
3. Tang
-- Kristine Henke, Marketing Representative, Wellness Center, kristine.henke@und.edu, 701-777-3003

Donations sought for Adelphi book/media sale

It's spring (sort of), which means it's time for the Adelphi book sale! As before, we need your help in advertising the event and in donating books, CDs and DVDs. We'll have a box in the English department office for donations, and if you have a large number, we're happy to come to your home to pick them up. If you drop them off in the office, please e-mail Michelle Sauer at michelle.m.sauer@und.nodak.edu so she can get you a tax receipt. All donations are, of course, tax deductible!

The book/media sale will be April 22 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., and April 23, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., in the hall outside 122 Merrifield Hall. We'll have fliers in your boxes and hung around Merrifield and campus, but we would appreciate you announcing this event to your classes and encouraging your students to come buy books. We'll also be selling pizza and drinks, so make sure to forget your lunch those days.

We need for this year's book sale to be especially successful because Adelphi is planning a trip to see Arthur Miller's "The Price" at the Theater in the Round in Minneapolis the first week in May, and we need money for gas and hotel rooms. All English majors and professors will be invited (again, we'll get a flier in your box as soon as we have the details figured out). Thanks for your support! -- English.

Doctoral examination set for Michael G. Nygaard

The final examination for Michael G. Nygaard, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in educational leadership, is set for 8 a.m. Thursday, April 23, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "Impact on Student Achievement Through the Use of the Six Traits of Writing Model." Sherryl Houdek (educational leadership) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Nursing hosts Visiting Scholar Lecture April 23

The College of Nursing will host a Visiting Scholar Lecture at 3 p.m. Thursday, April 23, in Room 248 of the Northern Plains Center for Behavioral Research (NPCBR). Ann Horgas will present "Pain Management in Aging." She is an associate professor and associate dean for research at the University of Florida College of Nursing. She is currently funded by the National Institute on Aging to study cognitive interventions for older adults, and recently completed an NINR-funded study of pain assessment in nursing home residents. Dr. Horgas is a consultant for the newly established Gerontological Nursing Specialization. Students who complete this master of science degree course of study are eligible for the American Nurse Credentialing Center examination for certification as a gerontological nurse practitioner or clinical nurse specialist. The College of Nursing welcomes all interested faculty, staff, students, and community members.
-- Valerie Krogstad, Gerontological Nursing Specialization Asst, Nursing, valkrogstad@mail.und.edu, 701-777-4535

President's Advisory Council on Women (PAC-W) present "Let's Do Lunch"

The President's Advisory Council on Women (PAC-W) present "Let's Do Lunch" luncheon is Thursday, April 23, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Memorial Union, River Valley Room.

* 11 a.m. to noon, awards ceremony and mentoring presentation. Winners of the Louise Ebwerwein Scholarship and the 2009 Women Studies Essay Contest will be honored. A short presentation will follow on the wealth of opportunities available through mentor relationships.
* Noon to 1 p.m., Panel on International women's issues. Vincent Bulus, doctoral student, will talk about "Cultural Conditions Faced by Nigerian Women," and Daphne Pedersen and Abdallah Badahdah, Department of Sociology, will discuss "Arab Women Living With HIV."

Attend one or both events. There is a free lunch for attendees who register. To register for a free lunch, please call Patty McIntyre at the Women's Center (777-4302) no later than Friday, April 17. The lunch is limited to the first 100 people.
-- Patty McIntyre, Program Associate, Womens Center, undwomenscenter@und.nodak.edu, 777-4302

Faculty-directed study abroad workshop is April 23

If you have considered offering a course in an international context and don’t know what to do next or want to know how to go about implementing a faculty-directed study abroad opportunity, then join us at the International Centre from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, April 23, for a Faculty-Directed Study Abroad Workshop.
Topics to be discussed:
- Logistics: when, where, who, what, and how
- Advertising and recruiting
- University regulations (e.g. insurance, registration, credit)
- Financing
- The role/support of the Office of International Programs

Please register by Monday, April 20, by contacting Tatjyana Richards at 777-6438 or e-mail: tatjyanarichards@mail.und.edu
-- Ray Lagasse, Director, International Programs, raymondlagasse@mail.und.edu, 777-2938

Forensic science candidate seminar is April 23

At noon Thursday, April 23, in 141 Starcher Hall, Igor Ovtchinnikov will present a seminar as part of his interview for a position in the Forensic Science program. The title of his seminar is: "DNA Detective Work in the Heart of Asia: Integrating Population and Forensic Genetics." Dr. Ovtchinnikov is interested in the use of molecular methods in the analysis of forensic evidence. He has analyzed DNA from both recent and ancient sources. Please contact John La Duke (777-3641) if you are interested in meeting with Dr. Ovtchinnikov.
-- John La Duke, Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences, Arts and Sciences, john_laduke@und.nodak.edu, 73641

Regional Brain Bee is April 23

The fourth annual Greater Grand Forks Regional Brain Bee will be held at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, April 23, in the Reed T. Keller Auditorium, School of Medicine. This is a neuroscience competition for high school students, covering topics such as brain anatomy, development, function, disorders, treatments and research advances in neuroscience. This year we anticipate about 12 students will be competing. Previous winners have represented North Dakota at the National Brain Bee in Baltimore.

Please join us in supporting these students. A reception will follow in the Vennes Atrium. For more information, please see http://www.dozelab.com/outreach/brainbee/

This event is sponsored by the Red River Valley Chapter of the Society for Neuroscience.
-- Karen Cisek, Lab Manager, Pharmacology, Physiology & Therapeutics, kcisek@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-6223

Scouts prepare for annual food drive

Scouts, UND students, and other volunteers from the Greater Grand Forks area will collect food to restock the shelves of local food cupboards. Volunteers will distribute doorknob hang-tags door-to-door Thursday, April 23. Residents can participate in this service project by filling bags with food and personal care items. Bags should be set outside Saturday morning, April 25, for volunteers to collect from 9 to 11 a.m.

Our local food cupboards have seen an increase in need. Scouts, UND students, and other volunteers have teamed up to "Do A Good Turn" for our local food cupboards.

For more information, contact Myron Barnes 775-3189.
-- Jan Orvik, Writer/Editor, University Relations, janorvik@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3621

Farewell party for Mary Cutler is April 24

A farewell party for Mary L. Cutler, theatre arts professor, will be held from 2 to 4 p.m. Friday, April 24, in the J. Lloyd Stone Alumni Center. Please join us as we thank Dr. Cutler for her many years of service and wish her well on her departure.
-- Kathleen McLennan, Chair, Department of Theatre Arts, Department of Theatre Arts, kathleen_mclennan@und.nodak.edu, 701-777-2871

Friday Night Cabaret Series presents "Maura Does Judy"

Join the Fire Hall Theatre and Maura Ferguson for an evening honoring Judy Garland at the Fire Hall Theatre in downtown Grand Forks on Friday, April 24 at 7:30 p.m. Acclaimed vocalist Maura Ferguson and accompanist Marlys Murphy explore the hits and songs of famed Judy Garland - it's all the fun of a Judy concert, with less drugs!

Ferguson, daughter of opera performer and vocal coach Maria Williams Kennedy, has been a mainstay of Greater Grand Forks Theatre for most of her life. Since her return to Grand Forks in 2007, Maura has most recently been seen in the smash hit "Lucky Stiff" as dog-loving Annabel Glick. Ferguson is known for her pure vocal talent and range. This tribute to the iconic Garland is a can't miss to usher in spring!

Tickets are $10 at the door, with proceeds benefiting the artist and the Theatre. All ages show, with wine available for 21+. The Friday Night Cabaret Series is a program of the Greater Grand Forks Community Theatre to explore music and theatre in an informal and relaxed format.

For more information, visit us online at www.ggfct.org.
-- Benjamin Klipfel, Executive Director, Fire Hall Theatre, ben@benklipfel.net, 701-746-0847

Gordon Henry, Larry Klundt, other graduates receive alumni achievement awards from departments

You are invited to join us in celebrating the College of Education and Human Development Alumni Achievement Awards Banquet Friday, April 24, at the Hilton Garden Inn. The social is at 6 p.m., followed by the dinner at 6:45 p.m.

We will be honoring:
* Gordon Henry, ’66, M.Ed., ’70, Ed.D. - Counseling Psychology and Community Services
* Rick Wilson, ’72, B.S.Ed. - Physical Education, Exercise Science and Wellness (cccepting on Rick's behalf is his son, Barrett.)
* Jodi Maker, ’98, B.S.Ed. - Teaching and Learning
* Larry Klundt, ’71, M.Ed., ’80, Spec. Dip., ’94, Ed.D. - Educational Leadership
* Ronald Ferguson, ’01, M.A., ’04, Ph.D. - Educational Foundations and Research

Tickets are $15. Please RSVP to Jena by Friday, April 17.

To register or send a note of congratulations, call 777-0844 or e-mail: jena_pierce@und.edu
Send payment to Jena Pierce, 231 Centennial Drive, Stop 7189, Grand Forks, ND 58202-7189.
-- Jena Pierce, Director of Alumni Relations and Development, College of Education and Human Development, jena_pierce@und.edu, 701-777-0844

Children's Center benefit is April 25

The University of North Dakota Children’s Center (UCC) will host its third annual benefit and silent auction from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Saturday, April 25, at UCC, 525 Stanford Rd. The event’s theme is “PLAY – Find Your Inner Child.” The evening will include auction items that showcase fun activities and services from local businesses. New this year is a raffle drawing for a variety of prizes including a Trek bicycle and a UND parking permit for 2009-10; see http://www.childrenscenter.und.edu/auction.html for a list of all the raffle items. All proceeds will benefit programs at the Children’s Center.

Tickets for the event are $15 for community members and raffle tickets are $2 each. Both may be purchased at the University Children’s Center at 525 Stanford Road; call 777-3947 for more information. The event is sponsored by the College of Education and Human Development, College of Arts and Sciences, and Residence Services and is open to the public.

The University Children’s Center has a long tradition of serving children and families, both on campus and from the Greater Grand Forks community. The Center is a licensed pre-school and childcare facility for young children two through 12 years of age. During the summer children first through fifth grades are also eligible to enroll. The Children’s Center works to provide quality, educational childcare in keeping with the best practices in the field of Early Childhood Development, offers experiential learning opportunities for UND students, and provides a research site that increases national knowledge about families and young children.
-- Jo-Anne Yearwood, Director, University Childrens Center, joanneyearwood@mail.und.edu, 7-3947

Building a veteran-friendly campus Webcast is April 29

A Web conference will be held from noon to 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 29,at the Clinical Education Center Auditorium, 725 Hamline St. Over 46,000 veterans have returned from the recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and are eligible for GI educational benefits. Many of them will start or return to college. In addition to probable emotional needs, veterans will also need special help navigating the campus system and their benefits. This Web conference will highlight the unique and varied needs of veterans and explore how your campus can deploy a support network to meet these needs. Administrators in student services, counseling services, disability services, admissions, and financial aid are invited to attend to learn how the Minnesota system has structured their support efforts and hear tips on making their own campus more veteran-friendly. This Academic Impressions Web conference is sponsored by the campus Veterans Advisory Group and Enrollment Management. Participants can register through U2 at http://www.conted.und.edu/U2/

University Senate meets May 7; agenda item deadline is April 23

The University Senate will meet Thursday, May 7, at 4:05 p.m. in Gamble Hall, Room 7. Agenda items for this meeting are due in the Office of the Registrar by noon Thursday, April 23. They may be submitted electronically to: lorihofland@mail.und.nodak.edu . It is recommended that some detail be included in the agenda items submitted. -– Suzanne Anderson, secretary, University Senate.

Unmanned Aircraft Systems Action Summit is May 27-28

The Unmanned Aircraft Systems Action Summit will be Wednesday, May 27, at the Alerus Center, and Thursday, May 28, at the Grand Forks Air Force Base. The summit is hosted by the Red River Valley Research Corridor, Sen. Byron Dorgan, UND Center for UAS Research and Education, and the Grand Forks Air Force Base.

The first day of the UAS Summit will address pilot and operator training needs for both military missions and civilian applications. Leading UAS training programs will discuss their approach to pilot/operator training and what they see on the training horizon. UAS technologies for meeting battlefield needs and for civilian and scientific applications are proliferating and advancing at a rapid rate. Day two will highlight emerging UAS technologies and industry-university partnership initiatives now under way here in the region and their implications for future UAS development.

International Climate Stewardship Conference is June 29-30

There's a world of experience coming to North Dakota this summer. The International Climate Stewardship Solutions Conference will be in Bismarck Monday, June 29, and Tuesday, June 30, will increase public understanding in the Northern Plains region of the opportunities and benefits of addressing climate change.

The conference is being organized by the Great Plains Institute and the Prairie Climate Stewardship Network in partnership with Great Plains Energy Corridor, Bismarck State College, and The Climate Group, an international business-oriented organization founded by former UK Prime Minister Tony Blair.

This conference builds on the success of last year's "Prairie Climate Stewardship Conference." This year's conference will take the same proactive and constructive approach, but shift the emphasis to international examples of strategies, policies and technologies in other countries that have been effective in reducing greenhouse gas emissions AND achieving real benefits to key economic sectors.

The conference will be held at Bismarck State College in the Sydney J. Lee Auditorium, Schafer Hall. Hotel blocks are being reserved and some discounted dorm-style accommodations are being arranged.

Please visit www.climatestewardshipsolutions.org to learn more and register. -- Soizik Laguette, Earth System Science and Policy.

cScibot Robot summer camp dates announced

The Department of Computer Science will once again provide a wonderful summer camp experience for students 10-14 years old. The cScibot Introduction Camp will run from July 27-31 and from Aug. 3-7 from 1 to 4 p.m. in Streibel Hall. An advanced camp for those with some programming experience, or those who have attended the Introductory Camp will run the same dates (July 27-31 and Aug. 3-7) from 8 a.m. to noon. Fees for Intro Camp are $70 and $85 for Advanced Camp. Registration forms are available at cs.und.edu/cscibot or in our office at 201 Streibel Hall. Call 777-4107 if you want a form sent out to you by mail.
-- Annette Glennon, Administrative Secretary, Computer Science, aglennon@cs.und.edu, 7-4107

Note 2008 employer satisfaction survey results

Results from the 2008 Employer Satisfaction Survey are in, and results show that employers of UND graduates report being very satisfied with UND graduates!

As part of state-mandated accountability measures, the North Dakota University System contracted with Noel-Levitz to administer this survey to determine the level to which North Dakota institutions of higher education are meeting the needs of current employers. The survey asks employers questions relating to their experience with employees who are recent UND graduates. The questions ask how well these employees are prepared in four general areas important to success in the work place: knowledge and understanding of information, qualities generally expected of employees, general skills, and specialized skills. Employers rate their satisfaction on a 5-point scale, with 1 = Not at all satisfied, 2 = Not very satisfied, 3 = Somewhat satisfied, 4 = Very satisfied, and 5 = Extremely satisfied. Mean scores are calculated to determine an overall level of satisfaction.

When asked about overall satisfaction, employers of UND graduates report the highest level of overall satisfaction in the area of employees demonstrating the qualities expected of a college graduate, which scored a mean of 4.29 out of 5. This is closely followed by the satisfaction reported for employee general skills as they relate to requirements of the job which reported a mean score of 4.28. Employers also report being very satisfied with the overall knowledge and understanding shown by UND graduates both within their major field of study and general knowledge outside the major field. These items scored means of 4.08 for knowledge of the major and 4.07 for general knowledge outside the major.

In the end, employers are asked how likely they are to hire other graduates of UND based on their experience with the current employee. Employers of UND graduates report being very likely to hire other UND grads based on their experience, reporting a mean score of 4.30 out of 5. UND scored the highest mark in this category when compared to all other NDUS institutions.

A complete survey report can be found on the Institutional Research Web site at http://www.und.edu/dept/datacol/reports/subFolder/ess2008/ess2008.htm For questions about this survey, contact me at 777-2265.
-- Sue Erickson, Research Analyst, Institutional Research, sueerickson@mail.und.nodak.edu, 7-2265

Grants and contracts administration produces departmental user guide

A short manual has been put together to assist departmental staff with reports and information concerning their grants and contracts. It covers such items as setting up a RUN control, PI report, commitment control, award profile page, project page, project team link and setting up a favorite.

This can be found on the Grants and Contracts Administration Wweb page on the left side of the page. The link is http://www.und.edu/dept/undgca/
-- David Schmidt, Assistant Vice President for Research and Economic Development, Grants & Contracts Administration, davidschmidt@mail.und.nodak.edu, 7-2505

University Curriculum Committee to hear program termination

The University Curriculum Committee will meet at 3:30 p.m. Thursday, April 16, in 305 Twamley Hall, to discuss the proposed request to terminate the B.S. Ed with Combined Major in Elementary Education and Mathematics. All interested parties are invited to attend.
-- Connie Borboa, Admissions and Records Officer, Office of the Registrar, connieborboa@mail.und.nodak.edu, 7-4852

University Senate elections announced

The following 14 Council members were elected on an at-large basis to serve two-year terms on the University Senate from September 2009 through August 2011: Royce Blackburn, Frank Bowman, Mary Drewes, Daniel Erickson, Loretta Heuer, James Higgins, Michele Iiams, Lynda Kenney, Adam Kitzes, Saobo Lei, Rosanne McBride, Eric Murphy, Curt Stofferahn and Gary Ullrich.

John Bridewell was elected to serve a five-year term on the Standing Committee on Faculty Rights.

Donald Poochigian was elected to serve a three-year term on the Council of College Faculties.

The 30 faculty elected to the Special Review Committee for 2009-2010 follow: Royce Blackburn, John Bridewell, Barbara Combs, Kathleen Dixon, Daniel Erickson, Ann Flower, Janice Goodwin, Mark Grabe, Mark Guy, Birgit Hans, Thomasine Heitkamp, Loretta Heuer, Wendelin Hume, Cindy Juntunen, Anne Kelsch, Mohammad Khavanin, John La Duke,
Steven Light, Glenda Lindseth, Michael Mann, James Mochoruk, Janet Moen, Eric Murphy, Sheryl O’Donnell, Donald Poochigian, Lana Rakow, Samuel Seddoh, Kathy Smart, Thomas Steen, and Wayne Swisher.
-- Lori Hofland, Administrative Assistant, Registrars Office, lorihofland@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3892

Center for People and the Environment releases Red River Valley flood images

The Center for People and the Environment has released the latest satellite images of the Red River Valley flood at http://www.umac.org/about/news/rrvFlood2009.html.

The images were captured and processed by the Center from LANDSAT, a system of Earth-observing satellites jointly managed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Since 1972, this system has collected information about Earth from space (see http://landsat.gsfc.nasa.gov/).

The Northern Great Plains Center for People and the Environment was established at UND in spring of 2001 to build and nurture learning communities, creating an integrated view of all Earth's systems, in order to serve humankind's needs and desires for a sustainable and prosperous future (see http://www.umac.org/cpe/index.html). -- Doug Olsen, AgCam project manager, Center for People and the Environment,
777-3543, olsen@aero.und.edu.

EERC Foundation receives patent application approval

After six years of diligent prosecution, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has issued the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Foundation, allowance for a patent application on a system that produces high-pressure hydrogen on-demand. The final patent will be approved in the very near future.

The EERC technology converts alcohols or liquid fuels, such as ethanol, methanol, and gasoline, to high-pressure hydrogen at the time of fueling. Utilizing this state-of-the-art process, the prohibitive infrastructure costs of nationwide hydrogen transportation and storage will be eliminated so that hydrogen refueling will be accessible and affordable. The hydrogen is produced on-site, on-demand at the fuel pump, rather than at a separate location.

"Through the hydrogen programs at the EERC, we are breaking down barriers, bringing down the costs, and shortening the timetable to the point where hydrogen will be a major component of our national energy future," said EERC Director Gerald Groenewold. "The high-pressure hydrogen production technology is a cornerstone technology for achieving those goals."

Researchers in the EERC's National Center for Hydrogen Technology, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory and over 85 corporate partners, have proved the conversion of methanol into hydrogen and are working toward obtaining similar results for ethanol and hydrocarbon fuels, including military jet fuel.

This technology is a cornerstone for the EERC's proposed United States-Israel Hydrogen Fueling and Fleet Demonstration, which proposes to demonstrate hydrogen as a fuel for transit buses in North Dakota and Tel Aviv, Israel. The EERC is currently seeking federal cofunding for that project.

Tom Bechtel, EERC Foundation board president and the principal at TFB Consulting Services in New Bern, N.C., said, "The EERC Foundation Board of Directors is extremely proud of this milestone. It is a marvelous example of the ever-increasing portfolio of EERC technologies the Foundation is bringing to commercial deployment."

The technology is also being commercialized for many other different applications as well as with a variety of corporate and governmental partners and includes industrial applications that provide near-term commercial opportunities for North Dakota in manufacturing and cold-weather testing.

"This patent allowance will clearly strengthen the ability of the EERC Foundation to license the technology," said Carsten Heide, associate director for Intellectual Property Management and Technology Commercialization. "We are continually making design advancements to this technology and are broadening the patent to protect those new developments." The EERC Foundation houses the rights to technologies developed by the EERC and promotes business relationships with strategic partners interested in commercializing those technologies. The patent term expires Dec. 13, 2024.

Student government positions open for application

There are several paid positions in Student Government that are open for application. The job descriptions are online at http://sg.und.edu

Please let students you think would be interested in gaining experience in their respective area, while working to improve the campus for everyone.

The positions include:
* Treasurer
* Assistant treasurer
* Executive office manager
* Chief of staff
* Deputy chief of staff
* Administrative assistant
* Public relations coordinator
* Marketing coordinator
* Technical support
* Emerging leaders director
* Government affairs coordinator
* Emerging leaders coordinators
-- Tyrone Grandstrand, Student Body President, Student Government, studentgovernment@mail.und.edu, 7017774377

Museum Cafe Weekly Menu

The North Dakota Museum Cafe lists the menu for April 14-17.

SALADS:
PITA POCKET WITH HUMMUS SPREAD: $6
Pita pocket with hummus spread and filled with scallions, sweet red pepper, tomatoes, cucumber, iceberg lettuce tossed in a Dijon vinaigrette dressing

MEDITERRANEAN ORZO SALAD: $6.50
Orzo pasta, kalamata olives, artichoke hearts, cucumber, red onion, roasted red pepper, capers, sun dried tomatoes, and eggplant in an Italian vinaigrette

BAKED POTATO SALAD: $6
Baked potato with cubed chicken breast, cheese, scallions, and dill; served on baby greens

SANDWICHES, (Served with fruit and kettle chips)
ITALIAN PORTABELLA: $7.50
Sautéed portabella mushrooms served on a French baguette with provolone cheese and roasted red bell peppers

ROAST BEEF TRIPLE DECKER: $7.25
Sliced roast beef, sprouts, sliced provolone cheese, cranberry horseradish sauce; broiled and served on honey wheat or marble rye bread

CAPRESE: $6.50
Tomatoes, mozzarella, and basil pesto, toasted on a baguette
ADD TURKEY FOR $1

SALMON LOX BAGEL: $5.50
Toasted bagel with a cream cheese spread, salmon lox, and sprouts

SANDWICH SPECIAL
TURKEY CHEESE PANINI: $5
Sliced turkey, provolone cheese, tomato slices, with a basil pesto spread served on sourdough bread; served with fruit and chips

SOUPS
Fresh Daily: Cup $2.75, Bowl $4.50
Lemon Chicken
Cream Potato Mushroom

SIDES
Pretzels with Honey Mustard: $2
French Baguette with butter: $2.50

The Museum Cafe is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. for coffee, with lunch served from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Take-out orders are available; call 777-4195. Free wireless internet!
-- Brian Lofthus, Assistant to the Director, North Dakota Museum of Art, blofthus@ndmoa.com, 701-777-4195

University of North Dakota Bookstore seeks employees

Your UND Bookstore is looking for associates to join our team.

Senior Accounting Clerk
The senior accounting clerk will maintain proper accounts with regard to financial transactions of the store. This person may check the work of other accounting clerks ensuring that forms are completed on time and that they are accurate and complete. Additionally, the senior accounting clerk will also routinely audit accounting and cash functions to ensure policies and procedures are being followed in the store. This person may train new employees. We seek a highly responsible, accounting professional who possesses one to two years of previous banking or bookkeeping experience, and who thrives in a fast paced, challenging and ever changing environment. For more information, please submit your resume to Jessica Schranz at jschranz@fheg.follett.com

Computer Manager I
This position is responsible for maximizing sales, profit and inventory objectives within the department; develops, upgrades and maintains computer sales database; installs, configures and maintains demo computers, software and computer department network; assists customers with searches for certain hardware or software and may recommend certain hardware and software based on customers' needs; provides in-store demonstrations of hardware, software and related products and equipment; responsible for installing, configuring, and maintaining demo computers, software and computer department network; provides technical advice and assistance to customers; knowledgeable with MAC products and how to build a computer to customers needs. To become part of our dynamic world and learn more about this exciting position, we encourage you to make your move now and visit us online to submit resumes at https://sh.webhire.com/servlet/av/jd?ai=518&ji=2342016&sn=I.

Shipping and Receiving Manager
This position is responsible for processing incoming and outgoing shipments, in addition to preparing items for shipment; communicating with store staff to direct staff in processing inventory to the selling floor and storage areas; ensuring customer service standards are consistently met by providing efficiency of shipped and received merchandise; supervising a seasonal staff during peak times; and creating an organized and efficient backroom area to promote a clean and safe working environment.

Cashier Coordinator
This position is responsible for greeting and assisting customers, operates the cash register to tabulate customer sales, coordinates the activities of other cashiers, trains new cashiers and ensures that company policies and procedures are followed. This person may order supplies, magazines, soft drinks, snacks, or candy from local vendors, receives items and stocks the shelves, checks for damages or shortages and for price changes. For more information, please submit your resume to Jessica Schranz at jschranz@fheg.follett.com
-- Michelle Abernathey, Assistant Store Director, UND Bookstore, michelle_abernathey@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2103

Adelphi Literary Society seeks book donations

It's time to spring clean your office, but don't throw away your old books! The Adelphi Literary Society in the Department of English seeks book donations for its spring book sale. Please contact Rebecca Weaver-Hightower at rwh@und.edu or 777-6391 if you have any books to donate, or bring them by the English department office in 110 Merrifield Hall. We will pick up books from your home as well.
-- Rebecca Weaver-Hightower, Assistant Professor, English, rwh@und.edu, 777-6391

Internal job openings listed

The following position vacancies are available only to regular UND staff employees who have successfully completed their six-month probation period, earn annual and sick leave, receive BC/BS health insurance and TIAA-CREF or ND PERS retirement benefits. Current UND Faculty, please contact Human Resources for eligibility.

TO APPLY: Please complete UND Application/Control Card form. Send letter of application and resume, referencing position name and number, to: Human Resources, University of North Dakota, Twamley Hall, Room 313, 264 Centennial Drive Stop 8010, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8010. Applications MUST be received by the deadline date.

EXECUTIVE/PROFESSIONAL/ADMINISTRATIVE/ATHLETIC COACHES:

POSITION: Research Specialist, Energy & Environmental Research Center, #09-252
APPLICATION DEADLINE: (I) 4/17/2009
COMPENSATION: $ 38,000 plus/year

POSITION: Intellectual Property Specialist/Contracts Officer, EERC, #09-248
APPLICATION DEADLINE: (I) 4/16/2009
COMPENSATION: $ 50,000 plus/year

POSITION: Publications Assistant, UND Aerospace, #09-249
(This is a temporary, benefitted position due to military deployment of current employee.
Employment may end when employee returns, estimated for September of 2010)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: (I) 4/15/2009
COMPENSATION: $ 21,500 plus/year

TECHNICAL/PARAPROFESSIONAL:

POSITION: Publications Assistant, UND Aerospace, #09-249
(This is a temporary, benefitted position due to military deployment of current employee.
Employment may end when employee returns, estimated for September of 2010).
APPLICATION DEADLINE: (I) 4/15/2009
COMPENSATION: $ 21,500 plus/year

OFFICE SUPPORT: No vacancies.

CRAFTS/SERVICE/TRADES:

POSITION: Courier, Campus Postal Services #09-251
APPLICATION DEADLINE: (I) 4/17/2009
COMPENSATION: $ 20,200 plus/year

POSITION: Building Services Technician (Monday - Friday, 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.), Facilities/Bookstore, #09-250
APPLICATION DEADLINE: (I) 4/17/2009
COMPENSATION: $ 18,746 plus/year

NDUS INTERNAL JOB OPENINGS:

Director of Articulation and Transfer

Lead time increased for grant proposals

The Division of Research is changing the policy for lead time for internal processing of grant proposals from three days prior to the due date to five days prior to the due date. This deadline is particularly important with federal electronic submissions. Submissions to Grants.gov have recently had numerous delays in submission, and these delays have almost caused a failure to meet submission deadlines. The change is effective immediately.

In addition, please remember that two copies of the proposal in final form must be brought to GCA at the time the proposal is submitted for review. One of those copies will be retained in RD&C, the other will be returned to the PI for submission to the funding agency.
-- John C. La Duke, Ph.D., Associate Vice President for Research and Economic Development, Research Development and Compliance, john_laduke@und.nodak.edu, 701/777-4278

Pamela Kalbfleisch named American Council on Education Fellow

The Washington, D.C.-based American Council on Education (ACE) announced that Pamela Kalbfleisch, professor of communication and psychology, has been named an ACE Fellow for academic year 2009-2010.

The ACE Fellows Program, established in 1965, is designed to strengthen institutions and leadership in American higher education by identifying and preparing promising senior faculty and administrators for responsible positions in college and university administration. Thirty-eight Fellows, nominated by the presidents or chancellors of their institutions, were selected this year in a national competition.

President Robert O. Kelley, with the support of the College of Arts and Sciences Dean Martha Potvin, nominated Kalbfleisch for the honor.

“My project for this fellowship is to develop a new school of sustainable energy resources, so I’ll be trying to find potential collaborators and partners,” said Kalbfleisch. “Development is the primary focus, so I’ll be identifying key faculty and working with faculty on the curriculum. This is an interdisciplinary effort, and we want to have something to make UND really stand out. The focus of the new school will be on new forms of energy.”

Sharon A. McDade, director of the ACE Fellows Program, noted that most previous Fellows have advanced into major positions in academic administration. Of the more than 1,500 participants in the first 44 years of the program, more than 300 have become chief executive officers and more than 1,100 have become provosts, vice presidents, or deans.

“We're extremely pleased with the incoming class,” McDade said. “The individuals selected have demonstrated strong leadership. The Fellows Program will sharpen and enhance their leadership skills and their network, and prepare them to address issues of concern to the higher education community.”

Kalbfleisch served as the director of the UND School of Communication from 2003 through 2008 and is now coordinating a new inter-disciplinary Communication Program which includes program offerings at the UND campus, on a campus in Bismarck, and online courses. Kalbfleisch is also a core member of the General and Experimental Psychology Program.

Each ACE Fellow will focus on an issue of concern to the nominating institution while spending the next academic year working with a college or university president and other senior officers at a host institution. The ACE Fellows Program combines seminars, interactive learning opportunities, campus visits and placement at another higher education institution to condense years of on-the-job experience and skills development into a single semester or year.

Fellows are included in the highest level of decision-making while participating in administrative activities and learning about an issue of concern to their institution.

Fellows attend three week-long retreats on higher education issues organized by ACE, read extensively in the field and engage in other activities to enhance their knowledge about the challenges and opportunities confronting higher education today.

Founded in 1918, ACE is the major coordinating body for all the nation's higher education institutions, representing more than 1,600 college and university presidents, and more than 200 related associations, nationwide. It seeks to provide leadership and a unifying voice on key higher education issues and influence public policy through advocacy, research, and program initiatives.

MeritCare Network receives Making a Difference Award

MeritCare’s Regional Critical Access Hospital Network, Fargo, received the 2009 North Dakota Medicare Rural Hospital Flexibility Program’s Making a Difference Award.

The award has been designed by the North Dakota Medicare Rural Hospital Flexibility (Flex) Program for critical access hospitals that are able to demonstrate that a program or service originally funded or supported with Flex funds is still making a difference to the community and service areas. As a part of the award, the MeritCare Network received a $12,000 grant to enhance the network’s efforts. The Flex Program is funded by the federal Office of Rural Health Policy, which is located in the Health Resources and Services Administration, in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

MeritCare’s network has grown since 2002 from seven hospital memberships to nineteen, covering both North Dakota and Minnesota. The network serves approximately 186,000 rural residents. This network laid the foundation for the development of the now statewide North Dakota Critical Access Hospital Quality Network. The MeritCare network’s accomplishments are many, including focused efforts around coordinating patient care with experts and hospitals, education, and improved care of cardiac and trauma patients. The Flex program interprets this award as a formal acknowledgement of a “best practice.”

The Flex Program is administered by the Center for Rural Health at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences together with the North Dakota Healthcare Review, Inc., the North Dakota Department of Health, and the North Dakota Healthcare Association.

The award is presented annually as part of the Dakota Conference on Rural and Public Health, which is facilitated by the Center for Rural Health. This year’s conference, scheduled for April 1–3 in Mandan, was canceled because many of the conference’s participants were providing support during the statewide emergency from flooding and severe weather.
-- Denis F. MacLeod, Communications Specialist, Center for Rural Health, dmacleod@medicine.nodak.edu, 701-777-3300

Rural, public health awards presented

Rural and public health providers, volunteers and organizations were recognized recently with awards. The North Dakota Public Health Association presented two awards:

• Public Health Worker of the Year to Debbie Swanson, Grand Forks Public Health Department, Grand Forks, and
• Outstanding Service to Heidi Heitkamp, Mandan, N.D.

The North Dakota Medicare Rural Hospital Flexibility Program’s Making a Difference Award went to the MeritCare Critical Access Hospital Network, Fargo.

The Dakota Conference on Rural and Public Health planning committee presented four awards:

• Outstanding Rural Health Professional to Sharon Ericson, CEO, Valley Community Health Centers, Northwood, N.D.;
• Outstanding Rural Health Program to Altru’s Hospice in Partnership with Faith in Action, Cavalier, N.D.;
• Outstanding Rural Health Provider to Gwen Witzel, Cavalier County Memorial Hospital, Langdon, N.D.; and
• Outstanding Rural Health Volunteer to Sarah Heitkamp, Petersburg, N.D.

The awards are presented annually as part of the Dakota Conference on Rural and Public Health, which is facilitated by the Center for Rural Health at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences. This year’s conference, scheduled for April 1–3 in Mandan, was canceled because many of the conference’s participants were providing support during the statewide emergency from flooding and severe weather.

The Dakota Conference is a joint effort by Altru Health System of Grand Forks, North Dakota Public Health Association, North Dakota Rural Health Association, College of Nursing, and the School of Medicine and Health Sciences’ Center for Rural Health and Department of Family and Community Medicine.
-- Denis F. MacLeod, Communications Specialist, Center for Rural Health, dmacleod@mail.nodak.edu, 701-777-3300

April U-Shine Award winner announced

UND Staff Senate is proud to announce the April “U Shine Award” recipient, Janice Hoffarth, administrative assistant in the music department. She was nominated by Tammy Mulske and was presented with a check for $50 and a certificate by Human Resources Director Diane Nelson on April 6.

This award is presented monthly to a UND staff member who went out of their way to make UND a better place. Here is an excerpt of what Tammy had to say about Janice:

“On Feb. 9, the Music Department held its Open House. On the iciest day of the year, several students, prospective students, and faculty members were unable to attend the event. One of the absent faculty members was assigned to take the prospective students to lunch at Wilkerson Dining Center. When we were unable to find another faculty member to take the students to lunch, Janice immediately volunteered and then proceeded to lead the students, their parents, and some grandparents across the ice and snow to the Dining Center. To keep everyone safe, Janice found the icy patches for them, and fell twice in the process. She spent the next hour chatting with the students and promoting our University. After lunch, she led the students back to Hughes Fine Arts Center through the same ice and snow and rain. It was not until she was back in her office that she told anyone how wet and cold she was, and that she was sore from falling twice. The students only saw a cheerful person who loved the University she works for.

On a day when some people were unable to make it to work, and others were unwilling to take on additional duties for the Open House, Janice found the time, strength, and positive attitude to ensure that the visiting students had the best possible experience in some of the worst weather conditions.”

All UND staff members are eligible to receive this award. Nominations can be submitted through the Staff Senate Web site, http://www.und.edu/org/undss/ or forms are available at UND Facilities, Dining Services and the Memorial Union Post Office.

Nominations must be received by the 15th of each month; awards are presented the first business day of the following month.
-- Diane Nelson, Director, Human Resources, dianenelson@mail.und.edu, 701-777-4361