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ISSUE: Volume 45, Number 45: July 02, 2008

Contents
Top Stories
President Kelley takes part in first news conference on Cirrus partnership
President Kelly, Vice President Boyd ride in North Dakota parade
Gift provides new opportunities for chemical engineering students
Events to Note
Doctoral examination set for Chastity Beth Gerhardt
Doctoral examination set for Plamen T. Miltenoff
U2 lists workshops
Special Denim Day for Backpacks for Brilliance is July 8
Doctoral examination set for Laiel Baker
Doctoral examination set for Balachandra Kumar Gorentla
Doctoral examination set for Pamela Holsinger-Fuchs
Doctoral examination set for Paul A. Stebbins
Doctoral examination set for Badreya Al Jenaibi
Doctoral examination set for Valeria N. Wax
Doctoral examination set for Daphne Ghorbani
Doctoral examination set for Christopher Irmen
Learn Sushi basics at Wellness Center July 14
Doctoral examination set for Pamela Cronin
UND Summer Graduation Expo is July 15
College of Education and Human Development hosts Bemidji area alumni
Announcements
Nursing appoints associate dean of graduate studies
Charles Christianson appointed associate dean for clinical education
Note U Card office organizational change
July 4 is holiday
Marci Mack named new assistant registrar
Law library announces July 4 weekend hours
International Centre lists July hours
ITSS lists holiday closing hours
Museum lists weekend hours
UND professors, students seed, track clouds for research project
University Relations will no longer log web files
Donated annual leave requested for Renae Tholkes
Museum Cafe Lists specials, soups
Weeders sought for Soaring Eagle prairie
Internal job openings listed
In the News
Graduate students join researchers at Nobel Laureate conference
UND economists say Microsoft positioned to weather departure of Bill Gates
President Kelley takes part in first news conference on Cirrus partnership

Cirrus Design Corp. will host a press conference at its Grand Forks plant at 10 a.m. Wednesday, July 2, detailing the beginning of construction of a horizontal space-flight simulator to be used by the John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences. The news conference will be the first for Robert Kelley as UND’s 11th president. The Cirrus Design Corp. is located at 1400 48th St. S.

When operational, the simulator will give North Dakota students and select visitors the opportunity to use software that simulates a spaceflight by either a NASA space shuttle, an X-15 or the pioneering personal commercial spacecraft, SpaceShipOne. UND students and Cirrus professionals were involved in the construction of the simulator, whose design was based on the personal commercial spaceflight Ansari X-Prize winner.

“Aside from working on a project in the field of aerospace, and the obvious excitement from helping replicate a design that won the X-Prize, the project has allowed both Cirrus and UND an opportunity to showcase our respective talents,” said Tom Haggy, director, Grand Forks Operations for Cirrus Design Corporation.

The principal investigator for the simulator’s construction, UND Space Studies research associate Pablo de Leon, said, “UND would be the only university with this combination of simulation software packages. This opportunity will pave the way for UND to have training for private spaceflight crews in the future.”

The project was funded in part by the North Dakota Space Grant Consortium. Suezette Bieri, deputy director of North Dakota Space Grant Consortium, said, “Cirrus agreed to give work space, expertise and materials to help us construct the simulator, which will be the first horizontal simulator made like SpaceShipOne in a university.”

Students involved in the project included Emily Chwialkowski, a UND Space Studies graduate student, and Luke Sandbeck-Moriarty and Tyler Jacobson, both UND undergraduate engineering students.

Both the media and the general public are invited to attend.

President Kelly, Vice President Boyd ride in North Dakota parade

Sheyenne, N.D., is celebrating 125 years during the Fourth of July. Taking part in the parade will be Robert Kelley, UND's 11th president who began July 1, and Robert Boyd, vice president for student and outreach services. Boyd and his wife, Dawn, own a house in Sheyenne and visit there often. Kelley and Boyd will ride in a special UND car, and will celebrate Sheyenne's 125th anniversary and also the 125th anniversary of the University of North Dakota. Kelley, who with his wife, Marcia, comes to UND from a state with another famous Cheyenne, Wyoming, should feel right at home in what, next to Medora, perhaps is the most western-looking town in North Dakota.

Gift provides new opportunities for chemical engineering students

The University of North Dakota Foundation has announced that Ann and Norman Hoffman, ’59, of Waconia, Minn., have donated more than $2 million to support UND, specifically the School of Engineering and Mines/Chemical Engineering Department. The Hoffman’s gift will establish The Ann and Norman Hoffman Chair in National Defense/Energetics within the School.

Norm Hoffman is one of UND's most successful engineering graduates. He has already served the University well through his success as an engineer, businessman and entrepreneur. By endowing a chair in the School of Engineering and Mines, Norm and Ann provide UND with a perpetual, additional benefit to all future engineering students, faculty and staff.

Norman Hoffman, a native of Mandan, N.D., graduated from UND in 1959 with a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering. Following graduation, he moved to California, where he was hired as an engineer with an aerospace company. Within months, he was promoted to manager of the chemical department, soon after becoming production manager with the company. In 1964 he did some consulting before moving to Minnesota to start his own company, Technical Ordnance, Inc. (Tek Ord). Hoffman ran the company for 40 years, serving as chair of the board and president. Today, Tek Ord remains an industry-leading designer and manufacturer of detonators and initiators used in rocket motor ignitors, rocket destruct systems components and various military safety systems. Hoffman sold Tek Ord in March 2006.

Ann Hoffman is from Stevens Point, Wis. She was a teacher in Minneapolis for many years.

“The Hoffmans’ gift to UND, and specifically the SEM, is a true testament of their dedication to the University and their interest in creating unique opportunities for students. This gift will allow the School to offer additional courses and research opportunities unique to UND. It’s a win-win for everyone,” said Tim O’Keefe, executive vice president and CEO of the UND Foundation.

Energetics is a branch of science that deals with energy and its rapid release or transformation, such as in explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics. Energetics is widely used in defense applications, and many other areas, including space exploration, counter-terrorism and public safety technologies, automotive airbags, and fireworks.

A recent Department of Defense study states “… the U.S. effort in research and development of energetic materials is small, fragmented, and suboptimal, leaving this critical national technology at risk.” They also list as a primary need “… training of replacements for the aging workforce”.

Norman Hoffman has recognized this concern and is helping to contribute to its solution through this gift. At Hoffman’s request, one of the first tasks will be to build of a repository of information on energetics. The scientific knowledge in the area is highly dispersed. Some of it exists in documents difficult to obtain, while other information is in the minds of scientists and engineers working in the field. Hoffman’s dream is to collect the existing body of knowledge to preserve it for future generations.

“There is a void in this field all across the country. Our hope is a repository will give people a place to go to learn more about the business. We had always wanted to give back to the University and we felt this was the perfect way to do so,” said Hoffman.

The Ann and Norman Hoffman Chair of National Defense/Energetics will use the expertise gained while developing this repository to develop a new research program at UND. “This will allow the School to train students in the area of energetics, providing them with fantastic job opportunities while serving a national need. This gift is an example of how the generosity of UND alumni can significantly impact the academics at UND, its students and society,” said Interim SEM Dean Michael Mann.

Doctoral examination set for Chastity Beth Gerhardt

The final examination for Chastity Beth Gerhardt, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in educational leadership, is set for 10 a.m. Monday, July 7, at the Memorial Union, Leadership Room. The dissertation title is "The Social Change Model of Leadership Development: Differences in Leadership Development by Levels of Student Involvement with Various University Student Groups." Donald Piper (educational leadership) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Plamen T. Miltenoff

The final examination for Plamen T. Miltenoff, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in educational leadership, is set for 11 a.m. Monday, July 7, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "Technological Strategic Planning and Globalization Impact: Fune-tuning Strategic Planning Methodology." Gary Schnellert (educational leadership) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

U2 lists workshops

University within the University (U2) lists the following workshops.

Defensive Driving
July 8, 12:30 to 4:30 p.m., Room 211, Skalicky Tech Incubator
This workshop is required by Atate Fleet for all UND employees who drive state vehicles on a regular (monthly) basis, received a traffic violation, or had an accident while operating a state vehicle. Employees are encouraged to bring a family member (spouse and/or dependents). This workshop may also reduce your North Dakota insurance premiums and could possibly remove points from your driving record. Presenter: Jason Uhlir.

What is Second Life and Why Would I Want One?** (NEW)
July 9, 9:30 to 11 a.m., Room 211, Skalicky Tech Incubator
This workshop will explain virtual worlds and demonstrate the well-known virtual environment called Second Life. There will be an overview of basic skills and a demonstration of how to get around. After the demonstration, we will break up into groups and help those who are not registered get in-world. Come prepared with a first name for your character (avatar) and we will get you started with your journey to fun! If you're already registered, we will take you exploring. Presenter: Christine Crawford.

Budgets Overview Inquiry**
July 10, 2 to 4 p.m., Room 9, or Aug. 12, 9 to 11 a.m., both in Room 9, Gamble Hall Lanterman Center.
Requirements: PeopleSoft user ID and password for Finance Module, a local fund number, and/or an appropriated fund number. This is for new PeopleSoft users or those PeopleSoft users needing a refresher. This training provides the tools necessary to navigate through PeopleSoft to find your department's budget and cash balance, utilize PeopleSoft to track your department's budget, cash, revenue, and expenditures, and complete a budget journal. The session also includes hands-on practice activities. Presenter: Shannon Smidt.

GroupWise 7.0: Beginning**
July 9, 1 to 4 p.m.
Students will navigate through the GroupWise environment, create and send messages, reply to and forward messages, use the address book, create a personal address book, create a mail group, work with calendar, schedule posted appointments and recurring events, work with junk mail folder and other mail handling features. Presenter: Heidi Strande.

Coffee, Cookies and Catered Events, Oh My! (UND Catering: Not Just Doughnuts!)
July 15, 9 to 10:30 a.m., Badlands Room, Memorial Union.
Learn how to plan an event from start to finish, discover what’s new in catered events, how to successfully complete the forms to request catering services, menu planning from the catering experts, and how to take your catered event to the next level. Presenters: Diane Brenno and Millie Strang.

Records Disposal Procedures
July 15, 1 to 2 p.m., Memorial Room, Memorial Union
Learn more about the process for destroying or transferring records that have passed their retention time limits. We'll review the system used, discuss why it's necessary to document, and take part in a hands-on run-through of the entire process. It's fun to clean out, it's easier to do than you think, and now's the time to do it. Presenter: Chris Austin.

Taking Care of Each Other When Tragedy Strikes (NEW)
July 17, 2 to 3:30 p.m., River Valley Room, Memorial Union
There are always bumps in the road at some point in life’s journey. For some, the path is rockier than for others. In our work environment we are trained to focus only on our work and leave our personal feelings at the door; but too often people around us may be suffering in silence, when even the slightest nudge of support and comfort could bring them hope. In this session, learn how to recognize some warning signs, raise awareness, and reach out to someone dealing with a loss from suicide. Presenter: Karyn Hippen.

Internet Safety for Kids: A Parent’s Guide** (NEW)
July 17, 10 a.m. to noon or Aug. 6, 2 to 4 p.m.
The Internet can help kids learn, communicate, and socialize, but it also exposes them to certain risks. This seminar will help parents learn how to protect their young kids and teens and keep them safe online. Some of the topics include: risks associated with popular Internet tools and social networking sites, how to filter objectionable Web content and use parental control software, cyberbullying, and how to prevent it, how to educate children about Internet predators, and Web resources to help parents learn and educate their children. Presenter: Brad Miller.

Records Retention and E-Mail
July 17, 1 to 2 p.m., Memorial Room, Memorial Union
Learn what role e-mail plays in an organization and UND policy and best practices for retaining e-mail messages. Presenter: Chris Austin.

** Computer lab – limited seating
-- Kathy Williams, U2 Coordinator, U2 Program, kathrynwilliams@mail.und.edu, 777-4266

Special Denim Day for Backpacks for Brilliance is July 8

Backpacks for Brilliance, a local charitable organization providing school supplies to children with special needs in our community, will be the beneficiary of a special Denim Day to be held Tuesday, July 8. Please give what you can to your building coordinator, enjoy wearing your denim, and support a good cause which will help over 200 children this coming school year.
-- Patsy Nies, Special Project Assistant, Enrollment Services, patsynies@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3791

Doctoral examination set for Laiel Baker

The final examination for Laiel Baker, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in clinical psychology, is set for 9 a.m. Wednesday, July 9, in 210 Corwin-Larimore Hall. The dissertation title is "Convergent and Discriminant Validity of Biculturalism and Depression Among Northern Plains American Indians." Justin McDonald (psychology) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Balachandra Kumar Gorentla

The final examination for Balachandra Kumar Gorentla, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in biochemistry and molecular biology, is set for 1 p.m. Wednesday, July 9, in United Hospital Lecture Hall, School of Medicine and Health Sciences. The dissertation title is "Molecular Characterization of Dopamine Transporter Phosphorylation and Regulation." Roxanne Vaughan (biochemistry and molecular biology) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Pamela Holsinger-Fuchs

The final examination for Pamela Holsinger-Fuchs, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in educational leadership, is set for 10:30 a.m. Thursday, July 10, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "College Students as Catalysts for Social Change: A Case Study." Marcus Weaver-Hightower (educational foundations and research) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Paul A. Stebbins

The final examination for Paul A. Stebbins, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in counseling psychology, is set for 10 a.m. Friday, July 11, in 318 Montgomery Hall. The dissertation title is "Adolescent Depression: Vulnerability Factors in Boys and Girls." Kara Wettersten (counseling psychology) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Badreya Al Jenaibi

The final examination for Badreya Al Jenaibi, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in communication and public discourse, is set for 2 p.m. Friday, July 11, in 200 O'Kelly Hall. The dissertation title is "Democracy and the Press in the Middle East." Mary Lee Horosewski (communication) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Valeria N. Wax

The final examination for Valeria N. Wax, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in teaching and learning, is set for 2 p.m. Friday, July 11, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "A Study of the Kindergarten and First Grade Programs at Minot State University Laboratory School (1966-1988): A School Ahead of Its Time." Glenn Olsen (teaching and learning) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Daphne Ghorbani

The final examination for Daphne Ghorbani, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in teaching and learning, is set for 10 a.m. Monday, July 14, in Room 308, Education Building. The dissertation title is "Characteristics of Male Pre-Service Elementary Education Candidates in North Dakota: An Exploratory Study." Richard Landry (educational foundations and research) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Doctoral examination set for Christopher Irmen

The final examination for Christopher Irmen, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in anatomy and cell biology, is set for 1 p.m. Monday, July 14, in Room B710, Frank Low Conference Room, School of Medicine and Health Sciences. The dissertation title is "The Role of Src-suppressed C-Kinase Substrate in Primary Sensory Neurons." Patrick Carr (anatomy and cell biology) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

Learn Sushi basics at Wellness Center July 14

Did you know Sushi doesn’t mean raw fish?! Come to “Sushi!” and learn the basics of the Japanese delicacy from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Monday, July 14. With just a little information and practice, you can learn to make really delicious and beautiful sushi at home. Each participant will get to make their own roll. This session of Sushi will also feature a delicious Japanese dessert known as sweet rice.

Cost is $10. Sign up at the Wellness Center Welcome Desk.
-- Leah Wagner, Coordinator of Wellness Programs, Wellness Center, leahwagner@mail.und.edu, 777-0842

Doctoral examination set for Pamela Cronin

The final examination for Pamela Cronin, a candidate for the Ed.D. degree with a major in educational leadership, is set for 1 p.m. Tuesday, July 15, in Room 206, Education Building. The dissertation title is "Perceptions of Shared Superintendency in North Dakota: Principals, Superintendents and School Board Members." Sherryl Houdek (educational leadership) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.
-- Joseph Benoit, Dean, The Graduate School, joseph.benoit@und.edu, 777-4005

UND Summer Graduation Expo is July 15

The Summer Graduation Expo will be held Tuesday, July 15, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Loading Dock, Memorial Union. A visit to the Expo will be a one-stop information source for students graduating Aug. 1. The Registrar's Office will be available with a list of students eligible to graduate. The UND Barnes & Noble Bookstore and Herff Jones will have regalia, diploma covers, frames, and class rings for purchase and viewing. Financial Aid can answer questions about student loan payments. Career Services will assist with any job search. The Alumni Association will explain services to new graduates. Additional information about the Graduate School, photographers, and catering will also be available. Faculty are invited to attend and check out custom regalia that can be ordered through the Barnes & Noble UND Bookstore. If you have any questions about the Expo, contact the Office of Ceremonies and Special Events at 777-6393 or e-mail dawnbotsford@mail.und.nodak.edu. For more information about the August commencement ceremony, visit http://commencement.und.edu.
-- Dawn Botsford, Events Coordinator, Office of Ceremonies and Special Events, dawnbotsford@mail.und.nodak.edu, 701-777-6393

College of Education and Human Development hosts Bemidji area alumni

The College of Education and Human Development invites you to the third annual Bemidji Alumni Gathering on Grace Lake from 4 to 6 p.m. Thursday, July 24, 30082 Viny Trail, Bemidji, Minn.

Meet Dean Dan Rice, visit with current and retired faculty and other alumni, and enjoy a light dinner. Discover what’s new at the college, enjoy an afternoon of great conversation and reminisce about your time on campus. Departments featured include Teaching and Learning, Social Work, Educational Foundations and Research, Counseling Psychology and Community Services, Educational Leadership, and Physical Education, Exercise Science and Wellness.
Hosts are Ann Porter, ’82, ’86, and Dawn Botsford, ’76, ’86.

Please respond by Monday, July 21, by calling Jena Pierce at 777-0844 or e-mail jena_pierce@und.edu
-- Jena Pierce, Director of Alumni Relations and Development, College of Education and Human Development, jena_pierce@und.edu, 701-777-0844

Nursing appoints associate dean of graduate studies

Julie Anderson, interim associate dean of graduate studies and director of the Ph.D. program at the College of Nursing since June 2007, has been appointed to permanently fill the position.

As associate dean, Dr. Anderson will be responsible for overseeing both the master’s degree tracks and the Ph.D. program offered at the college. She will also work to develop and implement the Doctor of Nursing Practice, curriculum evaluation and provide leadership in the ongoing development of the graduate nursing program within the college.

“I welcome Dr. Anderson’s leadership to the college as we address the growing nursing shortage in the region,” said Chandice Covington, dean of nursing. “Her experience and ideas will be extremely valuable as the college reaches out to more rural nurses and graduate students who aspire to become practitioners and teach in programs of nursing.”

Anderson has been with the College of Nursing since 2001. She is an associate professor of nursing, has chaired and served on several graduate committees, and is a strong advocate for the college’s graduate initiatives. Several letters of commendation have been received from graduate students regarding Anderson's mentorship quality and support for their programs of study.

She received her bachelor's degree in nursing in 1979 and master's in 1996, both from the College of Nursing. In 2000 she received her Ph.D. in research methodologies from the College of Education and Human Development. She is a practicing neonatal nurse at Altru Health System and is a published and noted researcher on issues of wound management and technology as well as worksite wellness programs.
-- Becky Cournia, Alumni & Development Officer, Nursing, beckycournia@mail.und.edu, 777-4526

Charles Christianson appointed associate dean for clinical education

Charles Christianson, associate professor of family medicine, has been named to the new position of associate dean for clinical education at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences. Among other accomplishments and responsibilities, Christianson is responsible for direction of the clinical sciences teaching in the first year of the medical curriculum, leads faculty efforts in professionalism education, and co-directs the Center of Excellence for Drug Abuse Education, one of the first four such centers nationwide established by the federal National Institute on Drug Abuse.

“This is a very important step for us as we continue to expand and build upon our very successful patient-centered curriculum for medical and health education,” said H. David Wilson, vice president for health affairs and dean of the School of Medicine and Health Sciences. “Dr. Christianson will oversee the clinical component of our medical students’ years one and two, including behavioral sciences and professionalism.”

Christianson also will supervise a major focus on years three and four of medical education, working with departments to support and develop clinical faculty. “We want Charlie to study carefully the last two years of medical school, especially how to make them better,” said Wilson. “We want to revisit basic sciences learning during the clinical years of a medical student’s four-year curriculum. We want to enhance our clinical education.” Christianson said, “Our patient-centered approach in the first two years is increasingly recognized nationally as a model for medical education in the 21st century; now we need to bring the same creativity to the third and fourth years. Fortunately, we have many physicians throughout the state who are committed to the education of our students.”

Christianson will address several key issues in his new clinical education role such as training students in management of chronic disease, improving education in areas such as geriatric and end-of-life care, and pain management, and increasing medical school support for and communication with clinical faculty throughout the state. “We also will continue to study and evaluate our innovations in education.” This work has been recognized by a number of publications and presentations at national academic meetings.

Moreover, Wilson said, Christianson will work with the SMHS associate dean for research to enhance and coordinate practice-based research in primary care, and health services research. Christianson brings broad and varied experience in medical education and in primary care practice. He directs NORTHSTAR, the Northern States Ambulatory Research Network, a collaborative effort of primary care providers and health organizations in the state to improve the quality of care, especially in the rural setting.

Note U Card office organizational change

With an increased awareness for security across the country, the U Card Office will move into the next generation for campus privileges and access controls. Effective July 1, the U Card Office will report to Campus Safety and Security. In addition to providing the official campus identification and related services attached to the card, this office will play a vital role for two major campus initiatives: electronic door access and emergency notification systems.

Phone numbers and the U Card production office in Room 3, Memorial Union, will remain the same. The new mailing address will be: 3851 Campus Road, Stop 9043. Our fax number will be: 777-4132. We look forward to serving you in our new capacity. -- Teresa Blilie, U Card Access Systems, Campus Safety and Security.
-- Jan Orvik, Writer/Editor, University Relations, janorvik@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3621

July 4 is holiday

In accordance with State Board of Higher Education directives, Friday, July 4, will be observed as Independence Day by faculty and staff members of the University. Only those employees designated by their department heads will be required to work on this holiday. -- Greg Weisenstein, vice president for academic affairs and provost, and Diane Nelson, director of human resources.

Marci Mack named new assistant registrar

Marci Mack has joined the Office of the Registrar as assistant registrar. She began her duties July 1. She supervises a staff of five and oversees the service area and maintenance of student records. Mack earned a bachelor's degree in information management and a master's in business administration, both at UND. Her previous position was with Career Services, where she held the position of administrative officer/recruitment coordinator. As assistant registrar, Mack is an integral member of the University registrar’s team of managers. -- Suzanne Anderson, University Registrar.
-- Lori Hofland, Administrative Assistant, Registrars Office, lorihofland@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-3892

Law library announces July 4 weekend hours

The Law Library will be closed Friday, July 4, through Sunday, July 6, in observance of Independence Day.
-- Jane Oakland, Circulation Manager, Law Library, oakland@law.und.edu, 7-3482

International Centre lists July hours

The International Centre will be closed Friday through Sunday, July 4, 5 and 6, for the Independence Day weekend.

International Centre hours for July are Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m.

Office hours for International Programs staff are Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
-- Tatjyana Richards, Office Manager, Office of International Programs, tatjyanarichards@mail.und.edu, 701-777-6438

ITSS lists holiday closing hours

Information Technology Systems and Services will close for the Independence Day holiday at midnight Thursday, July 3, and will reopen at 5 a.m. Saturday, July 5. -- ITSS.
-- Shelly Stewart, Help Desk Tech, ITSS, shellystewart@mail.und.nodak.edu, 777-2222

Museum lists weekend hours

The North Dakota Museum of Art lists the following holiday hours: Friday, July 4, closed; Saturday, July 5, open 1 to 5 p.m.; Sunday, July 6, open 1 to 5 p.m.
-- Brian Lofthus, Assistant to the Director, North Dakota Museum of Art, blofthus@ndmoa.com, 777-4195

UND professors, students seed, track clouds for research project

Students from the Department of Atmospheric Sciences and two of their professors are seeding clouds in North Dakota so they can monitor the resulting precipitation for a project called the "Polarimetric Cloud Analysis and Seeding Test 2 (POLCAST2).

The professors, Tony Grainger and David Delene, said the intent is to understand if seeding clouds will increase precipitation and how the precipitation process actually works. The project will continue for the next nine months.

The UND students and researchers fly out at a moment's notice to follow clouds and weather fronts to seed the skies before a rain event.

"The project here at UND puts these students ahead when it comes to career opportunities in the field," Delene said. "Giving them an opportunity in this field-measurement campaign will bring about further opportunity in the atmospheric sciences field."

Delene emphasized there are factors that must be considered when critically looking at the process. "Rainfall is very localized. If we seed one area, for example, it is not going to affect another area," he said. "A research project of our size would not affect moisture levels in the atmosphere from one area to another.

"Moreover, many large cities already have an unintentional way of affecting clouds in the atmosphere through pollution that's made up of fine particles."

The students, Christopher Kruse, Kelsey Watkins, Matt Ham, Robert Mitchell, Dan Koller and Dan Adriaansen, will help Grainger and Delene fly into rainfall and analyze the data afterward. The research project is a cooperative effort involving UND, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Weather Modification Incorporated (WMI) and Ice Crystal Engineering (ICE). It's sponsored by the North Dakota Atmospheric Resource Board.

University Relations will no longer log web files

Because the software has become outdated and other technical issues, University Relations will no longer run Web statistics for users after July 1. Instead, we will assist departments with installing Google Analytics, a free appliance that allows users to garner even more statistics than the former product, Web Trends. If you'd like help with Google Analytics, please call Kevin Crawford at 777-6298, or e-mail him at kevincrawford@mail.und.edu . -- Jan Orvik, Web manager, University Relations.

Donated annual leave requested for Renae Tholkes

The Chester Fritz Library is requesting donated annual leave for Renae Tholkes, library associate, to care for an ill family member. Donated leave forms are available on the Payroll Office Web site. Please send the forms to Karen Cloud, Chester Fritz Library, Stop 9000. Your response to our request is appreciated. -- Wilbur Stolt, director of libraries.

Museum Cafe Lists specials, soups

The North Dakota Museum of Art Cafe lists the following soups and specials.

July 2-3
Soups: Sausage Beef Soup / Potato Onion
Wednesday: Vegetable Panini
Thursday: Chicken Alfredo
Friday: Closed

July 7-11, France week
Soups: Butternut Squash Soup with Carmelized Apples / Cream of Tomato Basil
Monday: Roasted Loin of Pork with Ginger
Tuesday: Rosated Chicken Dinner
Wednesday: Chicken Breast Parmesan
Thursday: Stuffed Pork Doria
Friday: Coq au Vin

The Museum Café is open weekdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with lunch served from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
-- Brian Lofthus, Assistant to the Director, North Dakota Museum of Art, blofthus@ndmoa.com, 777-4195

Weeders sought for Soaring Eagle prairie

We will be regularly weeding Soaring Eagle Prairie. Until we get this garden under control, and to prevent it from being turned back to grass, it will need invasive plant removal. So, for the next few weeks on Wednesday at 4:30 p.m., I will be weeding and can use any help you can provide or send my way. Please bring gloves for one-half hour of weeding. Many half hours add up to a significant change. Thanks. Thanks also to Barb La Duke, Patricia Bohnet, and Kristen Borysewicz for helping this week. -- John La Duke, College of Arts and Sciences.

Internal job openings listed

The following position vacancies are available only to regular UND staff employees who have successfully completed their six-month probation period, earn annual and sick leave, receive BC/BS health insurance and TIAA-CREF or ND PERS retirement benefits. Current UND faculty, please contact Human Resources for eligibility.

TO APPLY: Please complete UND Application/Control Card form. Send letter of application and resume, referencing position name and number, to: Human Resources, University of North Dakota, Twamley Hall, Room 313, 264 Centennial Drive Stop 8010, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8010. Applications MUST be received by the deadline date.

EXECUTIVE/PROFESSIONAL/ADMINISTRATIVE/ATHLETIC COACHES:

POSITION: Information Specialist/Counselor, INMED Program. #08-395
APPLICATION DEADLINE: (I) 7/8/2008
COMPENSATION: $34,000 plus/year

POSITION: Associate Athletic Director/Chief Financial Officer, Athletics, #08-385
APPLICATION DEADLINE: (I) 7/2/2008
COMPENSATION: $55,000 plus/year

TECHNICAL/PARAPROFESSIONAL: No vacancies.

OFFICE SUPPORT:

POSITION: Administrative Specialist, Continuing Education, #08-394
APPLICATION DEADLINE: (I) 7/02/2008
COMPENSATION: $24,000 plus/year

CRAFTS/SERVICE/TRADES: No vacancies.

Graduate students join researchers at Nobel Laureate conference

University of North Dakota graduate students Peter Reis and Daniel Theis have been invited to attend the 58th meeting of Nobel Laureates in Lindau, Germany.

Reis and Theis were nominated for the honor by faculty of the Physics and Chemistry Departments, respectively, and were selected after a competitive application process. The meeting, set for the first week in July, brings together young researchers and other leaders in specific fields.

This year's meeting, which will be attended by 25 Nobel Laureates, is dedicated to physics. The laureates will share their knowledge, discuss topical developments and establish contacts with more than 550 young scientists from 66 countries.

"This is quite an honor for Peter Reis and UND," said Graeme Dewar, professor and chair of the Physics Department.

Reis, of Grand Forks, said he expects a packed and exciting schedule when he arrives for the meeting, set in the island town of Lindau on Lake Constance in northeastern Germany.

"The week in Lindau will be pretty busy. Every morning starts with a three-hour round-table meeting with laureates," Reis said.

He added that the public television program "Nature" is expected to be on hand to film the meeting for a future episode.

Theis, a native of the Twin Cities area, is a UND graduate student focusing his studies on theoretical physical chemistry under the tutelage of adviser Mark Hoffmann, professor and chair of chemistry.

Hoffmann said Theis came to UND with the help of a U.S. Department of Education Graduate Assistantship in Areas of National Need (GAANN) grant, which helps schools recruit graduate students.

To qualify for the Nobel Laureate meeting, in addition to their own credentials and studies, the young researchers must meet a host of criteria, including being in the top 10 percent of their class and being advised by faculty members who are funded by a grant from either the National Science Foundation or the DOE.

Joseph Benoit, dean of the Graduate School, said Reis and Theis join a growing list of UND graduate students who have competed successfully for the honor to attend Nobel Laureate meetings.

"It speaks highly of the quality of our students as well as the faculty who guide them," Benoit said.

Since 1951, more than 25,000 researchers have attended the meetings in Lindau.

UND economists say Microsoft positioned to weather departure of Bill Gates

University of North Dakota economist David Flynn says that computer software giant Microsoft Corp. is well prepared for next week's long-planned departure of its chairman and founder, Bill Gates.

He added it's unlikely the company will have to follow the same path as its competitor, Apple, Inc., which several years ago, had to call back a high-profile former boss to bail it out.

"I don't think you're going to see that kind of stagnation at Microsoft, where Bill Gates would have to come back," said Flynn, who is director of UND's Bureau of Business and Economic Research.

Flynn said Gates, though still wearing the chairman title, has been out of the Microsoft picture for about two years, as company CEO Steve Ballmer has been running the operation and leading the company through economic ups-and-downs, including trying to figure out how to compete with "Google" and an attempt to combine with "Yahoo!" Gates officially will step down as head of Microsoft Tuesday after 33 years of growing the software upstart into the world's dominant computer operating system, and in the process, becoming one of the richest men on the planet.

"You're probably not going to have many risks for stockholders, either, because Gates hasn't been hands-on for a long time," Flynn said. "I am sure that he'll still be available for counsel and advice."

The transition wasn't as smooth for Apple, Inc. in 1985, when another computing pioneer, Steve Jobs, abruptly quit the company he helped start after a power struggle with the board of directors. Eleven years later, Jobs was back at Apple after its directors lost confidence in then-CEO Gil Amelio. The company's stock had just hit a 12-year low.

Patrick O'Neill, professor and chair of the Department of Economics, said the future of Microsoft may hinge on how quickly and successfully it can prove itself with a new product without Gates at the helm.

"The biggest impact is the loss of the name and prestige," he said. "I would suggest that the most likely outcome would be a short-term period of questioning that might cause a short-term hit in its stock price. You can have a hit in stock prices if the new people don't come out strong right away."

Flynn said economists and computer-industry watchers also are curious to see whether a new culture or attitude is introduced at Microsoft with Gates gone. He said one of Microsoft's strengths has been that it was an informal and positive place for employees.

"The question is 'do they become more like an IBM culture with the white bottom-up shirts and black suits,'" Flynn said.

Flynn said, as Gates rides off into retirement, those who might have the most to gain are people on the receiving end of his charity work. In 2000, Gates and his wife, Melinda, combined three family foundations into the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which has become "the largest transparently operated charitable foundation in the world." "Forbes" magazine reported that the foundation gave away about $29 billion to various charities between 2000 and 2004.

"He'll now be able to work full-time on the foundation," Flynn said. "You just might see a real push by him in that philanthropic direction."

Gates' net worth was calculated to be about $58 billion this year.