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University Letter

April 10, 1998

Volume 35 No. 32

UNIVERSITY LETTER
University of North Dakota at Grand Forks
Vol. 35, Number 32, April 10, 1998

UNIVERSITY LETTER IS ALSO AVAILABLE ELECTRONICALLY in the Events and News section of UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address is: http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/our/uletter.htm

The University Relations Office maintains an index for the University Letter.

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CONTENTS

EVENTS TO NOTE

OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

BILLBOARD

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

IN THE NEWS

EVENTS CALENDAR

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APRIL 21 FLOOD OBSERVANCE ACTIVITIES ANNOUNCED FOR ALL OF UND COMMUNITY

Exactly one year later to the day that the Red River crested in the devastating 1997 flood, the University will observe its triumph in that struggle with events Tuesday, April 21. The entire University community is invited. The three main activities are outlined here. Further details will be communicated in various means in the next 10 days.

Monthly Community Meeting, 9 a.m., Ballroom, Memorial Union. Will include showing of a new video on UND flooding and recovery, refreshments, recognition of student flood fighting and recovery participation (Note: these community meetings had their beginning in the twice-daily employee briefings during the flood fight.)

Return to the Red Tag Diner, Noon to 1 p.m., Food Services Warehouse (near Central Receiving on the road on the southern edge of campus by the railroad tracks). Open to all UND faculty and staff, this free lunch will commemorate the camaraderie of the prime source for meals for more than a week for those UND personnel who remained on campus responding to immediate flood recovery needs last April while most other eating locations in the entire community were inoperable. The operation took its "Red Tag Diner" name from the fact that UND flood workers were issued identification badges crafted from unused red-zone parking tags.

Social and Refreshments, 2 to 4 p.m., Memorial Union Ballroom. The UND "tent" will be the central focus around which exhibits, displays, and videos will be presented. Seating will be available for visiting while enjoying free ice cream, cake, and beverages.

Department chairs and office heads are urged to encourage their faculty and staff members to join in this observance. The planning group has fashioned it to be on a level and of a tone commensurate with the sensibilities still felt in the aftermath of this great disaster, but it is also being conducted as a recognition of the recovery of the campus and larger community and the roles so many individuals have played in it.

Another special flood observance event will be the Residence Hall Reunion Dinner April 18 for UND faculty and staff and their families who lived for periods of time in UND housing during the flood aftermath. Invitations are being issued.

-- Jim Penwarden, University Relations, for the Flood Observance Planning Group.

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SENATE TO HOLD FORUM ON BUDGET REDUCTION

The University Senate will hold an open forum, non-procedural discussion on the budget reductions and the impact on academic programs and University operations on Thursday, April 16, at 4:05 p.m. in Room 7, Gamble Hall. The forum is open to the entire campus community. The effects of both the budget shortfall for 1998-99 due to low enrollments as well as the Governor's request for a 95 percent biennial budget for 1999-2001 will be discussed.

-- Al Fivizzani (Biology), Chair, University Senate.

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EVENTS TO NOTE

DEAN'S LECTURE DISCUSSES BIRDING

The School of Medicine and Health Sciences Dean's Hour Presentation will be "Birding for Health and Fun," presented by David Lambeth (Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) at noon Thursday, April 9, in the Reed T. Keller Auditorium (Room 1350), Wold Bio-Information Learning Resources Center.

-- Office of Medical Education, School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

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RECEPTION WILL HONOR COLLEEN GRASSEL

A reception honoring Colleen Grassel (Special Services) will be held from 1:30 to 3 p.m. Wednesday, April 15, at the Chester Fritz Auditorium. Grassel will retire from the University April 30. She has worked for the Special Services Department and the UND Police Department for 10 years, since retiring from Northwestern Bell. She has made many of us aware of her presence on campus by way of green and white rectangles placed upon our windshields. She is also familiar as the "parking meter person" and as the security officer at Sioux basketball games. Please join us.

-- Suzanne Gandrud, UND Police.

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RECEPTION WILL HONOR BOB KLINKHAMMER

Bob Klinkhammer, Associate Professor with the Department of Social Work for the last 28 years will be retiring June 30. Please join us in wishing him well. There will be a reception at the Holiday Inn on Thursday, April 16, from 3 to 5 p.m. with hors d'oeuvres and a cash bar. If you would like to come celebrate with us please contact Beverly Blegen at 777-3774 with your RSVP by Thursday, April 9. Thank you.

-- Department of Social Work.

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LEEPS LECTURE DISCUSSES FLOODS, FLOOD PLAINS

A LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary Sciences) Lecture will be presented by Jeffrey F. Mount, Department of Geology, University of California at Davis at noon Thursday, April 16, in 100 Leonard Hall Lecture Bowl. He will discuss "Managing Floods and Flood Plains: Hard Lessons Learned form the New Year's Floods in California."

Professor Mount received a B.A. in Geology from the University of California, Santa Barbara, in 1976, an M.S. in Earth Science from UC Santa Cruz in 1978 and a Ph.D. in Earth Science from UC Santa Cruz in 1980. From 1980 to the present he has been a professor in the Department of Geology at UC Davis. During this time he has conducted research on stratigraphy and sedimentation, with an emphasis on process sedimentology of marine and non-marine depositional systems. His current research interests include analysis of the geomorphic evolution of rivers in response to changing land use conditions; geochemical and petrologic identification of anthropogenic sediment sources within watersheds; and the mechanics of geomorphic recovery in riverine systems affected by catastrophic sedimentation events.

During the past five years Dr. Mount has been actively involved in science education and research on rivers, culminating in the recent publication of his book titled "California Rivers and Streams: The Conflict Between Fluvial Process and Land Use." Since the 1997 New Year's floods of the Central Valley he has been a conspicuous critic of current methods of flood management and a proponent of non-traditional approaches to reducing flood damages. He presently serves as a member of several multiagency task forces focusing on flood plain management within California, is the current Chair of the Department of Geology at UC Davis, and is the lead organizer of the UC Davis Center for Integrated Watershed Science and Management.

The LEEPS Lecture Series is supported by the Department of Geology and Geological Engineering, the Energy and Environmental Research Center and the North Dakota EPSCoR Program. All interested persons are welcome to attend. For additional information contact me.

-- Will Gosnold, Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering, 777-2631.

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COMPUTER SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM WILL DISCUSS ATM NETWORKS

A Computer Science Colloquium, "Allocating ATM Bandwidth to Groups of Cooperating and Uncooperating Real-time Distributed Applications," will be held at 3 p.m. Thursday, April 16, in 106 Streibel Hall (formerly CAS II). David Anderson will present.

The ability to guarantee a quality of service to the users of an Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) network has helped to make ATM a desirable technology. Past researchers have focused upon efficiently allocating bandwidth to each connection so that guaranteed quality of service can be provided while using the fewest network resources.

Since real-time distributed applications use several connections, resources must be guaranteed to each connection. This research illustrates the difference between the traffic requirements of each connection and the traffic requirements of all connections when there are grouped together. Using this information, a new method of allocating resources is suggested that uses information about the group so that resources can be allocated to the group as a whole.

A method that efficiently models the traffic generated by real-time distributed application will be described. This method can model almost any application implemented with the Message Passing Interface (MPI) standard. The traffic requirements of MPI applications will be discussed, along with how to provide the minimum latency needed by real-time MPI applications. Lastly, a supercomputer benchmark program implement using MPI will be described.

-- Bruce Maxwell, Computer Science.

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JANE KURTZ TO SPEAK ON PUBLISHING A NOVEL

Jane Kurtz (English) will speak on "Acquiescing to the Demands of Story: The Shaping of a Novel for Publication" at 4 p.m. Thursday, April 16, in 116 Merrifield Hall. Intended to coincide with the publication of her latest novel by Harcourt Brace, the talk will trace the development of her master's thesis into a published novel. The concluding event of this year's English Lecture Series, the presentation is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served.

-- Martha Meek, Coordinator, English Lecture Series.

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PAC-W CELEBRATION TEA SET

The President's Advisory Council On Women (PAC-W) Celebration Tea is set for 4 p.m. Thursday, April 16, in the North Dakota Museum of Art. This tea is in honor of the efforts by individuals and entities on behalf of women in every facet of campus life and work. Faculty and staff are invited to attend the tea. If you would like an invitation, contact Sara Hanhan at 777-3162 before Tuesday, April 14. Seating is limited.

-- Loretta Heuer (Nursing), for the President's Advisory Council on Women.

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COMMITTEE WILL REVIEW REQUESTS TO TERMINATE TWO DEGREES

The University Curriculum Committee will meet Thursday, April 16, at 3 p.m. in 303 Twamley Hall to review the request from the College of Arts and Sciences to terminate the B.S. with a major in Biology-Plant Science Emphasis and B.S. with a major in Biology-Zoology Emphasis. Anyone interested in the proposal is invited to attend.

-- Heidi Kippenhan (Admissions and Records) for the University Curriculum Committee.

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WHEELER LECTURE SERIES SET FOR APRIL 16, 17

Roy C. Brown and Betty E. Lemmon of the Department of Biology, University of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette, will present the George C. Wheeler Distinguished Lecture series on Thursday, April 16, at 7:30 p.m. and Friday, April 17, at noon, both in 141 Starcher Hall. Thursday's title is "Clues to the Origin of Land Plants: Ancient Patterns of Cell Division," and Friday's title is "Cytoplasmic Domains and the Control of Cell Division in Plant Development."

-- William Sheridan, Biology Department Seminar Coordinator.

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INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE SPEAKER TO PRESENT SEMINAR

Patrick Murray, Nalco Chemical, will present a seminar titled "Water Soluble Polymers in Industrial Water Treatment" at noon Friday, April 17, in 138 Abbott Hall, as part of the Industrial Research Institute Visiting Industrial Scientists/Engineers Program. Dr. Murray received his bachelor's degree in Biochemistry from Illinois Benedictine College (now Benedictine University) in Lisle, Ill., in 1989. He attended graduate school at the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana, where he worked with professor William H. Pirkle. In 1994, he joined Nalco Chemical Company, where he is currently involved in new polymer research and process development. He has developed and commercialized processes for the manufacture of quaternary monomer, high molecular weight water continuous dispersion polymers, and low molecular weight water soluble solution polymers.

-- Mark Hoffmann, Chemistry.

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SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND MINES PLANS OPEN HOUSE

The 1998 School of Engineering and Mines Open House will be held Tuesday, April 21, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. All events will take place within Upson I Hall, Upson II Hall, and Harrington Hall on the campus of the University, with the free registration taking place at the entrance to Upson I Hall. Some of the activities planned for the day include:

* Cryogenics shows, in which racquetballs, bananas, and marshmallows are frozen using liquid nitrogen;

* A presentation of Subzero, North Dakota's first solar-powered vehicle, designed, constructed and raced by UND engineering students in Sunrayce 97;

* Hands-on science experiments for children;

* An opportunity to take off your shoes and sink in quicksand;

* Student poster presentations and demonstrations of design projects;

* Tours of all engineering laboratory facilities;

* A discussion with engineering students who have participated in the highly successful cooperative education program; and

* An opportunity to talk informally with engineering students and faculty.

The School of Engineering and Mines open House is attended by regional elementary, middle school, and high school students, as well as UND students, faculty and staff. The primary goal is to show how much fun math, science, and engineering can be for people of all ages and backgrounds.

-- Richard Schultz, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering.

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NORTH DAKOTA EDUCATION CONNECTION RECRUITING FAIR SET FOR APRIL 22

Faculty and staff are asked to encourage Education students to participate in the North Dakota Education Connection Recruiting Fair Wednesday, April 22, in the Memorial Union Ballroom. This Fair is sponsored by all North Dakota universities that prepare teachers and is an opportunity for candidates to meet with representatives from many school districts in a one-day format. Registration forms are available at Career Services, 280 McCannel Hall or online at www.und.nodak.edu/dept/career.

-- Mark Thompson, Director, Career Services.

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IRB SET TO MEET MAY 1

The Institutional Review Board will meet at 4 p.m. Friday, May 1, in 305 Twamley Hall, to consider all research proposals submitted to the Office of Research and Program Development before Tuesday, April 21. Proposals received later will be considered only if a quorum has reviewed them and time permits.

Clinical medical projects must be reviewed by the Clinical Medical Subcom- mittee before being brought to the full Board. Proposals for these projects are due in the Office of Research and Program Development Tuesday, April 14.

Notes from the meeting will be available in ORPD approximately one week after the meeting.

-- F. R. Ferraro (Psychology), Chair, Institutional Review Board.

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OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

QUESTIONS ON BUDGET CUTS FRAME APRIL UNIVERSITY SENATE MEETING

University Senate, at its regular monthly meeting April 2, moved swiftly through its scheduled agenda that was sandwiched between an opening round of questions on the recently announced budget cutting exercises and closing queries on the same subject, capped by a resolution.

The resolution "urges the Grand Forks Chamber of Commerce to use its influence ot express concern that any reduction in funding from the present level would have negative impact on the University's ability to serve students, the community and the state."

Details on proceedings of the April meeting, and other Senate information such as agendas, minutes of other meetings, and announcements, can be accessed under the UND Internet home page, Academics -- Senate (http://www.und.nodak.edu).

-- Jim Penwarden, University Relations.

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BALLOTING RESULTS REPORTED FOR 1998-99 U SENATE COMMITTEES

New members were elected to the University Senate committees at the April 2, Senate meeting. Following are names of the new members of the 1998-99 Senate committees, which also have carry-over members in addition to these recenty elected.

ACADEMIC POLICIES: Michael Meyer (Criminal Justice Studies), Helen Melland (Nursing); ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES: Charles Robertson (Aviation), Ronald Brinkert (HPER), David Uherka (Mathematics); ADMISSIONS: Mary Ebertowski (Pediatrics), Ray Diez (Industrial Technology); COMPENSATION: Anne Gerber (Biology), Diana Wells (Mathematics); CONFLICT OF INTEREST/SCIENTIFIC MISCONDUCT: Richard Ferraro (Psychology), Sue Jacobs (Counseling); CONTINUING EDUCATION: Kathleen Tiemann (Sociology), Donald Moen (Mechanical Engineering); CURRICULUM: Mary Coleman (Clinical Laboratory Sciences), Bette Olson (Nursing), David Perry (Social Work); FACULTY ADVISORY BUDGET: Robert Kweit (Political Science); FACULTY INSTRUCTIONAL DEVELOPMENT: Birgit Hans (Indian Studies), Dexter Perkins (Geology and Geological Engineering); FACULTY RESEARCH AND CREATIVE ACTIVITY: Jiagin Yang (Management), Frank Karner (Geology and Geological Engineering); GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: Kathleen Dixon (English), Arnold Johnson (Electrical Engineering), Michael Jacobsen (Social Work); HONORARY DEGREES: Phil Harmeson (Political Science); HONORS: Scott Dale (Languages), Colin Hughes (Biology), Patrick Luber (Visual Arts); INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS: Elizabeth Nichols (Nursing), Judy DeMers (School of Medicine); LIBRARY: Jeffrey Lang (Biology), Rebecca Moore (Philosophy and Religion), Richard Wilsnack (Neuroscience); ROTC: Wilfred Jackson (Aviation); STUDENT ACADEMIC STANDARDS: Fred Schneider (Anthropology), Debra Maury (Languages); STUDENT POLICY: Jan Zahrly (Marketing), Mahesh Lakshman (Chemistry); SUMMER SESSIONS: Douglas Munski (Geography), Mary Askim (Marketing).

-- Jim Penwarden, University Relations.

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DOCTORAL EXAMS SET FOR FIVE CANDIDATES

The final examination for Catherine Ann Pavlish, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in English, is set for noon, Wednesday, April 15, in 21 Montgomery Hall. The dissertation title is "The Uncertainty Principle in Certain Uncertain Writers: Melville, Dickinson, Woolf, Atwood, and Others." Sandra Donaldson (English) is the committee chair.

The final examination for Susan L. Neste, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Educational Administration, is set for 9 a.m. Thursday, April 16, in 208 Education Building. The dissertation title is "Perceived Efficacy of Support Mechanisms in Higher Education: A Comparison of Traditional and Nontraditional Age Female Students." Gerald Bass (Educational Leadership) is the committee chair.

The final examination for Michael Friez, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, is set for 1:30 p.m. Monday, April 20, in 1370 Medicine and Health Sciences. The dissertation title is "Chromatin Structure of the Simian Virus 40 Late Promoter: A Deletional Analysis." Barry Milavetz (Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) is the committee chair.

The final examination for Shirley Greves, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Teaching and Learning, is set for 8:30 a.m. Thursday, April 23, in 104 Education Building. The dissertation title is "The Fourth R': The Role of Reflection in an Introductory Secondary Education Course." Kathy Gershman (Educational Foundations and Research) is the committee chair.

The final examination for Donald Earl Newberry, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Psychology, is set for 3:45 p.m. Tuesday, April 28, in Room 203, Corwin-Larimore Hall. The dissertation title is "Temporal Lobe Transients and Prayer." Joseph Plaud (Psychology) is the committee chair.

Members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

-- Harvey Knull, Dean, Graduate School.

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GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

ORPD SEEKS OPINIONS ON GRANT-FINDING SOFTWARE

The Office of Research and Program Development (ORPD) will soon decide which funding source search software it will continue to support. Because of limited funding, ORPD can not justify continuing to purchase both packages. UND faculty, students, and staff have the opportunity to determine which of the search engines will continue to be available.

Currently, IRIS and SPIN are available for UND faculty, students, and staff to use to search for external funding sources. They both offer access to searchable databases for determining private and public agencies that support research in your area. In addition, IRIS Alert and SMARTS are automatic services that search by pre-selected keywords and send periodic responses to your e-mail address listing possible sources for your work.

If you have a preference for one package over the other, please contact ORPD and express your opinion. If you haven't tried these search engines, we would encourage you to do so. Both are available from ORPD's webpage at http;//www.und.nodak.edu/dept/orpd/ under Funding Opportunities. Written instructions are also available in ORPD.

-- Sally Eckert-Tilotta, Assistant to the Director of Research and Program Development.

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RESEARCH, GRANT OPPORTUNITIES LISTED

Following are research and grant opportunities. For more information, contact the Office of Research and Program Development at 777-4278.

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE: INVESTIGATOR-INITIATED RESEARCH

The Expanding the Horizons Program (#SL000240) provides support to describe and classify new criminal events, moving beyond traditional definitions of crime and criminal relationships, to develop methods of deterrence that will improve the public's sense of well-being, and to identify new threats to public safety that will continue into the 21st century. Researchers might also consider new, nontraditional forms of criminal enterprise, including new criminal marketplaces and new approaches law enforcement or other agencies can adopt to combat crime of all definitions. Sample topics are: Inter- connections among Criminal Agents, Transnational Crime, Cybercrimes, Collaboration Between Law Enforcement and Nontraditional Partners Such as Correctional Agencies, Innovative Sanctions, Investigation and Prosecution.

The Breaking the Cycle Program (#SL000240) provides support to test interventions to remedy recurring problems and report on the outcomes of those interventions, possibly in conjunction with one or more operational agencies. Possible topics are: Interventions that curtail drug abuse in offender popu- lations, interventions against drugs and violence, interventions in sex offender and spouse batterer behaviors, parenting skill interventions for parents and guardians in at-risk households and neighborhoods, recent welfare reforms and "workfare" initiatives and their impacts on delinquency in at-risk families, effects of eliminating "hot spots" on a neighborhood's quality of life and business activity, treatment of populations that shuttle between criminal justice and mental health agencies, and interventions for repeat victimizations.

Applicants are encouraged to take their own approach or suggest their own topics of interest. Grants generally range between $25,000-$300,000 and for 1-2 years. Deadlines: 6/16/98, 12/15/98. Contact: 800/851-3420, 800/421-6770; askncjrs@ncjrs.org; http://www.ncjrs.org.

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NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR LITERACY

The purpose of the Literacy Leader Fellowship Program is to provide Federal financial assistance to adult learners and individuals pursuing careers in adult education or literacy in the areas of instruction, research, or innovation. Under the program, literacy workers and adult learners are applicants for fellowships. The estimated average award is $33,000 for 3-12 months of full or part-time activity. Fellowship applications that address one or more of the priorities are of special interest, but not to the exclusion of other significant issues. Priorities are: Developing Leadership in Adult Learners, Expanding the Use of Technology in Literacy Programs, Improving Accountability for Literacy Programs, and Raising Public Awareness about Literacy. Contact: Julie Gedden, 202/632-1515; fax 202/632-1512; jgedden@nifl.gov; http://www.nifl.gov/activities/fllwhome.htm. Deadline: 5/27/98.

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NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES

The purpose of the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study Pathogenesis Research Labs program (RFA-AI-98-003) is to fund separate laboratories or a consortia of laboratories to study the immunologic, virologic, and other biologic determin- ants of disease progression; factors that mitigate HIV-mediated immune system destruction; and factors that might protect individuals from acquiring HIV infection among participants in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS). The MACS is a study of HIV infection in homosexual and bisexual men; over 5,500 men have participated since the initial 1984 enrollment. Because the work to be accomplished requires diverse expertise in HIV virology, immunology, genetics, and molecular biology, proposed studies should utilize an interdisciplinary approach with well-integrated research plans that are based on appropriate collaborations. Deadlines: 5/1/98 (letter of intent), 7/9/98 (application). Contact: Patricia D'Souza, Ph.D., 301/496-8379; fax 301/402-3211; PD6N@NIH.GOV; http://www.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-AI-98-003.html.

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SAMUEL FREEMAN CHARITABLE TRUST

The Grants Program provides support for charitable, religious, scientific, literary, and educational purposes. Awards typically range from $1,000-25,000. Consideration is also given to cancer research and treatment, the preservation, exhibition and operation of historical railway equipment and to secondary schools and universities. Applicants should send written requests to the address below. Deadline: None. Contact: Linda Francisovich, 212/852-3693; Vice President, c/o U.S. Trust Company of New York, 114 W 47th St., New York, NY 10036-1532.

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DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

The goals of the Inventions and Innovation Program (SOL DE-PS36-98GO10293; to be issued on or about 5/1/98) is to improve energy efficiency through the pro- motion of innovative ideas and inventions that have a significant potential future commercial market. The goal is consistent with the mission of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, which is to develop and promote the adoption of cost-effective renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies within the building, industrial, transportation, and utility sectors for the benefit of economic competitiveness, energy security, and environmental quality of the nation. The following OIT focus industries are of particular interest: Aluminum, Chemicals, Forest Products, Glass, Metal-Casting, and Steel. Small start-up businesses, individual inventors and entrepreneurs are especially encouraged to participate. Deadline: 7/31/98. Contact: Jennifer Squire, Inventions and Innovations Project Monitor, 303/275-4764; jennifer_squire@nrel.gov; or Bertha Crisp, Contract Specialist, 303/275-4771; bertha_crisp@nrel.gov; http://www.eren.doe.gov/solicit.htm.

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B. F. GOODRICH FOUNDATION INC.

The Collegiate Inventors Program provides support to college students active in science, engineering, mathematics, technology and creative invention. Up to 3 entries will receive prizes of $7,500; advisors for the winning entries will receive $2,500. In addition, up to 3 undergraduate entries will receive $3,000; advisors for the winning undergraduate entries will receive $1,000. The entry must be the original idea and work product of the student/advisor team, and may not have been made available to the public as a commercial product or process, or been patented or published more than one year prior to the date of submission. Deadline: 6/2/98. Contact: Paul Kunce, Program Coordinator, 330/849-6887; pkunce@invent.org; http://www.invent.org/bfg/bfghome.html.

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WENNER-GREN FOUNDATION

The International Symposium Program provides support for conferences on topics of broad significance for anthropology. Up to 2 symposia/year are conducted; the Foundation will directly administer the conference. Inquiries should be initiated with a letter to the President summarizing the proposed project and budgetary needs. Deadline: None.

Historical Archives Grants provide up to $15,000 to encourage preservation of unpublished records and other materials of value for research on the history of anthropology. Grants are offered to assist individuals holding significant records/personal papers with the expenses of preparing/transferring them for archival deposit, and to aid oral-history interviews with senior anthropologists. Awards are up to $15,000. Inquiries should be initiated with a letter to the President summarizing the proposed project and budgetary needs. Deadline: None.

International Collaborative Research Grants provide up to $30,000 to assist anthropological research projects undertaken jointly by two or more investigators from different countries. Priority is given to those projects involving at least one principal investigator from outside North America and Western Europe, but other international collaborations will be considered. Deadline: None.

Regular Grants provide up to $20,000 for research in all branches of anthropology, including cultural/social anthropology, ethnology, biological/physical anthropology, archaeology, and anthropological linguistics, and in closely related disciplines concerned with human origins, development, and variation. Grants are made to seed innovative approaches and ideas, cover specific expenses or phases of a project and/or to encourage aid from other funding agencies. Projects employing comparative perspectives or integrating two or more sub-fields of anthropology are particularly invited. Awards are also available for projects designed to develop resources for anthropological research and scholarly exchange. Deadline: 5/1/98, 11/1/98.

Richard Carley Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowships provide up to $15,000 for the write-up of research results for publication in all branches of anthropology, including cultural/social anthropology, ethnology, biological/physical anthropology, archaeology, and anthropological linguistics, and in closely related disciplines concerned with human origins, development, and variation. Eligible applicants are scholars within 5 years of receipt of the doctorate or an equivalent qualification in anthropology. Deadline: 5/1/98, 11/1/98.

Contact: 220 5th Avenue, 16th Floor, New York, NY 10001-7780; 212/683-5000.

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HELEN BADER FOUNDATION

Support is provided for research on Alzheimer's disease and dementia, children and youth in Israel, economic development, or education. Awards vary; multi-year projects are funded for up to 3 years. Deadline: 4/24/98, 11/2/98 (Preliminary Applications); 5/26/98, 12/1/98 (Full Proposals). Contact: 414/224-6464; fax 414/224-1441; info@bader.org; http://www.bader.org.

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NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES

The purpose of RFA AI-98-007 is to stimulate multidisciplinary, collaborative research to further understanding of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and effective approaches to their prevention and control. Applications are sought for recompetition of the Sexually Transmitted Diseases Cooperative Research Centers (STD CRCs). Although each STD presents unique diagnostic, therapeutic, and prevention challenges, all STDs share a common mode of transmission, populations at risk for one STD are at risk for others, comorbidity is common, and the presence of one infection may influence the acquisition and natural history of another. Therefore, a research program that addresses these diseases as a group is likely to be highly productive. Multidisciplinary research, through collaborations among scientists from the biomedical, clinical, behavioral, and epidemiological research scientific areas, is required to solve these problems. Deadlines: 5/8/98 (Letter of Intent); 9/15/98 (Application). Contact: Dr. Penelope J. Hitchcock, 301/402-0443; fax 301/402-1456; ph22k@nih.gov.

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NAVAL AIR WARFARE CENTER (NAWCTSD)

Research and Development Support Services (SOL N61339-98-R-0017). The NAWCTSD has identified a requirement for research and development support services which encompass basic research, applied research, advanced development, prototype development, and technology transfer in areas such as simulation and training technology, individual and team training methodology, human cogni- tion, performance measurement, tactical decision making, embedded training, sensor simulation, optics, weapons simulation, aircrew training, and virtual environment technology. Contractor services are needed to support all aspects of research endeavors, such as conducting surveys, designing and implementing experiments, reporting experiment results, conducting conferences/workshops, developing technologies, and conducting demonstrations. An updated draft Statement of Work (SOW) will be released on the Web Site listed below on or about 4/3/98. Formal release of the solicitation is anticipated to take place on or about 5/4/98 on the web site listed below. Contact: POC Roxy R. Campos, Contract Specialist, Code 25723, 407/380-4784/Robert H. Riddle, Contracting Officer, Code 25723, 407/380-4095; http://www.ntsc.navy.mil/contract/procure.htm; Roxy_Campos@ntsc.navy.mil.

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NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF NURSING RESEARCH (NINR)

Diet and Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Childhood & Adolescents. The NINR and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) are seeking applications for investigator-initiated research relevant to the development and/or testing of dietary interventions to improve the cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk profiles in children and adolescents, especially those at increased risk for CVD or for development of CVD risk factors because of genetics, family history, socioeconomic status (SES), race/ethnicity, levels of blood cholesterol or blood pressure or other factors. Four types of studies are sought: observational studies identifying determinants of nutrient intakes and determinants of dietary effects on levels of CVD risk factors, intervention studies examining the effects on diet and CVD risk factors of approaches to improve dietary behavior to meet current dietary recommendations, intervention studies examining the true magnitude of effects on CVD risk factors of dietary or nutrient changes under conditions of high adherence and studies directed toward advancing measurement methodologies or behavioral theories which could then be applied to intervention studies. Deadlines: 6/1/98, 10/1/98, 2/1/99. Contact: Hillary D. Sigmon, Ph.D., RN, 301/594-5970; fax 301/480-8260; hilary sigmon@nih.gov; http://www.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-98-046.html.

-- Sally Eckert-Tilotta, Assistant to the Director of Research and Program Development.

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BILLBOARD

SPECIAL FUNDS ESTABLISHED IN MEMORY OF STUDENTS

Two special funds have been established in the aftermath of the boating accident which recently claimed the lives of two students who were enrolled at the UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences. The accident, which occurred March 29 on the Goose River near Hillsboro, took the lives of Buck Zahradka, a graduate of the M.D. Class of 1997 and first-year family medicine resident-in-training in Fargo, and Craig Cameron, graduate student and Ph.D. candidate in Anatomy and Cell Biology, Grand Forks. Dr. Zahradka was the son of Shirly Zahradka, Grand Forks, and the late William Zahradka. Mr. Cameron was the son of David and Carol Cameron of Staples, Minn.

The family of Dr. Zahradka prefers memorials to the Buck Zahradka Scholarship Fund, in care of the UND Foundation, Box 8157, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8157. Proceeds from the fund will provide scholarships for deserving medical students.

The Justin Cameron Education Endowment has been established for the sole purpose of providing for future college expenses of the eight-year-old son of Craig and Rhonda Cameron. Those wishing to contribute should make checks payable to: Justin Cameron Education Endowment, and send to: UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Attn: Dr. Ed Carlson, P.O. Box 9037, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9037.

-- Pamela Knudson, Public Affairs, School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

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HOLIDAY HOURS LISTED

CHESTER FRITZ LIBRARY:

Hours of operation for the Easter weekend at the Chester Fritz Library are: Thursday, April 9, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Friday, April 10, closed (Good Friday); Saturday, April 11, 1 to 5 p.m.; Sunday, April 12, closed (Easter Sunday). Regular hours will resume Monday, April 13.

-- Karen Cloud, Chester Fritz Library.

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LAW LIBRARY:

The Thormodsgard Law Library will observe the following hours for Easter Weekend: Thursday, April 9, 7:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday, April 10, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, April 11, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, April 12, closed; Monday, April 13, 7:30 a.m. to 11 p.m.

-- Rhonda Schwartz, Assistant Director and Head of Public Services, Thormodsgard Law Library.

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COMPUTER CENTER:

The Computer Center will close for the Good Friday holiday at midnight on Thursday, April 9, and will reopen at midnight Friday, April 10.

-- Marv Hanson, Associate Director, Computer Center.

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ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

SPECIAL DENIM DAY BENEFITS "BUCKS FOR THE BAY"

President Baker has announced a special Denim Day for Wednesday, April 15. All funds raised will go to the "Bucks for the Bay" effort which supports flood victims in the San Francisco Bay area. Questions about the project may be directed to Student Government at 777-4337. Donations may be made at Student Academic Services, Room 2, O'Kelly Hall, or Box 7143. Your support of this project is appreciated.

-- Cathy Buyarski, Director, Student Academic Services.

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FIRST N.D. FESTIVAL OF MEN'S VOICES HELD HERE

The first North Dakota Festival of Men's Voices will be hosted by the UND Varsity Bards. The final performance by over 150 voices will be at 3 p.m. Saturday, April 18, at United Lutheran Church, 324 Chestnut St. Participating in this musical event along with the Varsity Bards will be the SDSU Statesmen from South Dakota State University and approximately 50 high school male singers from throughout the region. The co-conductors will be Charles Canaan (SDSU) and James Rodde (UND).

High school students who in previous years have participated in this event in Brookings, S.D., have found it to be one of the memorable highlights of their singing careers. High schools represented in this year's festival are Cando, Hatton, Killdeer, Midway, Newburg, Park River, Rolla, St. John, Stephen-Argyle, and Thompson. In addition to performances by the Bards and Statesmen, the scheduled massed choir program includes four popular men's choir pieces: "Down in the Valley," "The Agincourt Song," "Betelehemu," and "In Dat Great Gittin' Up Mornin'."

The concert is free and the public is cordially invited to attend.

-- James Rodde, Director of Choral Studies.

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DAKOTA SPACE SOCIETY PLANS CAR WASH

The Dakota Space Society (DSS), the student organization of the Space Studies graduate program, will hold a car wash Saturday, April 18, at the Hugo's parking lot on 32nd Ave. S., next to the movie theater, from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. DSS will charge $4 per car wash for non-students and $3 for students. Please show your support for one of the world's most exciting and unique student organizations by attending our car wash and let us wash winter away. If there is inclement weather April 18, the car wash will b3e held Sunday, April 19.

-- Stephen Burke, Dakota Space Society.

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INTERNATIONAL CENTRE LISTS EVENTS

The Thursday, April 16, program at the International Centre, 2908 University Ave., will be "Celebrating the Culture of Native Americans. Members of our Native American community will share their culture through music, dance, song, food, stories and artifacts. Various Native American tribes will provide us with some insight into the differences or similarities between them. Please join us.

-- Sharon Rezac Andersen, Director, International Centre.

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WOMEN'S CENTER LISTS EVENTS

Programs at the Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., include Feast and Focus at noon, Wednesday, April 15, "The River Ran Through Us," and Soup for the Soul at 12:15 p.m. Thursday, April 16. Everyone is welcome.

-- Donna Oltmanns, Coordinator, Women's Center.

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FIRE HALL THEATER PLAYERS TO PERFORM AT MUSEUM

A light-hearted look at radio theater of the Forties, "Radio Daze," will be performed by the Fire Hall Theater players in the main galleries of the North Dakota Museum of Art at 8 p.m. Friday, April 17. Director Steve Saari, Deejay Arens, Sandee Wedin, and Susan Moberg will perform several vaudeville sketches and musical numbers, including selections from "High Water Follies."

"Radio Daze" is the last event in the 1997-1998 season of the North Dakota Museum of Art's Readers Series. The Series was instituted in 1991 and continued through 1993. It began again last fall with "The Ghost of Lake Agassiz," flood-related essays and poems by local writers. Other programs included readings by three nationally known poets from the region, and "Fireside Stories," a Sunday afternoon of Native American storytellers sharing their heritage. "Radio Daze" is open to the public and admission is free.

The Museum will also have on exhibition "Solo Paintings: Voices of Contemporary Abstraction," recent work of young painters from New York. This exhibit continues into May. For further information, please call 777-4195.

-- Barbara Crow, North Dakota Museum of Art.

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BURTNESS THEATRE TO CLOSE SEASON WITH MOLIERE COMEDY

The Department of Theatre Arts proudly presents "Tartuffe," a 17th Century French Comedy by Moliere. Under the direction of Fine Arts and Communication Dean Bruce Jacobsen, the Burtness Theatre season finale will run Tuesday through Saturday, April 21-25, at 7:30 p.m. each evening. Ticket prices are $5.

Moliere sharpens his wit as he skewers hypocritical morality in this, his most popular comedy. Within his work we are allowed to see the consequences of believing what is laid before us rather than acknowledging the towering pile of evidence that quite often proves otherwise.

In "Tartuffe," audience members will see many new faces along with those more familiar including, Mike McNeil who takes on the title role of Tartuffe. Other cast members include: Joyce Johnson (Mrs. Pernelle), Kimberly Sobolik (Elmire), Damian Hultgren (Dennis), Joan Lauckner (Mariane), Ken Churchill (Val), Stacie Joy Erickson (Dorine), Amber Mason, Rickey Ward, Mike Wood, and UND favorites, C.J. Hosier and Tim Delcavo in the roles of Orgon and Clay respectively. It is through these characters that audience members are able to witness that this romping farce has as much to say today as it ever did.

For more information, or to make reservations for "Tartuffe," please call the Burtness Theatre Box Office at 777-2085.

-- Laurie Hinn, Theatre Promotions Director.

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AIDS EDUCATION PROGRAM OFFERED

A total of 217 HIV infections have been reported in North Dakota since 1984, according to the North Dakota Department of Health. Two friends will speak about AIDS at the Chester Fritz Auditorium Monday, April 20, at 7 p.m.

T.J. Sullivan and Joel Goldman are friends from their college days at Indiana University. They speak bluntly about sex, drinking, and living with HIV. They have been touring the United States since 1993 and have visited more than 500,000 students and 100 campuses a year.

Goldman, who is HIV positive, speaks about his days as a fraternity member and the risks he took mixing alcohol and sex. Sullivan teaches students about how HIV works, alcohol's effect on decision making, and ways students can prevent infection. The program uses blunt language, adult themes, and comedy to get across to students the importance of being educated about HIV.

"Friendship in the Age of AIDS" is free. For more information, contact Kirsten Brown or Mike Corey at 777-3666. For more information about AIDS or HIV, contact the National AIDS Hotline (24 hours) at 1-800-342-AIDS.

-- Jan Orvik, Editor, for Kirsten Brown and Mike Corey.

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IN THE NEWS

Center for Aerospace Sciences

Dale DeRemer (Aviation) has earned recognition as a Master Certified Flight Instructor by the National Association of Flight Instructors (NAFI). DeRemer is only the 15th flight instructor in the U.S. to achieve NAFI's Master CFI rating, their most highly respected award.

College of Arts and Sciences

Kathryn Thomasson (Chemistry) co-authored with the late Norman Kulevsky (Chemistry) and others, "Applying Statistics in the Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory: Experiments with Food Dyes," Journal of Chemical Education, Vol. 75, No. 2, February 1998, pp. 231-233. . . . Barry Wagner and Carla Hess (Communication Sciences and Disorders) co-authored "Supervisees' Perceptions of Supervisors' Social Power in Speech-Language Pathology," American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1997. . . . Hess and Richard Landry (Educational Foundations and Research) co-authored, "The Multicultural Competence of Student Speech-Language Clinicians," presented at the American Speech-Language Hearing Association in Boston. . . . Mark Henriksen (Physics) participated in the peer review for NASA's Astrophysical Data Program in Washington, D.C. He has been invited to participate in the first peer review for the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility to be held at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. He presented a paper, "The Effect of Cluster Magnetic Fields on Omega," at the Dark Matter 98 Symposium hosted by UCLA. The paper contained results from a recent X-ray Timing Explorer observing program on which he is principal investigator. He will present additional results from the study at the COSPAR Symposium in Nagoya, Japan this summer. . . . Morten Ender (Sociology) published "The Postmodern Military: Soldiering, New Media, and the Post-Cold War" in Journal for the Study of Peace and Conflict, 1997-1998 annual edition, pp. 50-58. Ender published "The Military Family on the Information Superhighway" in Military Family Issues: The Research Digest, Vol. Two, No. Two (January 1998) (see http://mfi.marywood.edu/www/Research/infotran/MFIDigest/Vol2Num2/DigV2N2.htm). . . . Libby Rankin (English) is the author of "Changing the Hollow Conventions of Academic Writing," which appears on the back page of the April 3, 1998, Chronicle of Higher Education.

College of Business and Public Administration

Jacob Chacko (Marketing) has three research papers accepted for presentations and subsequent publications in regional and international business conferences: "An Enquiry Into the Business Environment in Slovakia," was presented at the Annual Meeting of Academy of International Business S.W. in Dallas, Texas; "Virtual Marketing," will be presented at the Western Decision Sciences Institute 27th Annual Conference in Reno, Nev.; and "Mercosur - A Market in Transition," was presented at the Global Business Conference (sponsored by Michigan State University) in Turkey. . . . Phil Harmeson (Accounting and Business Law) accepted the Region 8 (six Midwestern states) Graduate Student Case of the Year Award on behalf of an MBA graduate student at the Small Business Institute Directors Association Meeting in Santa Fe, N.M. . . . Dennis Elbert (Dean of the College of Business) and Harmeson co-authored "Successful SBI Student Projects: The Proof is in the Presentation," presented at the 22nd National Small Business Consulting Conference in Santa Fe, N.M. . . . Harmeson presented "Natural Disasters and Small Business: The Need and Role for University Based Advisors in the Recovery," written by Harmeson, Elbert and Bruce Gjovig (Center for Innovation) at the 22nd National Small Business Consulting Conference in Santa Fe, N.M. . . . J. Bronson and J. Faircloth (both Management) received a $23,180 grant from the Kauffman Foundation to study the effects of the Grand Forks flood of 1997 on Entrepreneurial and Small Businesses. . . . J.K.S. Chong and B.Y.K. Tai (both Management) co-authored "The Relationship Between Job Satisfaction, Work Beliefs, and Selected Demographic Variables: A Research Note on Chinese Managers" presented at the Pan-Pacific Business Association Annual Conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Chong and D.R. Escarraz (Management) co-authored "Preparing for Financial Crisis" presented at the Sixth International Conference of Decision Sciences Institute in Sydney, Australia. Bill Dougan (Management) presented "Extending Reliability to Multi-Organizational Contexts: The Case of the Civil Air Transport System," at the Annual Meeting of the Midwest Academy of Management in Ann Arbor, Mich. Dougan and Bronson co-authored "Technology Adoption in an Industrial Community: Should Externalities Influence Policy?" at the Annual Meeting of the Midwest Academy of Management. B.J. Eberhardt, S.B. Moser (both Management) and another co-authored "Sexual Harassment in Small Government Units: An Investigation of Policies and Attitudes" presented at the Annual Meeting of the Midwest Academy of Management in Ann Arbor, Mich. J. Park (Management) presented "Teaching on Lot-Sizing Decisions: An Integer Programming Approach" at the Eighth Annual Meeting of Production and Operations Management Society in Miami, Fla. J. Yang authored "A Scheduling Algorithm for Balancing Workload Among Parallel Processors," Transactions of the ACME VII International Conference, Aug. 10-12, 1997, pp. 55-64. J. Zahrly (Management) authored "The Buddy Project: A Semester-Long Project Aimed at Developing an Appreciation for Diversity," Association for Business Simulation and Experiential Learning 1998 Conference Proceedings, Maui, Hawaii. Zahrly presented "Business Ethics in Nonprofit Organizations at the Midwest Business Association in Chicago. . . . B.J. Eberhardt, P. McGee and S.B. Moser (all Management) co-authored "Business Concerns Regarding MBA Education: Effects on Recruiting," Journal of Education for Business, 72(5), 293-302, 1997. Eberhardt, L. Johnson, Moser co-authored "Reactions to the Americans with Disabilities Act: Attitudes of Business Decision Makers," Journal of Individual Employee Rights, 6(3), 167-178, 1997-1998. Moser co-authored "Total Quality Management in the U.S. Air Force: A Study of Applications and Attitudes," International Journal of Quality and Reliability Management, 14(5), 482-490, 1997. J. Yang authored "An AHP Decision Model for Facility Location Selection," Facilities, vol. 15 (/10), 241-254, 1997. . . . Management Department Case Publications: J. Zahrly, and B. Olson, Dayton Hudson Corporation. In J. Harrison and C. St. John, Strategic Management of Organizations and Stakeholders: Concepts and Cases, Second Edition: C375-382, Cincinnati, Ohio: Southwestern, 1998. . . . Management Department Community Involvement: Jan Zahrly participated in after-flood focus groups on Reimagining Downtown. James Bronson authored and administered the 1998 Grand Forks' Business Climate Survey in cooperation with Grand Forks Mayor's office, Chamber of Commerce, and UND College of Business and Public Administration. Bill Dougan served as a member of Mayor's Task Force for Business Development, Reimagining Downtown Committee and Chair of the Funding Priorities Subcommittee.

College of Education and Human Development

Lynn Anderson (Health, Physical Education and Recreation) was the invited keynote speaker for the therapeutic recreation stream of the Manitoba Recreation and Parks Conference in Winnipeg; has been named book review editor for the Therapeutic Recreation Journal; Review published in the Journal of Leisure Research, "Reviving Ophelia and Physical Activity and Sport in the Lives of Girls: An Integrative Review." (in press). . . . Lynn Anderson, Dale Anderson, Tim Schroeder (HPER) are completing a community recreational needs assessment for the Grand Forks Park District, which includes phone interviews, door-to-door interviews and focus groups in the high schools. The results are to be used for the Grand Forks Park District Master Plan. . . . John Backes (Educational Leadership) co-refereed "The North Dakota BRIDGES Project: A Study of Middle Level Reform," Research in Middle Level Education Quarterly, 21(1), 83-100. Backes presented the following: "Program Improvement and Assessment," Middle Grade School State Policy Initiative (MGSSPI) Leadership Conference, Anaheim, Calif.; "Documenting Student Success," Grand Forks; "The North Dakota Self-Study Education Improvement Process," Grand Forks; "Trainer of Trainers," Mandan; and "Implementing Shared Decision Making," West Fargo. Grants funded were $200,000. BRIDGES for Young Adolescents in North Dakota, John Backes, Director. Carnegie Middle Grade School State Policy Initiative, Carnegie Corporation of New York. October 1, 1997, thru September 30, 1999. . . . Kathy Bonn (Teaching and Learning) presented "What's IMP?" at the North Dakota Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NDCTM) Math Conference in Minot, N.D. . . . Kathleen Gershman (Educational Foundations and Research) published "Learning As Pattern Modification," Association for Process Philosophy of Education Newsletter, February 1998. . . . Thomasine Heitkamp (Social Work) has been nominated to receive a Faculty Service Award from the Conferences and Professional Programs of the University of Continuing Education Association (UCEA). Heitkamp was nominated by Fred Wittmann for her commitment and services to continuing education, conferences, students and community. . . . John Hoover (Teaching and Learning/Bureau of Educational Services and Applied Research) presented "Bullies and Victims in School" to the Carbondale, Ill., community anti-violence coalition community meeting; "Follow up on School-Climate Training" to the Hopewell Special Education Regional Resources Consortium, Hillsboro, Ohio; and "Putting School Bullies Out of Business," a training session presented to the Southeast Illinois Regional Education Office, Ullin, Ill. . . . Charlotte Humphries (HPER) presented "What's New in Inclusion: Current Federal Mandates and the Physical Educator/Coach," at the Central District Association of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance meeting in Wichita, Kan. Humphries also was elected secretary of the group. She will co-present "Don't Use Balloons on Windy Days: Elementary Education Majors' Perceptions of Teaching Physical Education" at the AAHPERD conference (national) in Reno, Nev. . . . Robert Eklund (HPER) co-authored "The Relationship Between Competitive Anxiety and Self-Presentational Concerns," Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 20, 81-97, 1998; co-authored, "Coping with Performance Slumps: Factor Analysis of the Ways of Coping in Sport Scale," Australian Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 29, 99-105, 1997; co-authored with J.R. Whitehead, "Who's Afraid of a Confirmatory Factor Analysis? RQES in the Classroom," 1, 6-8, 1997. Eklund presented "A Self-Presentational Perspective on Exercise Behavior Among the Obese and Overweight" at the annual meeting of the Rocky Mountain American College of Sports Medicine Conference, Frisco, Colo. . . . Sue Jacobs (Counseling) co-presented the following poster presentations at national conferences: Sue Jacobs and others, "Reliability of the Myocardial Infarction Onset Anger Scale," Proceedings of Association for Advancement of Behavior Therapy 31st Annual Convention, Miami Beach, Fla.; Jacobs and George Henly (Counseling), "Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Quality of Life, and Support Among Patients," Proceedings of Association for Advancement of Behavior Therapy 31st Annual Convention, Miami Beach, Fla.; Jacobs and others, "The Relationship of Measures of Anger, Anxiety and Depression to Mental Stress-Induced Wall Motion Abnormalities and Their Possible Prevention," Proceedings of Association for Advancement of Behavior Therapy 31st Annual Convention, Miami Beach, Fla.; Jacobs gave the following oral presentations at national conferences: Jacobs co-presented, "Evaluating and Facilitating Science Competence: Research Courses, Thesis, Dissertations, Research Teams and Apprenticeships," at the 1998 Mid-Winter Conference of the Council of Counseling Psychology Training Programs, Scottsdale, Ariz.; Jacobs chaired a panel, "Our Rational and Irrational Beliefs About Aging: The Role of Cognitive-Behavioral Formulations in Combating Ageism," Clinical Roundtable, Association for Advancement of Behavior Therapy"; Jacobs presented "In the Cognitive-Behavioral Perspective," Clinical Roundtable, Association for Advancement of Behavior Therapy 31st Annual Convention, Miami Beach, Fla.; Other presentations (selected) are: Jacobs, "Caring for the Caregivers: Stress Management in Our Workplaces," MedStar Health Education Television Network, Grand Forks, N.D.; Jacobs, "Project Refully defended his dissertation at the University of Memphis, "A History of College Admissions at the University of Mississippi Since 1954: Implications of Brown v. Board of Education, Meredith v. Fair, and Ayers v. Fordice upon Student Selection Criteria." . . . Ralph Woehle (Social Work) authored "Lessons from Yellow Medicine County: Work and Custodial Service at the County Poor Farm, 1889-1935," which appeared in the December 1997 issue of Sociology and Social Welfare (Vol XXIV, No. 4, pp. 14-28); Woehle also assumed a position on the Institutional Review Board in January 1998 and the P.I. position of the TOPPS (Treatment Outcomes and Performance Pilot Studies), a chemical abuse related study.

College of Fine Arts and Communication

Lana Rakow (School of Communication) has been appointed to the international advisory board for a new publication, New Media and Society, an international journal that will debut in April 1999, and will provide a forum for research focusing on the social dynamics of media and information exchange. According to SAGE Publications, the journal will provide a multidisciplinary perspective on key issues arising from the scale and speed of new media development.

College of Nursing

Bette Ide has been appointed to be the DHHS Region 8 Delegate to the Health Promotion Institute of the National Council of Aging.

School of Engineering and Mines

B. P. Bandyopadhyay (Mechanical Engineering) has published a paper, "Efficient and Stable Grinding of Ceramics by Electrolytic In-Process Dressing (ELID)," in the Materials Processing Technology Journal, Vol. 66, p 18, 1997.

School of Law

Randy Lee received the first "North Dakota Bar Foundation Professorship of Law," from the North Dakota Bar Foundation in conjunction with the UND School of Law.

North Dakota Museum of Art

Laurel Reuter, Director of the North Dakota Museum of Art spoke recently at The Getty Conservation Institute Conference, "Mortality Immortality? The Legacy of 20th Century Art," at The Getty Museum in Los Angeles.

EDITOR'S NOTE: Some items submitted included names of graduate students or people from other institutions. These have been removed to save space. "In the News" is intended to showcase faculty and staff achievements.

-- Jan Orvik, Editor.

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EVENTS CALENDAR

APRIL 1998

(Please contact Mavis at the Office of University Relations, Box 7144, or call 777-4304, if you wish to make changes or have an event included.)

Through Thurs., April 9 -- MASTER OF FINE ARTS EXHIBITION, Curtis Flexhaug, Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center.

Through Fri., April 10 -- STUDENT EMPLOYMENT WEEK; an opportunity as employers and educators to recognize the contributions student employees make to our campus, and to emphasize the benefits of the student employment programs to our students.

Thurs., April 9 -- LAST DAY TO FILE PRELIMINARY APPROVAL OF THESIS OR DISSERTATION IN THE GRADUATE SCHOOL.

Thurs., April 9 -- SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND HEALTH SCIENCES DEAN'S HOUR PRESENTATION, "Birding for Health and Fun" presented by David Lambeth (Biochemistry and Molecular Biology), Reed T. Keller Auditorium (Room 1350), Wold Bio-Information Learning Resources Center, noon.

Thurs., April 9 -- CHEMISTRY SEMINAR, "Footballs as Catalysts and Superbases," presented by John Verkade of Iowa State University, 138 Abbott Hall, 4 p.m.

Thurs., April 9 -- SOUP FOR THE SOUL, Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., 12:15 to 1 p.m.; everyone is welcome.

Thurs., April 9 -- VIDEO PRESENTATION, "Learning Disabilities and Self Esteem: Look What You've Done!" featuring Robert Brooks; Parent Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Rd., 12:10 to 1 p.m.; call 795-2765 to register or for more information; child care provided.

Thurs., April 9 -- CELEBRATING THE CULTURE OF CANADA, Canadians from all across the Great White North at UND will help celebrate their home and native land with music, artifacts, history and food, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; everyone is welcome to this free event; call 777-4231 for more information.

Thurs., April 9 -- BASEBALL, UND vs. Augustana College, Kraft Memorial Field, 1 p.m. (seven-inning doubleheader).

Fri., April 10 -- HOLIDAY, GOOD FRIDAY.

Fri., April 10 -- BASEBALL, UND vs. South Dakota State University, Kraft Memorial Field, 1 p.m. (seven-inning doubleheader).

Sat. and Sun., April 11-12 -- FASTPITCH, UND at University of Nebraska at Omaha.

Sun., April 12, through Thurs., April 23 -- BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS SHOW, Brian Earp, Brandon Gunderson, Jon Olson, Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center.

Mon., April 13 -- STUDENT HOLIDAY, EASTER MONDAY.

Mon., April 13 -- PARENT EDUCATION RESOURCE CENTER PROGRAM, "Positive Parenting II," also offered Monday, April 20 and 27; Parent Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Rd., 1 to 2:30 p.m.; call 795-2765 to register or for more information.

Mon., April 13 -- PARENT EDUCATION RESOURCE CENTER PROGRAM, "Strengthening Your Stepfamily," also offered Monday, April 20, 27, and May 4 and 11; Parent Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Rd., 7 to 8:30 p.m.; call 795-2765 to register or for more information.

Tues., April 14 -- INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARD DEADLINE for clinical proposals that require subcommittee and full board review.

Tues., April 14 -- MICROBIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY SEMINAR, "Genetic Analysis of SecDF Function in Escherichia coli," presented by graduate student Becky Kapphahn, Room 5510, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, 10:30 a.m.

Tues., April 14 -- THIRD DEADLINE for submission of applications to the Faculty Research and Creative Activity Committee (FRCAC); travel applications will be considered at that time only for travel that will occur between April 14 and Oct. 15.

Tues., April 14 -- BASEBALL, UND at Bemidji State University, Bemidji, Minn., 1:30 p.m. (seven-inning doubleheader).

Tues., April 14 -- FASTPITCH, UND vs. Moorhead State University (non conference), Apollo Complex.

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Tues. through Sun., April 14-19 -- UND INDIAN ASSOCIATION 29TH ANNUAL TIME-OUT AND WACIPI, "A Time of Pride, A Time of Celebration," Memorial Union and Hyslop Sports Center. The schedule is as follows: Time-Out Week, Tuesday through Sunday, April 14-17: Tuesday, April 14: 11 a.m., Opening Ceremonies, Chuck Ross Opening Prayer, Honor song by Catfish Bay, Red River Valley Room, Memorial Union; noon, "In Whose Honor" video, Theresa Brockie, Memorial Union basement; 1 p.m., presentation by Chuck Ross, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union; 3 p.m., "A Team Named Sioux" video, Vaughn Three Legs, Don Greyday and David Dodds, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union; 6 p.m., "In Whose Honor" video, Theresa Brockie, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union. Wednesday, April 15, 10 a.m., Presentation, Rick Thomas, "Parenting: How To Help Our Youth With Alcohol and Drug Problems," Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union; 2 p.m., presentation, Frank Sage, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union; 7 p.m., Fashion Show, "Indians/Cowboys," Ballroom, Memorial Union. Thursday, April 16, 9:30 a.m., presentation, "The Interface of Western Medicine and Traditional Holistic Healing," Marilyn Youngbird, sponsored by INMED, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union; 1:30 p.m., presentation, "The Philosophy of Native American Wellness," Marilyn Youngbird, sponsored by INMED, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union; 5:30 p.m., Banquet, "Honoring the Youth," with speakers Chance Rush and Sarah Jumping Eagle, performance by Bobbi Rae Sage and Catfish Bay, South Ballroom, Memorial Union; 8 p.m., Youth Dance sponsored by B.R.I.D.G.E.S., South Ballroom, Memorial Union; 9 p.m., Adult Dance, Sensations Night Club. Friday, April 17, Morning and afternoon schedule to be announced; 7 p.m., Grand Entry, Pow Wow starts. Pow-Wow/Wacipi, Friday through Sunday, April 17-19: Saturday, April 18, 5K Run and Walk (Contact: Frank Sage, 777-9529). Saturday and Sunday, April 18-19, Men's Basketball Tournament, Hyslop Sports Center (Contact: Derrick Dauphanais, 777-9786). For more information on Time-Out Week, call Dan Henry or Merry Ketterling at 777-4314. Pow-Wow/Wacipi, April 17-19: Announcer: Tom Iron, Standing Rock; Arena Director, Russ McDonald, Spirit Lake; Host Drum: TBA each session; Drum split to first 25 registered drums; Grand Entries: Friday, April 17, 7 p.m.; Saturday, April 18, 1 and 7 p.m.; Sunday, April 19, 1 and 6 p.m.; Admission is $7/weekend or $5/day, six and under and 60 plus are free. Saturday Feast during supper break. Craft stands will be on the second floor, Hyslop Sports Center. Gordon Henry, Vice President for Student Affairs, will be honored Saturday, April 18, after the 1 p.m. Pow-Wow's Grand Entry. For more information on the Pow-Wow/Wacipi, call Shannon or Michelle Fox at 772-4706.

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Wed., April 15 -- FACULTY WORKSHOP, "When Bad Writing Happens to Good Students," 114 Merrifield Hall, 3 to 5 p.m.; open to faculty and GTAs in all disciplines; call 777-3600 if you plan to attend.

Wed., April 15 -- HISTORY FOR LUNCH, "Christian Civilization and Higher Education on the Northern Plains: The Case of William Maxwell Blackburn, First President of UND," presented by Kenneth Smith, doctoral candidate in History, 300 Merrifield Hall, noon; bring your lunch (note room change).

Wed., April 15 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for Catherine Ann Pavlish, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in English, 21 Montgomery Hall, noon; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Wed., April 15 -- SPECIAL DENIM DAY, President Baker announced that all funds raised will go to the "Bucks for the Bay" effort which supports flood victims in the San Francisco Bay area; call Student Government at 777-4337 for more information.

Wed., April 15 -- "IN WHOSE HONOR," Memorial Union Lecture Bowl, noon, 5 and 6 p.m. (Related activity to Cultural Pluralism Day April 20).

Wed., April 15 -- RETIREMENT RECEPTION for Colleen Grassel (Special Services), Chester Fritz Auditorium, 1:30 to 3 p.m.

Wed., April 15 -- FEAST AND FOCUS PROGRAM, "The River Ran Through Us," Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon to 1 p.m.; everyone is welcome.

Wed., April 15 -- PARENT EDUCATION RESOURCE CENTER PROGRAM, "Parents Guide to Temperament," also Wed., April 22 and 29; Parent Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Rd., 9:30 to 11 a.m.; call 795-2765 to register or for more information; child care provided.

Wed., April 15 -- BASEBALL, UND at Northern State College, Aberdeen, S.D., 1 p.m. (seven-inning doubleheader).

Wed., April 15 -- FASTPITCH, UND vs. North Dakota State University (conference), Apollo Complex.

Thurs., April 16 -- TEST, College-Level Examination Program (CLEP), 200 McCannel Hall, 8:30 a.m.

Thurs., April 16 -- OPEN FORUM, University Senate will hold an open forum, non-procedural discussion on the budget reductions and the impact on academic programs and University operations, Room 7, Gamble Hall, 4:05 p.m.; the forum is open to the entire campus community.

Thurs., April 16 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for Susan L. Neste, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Educational Administration, 208 Education Building, 9 a.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Thurs., April 16 -- MEETING, University Curriculum Committee, 303 Twamley Hall, 3 p.m.

Thurs., April 16 -- COMPUTER SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM, "Allocating ATM Bandwidth to Groups of Cooperating and Uncooperating Real-time Distributed Applications," presented by David Anderson, 106 Streibel Hall (formerly CAS II), 3 p.m.

Thurs., April 16 -- CELEBRATION TEA, the President's Advisory Council on Women (PAC-W) Celebration Tea, North Dakota Museum of Art, 4 p.m.; contact Sara Hanhan at 777-3162 before Tues., April 14, if you would like an invitation as seating is limited.

Thurs., April 16 -- ENGLISH LECTURE SERIES, Jane Kurtz (English) will speak on "Acquiescing to the Demands of Story: The Shaping of a Novel for Publication," 116 Merrifield Hall, 4 p.m.

Thurs., April 16 -- LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary Sciences) LECTURE, "Managing Floods and Flood Plains: Hard Lessons Learned from the New Year's Floods in California," presented by Jeffrey F. Mount, Department of Geology, University of California at Davis,Lecture Bowl, 100 Leonard Hall, noon.

Thurs., April 16 -- MICROBIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY SEMINAR, "The Role of Protein Folding in Export in Escherichia coli," presented by graduate student Ipsita Mallik, Room 5520, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, 10:30 a.m.

Thurs., April 16 -- RETIREMENT RECEPTION for Bob Klinkhammer (Social Work), Holiday Inn, 3 to 5 p.m.; RSVP to Beverly at 777-3774 by Thursday, April 9.

Thurs., April 16 -- VIDEO PRESENTATION, "Learning Disabilities and Discipline: When the Chips Are Down," featuring Richard Lavoie; Parent Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Rd., 12:10 to 1 p.m.; call 795-2765 to register or for more information; child care provided.

Thurs., April 16 -- COMMUNITY CONCERT for children of all ages with Peter Alsop, Westward Ho, 7 p.m.; sponsored by the Parent Education Resource Center; call 795-2765 for more information; free and open to the public.

Thurs., April 16 -- SOUP FOR THE SOUL, Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., 12:15 to 1 p.m.; everyone is welcome.

Thurs., April 16 -- CELEBRATING THE CULTURE OF NATIVE AMERICANS, members of our Native American community will share their culture through music, dance, song, food, stories and artifacts, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; everyone is welcome to this free event; call 777-4231 for more information.

Thurs. And Fri., April 16-17 -- WHEELER LECTURE SERIES, Roy C. Brown and Betty E. Lemmon of the Department of Biology, University of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette, will present at 7:30 p.m. Thurs., April 16, "Clues to the Origin of Land Plants: Ancient Patterns of Cell Division," and at noon Fri., April 17, "Cytoplasmic Domains and the Control of Cell Division in Plant Development"; both lectures are in 141 Starcher Hall.

Thurs. And Fri., April 16-17 -- WORKSHOP, "Nurturing Children and Families for Positive Growth," Westward Ho; call Randy Slavens at Northeast Human Service Center, 795-3000, for more information; sponsored by the Parent Education Resource Center.

Thurs. through Sun., April 16-19 -- 8TH NATIONAL INDIAN NURSING EDUCATION CONFERENCE hosted by the RAIN Program of the Quentin N. Burdick Indian Health Program and the College of Nursing; conference opens at 6 p.m. Thursday, April 16, and closes at noon Sunday, April 19; sessions are open to the public.

Fri., April 17 -- INTEGRATED STUDIES WEEKLY SEMINAR DISCUSSION, "Sophie's World" (pp 149-403), Jostein Gaarder, 116 O'Kelly Hall, 10 a.m. to noon; call Pat at 777-3015 or Carl at 777-3058 for more information.

Fri., April 17 -- INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE VISITING INDUSTRIAL SCIENTISTS/ENGINEERS PROGRAM, Patrick Murray, Nalco Chemical Company, will present a seminar, "Water Soluble Polymers in Industrial Water Treatment," 138 Abbott Hall, noon.

Fri., April 17 -- GREEN AND WHITE DAY, President Baker has approved this day for employees to wear UND colors and jeans to show support for our Sioux athletes.

Fri., April 17 -- FIRE HALL THEATER PLAYERS, "Radio Daze," a light-hearted look at radio theater of the Forties, North Dakota Museum of Art, 8 p.m.; open to the public and admission is free.

Fri., April 17 -- FASTPITCH, UND at Mankato State University (conference), Mankato, Minn.

Sat., April 18 -- TEST, Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), 7 Gamble Hall, 8 a.m.

Sat., April 18 -- TEST, Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), 102 Witmer Hall, 8:30 a.m.

Sat., April 18 -- TEST, American Dietetic Association Examination (ADA), 109 Leonard Hall, 8 a.m.

Sat., April 18 -- RECITAL, Melanie Krepp Senior Composition, Josephine Campbell Recital Hall, Hughes Fine Arts Center, 2 p.m.

Sat., April 18 -- FIRST NORTH DAKOTA FESTIVAL OF MALE VOICES, United Lutheran Church, 324 Chestnut St., 3 p.m.; participating along with the Varsity Bards will be the SDSU Statesmen from South Dakota State University and approximately 50 high school male singers from throughout the region; concert is free and the public is invited.

Sat., April 18 -- RESIDENCE HALL REUNION DINNER for UND faculty and staff and their families who lived for periods of time in UND housing during the flood aftermath.

Sat., April 18 -- CAR WASH, Dakota Space Society (DSS), student organization of the Space Studies graduate program, will hold a car wash at the Hugo's parking lot on 32nd Ave. S., next to the movie theater, from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.; $4 per car wash for non-students and $3 for students.

Sat., April 18 -- BASEBALL, UND vs. University of South Dakota, Kraft memorial Field, 1 p.m. (seven-inning doubleheader).

Sat. and Sun., April 18-19 -- FASTPITCH, UND at Mankato State University Tournament, Mankato, Minn.

Sun., April 19 -- CONCERT, Wind Ensemble and University Band, Empire Theatre, 4 p.m.

Sun., April 19 -- UNIVERSITY PROGRAM COUNCIL EVENT, "The Lost World -- Jurassic Park," Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, 9 p.m.; free admission.

Sun., April 19 -- BASEBALL, UND vs. Morningside College, Kraft Memorial Field, 1 p.m. (seven-inning doubleheader).

Mon., April 20 -- MEETING, General Education Committee, 303 Twamley Hall, 3 p.m.

Mon., April 20 -- CULTURAL PLURALISM DAY, Chester Fritz Auditorium, 9 a.m. to noon, opening remarks by President Kendall Baker, Grand Forks Mayor Pat Owens and East Grand Forks Mayor Lynn Stauss; morning will feature the musical group "Jazz Poets Society" and an inter-cultural play, as well as other activities. The day's events will spread to the Memorial Union Ballroom and the cultural centers on campus for the afternoon; the Ballroom will open at noon and will feature information booths highlighting student organizations and cultural groups on campus. A "Feast of Cultures" is slated from 5 to 7 p.m. on the lawn of the Memorial Union (weather permitting). The "Jazz Poets Society" will play from 10 p.m. to midnight in the Ballroom.

Mon., April 20 -- JACK HAGERTY LECTURE, Holiday Inn, 1 p.m.; lecture features Bob Hagerty, editor/reporter of the Wall Street Journal in Atlanta, Ga.; Hagerty is the son of the late Jack and Marilyn Hagerty. Jack Hagerty was the long-time editor of the Grand Forks Herald.

Mon., April 20 -- DOCTORAL EXAM set for Michael Friez, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1370 Medicine and Health Sciences, 1:30 p.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Mon., April 20 -- AIDS EDUCATION PROGRAM, "Friendship in the Age of AIDS," T.J. Sullivan and Joel Goldman are friends from their college days at Indiana University and speak bluntly about sex, drinking, and living with HIV, Chester Fritz Auditorium, 7 p.m.; for more information, contact Kirsten or Mike at 777-3666.

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UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is also available electronically through UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address is http://www.und.nodak.edu.

All articles submitted for publication should be labeled "University Letter" and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu. Attachments to University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number. University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations, Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.

UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

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