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ISSUE: Volume 46, Number 14: November 19, 2008

Contents
Top Stories
President Kelley will give State of the University address today
Volunteers sought for winter commencement Dec. 19
Save the date: UND 125th closing celebration Dec. 10
ND SUNRISE receives more than $6 million in research grants
Events to Note
Opportunities available in student affairs
Global Visions film set for Nov. 18
Open audition for musical comedy "Lucky Stiff"
Geography GIS Day is Nov. 19
Nate Martindale final presenter for Leadership Series
"The Disappeared" opens in Washington, D.C. Nov. 19
Forums seek input to review, identify, develop information technology strategic plan
Doctoral examination set for Joan O. Aus
Kyle Conway presents talk Nov. 20 on Canadian news, translation
Thursday is Japan Night
California biologist set to deliver George C. Wheeler lectures
LEEPS lectures to be given by Bakken project subsurface manager
Notable scholar to discuss "North Dakota's New Geography"
Museum exhibit reception is Saturday
Artist to speak at Museum Saturday
Benefit spaghetti dinner set for Denice Schafer
Doctoral examination set for Meghan Salyers
Anatomy and cell biology seminar is Nov. 24
Pharmacology, physiology and therapeutics faculty candidate to present seminar
Bachelor of Fine Arts exhibition opens Nov. 24
Note upcoming classes at Wellness Center's Culinary Corner
Doctoral examination set for Glenda K. Cousins
Doctoral examination set for Jeanine S. McDermott
U2 lists session
Doctoral examination set for Pascal I. Binda
Author book signing at Barnes & Noble is Friday
Doctoral examination set for Kelly Don Peters
Doctoral examination set for Kim Higgs
Doctoral examination set for Anthony Williams
Doctoral examination set for Shirley Myran
Teaching with Technology Series focuses on teaching in blogosphere
Astronomy talk, telescope observing is Dec. 2
Announcements
Nominations sought for resident advisors (RA)
New holiday party platters available from Campus Catering
Nominations sought for Outstanding Faculty Academic Adviser
Submit spring semester employee spouse/dependent tuition waiver by Dec. 12
Note flexible benefits open enrollment deadline
Space Studies considers summer field trip to Russia
Note address update requirement on bulk mail
Nov. 27 observed as holiday
Chester Fritz Library lists Thanksgiving hours
Law library posts Thanksgiving holiday hours
Library of the Health Sciences lists Thanksgiving weekend hours
International Centre lists Thanksgiving holiday hours
Chester Fritz Library lists extended hours, final exam hours
Donated leave requested for Dawn Witherite
Donated leave sought for Denice Schafer
Senate Scholarly Activities Committee announces awards
Reduce the price of textbooks today
InEnergy formed to provide road map for investments in energy technologies
Barnes & Noble Stock Up and Save Sale on through Nov. 30
Museum Cafe lists specials, soups
Holidays present opportunity to gather family medical history
Dance Dance Revolution is free, fun
Flu shots available at no cost to you
COSE seeks representative nominations
Internal job openings listed
In the News
UND employee elected president of first-ever University System Staff Senate
Museum of Art receives grant from MetLife Foundation
Youth entrepreneurship education director wins award
President Kelley will give State of the University address today

President Kelley will give his first State of the University address at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 18, in the Memorial Union Ballroom. It will be part of the University Council meeting.

The agenda follows:
1. University Senate Status Report, Jon Jackson, chair
2. State of the University Address by President Kelley
3. Matters arising, Jon Jackson, chair

The University Council consists of the following who are employed primarily on the Grand Forks campus: the president, vice presidents, registrar, director of libraries, all deans, all department chairs, all full-time faculty of the rank of instructor, assistant professor, associate professor, and professor; program directors, coordinators, assistant and associate deans who concurrently hold faculty rank; the director of the Counseling Center; professional librarians, and such other academic personnel and administrative officers as the Council may designate. The quorum of the Council necessary for the transaction of business is 25 percent of the Council membership (or 158 of the current 633 members). Council meetings are normally co-chaired by the chair of the Senate and the president of the University. The registrar is ex officio secretary. Council meetings are open to the public, and students, staff and the general public are invited to attend.

Volunteers sought for winter commencement Dec. 19

Please consider serving as a green vest volunteer at one or both of the 2008 winter commencement ceremonies held Friday, Dec. 19, at the Chester Fritz Auditorium. UND will hold two commencement ceremonies. One ceremony will be held at 10 a.m. for graduate degrees and a second at 2 p.m. for undergraduate degrees.

Volunteers can assist with helping organize graduates by distributing name cards, greeting campus visitors attending the ceremonies, and directing people to their seats. You will be asked to report to the lower level of the Chester Fritz Auditorium 90 minutes prior to the beginning of the ceremony. We anticipate the ceremonies to be one and one-half hour in length.

If you are able to volunteer for one or both ceremonies, please contact the Office of Ceremonies and Special Events in the vice president for student and outreach services office at 777-2724 or e-mail terri.machart@mail.und.nodak.edu by Wednesday, Dec. 5. Please feel free to call if you have any questions.
-- Dawn Botsford, Events Coordinator, Office of Ceremonies and Special Events, dawnbotsford@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-6393

Save the date: UND 125th closing celebration Dec. 10

Save the date for the closing celebration of the University of North Dakota's 125th anniversary from 2 to 4 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 10, in the Memorial Ballroom. A program and closing ceremony will begin at 3 p.m. Refreshments will be served. Stay tuned to 125.und.edu for more information on this exciting event.
-- Benjamin Klipfel, Marketing Coordinator, 125th Anniversary, benjamin.klipfel@und.edu, 7-0857

ND SUNRISE receives more than $6 million in research grants

North Dakota university researchers with the Sustainable Energy Research Initiative and Supporting Education group, or SUNRISE, have received more than $6 million in external competitive grant awards this quarter. This bring total awards since 2004 to over $26 million.

ND SUNRISE has been awarded $2.95 million from the North Dakota Department of Commerce to establish the SUNRISE BioProducts Center of Excellence for biobased chemicals, polymers, and composites. Leveraged by more than $8 million in matching funds, SUNRISE is engaging 12 companies in this center including: Red River Valley companies, LM Glasfiber, Tecton Products, Northwood Mills, and Integrity Windows. Multi-national partners include Bayer CropScience, Bayer Material Science, Ashland Chemicals, Rohm and Haus, PPG Industries, Crown Iron Works, Global Ag Solutions, and Kadrmas, Lee, & Jackson.

The Center of Excellence was formulated by PI Wayne Seames, professor of chemical engineering and SUNRISE director along with co-PIs Brian Tande, assistant professor of chemical engineering and Jim Petell, associate vice president for Technology Transfer and Commercialization. Center activities performed at NDSU are administered by Chad Ulven, assistant professor of mechanical engineering and SUNRISE associate director. Khwaja Hossain, MaSU assistant professor will coordinate work activities at Mayville State. They will focus on developing processes for the economical production of chemicals and polymers that are identical to current products produced from crude oil and natural gas. Other work will blend some of the polymer products with natural fibers to produce novel composite materials.

“The SUNRISE BioProducts COE is a natural next step following SUNRISE’s current commercialization activities which include the scale-up of a 100 percent renewable jet fuel meeting U.S. Air Force JP-8 fuel specifications,” said Petell.

SUNRISE was recently awarded $3 million from the North Dakota EPSCoR program for 2009-2013. The funded research will elucidate fundamental aspects of heterogeneous catalysis, especially at the nanoscale, that are relevant to developing alternative transportation fuels and chemical feedstocks. These studies are organized into five broad projects, each of which involves multidisciplinary teams of researchers. The research program is managed by PI Mark Hoffmann, Chester Fritz professor and chair of chemistry and co-PI Michael Mann, professor and chair of chemical engineering. Infrastructure elements of the program will be administered by SUNRISE Director Wayne Seames. In addition to the PIs, SUNRISE UND researchers receiving funding from this grant include Irina Smoliakova, professor of chemistry, Darrin Muggli, associate professor of chemical engineering, plus Alena Kubatova and Julia Zhao, assistant professors of chemistry. New faculty positions in for both UND chemistry and chemical engineering will be supported during the grant.

SUNRISE received an additional $100,000 from the DOE EPSCoR program to support two SUNRISE outreach activities in 2009. $50,000 will be used for the NATURE Freshman Experience, a ND EPSCoR program administered by SUNRISE. Tribal college freshman come of UND or NDSU for one to four weeks and work with a faculty mentor in their laboratory. This program is coordinated by Julia Zhao, assistant professor of chemistry. The other $50,000 will be used for a 10-week summer undergraduate research program coordinated by Evguenii Kozliak, professor of chemistry.

For further information on SUNRISE, visit: http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/sunrise/index.html
-- Wayne Seames, Director, ND SUNRISE, wayneseames@mail.und.edu, 701-777-2958

Opportunities available in student affairs

Are you interested in working in a college or university setting after graduation? We have the perfect opportunity for you. On Tuesday, Nov. 18, from 5 to 6 p.m. in the Red River Valley Room, Memorial Union, there will be representatives from various offices on campus that will answer any questions you have about their professions or offices. This is not a career fair, it's just simply an oppotunity for you to ask questions about the opportunities that can be avaible to you after graduating. Sponsored by students from the EdL 541 class. - Amber Flickinger, master's student in educational leadership, amberflickinger@mail.und.edu, 777-0213.

Global Visions film set for Nov. 18

The next Global Visions film is "The Day My God Died" at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 18, in the Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union. It is funded by the Multicultural Awareness Committee and sponsored by the Anthropology Club.

Open audition for musical comedy "Lucky Stiff"

Join in the fun by auditioning for the community theatre's musical, "Lucky Stiff." This comedic musical has six men and four women. This open audition has parts for all ages.

The final audition is at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 18. Auditions are open to all ages, and all people, regardless of previous acting/singing experience. Auditionees should come prepared with 16 bars of a contemporary musical theatre song selection (an accompanist will be available), and a one-minute comedic monologue. Directors may or may not have callbacks.

For complete audition information, visit us at http://www.ggfct.org/audition.htm.

Lynn Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty, authors of “Once On This Island,” “My Favorite Year,” “Ragtime,” and the animated film, “Anastasia,” exploded on the musical theatre scene with this zany, offbeat, and very funny murder mystery farce about an unassuming English shoe salesman forced to take the corpse of his recently-murdered Atlantic City croupier uncle on a week-long vacation to Monte Carlo. Should he succeed, Harry Witherspoon stands to inherit $6,000,000. If not, the money goes to the Universal Dog Home of Brooklyn.

The proceedings are sheer lunacy as Harry comes up against his uncle’s insanely jealous and legally blind mistress, her much put-upon optometrist brother and Annabel Glick, a zealous representative from the Universal Dog Home determined to see Harry’s inheritance “go to the dogs.”

Originally played on a unit set, “Lucky Stiff” is an intimate show with extremely modest production requirements. A small ensemble cast has plenty to do, playing a variety of bizarre, memorable roles. Exuberant, energetic, and impeccably crafted, “Lucky Stiff” is above all fun, with a sly, contemporary sensibility.
-- Benjamin Klipfel, Executive Director, Greater Grand Forks Community Theatre, info@ggfct.org, 701-746-0847

Geography GIS Day is Nov. 19

The Geography Department will host several events for Geography Awareness Week through Nov. 21, and GIS Day, Nov. 19. There will be an information booth in the Memorial Union Thursday, Nov. 20, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Stop by and test your geographic knowledge. Geography students will also visit Valley Middle School Wednesday, Nov. 19, to host Geocaching events for students there. Finally, John Hudson of Northwestern University will give a public lecture at 11 a.m. Friday, Nov. 21, in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. The talk is titled "North Dakota's New Geography."
-- Gregory Vandeberg, Assistant Professor, Geography, gregory.vandeberg@und.nodak.edu, 777-4588

Nate Martindale final presenter for Leadership Series

Former student body president and District 42 Senatorial candidate Nate Martindale will be wrapping up the Leadership Series at 3 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 19, in the Badlands room, Memorial Union. He will give his presentation on student leadership. The series are open to everyone, and all are encouraged to attend.
-- Elizabeth Downs, Memorial Union Leadership Series, Center for Student Involvement and Leadership, leadership@und.edu, 701.777.3665

"The Disappeared" opens in Washington, D.C. Nov. 19

"The Disappeared," organized by the North Dakota Museum of Art, opens at the Art Museum of the Americas, 201 18th Street, NW, Washington, D.C. with an opening reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 19, with a gallery talk at noon by exhibit curator Laurel Reuter.

"The Disappeared" is on display through Jan. 18 at the Art Museum of the Americas, and is open Tuesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

"The Disappeared" gathers the work of 13 visual artists plus a collaborative work by 13 others from Latin America who over the last 30 years have made art about the disappeared and addressed universal human rights concerns in a powerful and moving way. It contains works by some of the most prominent artists from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Guatemala, Uruguay, and Venezuela. Many of them lived through the horrors of the military dictatorships that rocked their countries in the mid-decades of the twentieth century. Some worked in the resistance; some had parents or siblings who were disappeared; others were forced into exile. The youngest were born into the aftermath of those dictatorships. And still others have lived in countries maimed by endless civil, drug, and guerrilla wars.

"The Disappeared" is a traveling exhibition organized by the North Dakota Museum of Art and curated by Laurel Reuter. Sponsors for the exhibit are the Otto Bremer Foundation, Andy Warhol Foundation and the Lannan Foundation.

Forums seek input to review, identify, develop information technology strategic plan

Have a voice in the future of technology at UND. Join us as we review, identify and develop a meaningful strategic plan for UND information technology.

REVIEW: University community technology priorities
IDENTIFY: strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats
DEVELOP: a meaningful strategic plan for UND information technology

Wednesday, Nov. 19, Memorial Room, Memorial Union
* 8:30 to 10:15 a.m.: application/service for faculty, staff, student, organizations
* 10:30 to 11:45 a.m.: core and enabling infrastructure
* noon to 1:30 p.m.: research
* 2 to 3:30 p.m.: teaching and learning
* 3:45 to 5:15 p.m.: outreach and public service

Thursday, Nov. 20, River Valley Room, Memorial Union
* noon to 2 p.m.: application/service for faculty, staff, student, organizations
* 2:15 to 4:15 p.m.: core and enabling infrastructure
* 4:30 to 6 p.m.: research

Monday, Nov. 24, Badlands Room, Memorial Union
* 8 to 9:45 a.m.: outreach and public service
* 10 to 11:45 a.m.: teaching and learning
* noon to 2 p.m.: core and enabling infrastructure
* 5 to 7 p.m.: application/service for faculty, staff, student, organizations

Tuesday, Nov. 25, River Valley Room, Memorial Union
* 9 to 11 a.m.: research
* 11:30 to 1 a.m.: outreach and public service
* 1:15 to 3 p.m.: teaching and learning

Schedule by content Area:
* Application and service: Nov. 19, 8:30 a.m.; Nov. 20, noon; Nov. 24, 5 p.m.
* Core and enabling infra.: Nov. 19, 10:30 a.m.; Nov. 20, 2:15 p.m.; Nov. 24, noon
* Teaching and learning: Nov.. 19, 2 p.m; Nov. 24, 10 a.m.; Nov. 25, 1:15 p.m.
* Research: Nov. 19, noon; Nov. 20, 4:30 p.m.; Nov. 25, 9 a.m.
* Outreach and public service: Nov. 19, 3:45 p.m.; Nov. 24, 8 a.m.; Nov. 25, 11:30 a.m.
-- Mike Lefever, Assistant to CIO, Continuing Education, michaellefever@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2030

Doctoral examination set for Joan O. Aus

The final examination for Joan O. Aus, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in teaching and learning, is set for 1:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 20, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "Teaching Practices and Challenges: A Description of Monolingual English Language Learner Teachers' Practices in Grades One Through Six." Shelby Barrentine (teaching and learning) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Kyle Conway presents talk Nov. 20 on Canadian news, translation

The Arts and Sciences Interdisciplinary Speaker Series and Department of English present Kyle Conway, assistant professor of communications, speaking on “News Translation and Cultural Resistance” at 4 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 20, in 300 Merrifield Hall.

News translation, which takes many forms, encounters two types of cultural resistance that hinder intercultural understanding. The first is apparent in the need to transform a text in order to make it meaningful in a new context, while the second results from the irreducibility of culture as a way of life to the form of a text. This talk illustrates both forms of resistance by analyzing a story originally broadcast on The National in Canada in 1992, and it concludes by considering how journalists and news consumers might work to overcome the distortions caused by news translation.

-- Rebecca Weaver-Hightower, Assistant Professor, English, rwh@und.edu, 7-6391

Thursday is Japan Night

Experience the culture of Japan at Japan Night at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 20, at the Loading Dock, Memorial Union. The event is free and you may sample Japanese food for $1. Please note that this is a change from the schedule originally posted this fall.
-- Shannon Jolly, International Student Advisor, Office of International Programs, shannonjolly@mail.und.edu, 7-4118

California biologist set to deliver George C. Wheeler lectures

James Hicks, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of California, Irvine, will be the biology fall 2008 George C. Wheeler Distinguished Lecturer.

Hicks will deliver two presentations, the first of which, "Wall-E and the Professor: The Effects of Space Physiology and Form," will take place at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 20, in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. Another presentation, titled "Turning Crocodiles into Birds: Lessons from Altering Cardiac Anatomy," is set for noon Friday, Nov. 21, in 141 Starcher Hall.

Hicks has been a full professor within the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, at UC Irvine for more than 10 years. He has a bachelor’s degree from California State University, Fullerton, a master’s degree from the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, and a Ph. D., from the University of New Mexico, School of Medicine at Albuquerque. He has worked at various places throughout the world, including Denmark, Brazil, and Germany. His research has been featured on the Discovery Channel, National Geographic News, and the New York Times. He has completed more than 85 publications and has given numerous presentations throughout the world.

Hicks is a broadly trained, integrative physiologist. His research efforts are divided among five areas: understanding the mechanism(s), regulation and functional significance of cardiac shunting in turtles, snakes, lizards and crocodilians; investigating the factors that determine and regulate the cardiopulmonary response to elevated metabolism in vertebrates, investigating the ontogeny of cardiovascular regulation, studying acclimatization to hypoxia and investigating the effects of gravity on the vertebrate cardiovascular system. Dr. Hicks research focuses on vertebrates and spans several groups, including amphibians, reptiles and humans. His laboratory provides a unique evolutionary perspective into circulation and respiration and seeks to discover not only differences among organisms, but the unifying principles shared by diverse organisms.

The lectures are sponsored by the Department of Biology. They are free and open to the public.

LEEPS lectures to be given by Bakken project subsurface manager

David Brimberry, Bakken project subsurface manager at Marathon Oil Company, will give two LEEPS lectures Friday, Nov. 21. Both presentations are in 109 Leonard Hall. At noon, Brimberry will speak on "Bakken Geologic and Reservoir Engineering Technical Evaluation Methods." At 3 p.m., he will speak on one of two topics, depending on interest: "The Importance of Integrated Subsurface Solutions" or "Resource Estimation Approaches." Both topics include examples from the Bakken project. The 3 p.m. lecture will be one-half hour long, due to travel time constraints. Brimberry has been with Marathon Oil in Houston, Texas, for 24 years, primarily as a geologist, working on United States exploration and production projects in the Rocky Mountain basins, Onshore Gulf of Mexico, Alaska and North Dakota. He holds an M.S. in geology from Texas Tech University and a B.S. in geology from Baylor University.

The Department of Geology and Geological Engineering Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary Science lecture program (LEEPS) brings nationally- and internationally-known scientists and others to UND to give talks on cutting edge science and engineering. Lectures cover a wide range of topics, including academic science, applied engineering, and environmental issues of current significance. All are welcome to attend. For more information, contact Dr. Zhengwen Zeng at 777-3027.
-- Carissa Green, Administrative Secretary, Geology & Geological Engineering, carissagreen@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2248

Notable scholar to discuss "North Dakota's New Geography"

John C. Hudson, director of the program in geography at Northwestern University, will discuss how high crop prices, developing international markets, and advances in grain transportation technology have contributed to a new strategic significance for northern Great Plains agriculture at 11 a.m Friday, Nov. 21, in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. The free, public lecture is sponsored by the Department of Geography. Hudson, who taught at UND from 1966-1968, is visiting during Geography Action Week, an effort led by the National Geographic Society. He is the author of several books, including "Plains Country Towns," "Making the Corn Belt," "Across This Land: A Regional Geography of the United States and Canada," and "Chicago: A Geography of the City and Its Region."
-- Brad Rundquist, Associate Professor and Chair, Geography, bradley_rundquist@und.nodak.edu, 777-4589

Museum exhibit reception is Saturday

Museum Director Laurel Reuter has gathered the work of 25 artists from across North and South America in a contemporary exhibition, "Animals: Them and Us." The show is on display at the North Dakota Museum of Art through Jan. 5. The public is invited to a reception from 5 to 7 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 22.

The biological definition of animal refers to all members of the kingdom Animalia, including humans who are only one of the nine or 10 million species of animals that inhabit planet Earth. In curating the exhibition, Reuter searched for art from the complicated animal genre that exhibits contrasting and conflicting visions, points-of-view, assumptions, assertions, and historical remembrances of other members of the kingdom Animalia.

There are historical ways of thinking about animals. Henry Horenstein, a photographer from Boston, has six photographs in the exhibition that were part of his 2008 solo exhibition at the Harvard Museum of Natural History. It was part of a series designed as “lessons in looking.” According to Elisabeth Werby, director of the Harvard Museum, Horenstein’s work continues a centuries-old tradition of natural history illustration. In such work, “Animals are often presented in shallow space with limited landscape, sometimes even against a blank page, in order to promote close examination and study of detail.”

Thomas Brummett sees his work on a continuum with the 19th century practice of cataloguing natural history. According to the artist, “This series of animal portraits is my attempt to collect specimens from the natural world for my own personal Cabinet of Wonder. My goal is for the images to be part photograph and part cave drawing, part document and part dream ...
”

By combining traditional photographic and contemporary digital processes, Brummett creates mysterious animal portraits that leave the viewer wondering, “Is this a mezzotint, an ancient photographic work, or a transferred cave drawing?” Brummett, who lives in Philadelphia, names the series Animalis from the Latin term meaning literally “to have breath,” which is the origin of our modern word for animal. 


Frank Kelly taught art at the University of North Dakota for decades. He is also a long-time bird watcher, a point-of-view that dominates his study of redpolls, Arctic Wanderer. Painted in the 1960s, it also resembles earlier natural history studies with its shallow backgrounds, attention to bird markings, and suggestions of flight patterns. Yet the work clearly was painted by one schooled in abstract expressionism with its lush surfaces and loose application of paint.

In her Natural History Series, Lynn Geesaman photographs the historical presentation of animals in museums. That is, Geesaman photographs dioramas in history museums, creating black and white images that are as much about illusion as is the original diorama. One must look carefully at each photo to figure out where the work of the taxidermist and the background painter overlap. What is real? What is supposition?

Other artists create art directly from their own relationships with animals; chief among them is Guillermo Hart. His family owns an estancia encompassing thousands of hectors of land in the far south of Patagonia, Argentina. Even while completing his graduate work in photography at the Massachusetts College of Art, Hart would return to the family ranch to work and to photograph. His video work documents his play with the animals: sleeping with the goats, being nuzzled by the sheep, and reading Black Beauty to his horse. His photographs tell the story of Argentine ranching where the stomachs of cattle are dried on fences for the cheese industry, hundreds of hare pelts are placed on racks to cure for the fur trade, and the interior of the veterinarian’s office is hung with Argentinean hunting trophies and a two-headed calf.

Barton Lidice Benes brings wit and humor to his mixed media assemblages and sculptures. Among them is an effigy of a mink wearing a mink coat, cut-outs of various fancy ladies decked out in real furs, two turtles sheltered under fur instead of shells as they set off on a race, and a ball of seal’s teeth. Likewise, Minnesota artist Albert Belleveau creates both graceful and bold animals from the materials he finds laying around. A graceful stone crane made of steel rod with a stone for its head, and a droll junk yard dog from welded junk represents him in this exhibition.

Fargo artist Kim Bromley was invited to judge a Ducks Unlimited competition, after which he responded, “Ducks don’t have to look like this.” He went home and created his own counter-version of six-foot duck paintings that are wacky, colored any which way, and full of life and movement. In the same spirit, Mary Sprague’s portraits of elegant chickens spoof the whole idea of elegance. Dowager Couple, a drawing of two old chicken dames in their finest attire, and All Dressed Up, No Place to Go, a portrait of a gussied up, extravagantly feathered chicken, leave the viewer in stitches.

Animals were our first art and our first metaphors, as demonstrated in the exhibition by Stuart Klipper’s Rock Art from Northern Territory, Australia. But Klipper, a world traveler with camera, is most widely known for his work in Antarctica, a place he has traveled to six times as a guest of the National Science Foundation. His book, "The Antarctic: From the Circle to the Pole," has just been published by Chronicle Books. Four exquisite exhibition photos are taken from the book. They include basking seals on an ice floe; the blue-eyed shag shadowed by a spectacular glacier (the only member of the cormorants to venture down into the Antarctic proper); an Adelia Penguin colony; and a family of Emperor Penguins.

Roberta Paul, an artist who graduated with an M.F.A. from the University of North Dakota, took a sketchbook instead of a camera on her first trip to Africa. Back in her studio in Massachusetts, she converted her small sketches into eight-foot drawings of baboons, cheetahs, and wildebeests, and did so without loosing the immediacy, the humor, and directness of the original sketches.

For several artists, there isn’t a great distance between what is animal and what is human. For example, in Amy Ross’s watercolors birds and animals morph into plants and humans. In Susana Jacobson’s small painted portraits, the people are portrayed as monkeys as the artist successfully suggests the underlying psychology of the formal portrait sitter.

Other works in the exhibition include two gigantic paintings of a moth and a buffalo by New Yorker Kate Javens; a mixed-media Scaredy Cat in the form of a chicken by Minneapolis artist Ingrid Restemayer; photo montages by Thomas Allen, also of Minneapolis; polychrome wood sculptures by Wisconsin artist Don Gahr; and Vance Gellert’s photos taken in Peru that are part of his much larger study of healers and healing.

Finally, Cecelia Condit’s five-minute video "All About a Girl" is a deceptively charming psychological set piece, which depicts a young girl wrestling with her own imagination and fears. An ordinary game of "let's pretend" turns uncanny as, alone in the woods, she projects life, voice, and ultimately her own identity onto an unexpected surrogate in a doll's dress: a rat.

"Animals: Them and Us" was created as a holiday gift to the friends, supporters, and audience of the North Dakota Museum of Art. There is no admission charge. Tours can be arranged through the Education Department. Likewise, the exhibition is supported by Museum friends, Whitey’s Cafe, and the North Dakota Eye Clinic, with additional funding from the Minnesota State Arts Board, the North Dakota Council on the Arts, and the North Valley Arts Council.
-- Brian Lofthus, Assistant to the Director, North Dakota Museum of Art, blofthus@ndmoa.com, 701-777-4195

Artist to speak at Museum Saturday

An exhibition by English born Bemidji photographer, Vivienne Morgan, opened at the North Dakota Museum of Art. On display are 23 full-color photographs. Each large-format image depicts a view of Minnesota, many on or near the Continental Divide. The show is on display in Grand Forks through Jan. 5. The public is invited to a reception at 5 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 22, for "Vivienne Morgan: A Sense of Place," a landscape photography exhibition by Bemidji-based artist Vivienne Morgan. There will be a short lecture by Morgan.

According to Morgan, “After living in the United States for nearly 30 years, I still define myself as English. I almost live in two worlds, watching BBC television, listening to BBC Radio 4: all my news and sense of America is filtered through those sources. It keeps me happy to remain connected, but when I leave my house, the whole wild wooded landscape of Northern Minnesota tells me plainly: I'm not in England anymore. Of all things English, my identity is most closely tied to the English landscape. This series of photographs is part of my conscious effort to become connected to this country, and this land, to feel truly present in my surrounding landscape. I immersed myself in the local landscape.”

“I walked in Minnesota along a part of the Continental Divide, an area where I hope to live some day, and through a field close to my house. I watched the grasses grow wildly at the edge of the forest and watched the fields transform into pastoral hayfields. I went out every day, often in the gloaming, watching the rapidly shifting light, soft mists, or swift clouds change the sense of space. At this time of day, everything hidden in the shadows is slowly revealed. Standing in this light, I could almost be anywhere in the world. There isn't much color in the gloaming—only forms, but there are sounds as the world wakes up. For a few moments as the sun hits the horizon everything turns golden, filled with transcendental light. I feel a sense of connection, a sense of being present in the world. The sweet light moves quickly. The only thing that keeps me in the same frame of mind—an acute awareness of being alive and present—is the weather. Foggy mornings are quiet and shrouded, paring the world down to what is underfoot. There is a sense of intimacy in the fog, which falls away when the sun burns through. Only that moment when the sun sits in the fog is the land filled with a transcendental light.”

“During this exploration of the American landscape I felt akin to the nineteenth century, European–influenced Barbizon painters. Like them, I went looking for tranquility, familiarity, and intimacy in the wild wooded landscape around me. Like these painters I saw how much light transforms the sense of place.”

The North Dakota Museum of Art is located on Centennial Drive, Grand Forks. Weekday hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; weekends, 1 to 5 p.m. The Museum Shop is open during these hours as well. The Museum Café is open weekdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with lunch served from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Although the Museum does not charge an admission fee, the suggested donation is $5 for adults and change for children. Wireless internet access is available.
-- Brian Lofthus, Assistant to the Director, North Dakota Museum of Art, blofthus@ndmoa.com, 701-777-4195

Benefit spaghetti dinner set for Denice Schafer

A benefit spaghetti dinner from 5 to 7 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 22, is set for Denice Schafer, research specialist at the Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center. The dinner will be at Bruski's Lounge, Thompson, N.D. All proceeds will be given to the family for medical expenses.

Doctoral examination set for Meghan Salyers

The final examination for Meghan Salyers, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in teaching and learning, is set for 11:30 a.m. Monday, Nov. 24, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "A Meta-Analysis of Adolescent Rampage Shootings and the Potential Interconnectivity to Gifted/Talented Children with Emotional/Behavior Disorders." Lynne Chalmers (teaching and learning) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Anatomy and cell biology seminar is Nov. 24

Keith Henry, assistant professor of pharmacology, physiology and therapeutics, will present a seminar titled, “Hold the Salt: Mechanistic Insights Into the Function of Na/CI Dependent Serotonin Neurotransmitter Transporter,” at noon Monday, Nov. 24, in Clifford Haugen, Room 1360, School of Medicine and Health Sciences. All are welcome to attend.
-- Bonnie Kee, Administrative Assistant, Anatomy and Cell Biology, bkee@medicine.nodak.edu, 7-2102

Pharmacology, physiology and therapeutics faculty candidate to present seminar

Shankar Chinta, a staff research investigator at the Buck Institute for Age Research will present a seminar titled “Understanding the Role of Antioxidant Glutathione in the Etiology of Parkinson’s Disease” at 2 p.m. Monday, Nov. 24, in Room 3933, School of Medicine. Dr. Chinta is a faculty candidate for the Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics. All are welcome to attend.
-- Deb Kroese, Administrative Officer, Pharmacology, Physiology & Therapeutics, dkroese@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-6221

Bachelor of Fine Arts exhibition opens Nov. 24

"Bee Delighted" a Bachelor of Fine Arts exhibition by Susan Kauk opens Monday, Nov. 24, from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Col. Eugene E. Myers Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center. The exhibition runs through Wednesday, Nov. 26, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Note upcoming classes at Wellness Center's Culinary Corner

The Culinary Corner at the Wellness Center lists upcoming classes.

Cheap, Fast and Healthy
Monday, Nov. 24, 5:30 p.m. Class is free.
Come join us Monday nights for Cheap, Fast, and Healthy! The session features tips on shopping for fresh and healthy ingredients, easy to prepare recipes, and cost comparisons. Participants will see the recipe being prepare, enjoy a sample, and leave with a recipe card and nutrition information to make the meal themselves.

Sports Nutrition
Tuesday, Nov. 25, 6 p.m. The cost is $5.
Whether you are eating before an athletic competition, or a basic training workout, what you eat can make a difference in both your performance and recovery. If you are interested in how fat, carbohydrates, protein, and hydration influence an athlete, then this class is for you. Come join us in the kitchen for a breakdown of sports nutrition into phases, and get the basic knowledge for peak performance. Learn a great recipe for post-competition, enjoy the food, and take home the recipe and tips.

Have a great Thanksgiving holiday. A full monthly calendar of classes is available on the Wellness Center's Web site at www.wellness.und.edu- click on nutrition.

To pre-register for these classes, visit the Welcome Desk or register online.
-- Karina Wittmann, Coordinator of Nutrition Services, Wellness Center, karinawittmann@mail.und.edu, 777-2719

Doctoral examination set for Glenda K. Cousins

The final examination for Glenda K. Cousins, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in educational leadership, is set for 9 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 25, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "Organizational Change in Higher Education: Increasing International Student Enrollment." Margaret Healy (educational leadership) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Jeanine S. McDermott

The final examination for Jeanine S. McDermott, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in nursing, is set for 2 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 25, in Room 201 (back), College of Nursing Building. The dissertation title is "Explicating Global Wellbeing in College Students Using Health Risk Behaviors and Adjustment to College." Julie Anderson (nursing) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

U2 lists session

University within the University (U2) lists the following session.

Managing a Generational Workforce
Nov. 25, 9 to 11 a.m., 305 Twamley Hall
Learn the differences between the generations and how they impact the workforce. Presenters: Desi Sporbert and Joy Johnson.
-- Denis F. MacLeod, U2 Coordinator, University Within the University, denismacleod@mail.und.edu, 701-777-0720

Doctoral examination set for Pascal I. Binda

The final examination for Pascal I. Binda, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in chemistry, is set for noon Wednesday, Nov. 26, in 138 Abbott Hall. The dissertation title is "Synthesis and Characterization of Lanthanide Phenolate Compounds and Their Catalytic Activity Towards Ring-Opening Polymerization of Cyclic Esters." Harmon Abrahamson (chemistry) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Author book signing at Barnes & Noble is Friday

Heath Hertel, author of "To Be the Best: Book One: Six Minutes," will be at Barnes & Noble Bookstore for a book signing from 1 to 2:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 28. The public is invited. -- Barnes & Noble Bookstore.

Doctoral examination set for Kelly Don Peters

The final examination for Kelly Don Peters, a candidate for the Ed.D. degree with a major in educational leadership, is set for 3 p.m. Monday, Dec. 1, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "Know Your Audience: An Assessment of Preferred Learning Styles of Freshman Students at Red River High School in Grand Forks, North Dakota." Gary Schnellert (educational leadership) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, gailholweger@mail.und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Kim Higgs

The final examination for Kim Higgs, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in communication and public discourse, is set for 3:30 p.m. Monday, Dec. 1, in 200 O'Kelly Hall. The dissertation title is "Collaborating Narrative Structures and Social Interactions Among Doll Collectors on a Web-Based Forum." Richard Fiordo (communication) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Anthony Williams

The final examination for Anthony Williams, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in teaching and learning, is set for 10 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 2, in Room 104, Education Building. The dissertation title is "The Fit for and Interest in a Proposed Doctoral Program in Business Administration by Retirement-eligible Military Commanders." Steven LeMire (education foundations and research) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Shirley Myran

The final examination for Shirley Myran, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in educational leadership, is set for 8:30 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 2, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "The Educational Experience of First Nation People in the Indian Residential System in Canada." Sherryl Houdek (educational leadership) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Teaching with Technology Series focuses on teaching in blogosphere

The OID/WAC co-sponsored On Teaching seminar will focus on “Teaching in the Blogosphere” from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 2, in Room 10-12, Swanson Hall.

In this past election cycle, we heard a lot about sharing information using blogs and the ongoing debate over whether democratization accompanies the growth of the intellectual cyberspace (or “blogosphere”) that bloggers occupy. Many of our students are enthusiastic about the technology and it is being used in a variety of settings. Blogs, or “weblogs,” are sometimes likened to online personal journals or discussion boards, but they can be much more. They have tremendous potential in terms of teaching and learning. Ever think about using blogs to enhance your student’s learning? What are blogs, what are the functions, capabilities and limitations of the technology? Can students effectively share information and have discussions using blogs? Can they learn to be better writers and editors? In what ways can students use blogs to connect more with each other, the content of the course and their own learning?

If you are interested in blogs or have used them, come join the discussion. Julie Zikmund (nutrition and dietetics) has used blogging in a variety of ways in her campus-based and online courses. She will share her insights, and talk about some of the ways that she has used this technology in her courses to enhance student learning and interaction with course content and materials. We will have time for discussion of pedagogy around this new technology, so bring your experiences and questions.

To register and reserve your lunch, call Jana Hollands at 777-4998 or e-mail jana_hollands@und.edu by noon Wednesday, Nov. 26.
-- Anne Kelsch, Director, Office of Instructional Development, anne.kelsch@und.nodak.edu, 701-777-4233

Astronomy talk, telescope observing is Dec. 2

The physics department will hold an astronomy and astrophysics public talk and telescope observing session at 7 p.m. Tuesday Dec. 2, in 116 Witmer Hall. The talk, "Retro-Rocketry: NASA Looks Back to Move Forward," will be presented by the UND Frozen Fury Rocketry Team. Following the talk, attendees will be given the opportunity to observe the night sky through a telescope (weather permitting).
-- Wayne Barkhouse, Assistant Professor, Physics, wayne.barkhouse@und.nodak.edu, 777-3520

Nominations sought for resident advisors (RA)

The Housing Office is currently accepting applications for resident advisors for the 2009-10 academic year. As an integral part of the housing staff, resident assistants live and work with new and returning students in the residence halls. RAs learn skills in administration and programming functions, as they build a positive living environment.

Faculty and staff are encouraged to nominate qualified students for the position of RA. All candidates must attend one information session before the end of fall semester. For times and locations of these sessions, see the Web site www.housing.und.edu/reshalls/ra.shtml

The qualities of a good RA include a strong academic background (minimum of 2.5 GPA), effective leadership and communication skills, prior residential group living experience, and willingness to assist new residents with the transition to college and community living. Benefits include a single room waiver, monthly salary and life skills that are transferable to a successful career.

We appreciate your assistance in recruiting student leaders. Please submit names of qualified candidates to: Missy Burgess, Stop 9029, or e-mail referrals to missyburgess@mail.und.edu by Dec. 1. We will contact the student and send them information regarding an RA information session. If you have any questions, please call 701-777-8877.
-- Missy Burgess, Assistant Director, Housing, missyburgess@mail.und.edu, 777-8877

New holiday party platters available from Campus Catering

Order your party platters now from Campus Catering. As you plan your department or personal holiday functions, Campus Catering offers several new cookie, sweet bread, and sandwich platters perfect for any event. Special platters are 16 inches round and can be delivered or picked up at the Campus Catering office. Let Campus Catering do all your holiday baking.

Apple Strudel and Petit Fours Platter: one dozen apple strudel and two dozen petit fours (serves approximately 24)

Lemon Blueberry Bread, Petit Fours and Tea Cookie Platter: one loaf lemon blueberry bread, two dozen petit fours, two dozen assorted tea cookies (serves approximately 32)

Cranberry Bread, Petit Fours and Tea Cookie Platter: one loaf cranberry bread, one dozen petit fours, three dozen tea cookies (serves approximately 32)

Silver Dollar Sandwich Platter: two dozen silver dollar buns, Swiss and Colby cheese, turkey, ham and tangy salami (serves approximately 12 to 15)

Campus Catering offers a full selection of cakes (1/4 sheet cakes, 1/2 sheet cakes, full sheet cakes), meat and cheese platters, fruit and vegetable trays, punch, taco platters, and two-foot sub sandwiches. See http://www.housing.und.edu/dining/catering/ or call 777-2256 for more information.
-- Diane Brenno, Catering Manager, Dining Services, dianebrenno@mail.und.edu, 777-2256

Nominations sought for Outstanding Faculty Academic Adviser

The Academic Advising Committee is accepting nominations for the Outstanding Faculty Academic Adviser Award to be presented at Founders Day 2009. To access the nomination form online, go to http://ssc.und.edu/forms/nomination.php .

Paper nomination forms are available at the following locations: Memorial Union Information Center, Student Success Center, dean’s offices, and the Student Government office. All students, faculty, staff, and alumni are eligible to nominate an undergraduate faculty academic adviser for this award. Nominations will be accepted through Jan. 16.

For more information, please contact the Student Success Center, 201 Memorial Union, 777-2117.

-- Lisa Burger, Director, Student Success Center, lisaburger@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-4706

Submit spring semester employee spouse/dependent tuition waiver by Dec. 12

The deadline to submit the 2009 spring semester spouse/dependent tuition waiver form is Friday, Dec. 12. Applications for spring semester received after this date will not be processed, and there will be no extension of the Dec. 12 deadline date.

If you received the waiver for fall, you may see a spring waiver in your anticipated aid. However, you MUST STILL REAPPLY for the waiver by the due date of Dec. 12 in order to receive the waiver for spring. Your eligibility for the waiver must be approved before the waiver will be applied to your account.

The amount of the spouse/dependent tuition waiver is 50 percent of the billed tuition per spouse and/or dependent for UND undergraduate and graduate classes excluding professional programs (law and eedicine) and self supporting continuing education courses (correspondence and online studies). The deadline to submit your completed spouse/dependent tuition waiver form is 30 days prior to the start of the semester. You are encouraged to take advantage of this new benefit.

The spouse/dependent tuition waiver policy is available at: http://www.humanresources.und.edu/html/SpouseDependentTuitionWaiverPolicy.html.

The spouse/dependent tuition waiver form and checklist of eligibility are located at:
http://www.humanresources.und.edu/docs/TuitionWaiverForm-2008-10-06.pdf.

If you have questions regarding the policy, please call the Human Resources office at 777-4361. If you have any questions regarding the actual tuition waiver, please call Student Account Services at 777-3911.
-- Diane Nelson, Director, Human Resources, Human Resources, dianenelson@mail.und.nodak.edu, 7-4364

Note flexible benefits open enrollment deadline

Only two weeks remain to sign up for flexible benefits for 2009. All benefited employees have the opportunity to enroll or re-enroll in this benefit. The program helps employees pay for medical and dependent care expenses with pre-tax dollars instead of after-tax dollars.

Enrollment agreements MUST be returned to the Payroll Office by 4:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 28. No exceptions will be made for mail delays. If you have questions or need additional information, call Cheryl Arntz, Flex-Comp specialist at 777-4423.

Space Studies considers summer field trip to Russia

The Department of Space Studies is considering offering a summer 2009 field trip to Russia. The field trip is aimed at visits to Russian Space Program institutions and facilities.

Students will be introduced to the Russian Space Program through lecture videos and selected reading materials prior to the trip. The field trip will include visits to selected Russian space facilities in and around Moscow. Preliminary plans are being made for a 10 to 12 day trip during the latter half of June 2009. Tentative plans include visits to NPO ‘Energia,’ Zvezda-Corporation Museums, Joint Space Missions Control Center at Korolyev, Space Museum and K. Tsiolkowsky House-Museum at Kaluga, and other facilities. There will be opportunities for experiencing the culture of Russia, sight seeing in Moscow at such places as Red Square, as well as other historic places. The preliminary estimated total cost for this trip will be about $4,500 per participant (based on a group of 10). This estimate includes air travel from New York to Moscow and back, local transportation while in Russia, accommodations which include breakfast, and study abroad insurance. Costs of travel for the round trip from the student’s home to New York, and other meals are not included.

The possibility of academic credit for this field trip is pending. Further details will be available at a later date.

A similar tour took place in the summer of 2006. For more details regarding the 2006 tour, you may refer to the personal blog provided by Michael Gerszewski, one of the participants of the summer 2006 field trip. Go to http://www.antaressol.com/~mgerszew/russia/

Vadim Rygalov, a faculty member in the Department of Space Studies and a native Russian, will lead the tour. Please contact him if you are interested by e-mailing him at vrygalov@space.edu, or calling him at 777-6041. Preliminary student interest is required for continued planning.

Note address update requirement on bulk mail

Beginning Nov. 23, all nonprofit and regular rate bulk mail must meet the new United States Postal Services’ move update requirement in order to receive these discounted postage rates. The requirement states that a mailing list must be updated within 95 days prior to the day of mailing. There are several approved methods that meet this requirement. One method that is currently used by many departments is using an ancillary endorsement such as Address Service Requested or Return Services Requested on their mail piece. This method is only valid, however, if the mailing list is used every 95 days. Another approved method that is available to departments is Fastforward. Mailing Services has software that is capable of submitting a mail list electronically to a vendor that will check the USPS database for address changes. The database contains all change of address notifications filed with the USPS in the past four years. After the database is checked, any change of address notifications are sent back to the program electronically. Usually it takes less than 24 hours for the file to be checked against the national database. The cost for this method is approximately $.01 per address.

Any mailing not meeting this requirement must be sent at the first class postage rate regardless if the mailing meets the other bulk mail requirements. If you have any questions regarding this requirement, please contact Darin Lee at 777-2279.

Nov. 27 observed as holiday

Thursday, Nov. 27, Thanksgiving Day, will be observed as a holiday by faculty and staff members of the University. Only those employees designated by their department heads will be required to work on this holiday. -- Greg Weisenstein, vice president for academic affairs and provost, and Diane Nelson, director, human resources.

Chester Fritz Library lists Thanksgiving hours

The Chester Fritz Library will observe the following hours of operation during Thanksgiving week: Wednesday, Nov. 26, 7:45 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Thursday, Nov. 27 (Thanksgiving Day), closed; Friday, Nov. 28, 7:45 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Saturday, Nov. 29, 1 to 5 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 30, 1 p.m. to midnight.
-- Karen Cloud, Administrative Assistant, Chester Fritz Library, karencloud@mail.und.edu, 7-2618

Law library posts Thanksgiving holiday hours

Thanksgiving holiday hours for the law library are: Wednesday, Nov. 26, 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Thursday, Nov. 27, closed; Friday, Nov. 28, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, Nov. 29, noon to 5 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 30, noon to 11 p.m.
-- Jane Oakland, Circulation Manager, Law Library, oakland@law.und.edu, 7-3482

Library of the Health Sciences lists Thanksgiving weekend hours

The Library of the Health Sciences hours for the Thanksgiving weekend are: Thursday, Nov. 27, closed; Friday, Nov. 28, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, Nov. 29, 1 to 5 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 30, 1 p.m. to midnight.
-- April Byars, Administrative Assistant, Library of the Health Sciences, abyars@medicine.nodak.edu, 777-3893

International Centre lists Thanksgiving holiday hours

Thanksgiving holiday hours for the International Centre follow.
• Wednesday, Nov. 26, closes at 4:30 p.m.
• Thursday, Nov. 27, open only for Thanksgiving dinner from 1 to 3 p.m.
• Friday, Nov. 28, and Saturday, Nov. 29, closed.
• Sunday, Nov. 30, resumes regular hours; open from noon to 10 p.m.
-- Tatjyana Richards, Office Manager, Office of International Programs, tatjyanarichards@mail.und.edu, 777-6438

Chester Fritz Library lists extended hours, final exam hours

The Chester Fritz Library will observe the following extended hours of operation from Dec. 5 through the final exam period: Friday, Dec. 5, 7:45 a.m. to 2 a.m.; Saturday, Dec. 6, 10 a.m. to midnight; Sunday, Dec. 7, 1 p.m. to 2 a.m.; Monday through Friday, Dec. 8-12, 7:45 a.m. to 2 a.m.; Saturday, Dec. 13, 10 a.m. to midnight; Sunday, Dec. 14, 1 p.m. to 2 a.m.; Monday through Thursday, Dec. 15-18, 7:45 a.m. to 2 a.m.; Friday, Dec. 19, 7:45 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday,
Dec. 20-21, closed.
-- Karen Cloud, Administrative Assistant, Chester Fritz Library, karencloud@mail.und.edu, 7-2618

Donated leave requested for Dawn Witherite

Leave donations are sought for Dawn Witherite, cook at Wilkerson Dining Center. She and her family thank you for your generosity. Please send a donated sick or vacation leave form to Lola Conley, Stop 9033. Donated leave forms are available at www.und.edu/dept/payroll, then click on "forms."

Donated leave sought for Denice Schafer

Leave donations are sought for Denice Schafer, research specialist, Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center. She and her family thank you for your generosity.

Please send a donated sick or vacation leave form to Linda Hurst Torgerson, Stop 9034. Donated leave forms are available at www.und.edu/dept/payroll, then click on "forms."

Senate Scholarly Activities Committee announces awards

The Senate Scholarly Activities Committee received five research/creative activity grant applications, requesting a total of $9,832.20, and six publication applications, requesting a total of $3,350.00, in response to the October call for proposals. The following awards were made at the committee meeting.

Research/Creative Activity Awards
* Carenlee Barkdull (social work), “Qualitative Investigation of Practice Courses Offered Through Distance MSW Program,”$650
* Patricia Conway (Center for Rural Health), "Identifying Factors that Contribute to Student Career Paths: Expansion of Program to Track Outcomes of Students Participating in INBRE,” $1,709
* Frank Cuozzo (anthropology), “‘Dental Ecology’ of Madagascar’s Extinct Lemurs: Evidence of Evolutionary Disequilibrium?” $1,390
* Turk Rhen (biology), “Localization of Gene Expression Within Developing Gonads During Sex Determination,” $2,500
* Marcellin Zahui (mechanical engineering), “Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Distributed Wing Vibration Sensors,”$2,500

Publication Awards
* Sandra Donaldson (English), $832.85
* David Flynn (economics), $133.26
* David Lawrence (philosophy and religion), $523.03
* Patrick O’Neill (economics), $399.77
* Department of Art faculty, $677.83
* Ryan Zerr (mathematics), $224.87
-- Patrick A. Carr, Ph.D., Chair, Senate Scholarly Activities Committee, Anatomy and Cell Biology, pcarr@medicine.nodak.edu, 701/777-2576

Reduce the price of textbooks today

Barnes & Noble at UND is actively working to reduce the costs of textbooks for your students. If you are planning to reuse your current textbook in the spring, we can offer your students 50 percent back on the costs of their textbooks. That is a significant savings to students and will also allow your students in the spring to save an additional 25 percent on the purchase of the book when they buy used copies. In order to do this, we need to have a confirmed order as soon as possible.

If possible, we would like to take your book order information today and, if not, remind you that finals week is the peak time for students to sell their books and to maximize their textbook savings. Please submit your orders prior to Dec. 1.

Submit your requests:
* Online at: http://und.bncollege.com - click on faculty services tab
* Fax: 777-3410
* Call: 777-2106
* Stop by the store and ask for Tina Monette, textbook manager
* Or we'll come to your office at a time convenient for you

Thank you for your contuined support.
-- Michelle Abernathey, General Manager, Barnes & Noble at UND, michelle_aberanthey@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2103

InEnergy formed to provide road map for investments in energy technologies

The Energy & Environmental Research Center Foundation announces the launch of InEnergy, Inc., a new consulting corporation created to provide expert due diligence services for financial investors faced with critical choices in analyzing risks and opportunities in new energy technologies and emerging energy industry trends.

"Even in a time of tremendous global market volatility and business uncertainty, commitments to clean energy technology will move forward, and InEnergy is providing leadership in the energy investment field," said EERC Director Gerald Groenewold. "With a group of top experts in the energy and financial field, InEnergy connects the investment community with the energy sector, particularly in the area of smart green technologies."

Current areas of technical focus for InEnergy include alternative fuels, clean coal technologies, gasification technologies for the production of electricity, fuels and hydrogen, combustion technologies for waste management and electricity production, emission control systems, carbon dioxide management and utilization, and energy and water sustainability.

InEnergy's core consulting group includes a diverse group of energy, global finance, and business development experts who possess a wide range of expertise in engineering, strategic vision, and financial management.

"InEnergy combines unique energy industry-specific, engineering, and financial talent," said Clara Del Villar, who manages InEnergy's New York office. "InEnergy helps investors develop a clearer picture of the energy sector, protect against technology risk, and identify investment opportunities before competitors do-key drivers for superior performance in volatile markets. We ultimately prepare our clients to have a far more informed and empowered perspective which is a critical advantage in this growing market."

Barnes & Noble Stock Up and Save Sale on through Nov. 30

Start your holiday shopping early with Barnes & Noble's Stock Up and Save Sale. Buy any one Champion brand item and get a second one of equal or lesser value at 50 percent off now through Nov. 30.

All men's, women's, and even children's Champion apparel is included in the sale. It's a great opportunity to get an early jump on holiday shopping -- right on campus. The bookstore offers a variety of Champion items bearing the school name and logo. Make sure your friends and family show their school pride from top to bottom.

Stop by the store today to take advantage of this incredible sale. -- Barnes & Noble at UND.

Museum Cafe lists specials, soups

The North Dakota Museum of Art Cafe lists its daily soups and specials: 



Nov. 19-21
Soups: Creamy Tomato Basil / Pasta Fagioli
Wednesday: Beer Braised Rabbit
Thursday: Jamaican Jerk Rabbit
Friday: Dagwood Sandwich

Nov. 24-28
Soups: Puree of Squash / Knoephla
Monday: Cranberry Stuffed Pork Chop
Tuesday: Turkey Stuffing Melt
Wednesday: Thanksgiving Stir-Fry
Thursday: Closed
Friday: Club Sandwich

The Museum Café is open weekdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., with lunch served from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
-- Brian Lofthus, Assistant to the Director, North Dakota Museum of Art, blofthus@ndmoa.com, 701-777-4195

Holidays present opportunity to gather family medical history

A new tool to help families capture and record their health history is now available through the Division of Medical Genetics at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

The family history form is a web-enabled program that helps people organize family health history information which can be printed out for the family’s doctors. It also helps users save that information as a computer file and share it with other family members.

Family history is considered one of the most important elements in assessing risk factors for health problems such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer and certain psychiatric disorders.

For more information or to obtain a paper version of the family history form, contact the Division of Medical Genetics, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, at 777-4277, go to a local library and request assistance in accessing this form at the Web site www.heartlandfamilyhistory.org or call Heartland Regional Coordinating Center at 1-888-881-8852.

“Families share more than genetic characteristics,” said John Martsolf, professor of pediatrics and director of the Division of Medical Genetics at the UND medical school. “They also share environments, lifestyles and personal habits, all of which can be factors for disease. Knowing the risk of certain diseases can motivate individuals to change any unhealthy behaviors.”

Family health histories should be given to all health care providers to be retained as a permanent part of a patient’s medical file, Martsolf said. “This information can help health care providers do a better job of assessing a patient’s risk of disease and prescribing appropriate preventive measures or courses of treatment.”

Gov. John Hoeven has declared November as Family History Month and is encouraging North Dakotans to learn more about the diseases and causes of death affecting at least three generations of family members.

Family gatherings, such as holidays, present a great opportunity to learn about your family’s health history, Martsolf said. A survey, conducted last year by the U.S. Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, found that 96 percent of Americans believe that knowing a family history is important to their health. The survey also showed that only one-third of Americans have ever tried to gather and organize their families’ health history.
-- Shelley Pohlman, Assistant to Director, Office of Public Affairs, spohlman@medicine.nodak.edu, 701-777-4305

Dance Dance Revolution is free, fun

Dance Dance Revolution (DDR) is at the Wellness Center. It’s free, it’s fun, and it’s for you. Don’t know how? That’s fine, we will have a seasoned expert in DDR there to get you set and ready. We will have eight pads total for this unique gaming experience. Stop by for this alternate form of fitness to test your skills and keep you moving.
Too much fun not to try. It is Mondays at 7 p.m. in the Wellness Center, second floor, Spin Room. No registration is required, just bring your ID card and join us.
-- Stefanie Meyer, Assistant Director of Fitness Experience, Wellness Center, stefaniemeyer@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2943

Flu shots available at no cost to you

UND faculty, staff, and students with North Dakota Blue Cross/Blue Shield (ND BC/BS) coverage who provided insurance cards and UND IDs at the time of their flu vaccinations will not be billed for any portion not covered by insurance. Although you may receive an explanation of benefits form from ND BC/BS which indicates that a portion of the bill is not covered by insurance, Student Health Services will accept whatever reimbursement ND Blue Cross/Blue Shield provides as full reimbursement for your vaccination.
-- Jane Croeker, Health Promotion Advisor, Student Health Services, jane.croeker@und.edu, 701.777.2097

COSE seeks representative nominations

In 1991 the Council of State Employees was established to enhance the morale, productivity, and image of state employees, and develop an appreciation of state agencies and programs. The Council represents all state employees through the equitable assignment of state agencies of which the University of North Dakota has two regular representatives and one alternate representative.

David Senne's term as a representative is ending Dec. 31, so an election will be held to fill that vacancy.

A nomination form was mailed to all eligible staff members Nov. 1, or is available on Human Resource's Web site. A minimum of 10 signatures is required to be nominated. Additional information concerning the nomination process is detailed on the nomination form. The completed nomination form must be received no later than 4:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 21. -- Human Resources.

Internal job openings listed

The following position vacancies are available only to regular UND staff employees who have successfully completed their six-month probation period, earn annual and sick leave, receive BC/BS health insurance and TIAA-CREF or ND PERS retirement benefits. Current UND faculty, please contact Human Resources for eligibility.

TO APPLY: Please complete UND Application/Control Card form. Send letter of application and resume, referencing position name and number, to: Human Resources, University of North Dakota, Twamley Hall, Room 313, 264 Centennial Drive Stop 8010, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8010. Applications MUST be received by the deadline date.

EXECUTIVE/PROFESSIONAL/ADMINISTRATIVE/ATHLETIC COACHES:

POSITION: Budget Manager, Wellness Center, #09-137
APPLICATION DEADLINE: (I) 11/21/2008
COMPENSATION: $ 36,000 plus/year

POSITION: Web Application Developer/IDM Coordinator, ITSS, #09-136
APPLICATION DEADLINE: (I) 11/19/2008
COMPENSATION: $ 40,000 plus/year

POSITION: Help Desk Representative, ITSS, #09-134
APPLICATION DEADLINE: (I) 11/21/2008
COMPENSATION: $ 31,000 plus/year

POSITION: Clinical Nurse, Research Affairs, SMHS, #09-133
APPLICATION DEADLINE: (I) 11/21/2008
COMPENSATION: $ 38,000 plus/year

TECHNICAL/PARAPROFESSIONAL:

POSITION: Financial Aid Associate, Student Financial Aid, #09-140
APPLICATION DEADLINE: (I) 11/24/2008
COMPENSATION: $ 27,000 plus/year

POSITION: Publications Assistant, UND Aerospace, #09-135
APPLICATION DEADLINE: (I) 11/18/2008
COMPENSATION: $ 21,000 plus/year

OFFICE SUPPORT: No vacancies.

CRAFTS/SERVICE/TRADES: No vacancies.

NORTH DAKOTA UNIVERSITY SYSTEM POSITION OPENINGS:

NDUS Programmer Analyst - Grand Forks

UND employee elected president of first-ever University System Staff Senate

The North Dakota University System initiated a first-ever Staff Senate in the state and elected officers at a leadership conference held late last week at the University of North Dakota.

The new Staff Senate was started with the approval of NDUS Chancellor William Goetz, and a subcommittee currently is working to establish bylaws for the group by Jan. 1. Each institution would be allowed one vote on all issues brought before the NDUS Staff Senate.

Janice Hoffarth, who currently serves as president of the UND Staff Senate, was elected president of the NDUS Staff Senate. Janine Trowbridge, North Dakota State University in Fargo, will serve as vice president; Mary Morell, Bismarck State College, will be secretary; and Cindy Rerick, Lake Region State College, was chosen to be communications officer.

The NDUS has never had a body made up exclusively of nonfaculty employees from its 11 colleges and universities. There are about 7,500 full and part-time employees in the university system.

"This is all brand new," said Hoffarth.

The NDUS Staff Senate hopes to set up a network for information to flow from the state Legislature and Board of Higher Education to NDUS staff members. It also will work with the chancellor to establish a nonvoting representative on the Board of Higher Education. Currently, the board is made up of eight voting members, including one student representative, Haylee Cripe of UND. The board also has one nonvoting board member, Jon Jackson, who represents system faculty. Jackson is a professor of anatomy and cell biology at UND.

The NDUS Staff Senate will meet yearly for "face-to-face" meetings, although it will convene via Interactive Video Network (IVN), conference calls or through e-mail as needed throughout the year. Yearly meetings will take place on the third Wednesday of June each year. Next year's meeting will be held at Bismarck State College.

The development of the new staff Senate and the election of its officers took place during the NDUS Leadership Conference held at UND.

Those in attendance were:

Mary Morell and Rita Nodlan: Bismarck State College
Kelly Steffes and Christine Chernich: Dickinson State
Bobbi Lunday, Nicole Lundquist and Cindy Rerick: Lake Region State
Gail Schumann and Sharyl Hanson: Mayville State
Shirley Fox-Trydahl, Joel Kotschevar and Ann McGray: North Dakota State College of Science
Diane Nelson, Janice Hoffarth, Loren Liepold and Joneen Iverson: UND
Steve Bergeson, Barb Gesslin, Vance Olson and Janine Trowbridge: NDSU
Lynn Haverlock and Melissa Meyer: Williston State

Museum of Art receives grant from MetLife Foundation

MetLife Foundation has announced the grant winners of its 2008 Museum and Community Connections program. The grants, totaling $1,000,000, were awarded to 16 museums for exhibitions, artist residencies, and other programs that extend their reach into diverse communities and make art a part of people's lives. North Dakota Museum of Art is one of the recipients.

"MetLife Foundation has a long history of partnering with museums to support educational opportunities for people of all ages," said Sibyl Jacobson, president and CEO, MetLife Foundation. "Museums enrich our lives in many ways, increase understanding of our world and reflect diverse cultural traditions. MetLife Foundation is pleased to make investments in projects that reach out to people in imaginative ways."
The goal of the competitive program is to broaden arts programming and promote museums as centers of education without boundaries. Winners were selected on the basis of their potential to engage diverse populations in the arts, creativity and innovation, and commitment to community.

Sharon Etemad, new senior development specialist at the Museum, garnered her first grant: $65,000 to extend our Rural School Initiative into northwest Minnesota. -- Laurel Reuter, North Dakota Museum of Art.

Youth entrepreneurship education director wins award

Barry Striegel, director of youth entrepreneurship education at the Center for Innovation, was awarded a $3,000 elevator grant from the Coleman Foundation of Chicago at the 26th annual Entrepreneurship Education Forum held in Austin, Texas, Nov. 7-11. Prior to the forum, each winner submitted a three-page proposal for an entrepreneurial project that would develop skills for self-employment among students. Those finalists selected to compete were given three minutes to present their proposals and then questioned by a panel of entrepreneurs and educators.

Grant funds will provide micro loans to University and community college undergraduates majoring in entrepreneurship, education or economics who will contract to provide food services to six mini-society summer camps now established in Grand Forks, Dickinson, Belcourt, Parshall, New Town and Fort Yates. These start-up catering businesses will be required to repay the loans, plus a 5 percent fee, in order to sustain and grow the original Coleman investment. The Grand Forks summer camp is scheduled for June 1-12, at the Center For Innovation.

The Consortium for Entrepreneurship Education is a national membership organization that provides leadership in support of entrepreneurship education as a lifelong learning process. The Forum brings together over 300 educators who share program ideas and build networks for enhancing the implementation of entrepreneurship education. The Coleman Foundation funds unique education institutions with a strong emphasis on entrepreneurship education and awareness.

The Center for Innovation helps entrepreneurs, students and researchers launch new technologies, products and ventures, develop business and marketing plans, access talent of universities and secure venture financing. It is a division of the College of Business and Public Administration.
-- Barry Striegel, Director, Youth Entrepreneurship Education, Center For Innovation, b.striegel@und.edu, 701-741-6985