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University Letter

April 17, 1998

Volume 35 No. 32

UNIVERSITY LETTER
University of North Dakota at Grand Forks
Vol. 35, Number 32, April 17, 1998

UNIVERSITY LETTER IS ALSO AVAILABLE ELECTRONICALLY in the Events and News section of UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address is: http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/our/uletter.htm

The University Relations Office maintains an index for the University Letter.

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CONTENTS

EVENTS TO NOTE

OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

BILLBOARD

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

EVENTS CALENDAR

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UND TO DEDICATE ODEGARD HALL, JOHN D. ODEGARD SCHOOL OF AEROSPACE SCIENCES APRIL 23

The University will formally dedicate Odegard Hall -- commonly referred to as CAS I -- and the renaming of its aerospace college as the John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences at 2 p.m. Thursday, April 23, in the Chester Fritz Auditorium. A reception will follow in the newly named Odegard Hall.

On Jan. 15, the North Dakota State Board of Higher Education approved re-naming UND's aerospace college and the college's first building in honor of the man who founded and has piloted UND's internationally-respected aerospace program from a two-plane operation to one of the largest non-military aircraft training fleets in the world.

The naming of the school is an important milestone: This is the first time a program at the University has been named after an individual, according to President Kendall Baker.

"This really is a tribute to Dean Odegard who is a pioneer in the truest sense," said Baker. "We are enormously pleased that John is being recognized for his remarkable accomplishments during the 30th anniversary of UND's aerospace program. Really it is John's vision and his ability to bring that vision to fruition that is being celebrated. As a young man, a 25-year-old graduate student at UND, John had a vision of a University-based aviation training program. During the past 30 years he turned a two-plane, fledgling operation into the premier aerospace training facility in the world. UND's newly-named John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences is truly a jewel in the crown of the University of North Dakota, as well as a jewel for the entire state of North Dakota."

The newly named John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences consists of the departments of aviation, atmospheric sciences, computer science, and space studies.

John D. Odegard, Dean, John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences

Odegard is founder and dean of the Center for Aerospace Sciences and president of the non-profit UND Aerospace Foundation. Together, the college and the foundation are known as UND Aerospace and provide a broad range of collegiate and commercial aerospace training programs to clients from around the world.

In 1968, Odegard pioneered UND's aviation program with one other faculty member and a pair of aircraft financed by the Alumni Foundation. Today, under his leadership, the college has grown to become UND's largest degree-granting college, one of the nation's most widely-respected aerospace education programs and a leader in atmospheric research. Beginning with only 12 students, enrollment is now over 1,400 students who come from every state in the U.S. and several foreign countries. The program and its 400 faculty and staff members are housed in a one-of-a-kind aerospace education complex. The Center's flight training facility is the largest of its kind in North America. Students fly more than 50,000 flight hours annually in a fleet of 85 aircraft and 16 flight simulators.

During his 32-year career as an aerospace educator, Odegard's reputation for leadership has earned him industry respect and numerous awards. It prompted his appointment in 1982 to chair the University Aviation Association's Airway Science committee. In that post, he directed the development of the Federal Aviation Administration's four-year degree designed to prepare technical managers for an increasingly complex National Airspace System. UND Aerospace was the first to implement the curriculum and has served as a model for academic institutions nationwide. His visionary approach helped initiate the Airway Science Network, a joint effort between UND Aerospace and the FAA, which, in 1993, began broadcasting aviation classes live via satellite to college campuses across the country. Students at these remote classrooms are able to view the broadcast and talk directly to the professors at UND through a system developed in partnership with IBM.

In 1986, Odegard captured worldwide industry attention for leading the development of the SPECTRUM ab initio airline pilot training program. The program, based on an extensive and unprecedented task analysis, is emerging as an industry standard for commercial pilot training around the globe. Central to this effort is the development of computer-based instruction programs and research into human factors affecting flight crew performance. As an outgrowth of Advanced Spectrum , airline service has been established offering scheduled flights between major cities in the state and connecting hubs in neighboring states.

Odegard's leadership was instrumental in organizing an international ad hoc industry group the International Air Transport Ab Initio Training Committee (IAATC) in which he serves as vice chairman - training. Its purpose is to establish an open forum for developing uniform worldwide guidelines for ab initio training of air transport pilots and mechanics, focusing on personnel needs of airlines and corporate aviation.

In 1993, he was selected to be a member of the National Business Aircraft Association/University Aviation Association Management Training Certification Task Force. This group is charged with developing professional certification standards for aviation managers.

Under Odegard's leadership, UND Aerospace faculty moved to the forefront of research aimed at modernizing the nation's aging weather radar surveillance system. Their record of accomplishments in severe weather analysis has generated millions of dollars in federal research contracts supporting studies on wind shear, aircraft icing and digital Doppler radar. The nation's first multidisciplinary space studies program was established by UND Aerospace in 1987. It offers both a Master's degree and undergraduate minor to provide a comprehensive understanding of the impact of humankind's move into space. The program examines the scientific and technical issues with particular emphasis on the social, political, economic, legal and medical aspects of living and working on this new frontier. Because of this program, NASA has designated UND as the state's Space Grant College.

The newest addition to the UND Aerospace complex, the $8.4 million Earth System Science (ESS) building funded by USDA, was completed early in 1992 and houses a comprehensive program of interdisciplinary research. High performance computing systems, including a Cray Supercomputer, analyze radar and satellite data to provide timely and reliable information helpful to farmers in making cost-effective decisions regarding crops and resource management. An outgrowth was the selection of UND by the National Weather Service as the location for the NWS Forecast Office for eastern North Dakota which became operational in 1996. The Regional Weather Information Center provides users with the latest weather information and gives students the opportunity to learn the latest in forecasting and weather broadcasting techniques.

In October 1997, the General Aviation Manufacturers Association/GA Team 2000 at its Annual Meeting of Founders honored Odegard with the inaugural Outstanding Contribution to Flight Training Award. The presentation noted, "John Odegard has been an innovative leader in aerospace education. GA Team 2000 is proud to be able to recognize John for his tremendous accomplishments and contributions. He is the first person to receive this award and sets a very high standard for future recipients."

In March 1996, Odegard was honored by the FAA with its Distinguished Service Award. The award, presented by FAA Deputy Administrator Linda Hall Daschle in Grand Forks, recognized Odegard's many achievements in Aerospace education and accomplishments in aviation safety.

Odegard was honored by the National Air Transportation Association with its Excellence in Pilot Training Award in April 1994, presented for his "outstanding contributions in safety, professionalism, leadership, and excellence in the field of pilot training. In aviation education and pilot training, this 14,000 hour pilot's pilot, pilot examiner and college dean is a standout." Among Odegard's many other awards is the prestigious Frank G. Brewer Trophy presented in November 1988 by the National Aeronautics Association for "his distinguished and inspiring leadership in creating new educational opportunities." A year earlier, the editors of Aviation Week and Space Technology recognized his contributions to aerospace in their 1987 Laurels nominations for "building the Center for Aerospace Sciences into a major force in aviation and space education. "

In 1989, Odegard received the FAA Administrator's Regional "Championship" Award for Excellence in Aviation Education in the Individual Category and he was also honored as North Dakota Business Innovator of the Year. In 1992, he received the President's Medal for service to UND, to the state, and to humanity, presented by Ken Baker.

Odegard has served as a consultant and guest speaker to many national governments, multi-national corporations, airlines, and educational institutions. In North Dakota, he has been a prominent figure on numerous civic and gubernatorial committees, and was honored for 20 years of service with the North Dakota Aeronautics Commission. He is widely published on subjects of aviation education and flight training and is co-author of a leading textbook, Airport Planning and Management.

Odegard is a Minot native and a graduate of the University. He received a B.B.A. in 1966 and an M.A. in Accounting in 1967. While an undergraduate student working summers as a crop sprayer, he revitalized the school's flying club by generating support for leasing an aircraft and offering flight lessons. His Master's thesis, "Feasibility and Cost Analysis of Institutional Private Aircraft Transportation," earned him approval to establish an air transportation service for the University.

He was appointed to UND's faculty in 1966 in the business college. He proposal to merge a business degree with a flight program gave birth to UND's aviation program and he was named assistant professor and chairman of the new Department of Aviation in 1968. He was promoted to associate professor in 1972 and to full professor in 1977. In 1982, the department was re-organized to become the Center for Aerospace Sciences, with Odegard as director. In 1984, the Center was granted full status as a college and he was named dean.

Odegard has logged more than 14,000 flight hours and holds an airline transport pilot certificate, with type ratings for the Learjet, Beechjet 400, and Cessna Citation I/II aircraft. He is a certified flight instructor for airplanes, instrument, multi-engine and gliders. He is also an FAA pilot examiner for private, commercial, instrument, multi-engine, flight instructor, ATP, glider, seaplane certificates and ratings and for the Cessna Citation.

-- Kendall Baker, President.

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DETAILS IN PLACE FOR TUESDAY, APRIL 21, OBSERVANCE OF UND FLOOD FIGHT, RECOVERY

The entire University community is urged to participate in a round of activities in UND's observance of the 1997 flood struggle and recovery Tuesday (April 21), exactly one year to the day after the Red River of the North crested in the devastating 1997 flood. Members of the community are invited to wear their "UND Proud" T-shirts that day. The three-part observance includes the following.

The all-University community meeting at 9 a.m. in the Memorial Union Ballroom is based on the daily 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. briefings that were conducted by UND personnel in the immediate post-flood period. The agenda for the gathering will include the recognition of student flood fighting and recovery participation, a new video on UND flooding and recovery, observations on UND's flood experience and refreshments.

The "Return of the Red Tag Diner" from noon to 1 p.m. at the Food Services Warehouse (near Central Receiving on the road on the southern edge of campus by the railroad tracks) features a free lunch. The "Red Tag Diner" reunion commemorates the camaraderie of the prime source of meals for more than a week for those UND personnel and students who remained on campus responding to immediate flood recovery needs last April while most other eating locations in the local community were inoperable. The operation took its "Red Tag Diner" moniker from the fact that UND flood workers were issued campus-access identification badges crafted from unused red-zone parking tags.

A social with refreshments and many other features from 2 to 4 p.m. in the Memorial Union Ballroom will be conducted around the UND "tent" as the central focus around which exhibits, displays, and videos will be presented. Seating will be available for visiting while enjoying free ice cream, cake, and beverages. The social is intended to provide a "reunion" style atmosphere where students, faculty and staff can visit about and share their memories about the flood and revisit the camaraderie and "esprit d' corps" which stemmed from the flood fight and post-flood activities.

Among the displays will be enlargements of photo-text pages from the book which the University is preparing on the flood and recovery. The displays will feature observations by UND personnel from interviews about their flood experiences. Enlarged photos of UND and community flood scenes will be featured, and albums of other photos will be available for perusing. Also from 2 to 4 p.m., Student Health Services will give free tetanus shots to the first 40 students, faculty and staff who show up at the Alumni Room in the Memorial Union. During the flood fight, Student Health Services held a number of free tetanus shot clinics where many members of the UND community were vaccinated as a precaution against flood-related health dangers.

-- Jim Penwarden, University Relations, for the Flood Observance Planning Group.

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EVENTS TO NOTE

GORDON HENRY WILL BE HONORED AT POW-WOW

Gordon Henry will be honored at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, April 19, at the Hyslop Sports Center, not on Saturday as previously published.

Jan Orvik, Editor, University Letter.

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GRADUATE COMMITTEE MEETS MONDAY

The Graduate Committee will meet Monday, April 20, at 3:05 p.m. in 305 Twamley Hall. The agenda will include:

1. Consideration of a proposal by the Public Administration department to offer three Certificate Programs.

2. Discussion of the certificate notation on transcripts.

3. Consideration of a request by the Biology department to add a new course, Biology 590, Special Topics.

4. Consideration of a request by the Communication Sciences and Disorders department to change the credits for CSD 585, Practicum in the School Setting.

5. Consideration of a request by the Computer Science department to add a new course, CSci 537, Graduate Cooperative Education.

6. Consideration of a request by the Teaching and Learning department to:

7. Matters arising.

-- Harvey Knull, Dean, Graduate School.

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UND TO CELEBRATE CULTURAL PLURALISM DAY APRIL 20

The University will celebrate Cultural Pluralism day Monday, April 20. Co-sponsored by the Cultural Awareness Committee and the Multicultural Awareness Committee as their first joint project, the day is intended to celebrate diversity.

The day starts with a gathering in the Chester Fritz Auditorium, 9 a.m. to noon. In addition to opening remarks from President Kendall Baker, Grand Forks Mayor Pat Owens and East Grand Forks Mayor Lynn Stauss, the morning will feature "Shades," an inter-cultural play; Seven Feathers Dancers; Wayne Fox, Hoop Dance; as well as other activities.

The day's events will spread to the Memorial Union Ballroom and the cultural centers on campus for the afternoon. The Ballroom will open at noon and will feature informational booths highlighting student organizations and cultural groups on campus. Movies in the Lecture Bowl include "Beautiful Thing" at 3 p.m. and "It's My Party" at 5:30 p.m.

A "Feast of Cultures" is slated for 5 to 7 p.m. on the lawn of the Memorial Union (weather permitting). "T.J. and Joel" are the speakers in the Chester Fritz Auditorium at 7 p.m., and the Jazz Poet's Society, a multicultural group from Richmond, Va., will play from 10 p.m. to midnight in the Ballroom (a reception for the Jazz Poet's Society will start at 8:30 p.m.).

Related events include Wednesday, April 15, "In Whose Honor," noon, 5 and 6 p.m., Memorial Union Lecture Bowl; and Monday, April 20, "Jack Hagerty Lecture," sponsored by the UND School of Communication and the Grand Forks Herald, 1 p.m. at the Holiday Inn. This year the lecture features Bob Hagerty, editor/reporter of the Wall Street Journal in Atlanta, Ga. Until March, Hagerty lived in Hong Kong as the managing editor of the Asian Wall Street Journal. He is the son of the late Jack and Marilyn Hagerty. Jack, for whom the lecture is named, was the long-time editor of the Grand Forks Herald. Marilyn continues to write for the Herald.

-- Sharon Rezac Andersen, International Centre.

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FOURTH ANNUAL McNAIR SCHOLAR RESEARCH FORUM SET

The Ronald E. McNair Program will hold its fourth annual McNair Scholar Research Forum Tuesday, April 21, in the Fred Orth Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, from 1 to 5:15 p.m. Faculty, staff and students are invited to attend the formal presentations of the McNair Scholar research projects completed during the 1997-98 academic year. Due to the number of scholars and length of presentations, please feel free to come and go as your schedule permits.

-- Patrice Giese, Assistant Director, Ronald E. McNair Program.

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UND'S TELEVISION CENTER TELECASTS FLOOD VIDEO ON CHANNEL 3

The UND Television Center will telecast various flood video footage on cable channel 3 starting Tuesday, April 21, and running through Friday, April 24. The videos will begin each evening at 8:30 p.m. and run for approximately two hours.

During the flood and through the recovery process, the University became the staging site for managing much of the crisis and recovery. During the flood, UND videographers Monte Koshel and Marv Leier documented much of the damage to the university. Approximately eight hours of footage was taped. Some of the footage was edited into a documentary for UND Plant Services. The documentary, UND Proud, shows the important role that Plant Services played during the university's recovery.

Each night UND Proud, the Plant Services documentary, will be shown, followed by approximately two hours of unedited video shot by UND photographers. Different unedited footage will be telecast each night. Included in the telecasts will be pool footage which consists of aerial and boat views shot by various networks.

Members of the community will have the opportunity to tape all of UND's unedited footage. The tape is being presented to the community to commemorate the one year anniversary of the flood.

-- Barry Brode, Director, Television Center.

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MACEDONIAN ROYAL TOMBS TOPIC OF LECTURE

"The Treasures of the Macedonian Royal Tombs" will be presented by Eugene Borza Wednesday, April 22, at 4 p.m. in 303 Gillette Hall. The lecture will be accompanied by slide illustrations and is intended for all audiences. Professor Borza, a distinguished expert on Alexander the Great and other aspects of ancient Greek history, is Professor Emeritus of Ancient History at Penn State and Adjunct Professor of Classical Studies at Concordia College.

-- Joseph DeFilippo, Associate Professor, Languages/Philosophy and Religion.

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RECYCLING WAR, FLOOD WALK WILL HONOR EARTH DAY

UND students are responding to Earth Day, Wednesday, April 22, celebrations by engaging in a recycling war. Student recycling representatives of the Association of Residence Halls and Plant Services hope to increase student awareness of the opportunities to recycle on campus by sponsoring this contest. The hall which recycles the most paper, glass, and plastic will be declared the winner. The addition of glass and plastic recycling containers in all residence halls, Memorial Union, Gamble, Rural Technology Center, and Ryan Hall will also increase efforts. When recycling glass and plastic containers, please make sure to remove the covers, empty and rinse thoroughly.

The Sierra Club is sponsoring a Flood Commemorative Walk on Saturday, April 18, at 9 a.m. in University Park. The University community is encouraged to come to the park and participate in this walk. Contact Janice Troitte at 777-4878 or Heidi McCormick at 594-4099 for more information.

Check out the Earth Day celebration at the Columbia Mall, Friday through Sunday, April 24-26. Displays and a children's activity center will be featured. Find your way through the Recycling Maze and view the creations in the children's poster contest.

Think "Reuse or Recycle" before throwing anything away. Take care of our earth.

-- Janice Troitte, Recycling Coordinator, Plant Services.

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RECEPTION WILL HONOR REGINA MONNIG AND MARY WILHITE

The College of Nursing will host a reception honoring Regina Monnig and Mary Wilhite Friday, April 24, from 3 to 4 p.m. at the Alumni Center. Both are retiring this summer. Dr. Monnig has served the college as Associate Dean and Director of Graduate Studies for eight years. Dr. Wilhite joined the college in 1988 as Associate Professor in the Adult Health Nursing Department and is currently Acting Chair of that department. Please join us to wish them well.

-- Elizabeth Nichols, Dean, College of Nursing.

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RECEPTION WILL HONOR GORDON HENRY

The University of North Dakota will hold a reception for Gordon Henry, Vice President for Student Affairs on Thursday, April 30, from 3 to 5 p.m. in the Memorial Union's Dakota Lounge. Henry will retire at the end of the academic year, June 30.

The 57-year-old Westhope, N.D., native said he decided in the early 1980s to retire early. "I have planned for a time in my life when I could explore, discover, and try new things. Those who know me know I believe you have to change to keep growing," said Henry.

Henry was appointed vice president for student affairs Feb. 1, 1984, after a nationwide search. He began his career at UND in 1965 as a residence hall head resident, became Assistant Dean of Men in 1969 and Associate Dean for Student Development in 1972. He served as interim dean for student development in 1977-79. Following his return from leave in 1980 for post-doctoral studies in higher education in Arizona State University, he was appointed director of the Memorial Union in addition to his title of Associate Dean of Students.

Henry graduated with a B.S. in physical education from Minot State University in 1962 and then taught science and served as head basketball coach at Tioga (N.D.) High School for three years (1962-65). He subsequently graduated from UND with the M.Ed. (1966) and the Ed.D. (1970) degrees in Counseling and Guidance, and went for post-doctoral studies in 1980.

Henry, who takes pride in being the "students' vice president," said he is proud of the work he has done with students and the strong working relationship he has developed with all aspects of student government during his career. He is also proud of the Crisis Response program he helped develop in the 1970s and which UND still employs to help students, faculty and staff deal with virtually any type of crisis.

Under Henry's vice presidency, UND has continued to be recognized as a regional and national leader in developing its Native American programs, Disability Support Services unit, international programs, and other student-oriented services. He has been recognized as one of the top student affairs leaders in North Dakota. He actively served on a committee that was successful in the reclassification and upgrading of student affairs professionals throughout the state.

-- Kendall Baker, President.

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UNIVERSITY SENATE MEETS MAY 7

The University Senate will meet Thursday, May 7, at 4:05 p.m. in Room 7, Gamble Hall. Agenda items for this meeting are due in the Office of Admissions and Records by 4 p.m. Thursday, April 23. It is recommended that some detail be included in the agenda items submitted.

-- Alice Poehls (Admissions and Records), Secretary, University Senate.

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TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR STAFF RECOGNITION CEREMONY

The 1998 Recognition Ceremony for Staff Personnel will be held at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, May 12, at the Memorial Union Ballroom. Employees will be recognized for years of service in five-year increments, and the 10 Meritorious Service Award winners will be announced. Tickets may be purchased beginning Monday, April 20, in the Office of Personnel Services, 313 Twamley Hall, for $3.50 each. Tickets must be purchased no later than Wednesday, May 6. All members of the University community are invited.

-- Diane Nelson, Director, Personnel Services.

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ALUMNI DAYS SET FOR MAY 20-22

The Alumni Association invites all faculty and staff to join in the activities of Alumni Days 98. This year's festivities feature the classes of 1937, 1938, 1942, 1943, 1947, 1948, 1952 and 1953. The class reunions postponed last year due to the flood have been rescheduled for this year; so we are anticipating our biggest and best Alumni Days ever. We hope you will be able to join us.

Alumni Days get under way Wednesday, May 20, with campus tours in the morning. The afternoon includes class socials and an open house at the J. Lloyd Stone Alumni Center from 3:30 to 5 p.m. The Get Reacquainted Dinner is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday in the Memorial Union Ballroom. We will be having a special video presentation and entertainment which will stir up campus memories from the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s.

Special reunion breakfasts for the Schools of Engineering and Mines, Law, Medicine and Health Sciences, Communication, the College of Education and Human Development, and the Departments of Accounting and Business Law, and Nutrition and Dietetics (Home Economics), will be held Thursday, May 21, from 8 to 9:45 a.m.

This year we are proud to honor the "Boys of Camp Depression" at a Dedication Ceremony and Luncheon at 11:30 a.m. on Thursday. An impressive monument has been commissioned in honor of those who lived a part or all of their University days in the railroad caboose complex. The monument stands south of the Chester Fritz Library. Following the ceremony, a luncheon will be held at the River Valley Room in the Memorial Union.

The Citations Committee of the UND Alumni Association has selected four outstanding alumni to receive the Sioux Award to be presented during the annual Alumni Days Awards Banquet. The awards banquet will be at the Westward Ho on Thursday evening with a social at 6:30 p.m., followed by a dinner and program at 7 p.m. Alumni Days 98 Award recipients are: Sam Silverman, 37, 39; Norma (Peterson) Oreskovich, .. 37; Dr. Robert A. Kyle, 48; and The Rev. Harry Durkee, ..'43.

After class breakfasts on Friday, May 22, a memorial service in honor of friends and classmates will be held at 10:15 a.m. in the Swanson Hall Courtyard. The three-day festivities conclude with an "Until We Meet Again" Buffet at 12:30 p.m. in the Memorial Union Ballroom.

For more information or to make reservations, contact the Alumni Association at 777-2611.

-- Kirsten Carolin, Alumni Association and Foundation.

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OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

GRADE REPORT FORMS AVAILABLE APRIL 21

The "Grade Report" forms will be available in the Office of Admissions and Records for pick-up by the department offices beginning at 9 a.m. Tuesday, April 21. The procedures to follow and deadlines will be noted in a memo attached to the report forms. If you have questions, please call 777-2711.

-- Veriena Garver, Admissions and Records Officer.

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1998 MERRIFIELD AWARD DEADLINE APPROACHES

Faculty are asked to remind students that all papers to be considered for the annual Merrifield Competition Award must be submitted to the Department of Special Collections no later than Friday, April 24. The $1,500 scholarship is awarded annually based upon a competitive review of original research papers that utilize primary resource materials held in the Elwyn B. Robinson Department of Special Collections in the Chester Fritz Library. More information concerning research criteria and paper guidelines is available in Special Collections, located on the Library's fourth floor.

-- Sandy Slater, Head, Elwyn B. Robinson Department of Special Collections, Chester Fritz Library.

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MUSIC COURSE OMITTED FROM SUMMER COURSE LISTING

A summer session course for non-majors was accidentally omitted from the Summer course schedule. MUS 220: Music in America carries three credits, General Education, Arts and Humanities with Gary Towne; call #92240. The course covers basic listening skills, Jazz, Rock, Folk, Blues, Popular, Classical, Historical, and Native American Music, and has a cassette for home listening with book. It will be held May 11 to June 5, MTWR from 9 a.m. to noon, 164 Hughes Fine Arts Center. Call me at 777-2826 or 772-1982 for more information.

-- Gary Towne, Associate Professor of Music.

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DOCTORAL EXAMS SET FOR FIVE CANDIDATES

The final examination for Dong Ho Lee, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Energy Engineering, is set for 3 p.m. Monday, April 20, in 268 Upson Hall II. The dissertation title is "A Comparison of experimental Measurements and Numerical Calculations of Ignition Delay in Lean Premixed H2/O2/N2 Turbulent Combustion: A Simple Approach to Modeling Turbulent Combustion." Nanak Grewal (Mechanical Engineering) is the committee chair.

The final examination for Antoinette James, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Counseling Psychology, is set for 9:30 a.m. Tuesday, April 21, in 318 Montgomery Hall. The dissertation title is "Validity and Norm Development for the Composite Examination of Mental Status." Charles Barke (Counseling) is the committee chair.

The final examination for Rosemary Barke, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Counseling Psychology, is set for 11 a.m. Wednesday, April 22, in 318 Montgomery Hall. The dissertation title is "Women, Sex and Dating: A Qualitative Study of College Men's Perceptions." Denise Twohey (Psychology) is the committee chair.

The final examination for Ann R. Brummel, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Teaching and Learning, is set for 9 a.m. Monday, April 27, in 104 Education Building. The dissertation title is "A Qualitative Study of Educational Values of Parents and Educators in An American Indian Community." Janet Ahler (Education Foundations) is the committee chair.

The final examination for J. Ken Horton, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Teacher Education: Research Methodologies, is set for 9 a.m. Wednesday, April 29, in 104 Education Building. The dissertation title is "The Effects of a Districtwide Criterion-Referenced Testing Program on Students' Achievement and Teachers' Attitudes and Instructional Behavior." Richard Landry (Educational Foundations and Research) is the committee chair.

Members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

-- Harvey Knull, Dean, Graduate School.

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NOT JUST FOR ADVISORS: SATISFACTORY PROGRESS

Any time you drop a course or withdraw from the University, you may be jeopardizing your federally funded student financial aid, now or in the future. You must successfully complete at least two-thirds of all the courses in which you enroll. Dropping after the first 10 days of class may not affect your academic standing, but it may affect your ability to receive financial aid. For further review of this policy see the Code of Student Life in the appendix section titled "A Summary of the Standards of Satisfactory Progress for Financial Aid Eligibility," page 27, or contact the Student Financial Aid office.

-- Student Academic Services.

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GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

RESEARCH, GRANT OPPORTUNITIES LISTED

Following are research and grant opportunities. For more information, contact the Office of Research and Program Development at 777-4278.

PROGRAM GUIDE TO FEDERALLY FUNDED ENVIRONMENT AND NATIONAL RESOURCES R & D

The guide, located at: http://www.nnic.noaa.gov/CENR/Contents.html, has been produced by the National Science and Technology Council Committee on Environment and Natural Resources. It provides information about the R&D activities supported by 10 federal agencies.

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PEDIATRIC AIDS FOUNDATION

Funding is available for one and two year Pediatric Research Grants (up to $80,000 annually in direct costs), two-year Pediatric Scholar Awards (up to $66,000 in direct costs for 2 years of salary support), and Pediatric Short-Term Scientific Awards ($5,000). Creative and innovative research ideas not yet suitable for funding by other agencies are of special interest. All proposals must have direct relevance to pediatric HIV/AIDS and related issues. Established investigators and international applicants are encouraged to apply, as well as researchers interested in collaborating with investigators from developing countries. Contact: Trish Devine, Programs Director, 310/395-9051; research@pedaids.org; www.pedaids.org. Deadline: 7/22/98 (Letter of Intent).

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AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS ASSOCIATION (ALS)

The ALS Association is now receiving one-page abstracts for multi-year grants (up to $60,000/year for 2-3 years) and one-year starter awards ($35,000). Awards are made for both basic and clinical research. Clinical research includes research conducted with human subjects and materials of human origin, but not clinical trials nor patient management studies. Deadline: 6/1/98 (Abstracts); 9/1/98 (Formal Applications). Contact: Ruth Papadatos, Research Coordinator, 818/340-7500; fax 818/340-2060; Ruth@alsa-national.org; http://www.alsa.org.

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NATIONAL CENTER FOR RESEARCH RESOURCES (NCRR)

The Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) Program encourages active biomedical and/or behavioral scientists to work as partners with educators, media experts, community leaders and other interested organizations on projects to improve student (K-12) and public understanding of the health sciences. It is intended to support development and evaluation of model biomedical and/or behavioral science education partnership programs (Phase I) or provide funding for the development of effective strategies for the dissemination of successful existing innovative biomedical and/or behavioral science education partnership models (Phase II). The program will support grants designed to encourage scientists to work with educators, community leaders and others to improve student and public understanding of science, and increase interest of young people in health sciences careers. SEPA projects must represent new activities and focus on health-related science, but coordination with existing science education improvement programs, such as those funded by the NSF, the DOE, the Department of Education, etc., is encouraged. Contact: Dr. Robert F. Hendrickson, 301/435-0760; roberth@ep.ncrr.nih.gov; http://www.ncrr.nih.gov/. Deadline: 10/1/98.

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NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH & HUMAN DEVELOPMENT (NICHHD)

Applications are invited for cooperative agreements to continue and expand the NICHD Family and Child Well-Being Research Network (RFA--HD-98-009). The Network analyzes existing data examining the relationship of family factors to child well-being and cooperates in pursuing multi-disciplinary data analysis that has public policy utility. The network may also cooperate to collect data if resources are made available to it from outside sources. The major objective will continue to be secondary data analysis of the relationship of family factors to child well-being in the context of neighborhood, community, societal and public policy influences. Written and telephone inquiries concerning this RFA are encouraged. Deadline: 7/9/98. Contact: V. Jeffery Evans, Ph.D., J.D., 301/496-1174; fax 301/496-0962; Jeff Evans@NIH.gov; http://www.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-HD-98-009.html.

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HENRY M. JACKSON FOUNDATION

Areas of interest are: education and advanced research in international affairs related to the history, cultures, political and economic systems, and trade practices of other nations, particularly in the Asia-Pacific region; public service; environment/natural resources management, with priority given to land use and growth management; and human rights, limited primarily to Russia as it makes the transition from communism to democracy. Preference is given to funding programs with potential national or international significance or those that offer promising models for replication. Applicants are encouraged to call or send a brief letter of inquiry before submitting a full proposal. Contact: Ms. Lara Iglitzen, Executive Director, 206/682-8565; fax 206/682-8961; HMJackson@aol.com. Deadline: 6/1/98.

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ELEANOR NAYLOR DANA CHARITABLE TRUST

Support is provided for Biomedical Research and Performing Arts Programs. Grants are up to $100,000/year. The Biomedical Program generally supports clinical investigation by established scientists. Projects should be innovative and designed to improve medical practice or prevent disease. Performing Arts program grants are not generally made to fund deficits; for exhibits, publications, or conclaves; or to individuals. Initial inquiries should be submitted as letters of intent. Deadline: None. Contact: The Trustees, 212/754-2890; fax 212/754-2892.

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NATIONAL HISTORICAL PUBLICATIONS & RECORDS COMMISSION

Level-Three Grants provide support to preserve and make available those records that further an understanding and appreciation of American history. Types of projects include: publication, training, curriculum development, conferences, and preservation. Cost sharing of fifty percent is required. Average past grants have been $50,000. Applicants should request the sponsor's program guidelines, which include application forms. Special guidelines are required for each objective area. For all projects, the sponsor suggests consultation with the staff prior to developing a formal application. Deadline: 2/1/99. Contact: Program Director, 202/501-5610; fax 202/501-5601.

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NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION

The Integrative Graduate Education and Research Training Program is an agency-wide, multidisciplinary, graduate training program. The goal is to enable the development of innovative, research-based, graduate education and training activities that will produce a diverse group of new scientists and engineers well-prepared for a broad spectrum of career opportunities in industry, government and academe. Supported projects must be based upon a multidisciplinary research theme and organized around a diverse group of investigators from U.S. Ph.D.-granting institutions with appropriate research and teaching interests and expertise. The research theme may draw upon investigators from two or more departments within one institution or from more than one institution. Primary emphasis is on new and innovative training of doctoral students. Awards will range up to $500,000/year for up to 5 years; up to an additional $200,000 will be available for appropriate state-of-the-art research instrumentation and special purpose research materials during the first year of the award. Details on preproposals were sent to deans and department heads. Because UND can submit only two applications, preproposals must be submitted to ORPD before June 1, 1998. Deadlines: 6/1/98 (Preproposal to ORPD); 7/1/98 (Preproposal to NSF); 11/23/98 (Full Proposal). Contact: ORPD for contact numbers at NSF, or http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/1998/nsf9896/nsf9896.txt.

The Science and Technology Studies Program (STS; NSF 97-142) supports research and related activities that contribute to systematic understanding of the character and development of science and technology, including their cultural, intellectual, material and social dimensions. The program supports research on the nature and development of science and technology, both in the past and present, and on differences in the nature of theory and evidence in various fields of science and engineering. It also supports research on the interactions among science, technology and society. Proposals are welcome from various disciplinary perspectives, including history, philosophy, and the social sciences. Deadline: 8/1/98 (Target Date). Contact: Edward J. Hackett, ehackett@nsf.gov; John Perhonis, e-mail: jperhoni@nsf.gov; 703/306-1742; fax 703/306-0485.

The Small Grants for Exploratory Research (SGER) funds small-scale exploratory work in all fields of science, engineering, and education supported by NSF, through brief proposals without the usual external review. Such work includes preliminary research on untested and novel ideas, ventures into emerging research areas, research requiring urgent access to specialized data, facilities, or equipment, or similar exploratory efforts likely to catalyze innovative advances. Awards are normally for one year and may not exceed $100,000. Only one copy of a brief proposal is required. Investigators are strongly encouraged to contact the appropriate program officer to see if the proposed research would be suitable for SGER support, or if a fully reviewable proposal should be submitted. Contact: 703/306-1130; http://www.nsf.gov/. Deadline: None.

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NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY

Support is provided for scientific research and exploration through grants for basic, original field research in disciplines including anthropology, archaeology, astronomy, biology, botany, geography, geology, oceanography, paleontology and zoology. Particular emphasis is currently being placed on multi-disciplinary projects of an environmental nature such as loss of biodiversity and habitat, and effects of human-population pressures. All projects must have both a geographical dimension and relevance to other scientific fields. Average grants are for $15,000-$20,000/year. Collaborative funding with other organizations, or through matching grants, is encouraged. Potential investigators must submit preproposals (500 word maximum). Contact: Steven S. Stettes, Secretary, fax 202/429-5729; http://www.nationalgeographic.com/society/. Deadline: None.

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DEADLINE DATES: SBIR/STTR

The Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program is a high technology-based three-phase process which permits research and development to be conducted jointly by a small business STTR awardee concern and a research institution. To stimulate and foster scientific and technological innovation, which includes increasing commercialization of the federal research or research and development effort, the program follows a uniform competitive process which consists of the following phases: Phase I (one year) is to determine the scientific, technical and commercial merit and feasibility of the proposed cooperative effort and the quality of performance of the small business awardee concern with a relatively small federal agency investment prior to consideration of further federal support at the Phase II level; Phase II (two years) is to continue the research or research and development effort from Phase I (only Phase I awardee concerns are eligible to participate); Phase III may involve the commercial applications of the funded research funded by non- federal sources of capital or awards from non-STTR federal funding sources. Deadlines: 5/14/98 (NASA), 8/1/98 (HHS/NIH). Contact: ORPD for internet addresses.

The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program affords small business concerns an opportunity to propose innovative ideas that meet the research and research and development needs of the Federal Government while opening the door for commercialization. The Program consists of the following phases: Phase I is to evaluate the scientific technical merit and feasibility of an idea; Phase II is to expand on the results of and further pursue the development of Phase I awards; Phase III is for the commercialization of the results of Phase II. Areas of research supported depend on the federal agency offering the SBIR award. Deadlines: 9/3/98 (USDA); 8/19/98 (DOD); 5/1/98 (DOT); 8/15/98, 12/15/98 (HHS/NIH); 7/7/98 (NASA); 6/12/98 (NSF). Contact: ORPD for internet addresses.

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BURLINGTON RESOURCES, INC.

Grants are made for capital and general support in the following areas: education (high priority to technical colleges and educational programs addressing the mining industry), arts and humanities, social services (primarily youth and community service), civic and public affairs and health. Initial contact should be a brief letter describing the project, requesting an application, etc. Initial contacts by telephone or personal visit are discouraged. Contact: Donald K. North, President, 713/624-9500; 801 Cherry Street, Fort Worth, TX 76102. Deadline: None.

-- Sally Eckert-Tilotta, Assistant to the Director of Research and Program Development.

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UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS RECEIVE EPSCoR AWARDS

The ND EPSCoR annual Advanced Undergraduate Research Awards (AURA) provides $2,500 summer-research stipends for undergraduates who join a faculty member's laboratory at UND or NDSU. Awards are made directly to the students who select a research topic and mentor from the sciences, engineering, or mathematics disciplines. North Dakota residents and students enrolled at North Dakota University System institutions are eligible.

The AURA program has grown from three students as a pilot program in 1987, to an average of 20 students per year at the two research universities. A total of 192 undergraduates (109 women and 83 men) from an applicant pool of 414 have received these awards. The average GPA for an AURA awardee is 3.67.

The 1998 UND award winners,, their home towns and mentors are Paul Pfennig, Bismarck, Ann Flower (Microbiology and Immunology); Damien Matthew, Dickinson, Ju Kim (Physics); Suzanna Styles, Drayton, Serge von Duvilliard (Human Performance Lab); Serena Mattson, Fargo, Jeffrey Carmichael (Biology); Mary Ellen Kovarik, Grand Forks, Janis Hulla (Pharmacology and Toxicology); Edward Peterson, Jamestown, Ju Kim; Lesley Laub, Regent, Andrea Zevenbergen (Psychology); and Tondi Whetham, Wilton, F. Richard Ferraro (Psychology).

Students submit an application during the fall semester. A faculty review committee ranks the students. For AURA program information, contact me at (701) 231-7516 or givers@badlands.nodak.edu.

The purpose of ND EPSCoR, a North Dakota University System program, is to make North Dakota more competitive nationally in science, engineering, and mathematics research and development. Learn more about ND EPSCoR at http://www.ndsu.nodak.edu/epscor.

-- David Givers, Program Officer, ND EPSCoR.

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BILLBOARD

STAFF SENATE WILL BE FORMED

President Baker has approved the formation of a Staff Senate. The staff Senate Steering Committee, appointed last April, was charged to draft the constitution and bylaws. According to the constitution, the Staff Senate will be a representative body of UND staff to serve the following purposes:

a. To foster a spirit of unity, pride, and cooperation by being recognized equally with University Senate and Student Senate as participants in advising University administration.

b. To serve as an active communication link for meaningful information exchange between staff and administration relative to issues of mutual concern.

c. To provide open meetings to express, propose, represent, investigate, and debate issues. The Staff Senate, acting as an official and responsible voice in University affairs, will recommend action on issues which receive majority approval of the Senators.

d. To advise the President with regard to working conditions and employment practices, including recognition, compensation and other pertinent issues.

e. To promote awareness of opportunities and encourage involvement in the activities and operation of the University.

The Staff Senate will be composed of elected members representing approximately 3 percent of each of the following classifications:

Professional (Job Category 1000 and 3000) with 17 senators Technical/Paraprofessional (Job Category 4000) with eight senators Secretarial/Clerical (Job Category 5000) with 13 senators Trades (Job Category 6000) with five senators Service (Job Category 7000) with seven senators

This is a great opportunity to participate. The election process will continue with an informational forum Wednesday, April 22, at 3:30 p.m. in 303 Gillette Hall. Elections to the Staff Senate will be held in May.

If you have any questions or concerns, please feel free to contact the members of the UND Staff Senate Steering Committee.

-- Rhonda Schwartz (Law), Chair, Connie Cicha (Physics), Jo Coutts (Continuing Education), Charlotte Minier (Academic Affairs), Helen Murphy (Arts and Sciences), Diane Nelson (Personnel), Jill Novotny (Student Affairs), Steve Reller (Controller's Office), Kathy Spender (Geology and Geological Engineering), Rick Tonder (Plant Services).

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POST SUMMER JOBS SOON

It is time to think about summer jobs. We will post Federal Work Study jobs for summer Wednesday, May 6, so please get your summer listings to us by Friday, April 24. Remember: students must complete a summer application, be enrolled half time (six credits) and be awarded FWS to qualify for employment. Applications are available in the Financial Aid Office, 216 Twamley Hall. The employment eligibility dates for summer are from May 10 to Aug. 22. Please call Dorothy at 777-4411 to post, e-mail or fax 777-2040 and Dennis at 777-3013 to post Institutional jobs.

-- Dorothy Olson, Financial Aid.

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COPYRIGHT FAIR USE INFORMATION AVAILABLE

Rick Johnson, General Counsel for North Dakota State University, has written an article concerning copyright fair use law. It discusses copyrights, ownership, exceptions to copyright infringement, fair use and guidelines. It is available online at http://www.ndsu.nodak.edu/ndsu/ochoa/watch.stm.

-- Jan Orvik, Editor.

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LIBRARY HAS NEW VIDEO FOR LOAN

A video "In Whose Honor?" about American Indian mascots in sports has been acquired by Chester Fritz Library with the support of the Cultural Awareness Committee. This video circulates for one week and is available from the Reserve Collection at the Access Services Desk (Second Floor) of the Chester Fritz Library. It is suitable for use in courses on Sociology, Anthropology, Native American Studies, Women Studies, Education, Media Studies, and Sports and Culture, or for any campus groups that wish to address minority and social issues. If you have any question about the video, please contact Reference and Research Services, 777-4629.

-- Cynthia Shabb, Chief Bibliographer, Chester Fritz Library.

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CRAZY 8 LOAN SALE WILL BE MAY 8

The University Credit Union hopes to loan out $125,000 on Friday, May 8, to 125 members. The 1997 promotion was washed out by the flood of 1997. In 1996, $112,000 was loaned out May 8. Tell your fellow employees about the "Crazy Eight Loan" sale and help us reach our goal.

To help our members, the loans will be made at an Annual Percentage Rate of 8.8 percent on Friday, May 8. Loans will be made for $1,000. Payments will be $88 a month or $44 a payday.

Eight drawings for door prizes will be held as follows: 8:08 a.m., eight donuts; 9:08 a.m., cash drawing; 10:08 a.m., eight-pack of Coke; 11:08 a.m., cash drawing; 12:08 p.m., eight roses; 1:08 p.m., cash drawing; 2:08 p.m., eight carnations; 3:08 p.m., cash drawing. The cash drawings will be for $8, $8.08, $8.88, and $88.88.

Applications will be available from the following departments: Energy and Environmental Research Center, Cheryl Danduran; Aerospace, Gary Ebel; School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Administration and Finance Office; Plant Services, Patti Schmidt; Human Nutrition Research Center, State Administration Office; College of Nursing, Admissions and Records Office.

-- George Meister, Manager, University Federal Credit Union.

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ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

STUDIO ONE LISTS GUESTS

North Dakota Sen. Kent Conrad will be featured on the Thursday, April 16, edition of "Studio One." Sen. Conrad serves on several committees, including the Budget and Finance Committee. He will discuss budget issues, current tobacco legislation, and the state of agriculture in America.

Boris Avramski is a gymnast and circus performer from Bulgaria. He has been involved in gymnastics since kindergarten, then was recruited to join a Bulgarian gym. At the age of 12 he decided to join the Bulgarian Circus. Since then he has been a part of Circus Circus and Circus Vargus. Avramski will discuss circus life as well as the ups and downs of performing. He will also talk about traveling in a circus troupe and what circus life is like behind the glitz and glamour.

"Studio One" is an award-winning one-hour weekly afternoon show featuring news, weather, sports and interviews produced at the University Television Center. The program airs live on Channel 3 at 5 p.m. on Thursdays. Rebroadcasts can be seen Fridays at noon and 7 p.m., Saturdays at 10 a.m. and noon, as well as Monday through Wednesday at 7 p.m. "Studio One" also airs in Fargo, Bismarck/Mandan, Minot and Minneapolis.

-- Alycia Gleave, Studio One Marketing Team.

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WOMEN'S CENTER LISTS EVENTS

Programs at the Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., include Feast and Focus at noon Wednesday, April 22, "Just Between Us" and Soup for the Soul at 12:15, Thursday, April 23. Everyone is welcome.

-- Donna Oltmanns, Coordinator, Women's Center.

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INTERNATIONAL CENTRE LISTS EVENTS

The Thursday, April 23, 7 p.m. program at the International Centre, 2908 University Ave., will be "Celebrating the Culture of Taiwan/Formosa." Taiwanese students and faculty will present their culture through literature, artifacts, slides and food. Please join us.

-- Sharon Rezac Andersen, Director, International Centre.

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CONCERT FEATURES RENAISSANCE MUSIC FROM ITALY AND MEXICO

A concert, Renaissance Around the World: 16th-Century Music from Italy and Mexico will be performed at 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 24, by the UND Collegium Musicum directed by Gary Towne, in the Josephine Campbell Recital Hall, Hughes Fine Arts Center.

The program will present sacred and instrumental masterpieces from the peak of the Renaissance in the late 16th century. The Renaissance Wind Band will present double-choir works from Venice and elsewhere in Italy by Gabrieli, Viadana, and others; and the Collegium Singers will present the "Lamentations of Jeremiah" by Pedro Bermudez and other colonial Mexican music by Hernando Franco. The performance will be a showcase for UND's collection of historic instruments, and offers an opportunity to hear cornetto, shawm (the oboist's revenge), and sackbut.

The UND Collegium Musicum specializes in authentic performance of rare and historic music. The group includes a Vocal Ensemble and a Renaissance Wind Band. Now directed by Gary Towne, the Collegium Musicum was founded by Tamar Read in the early 1960s as an outgrowth of her Music History class. The group has done a broad range of music, including the American premieres of several major works.

Admission to the concert is $4; $2 for students.

-- Gary Towne, Associate Professor of Music.

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MASTERWORKS CONCERT HIGHLIGHTS HAYDN AND BEETHOVEN

The Grand Forks Master Chorale will present its annual Masterworks Concert at 7:30 p.m. Sunday, April 26, at Holy Family Catholic Church, 1001 17th Ave. S. The Master Chorale will be joined by the UND Concert Choir in a program of music by Haydn and Beethoven, under the direction of James Rodde.

"The Chorale Fantasy" by Ludwig von Beethoven will feature piano soloist Jane Solose. This work for piano and orchestra builds to a rousing choral finale, in a form similar to Beethoven's ending of the "Symphony #9." Solose (Piano Studies) is a concerto soloist, recitalist, duo pianist and master teacher in this country and her native Canada. Among other honors, she has won the CBC Radio Music National Competition and the Eastman School of Music Concerto Competition. She performs regularly as a duo-pianist with her sister Kathleen, with whom she has released a CD.

The combined choirs and orchestra will also perform "The Lord Nelson Mass" by Franz Joseph Haydn. The mass is receiving new attention this year, the 200th anniversary of its composition. The third of six masses by Haydn, its title is a tribute to Admiral Horatio Nelson's battles against Napoleonic imperialism.

Tickets for the Masterworks Concert, at $8, $7 for seniors and $5 for students, will be sold at the door. For more information, call 777-3376.

-- Ruth Marshall, Grand Forks Master Chorale.

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ASIAN CULTURAL MONTH EVENTS SET

The University will celebrate its first Asian Cultural Month in April. The purpose of this month is to celebrate and bring awareness of the variety of Asian cultures to the campus. The events are sponsored by the President's Office through the Rich and Joanne Becker Fund and the Student Body Government. Events will include contemporary Chinese movies, chopstick lessons, food sampling, and various speakers and presentations.

On Monday, April 27, Tom T. Oye will speak at the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl about his experiences with the 442nd Battalion during World War II. The 442nd Battalion was an all Japanese-American battalion, and the most highly decorated in United States military history. A reception will follow at the Alumni House from noon to 1 p.m.

The schedule for the month is as follows: (Editor's Note: This information was not received in time to publish earlier.)

April 20: Cultural Pluralism Day;

April 21: Vietnamese History and Culture, Era Bell Thompson Cultural Center (EBTCC), 11 a.m. to noon; Movie: "Blue Kite," EBTCC, 7 to 9 p.m.;

April 22: Chopstick Lessons, EBTCC, 11 a.m. to noon; Crafts and Fashion of Asia, EBTCC, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.;

April 23: Crafts and Fashions of Asia, EBTCC, noon to 2 p.m.; Movie: "Man and Woman, Eat and Drink," EBTCC, 7 to 9 p.m.;

April 24: Origami Lessons, EBTCC, 10 to 11 a.m.; Movie: "Red Lantern and Green Lantern," EBTCC, noon to 2 p.m.;

April 25: Movie: "To Live," EBTCC, 2 to 4 p.m.;

April 26: Movie: "Shanghai Trias," EBTCC, 2 to 4 p.m.;

April 27: Tom T. Oye, World War II veteran of the 442nd, Memorial Union Lecture Bowl, 10:30 a.m. to noon; Reception, Alumni House, noon to 1 p.m.; 442nd Documentary and Discussion, Memorial Union Lecture Bowl, 7 to 9 p.m.;

April 28: 522nd Documentary "From Hawaii to the Holocaust" and Discussion, EBTCC, 11 a.m. to noon; Movie: "Go For Broke," EBTCC, 7 to 9 p.m.;

April 29: Asian Food Sampling, EBTCC, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.; Chopstick Lessons, EBTCC, 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.

All Asian Month events are free and open to the public. A calendar of Asian Cultural Month activities may be picked up at the Era Bell Thompson Cultural Center at 2800 University Ave. For more information regarding events, contact Aimee at 777-4259.

-- M.C. Diop, Director, Multicultural Student Services.

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CHESTER FRITZ AUDITORIUM BENEFIT AUCTION SET

Step out for "A Starry Starry Night, 25 Years of Stargazing at the Fritz!" The Eighth Annual Chester Fritz Auditorium Benefit Auction will be held Wednesday, May 6, at the Grand Forks Civic Auditorium. Festivities begin with a 5:30 p.m. social, silent auction bidding, and raffle boards. Dinner will be served at 7 p.m., and the live auction will follow at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $30 per person. The ticket sales committee plans to sell out the event by selling 525 tickets.

The Chester Fritz Auditorium is built where UND theatre tradition began many years ago on the banks of the English Coulee. In 1965, Chester Fritz gave the University $1 million toward the construction of a "distinctive auditorium" on campus. A matching appropriation of $1 million from the state and $1 million in private bequests completed the funding for the Auditorium.

The Chester Fritz Auditorium is considered the finest facility of its kind from Minneapolis to the West Coast. Since its opening, it has brought nationally acclaimed performers to Grand Forks and to the University. The programming has varied form country western, opera, ballet, and symphonies, to Broadway shows. The Auditorium also serves as a major conference center for this region.

Although the Auditorium, which seats 2,400 people, has aged gracefully over the years, 25 years of activities at the Fritz have had their effect on the facility. Some major improvements have been made, but more are needed to keep the Fritz in first-class condition.

There are ongoing needs of the Chester Fritz Auditorium which must be met. "Friends of the Fritz," a volunteer committee, was formed to organize an annual event to raise money to finance these and other projects. The Annual Chester Fritz Auditorium Benefit Auction is the gala event set up for this purpose.

This year's goals include netting $70,000 to replace the 25-year-old lighting system. All existing lighting equipment is original with the building, and is 25-year-old technology. This means parts to fix the equipment are hard to obtain or non-existent.

The first six auctions netted more than $275,000 for the Chester Fritz Auditorium, providing funding for new carpeting, lettering above the entrance doors, electric shades in the lobby, expansion of the women's bathrooms, painting of the backstage area, the rearrangement and restructuring of portraits, and partial refurbishment of the Auditorium seats.

Duaine and Phyllis Espegard, Grand Forks, are co-chairs for the event.

Gifts for the auction have been received from local businesses, alumni and friends of the University, and the Chester Fritz Auditorium. Among the variety of items available are: a backyard picnic for 25 people from GF Goodribs, getaways, jewelry, tickets to the San Francisco Opera, autographed Sioux sports memorabilia, original art, fine collectibles, and celebrity items.

A team of local volunteers serve on the steering committee. The arrangements committee is chaired by Linda Hawkins and Anita Newman. Gift solicitation committee chairs are Jim and Nicole Poolman and Dan Swingen. Coleen Tweten is heading up promotions for the event, and ticket sales chair is Carmen Toman. Corporate sponsors committee co-chairs are Duane Loven and Jim Gjerset. Auctioneer services will again be provided by the Curt D. Johnson Auction Company, Doug and Tracy Merfeld.

For the second year, corporate sponsorship has been another strong factor in the Benefit's success. Each corporate sponsor has made a gift of $2,500 to the Auction. They are: Brady Martz, Burger King, Community National Bank, First American Bank, First National Bank, Jim and LuAnne Gjerset, Hansen Ford Lincoln Mercury, Happy Harry's Bottle Shops, Home of Economy, Hugo's, Altru Health System, Northern States Power, and the Curt D. Johnson Auction Company/Doug and Tracy Merfeld. First Bank will again be a live auction matching sponsor, donating $100 for each live auction item that reaches or exceeds its retail value as listed in the auction catalog.

Make your plans now to enjoy "A Starry Starry Night, 25 Years of Stargazing at the Fritz." All item contributions and payments for items will be directed through the University of North Dakota Foundation for the benefit of the Chester Fritz Auditorium. Individuals or businesses interested in receiving information regarding this Auction or who would like to donate an item to the Auction may contact the UND Foundation at 777-2611, 1-800-543-8764, or fax to (701) 777-4054.

-- Janna Mostad, Alumni Association and Foundation.

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SPECIAL DENIM DAY BENEFITS ST. PETER, MINN.

In response to requests from the UND community, President Baker has announced another special Denim Day for Friday, April 24. The dollar you pay for the privilege of "going casual" will be sent to the St. Peter, Minn., area recently devastated by a tornado.

It's especially appropriate that UND reaches out its hand to an area which gave us so much in the way of volunteer labor, goods, and moral and physical support a year ago. Now it's our turn!

-- Patsy Nies (Student Affairs) for the Denim Day Committee.

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EVENTS CALENDAR

APRIL 1998

(Please contact Mavis at the Office of University Relations, Box 7144, or call 777-4304, if you wish to make changes or have an event included.)

Through Thurs., April 23 -- BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS SHOW, Brian Earp, Brandon Gunderson, Jon Olson, Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center.

Through Sun., April 19 -- UND INDIAN ASSOCIATION 29TH ANNUAL TIME-OUT AND WACIPI, "A Time of Pride, A Time of Celebration," Memorial Union and Hyslop Sports Center.

The schedule is as follows:

Time-Out Week:

Wednesday, April 15, 7 p.m., Fashion Show, "Indians/Cowboys," Ballroom, Memorial Union.

Thursday, April 16, 9:30 a.m., presentation, "The Interface of Western Medicine and Traditional Holistic Healing," Marilyn Youngbird, sponsored by INMED, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union; 1:30 p.m., presentation, "The Philosophy of Native American Wellness," Marilyn Youngbird, sponsored by INMED, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union; 5:30 p.m., Banquet, "Honoring the Youth," with speakers Chance Rush and Sarah Jumping Eagle, performance by Bobbi Rae Sage and Catfish Bay, South Ballroom, Memorial Union; 8 p.m., Youth Dance sponsored by B.R.I.D.G.E.S., South Ballroom, Memorial Union; 9 p.m., Adult Dance, Sensations Night Club.

Friday, April 17, Morning and afternoon schedule to be announced; 7 p.m., Grand Entry, Pow Wow starts.

Pow-Wow/Wacipi, Friday through Sunday, April 17-19:

Saturday, April 18, 5K Run and Walk (Contact: Frank Sage, 777-9529).

Saturday and Sunday, April 18-19, Men's Basketball Tournament, Hyslop Sports Center (Contact: Derrick Dauphanais, 777-9786). For more information on Time-Out Week, call Dan Henry or Merry Ketterling at 777-4314.

Pow-Wow/Wacipi, April 17-19:

Announcer: Tom Iron, Standing Rock; Arena Director, Russ McDonald, Spirit Lake; Host Drum: TBA each session; Drum split to first 25 registered drums; Grand Entries: Friday, April 17, 7 p.m.; Saturday, April 18, 1 and 7 p.m.; Sunday, April 19, 1 and 6 p.m.; Admission is $7/weekend or $5/day, six and under and 60 plus are free. Saturday Feast during supper break. Craft stands will be on the second floor, Hyslop Sports Center.

Gordon Henry, Vice President for Student Affairs, will be honored at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, April 19.

For more information on the Pow-Wow/Wacipi, call Shannon or Michelle Fox at 772-4706.

Thurs., April 16 -- TEST, College-Level Examination Program (CLEP), 200 McCannel Hall, 8:30 a.m.

Thurs., April 16 -- OPEN FORUM, University Senate will hold an open forum, non-procedural discussion on the budget reductions and the impact on academic programs and University operations, Room 7, Gamble Hall, 4:05 p.m.; the forum is open to the entire campus community.

Thurs., April 16 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for Susan L. Neste, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Educational Administration, 208 Education Building, 9 a.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Thurs., April 16 -- MEETING, University Curriculum Committee, 303 Twamley Hall, 3 p.m.

Thurs., April 16 -- COMPUTER SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM, "Allocating ATM Bandwidth to Groups of Cooperating and Uncooperating Real-time Distributed Applications," presented by David Anderson, 106 Streibel Hall (formerly CAS II), 3 p.m.

Thurs., April 16 -- CELEBRATION TEA, the President's Advisory Council on Women (PAC-W) Celebration Tea, North Dakota Museum of Art, 4 p.m.; contact Sara Hanhan at 777-3162 before Tues., April 14, if you would like an invitation as seating is limited.

Thurs., April 16 -- ENGLISH LECTURE SERIES, Jane Kurtz (English) will speak on "Acquiescing to the Demands of Story: The Shaping of a Novel for Publication," 116 Merrifield Hall, 4 p.m.

Thurs., April 16 -- LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary Sciences) LECTURE, "Managing Floods and Flood Plains: Hard Lessons Learned from the New Year's Floods in California," presented by Jeffrey F. Mount, Department of Geology, University of California at Davis,Lecture Bowl, 100 Leonard Hall, noon.

Thurs., April 16 -- MICROBIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY SEMINAR, "The Role of Protein Folding in Export in Escherichia coli," presented by graduate student Ipsita Mallik, Room 5520, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, 10:30 a.m.

Thurs., April 16 -- RETIREMENT RECEPTION for Bob Klinkhammer (Social Work), Holiday Inn, 3 to 5 p.m.; RSVP to Beverly at 777-3774 by Thursday, April 9.

Thurs., April 16 -- VIDEO PRESENTATION, "Learning Disabilities and Discipline: When the Chips Are Down," featuring Richard Lavoie; Parent Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Rd., 12:10 to 1 p.m.; call 795-2765 to register or for more information; child care provided.

Thurs., April 16 -- COMMUNITY CONCERT for children of all ages with Peter Alsop, Westward Ho, 7 p.m.; sponsored by the Parent Education Resource Center; call 795-2765 for more information; free and open to the public.

Thurs., April 16 -- SOUP FOR THE SOUL, Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., 12:15 to 1 p.m.; everyone is welcome.

Thurs., April 16 -- CELEBRATING THE CULTURE OF NATIVE AMERICANS, members of our Native American community will share their culture through music, dance, song, food, stories and artifacts, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; everyone is welcome to this free event; call 777-4231 for more information.

Thurs. And Fri., April 16-17 -- WHEELER LECTURE SERIES, Roy C. Brown and Betty E. Lemmon of the Department of Biology, University of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette, will present at 7:30 p.m. Thurs., April 16, "Clues to the Origin of Land Plants: Ancient Patterns of Cell Division," and at noon Fri., April 17, "Cytoplasmic Domains and the Control of Cell Division in Plant Development"; both lectures are in 141 Starcher Hall.

Thurs. And Fri., April 16-17 -- WORKSHOP, "Nurturing Children and Families for Positive Growth," Westward Ho; call Randy Slavens at Northeast Human Service Center, 795-3000, for more information; sponsored by the Parent Education Resource Center.

Thurs. through Sun., April 16-19 -- 8TH NATIONAL INDIAN NURSING EDUCATION CONFERENCE hosted by the RAIN Program of the Quentin N. Burdick Indian Health Program and the College of Nursing; conference opens at 6 p.m. Thursday, April 16, and closes at noon Sunday, April 19; sessions are open to the public.

Fri., April 17 -- INTEGRATED STUDIES WEEKLY SEMINAR DISCUSSION, "Sophie's World" (pp 149-403), Jostein Gaarder, 116 O'Kelly Hall, 10 a.m. to noon; call Pat at 777-3015 or Carl at 777-3058 for more information.

Fri., April 17 -- INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE VISITING INDUSTRIAL SCIENTISTS/ENGINEERS PROGRAM, Patrick Murray, Nalco Chemical Company, will present a seminar, "Water Soluble Polymers in Industrial Water Treatment," 138 Abbott Hall, noon.

Fri., April 17 -- GREEN AND WHITE DAY, President Baker has approved this day for employees to wear UND colors and jeans to show support for our Sioux athletes.

Fri., April 17 -- FIRE HALL THEATER PLAYERS, "Radio Daze," a light-hearted look at radio theater of the Forties, North Dakota Museum of Art, 8 p.m.; open to the public and admission is free.

Fri., April 17 -- FASTPITCH, UND at Mankato State University (conference), Mankato, Minn.

Sat., April 18 -- TEST, Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), 7 Gamble Hall, 8 a.m.

Sat., April 18 -- TEST, Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), 102 Witmer Hall, 8:30 a.m.

Sat., April 18 -- TEST, American Dietetic Association Examination (ADA), 109 Leonard Hall, 8 a.m.

Sat., April 18 -- RECITAL, Melanie Krepp Senior Composition, Josephine Campbell Recital Hall, Hughes Fine Arts Center, 2 p.m.

Sat., April 18 -- FIRST NORTH DAKOTA FESTIVAL OF MALE VOICES, United Lutheran Church, 324 Chestnut St., 3 p.m.; participating along with the Varsity Bards will be the SDSU Statesmen from South Dakota State University and approximately 50 high school male singers from throughout the region; concert is free and the public is invited.

Sat., April 18 -- RESIDENCE HALL REUNION DINNER for UND faculty and staff and their families who lived for periods of time in UND housing during the flood aftermath.

Sat., April 18 -- CAR WASH, Dakota Space Society (DSS), student organization of the Space Studies graduate program, will hold a car wash at the Hugo's parking lot on 32nd Ave. S., next to the movie theater, from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.; $4 per car wash for non-students and $3 for students.

Sat., April 18 -- BASEBALL, UND vs. University of South Dakota, Kraft memorial Field, 1 p.m. (seven-inning doubleheader).

Sat. and Sun., April 18-19 -- FASTPITCH, UND at Mankato State University Tournament, Mankato, Minn.

Sun., April 19 -- CONCERT, Wind Ensemble and University Band, Empire Theatre, 4 p.m.

Sun., April 19 -- UNIVERSITY PROGRAM COUNCIL EVENT, "The Lost World -- Jurassic Park," Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, 9 p.m.; free admission.

Sun., April 19 -- BASEBALL, UND vs. Morningside College, Kraft Memorial Field, 1 p.m. (seven-inning doubleheader).

Mon., April 20 -- MEETING, General Education Committee, 303 Twamley Hall, 3 p.m.

Mon., April 20 -- MEETING, Graduate Committee, 305 Twamley Hall, 3:05 p.m.

Mon., April 20 -- CULTURAL PLURALISM DAY, Chester Fritz Auditorium, 9 a.m. to noon, opening remarks by President Kendall Baker, Grand Forks Mayor Pat Owens and East Grand Forks Mayor Lynn Stauss; morning will feature the musical group "Jazz Poets Society" and an inter-cultural play, as well as other activities. The day's events will spread to the Memorial Union Ballroom and the cultural centers on campus for the afternoon; the Ballroom will open at noon and will feature information booths highlighting student organizations and cultural groups on campus. A "Feast of Cultures" is slated from 5 to 7 p.m. on the lawn of the Memorial Union (weather permitting). The "Jazz Poets Society" will play from 10 p.m. to midnight in the Ballroom.

Mon., April 20 -- DOCTORAL EXAM set for Michael Friez, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1370 Medicine and Health Sciences, 1:30 p.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Mon., April 20 -- DOCTORAL EXAM set for Dong Ho Lee, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Energy Engineering, 268 Upson Hall II, 3 p.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Mon., April 20 -- AIDS EDUCATION PROGRAM, "Friendship in the Age of AIDS," T.J. Sullivan and Joel Goldman are friends from their college days at Indiana University and speak bluntly about sex, drinking, and living with HIV, Chester Fritz Auditorium, 7 p.m.; for more information, contact Kirsten or Mike at 777-3666.

Mon., April 20 -- ASIAN CULTURAL MONTH EVENT, "Cultural Pluralism Day," a day intended to celebrate diversity; the day starts with a gathering in the Chester Fritz Auditorium at 9 a.m. with opening remarks by President Kendall Baker, Grand Forks Mayor Pat Owens, and East Grand Forks Mayor Lynn Stauss; the morning will feature "Shades," an inter-cultural play; Seven Feathers Dancers; Wayne Fox, Hoop Dance; as well as other activities. The day's events will spread to the Memorial Union Ballroom and the cultural centers on campus for the afternoon; the Ballroom will open at noon and will feature informational booths highlighting student organizations and cultural groups on campus; a "Feast of Cultures" is slated for 5 to 7 p.m. on the lawn of the Memorial Union (weather permitting); "T.J. and Joel" are the speakers in the Chester Fritz Auditorium at 7 p.m., and the Jazz Poet's Society, a multicultural group from Richmond, Va., will play from 10 p.m. to midnight in the Ballroom (a reception for the Jazz Poet's Society will begin at 8:30 p.m.).

Mon., April 20 -- JACK HAGERTY LECTURE features Bob Hagerty, editor/reporter of the Wall Street Journal in Atlanta, Ga. Until March, Hagerty lived in Hong Kong as the managing editor of the Asian Wall Street Journal. He is the son of the late Jack and Marilyn Hagerty. Jack, for whom the lecture is named, was the long-time editor of the Grand Forks Herald and Marilyn continues to write for the Herald. The event will be at 1 p.m. in the Holiday Inn.

Mon., April 20 -- "FAMILY TALK," from 9:30 to 11 a.m.; also offered Monday, April 27 and May 4; Parent Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Rd.; call 795-2765 to register or for more information; child care provided.

Mon., April 20 -- "WORKING WITH YOUR CHILD'S TEMPERAMENT," also Monday, April 27; Parent Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Rd., 7 to 9 p.m.; call 795-2765 to register or for more information.

Mon., April 20 -- BASEBALL, UND vs. Jamestown College, Kraft Memorial Field, 2 p.m. (seven-inning doubleheader).

Tues., April 21 -- 9 O'CLOCK BRIEFING by President Baker, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, 9 a.m.; will include showing of a new video on UND flooding and recovery.

Tues., April 21 -- DOCTORAL EXAM set for Antoinette James, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Counseling Psychology, 318 Montgomery Hall, 9:30 a.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Tues., April 21 -- FOURTH ANNUAL McNAIR SCHOLAR RESEARCH FORUM, Fred Orth Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, 1 to 5:15 p.m.; faculty, staff and students are invited to attend the formal presentations of the McNair Scholar research projects completed during the 1997-98 academic year.

Tues., April 21 -- FLOOD OBSERVANCE ACTIVITIES, Monthly Community Meeting at 9 a.m., Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union; Return to the Red Tag Diner, noon to 1 p.m., Food Services Warehouse; Social and Refreshments, 2 to 4 p.m., Memorial Union Ballroom with exhibits, displays and videos, with free ice cream, cake and beverages.

Tues., April 21 -- OPEN HOUSE, School of Engineering and Mines, Upson I Hall, Upson II Hall, Harrington Hall, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; free registration at the entrance to Upson I Hall; attended by regional elementary, middle school, and high school students, as well as UND students, faculty and staff.

Tues., April 21 -- INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARD deadline for proposals requiring full board review for Fri., May 1, meeting.

Tues., April 21 -- ASIAN CULTURAL MONTH EVENT, "Vietnamese History and Culture," Era Bell Thompson Cultural Center, 2800 University Ave., 11 a.m. to noon; also movie, "Blue Kite," at the Center from 7 to 9 p.m.; both events free and open to the public.

Tues., April 21 -- BASEBALL, UND vs. Bemidji State University, Kraft Memorial Field, 1:30 p.m. (seven-inning doubleheader).

Tues., April 21 -- FASTPITCH, UND at North Dakota State University, Fargo, N.D.

Tues. through Fri., April 21-24 -- FLOOD VIDEO, UND Television Center will telecast various flood videos on cable channel 3, beginning at 8:30 p.m. each evening and running for approximately two hours.

Tues. through Sat., April 21-25 -- THEATRE, "Tartuffe," popular Moliere comedy, Burtness Theatre, 7:30 p.m.; cost is $5; call 777-2085 for tickets.

Wed., April 22 -- DOCTORAL EXAM set for Rosemary Barke, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Counseling Psychology, 318 Montgomery Hall, 11 a.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Wed., April 22 -- NORTH DAKOTA EDUCATION CONNECTION RECRUITING FAIR, Memorial Union Ballroom; registration forms are available at Career Services, 280 McCannel Hall or online at www.und.nodak.edu/dept/career.

Wed., April 22 -- LECTURE, "The Treasures of the Macedonian Royal Tombs," presented by Eugene Borza, Professor Emeritus of Ancient History at Penn State and Adjunct Professor of Classical Studies at Concordia College, 303 Gillette Hall, 4 p.m.

Wed., April 22 -- FEAST AND FOCUS PROGRAM, "Just Between Us," Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon to 1 p.m.; everyone is welcome.

Wed., April 22 -- ASIAN CULTURAL MONTH EVENT, "Chopstick Lessons," Era Bell Thompson Cultural Center, 2800 University Ave., 11 a.m. to noon; from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.; free and open to the public.

Wed., April 22 -- STAFF SENATE INFORMATIONAL FORUM, 303 Gillette Hall, 3:30 p.m.

Wed., April 22 -- EARTH DAY, UND students will celebrate by engaging in a recycling war; Sierra Club is sponsoring a Flood Commemorative Walk at 9 a.m. in University Park; call Janice at 777-4878 or Heidi at 594-4099 for more information.

Wed., April 22 -- PARENT EDUCATION RESOURCE CENTER PROGRAM, "How to Talk So Kids Will Listen and Listen So Kids Will Talk," also Wednesday, April 29, May 13, 20 and 27; Parent Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Rd., 1 to 2:30 p.m.; call 795-2765 to register or for more information; child care provided.

Wed., April 22 -- FREE DEFENSIVE DRIVING COURSE for UND employees and a member of their family, 211 Rural Technology Center, 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. call the Safety Office at 777-3341 to register and get directions.

Wed., April 22 -- BASEBALL, UND vs. Northern State College, Kraft Memorial Field, 2 p.m. (seven-inning doubleheader).

Thurs., April 23 -- LAST DAY TO SUBMIT FINAL COPY OF THESIS OR DISSERTATION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL.

Thurs., April 23 -- DOCTORAL EXAM set for Shirley Greves, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Teaching and Learning, 104 Education Building, 8:30 a.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Thurs., April 23 -- CEREMONY, Naming of John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences and Dedication of Odegard Hall, Chester Fritz Auditorium, 2 p.m.; reception follows in Odegard Hall.

Thurs., April 23 -- LUNCH BOX SPECIAL, "The New IDEA" presented by Rick Blair, Director of Family Advocacy and Support Services with ARC Upper Valley; Parent Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Rd., 12:10 to 12:50 p.m.; call 795-2765 to register or for more information; child care provided.

Thurs., April 23 -- PARENT EDUCATION RESOURCE CENTER PROGRAM, "Systematic Training for Effective Parenting," also Thursday, April 30, May 7, 14 and 21; Parent Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Rd., 7 to 8:30 p.m.; call 795-2765 to register or for more information.

Thurs., April 23 -- SOUP FOR THE SOUL, Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., 12:15 to 1 p.m.; everyone is welcome.

Thurs., April 23 -- ASIAN CULTURAL MONTH EVENT, "Crafts and Fashions of Asia," Era Bell Thompson Cultural Center, 2800 University Ave., noon to 2 p.m.; movie, "Man and Woman, Eat and Drink," also at the Center from 7 to 9 p.m.; both events free and open to the public.

Thurs., April 23 -- CELEBRATING THE CULTURE OF TAIWAN/FORMOSA, UND's Taiwanese students will present their culture through literature, artifacts, slides and food, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; everyone is welcome to this free event; call 777-4231 for more information.

Thurs. and Fri., April 23-24 -- CONFERENCE, Common Course Numbering Conference, Capitol Building, Bismarck (continues the work begun at Fargo conference); call Elizabeth Hampsten or Janet Kelly Moen for more information.

Fri., April 24 -- EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP FORUM, "Educational Leadership for a New Millennium," featuring Terrence Deal of Vanderbilt University, River Valley Room, Memorial Union, 10 to 11:30 a.m.: "Leadership and Change in Higher Education"; 2 to 4 p.m.: "Leadership: Standards and Soul" and 4:30 to 6 p.m.: reception; call John Backes at 777-3249 for more information or Tom at 777-3574 to confirm your attendance.

Fri., April 24 -- INTEGRATED STUDIES WEEKLY SEMINAR DISCUSSION, "M. Butterfly," David Henry Hwang, 116 O'Kelly Hall, 10 a.m. to noon; call Pat at 777-3015 or Carl at 777-3058 for more information.

Fri., April 24 -- TECHNOLOGY FAIR, 141 Starcher Hall, 12:15 to 3 p.m.; for more information call Ray Diez or Ron Holten at 777-3061, or Chad Coauette at 777-3114.

Fri., April 24 -- RETIREMENT RECEPTION for Regina Monnig and Mary Wilhite, both of the College of Nursing, Alumni Center, 3 to 4 p.m.

Fri., April 24 -- CONCERT, "Renaissance Around the World: 16th Century Music from Italy and Mexico," by the Collegium Musicum, Josephine Campbell Recital Hall, Hughes Fine Arts Center, 7:30 p.m.; admission is $4 and $2 for students.

Fri., April 24 -- ASIAN CULTURAL MONTH EVENT, "Origami Lessons," Era Bell Thompson Cultural Center, 2800 University Ave., 10 to 11 p.m.; movie, "Red Lantern and Green Lantern," also at the Center from noon to 2 p.m.; both events free and open to the public.

Fri., April 24 -- DENIM DAY, the dollar you pay for the privilege of "going casual" will be sent to the St. Peter, Minn., area recently devastated by a tornado.

Fri., April 24 -- BASEBALL, UND at North Dakota State University, Fargo, N.D., 1 p.m.

Fri., April 24 -- FASTPITCH, UND vs. St. Cloud State University (conference), Apollo Complex.

Fri. and Sat., April 24-25 -- CONDUCTING SYMPOSIUM, Hughes Fine Arts Center, 1 to 5 p.m. Friday, April 24, and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, April 25.

Fri. and Sat., April 24-25 -- FACULTY CONFERENCE, State of the Faculty Conference, Bismarck State College, keynote speaker will be John Frohnmayer, former National education Association chair.

Sat., April 25 -- UNIVERSITY PROGRAM COUNCIL EVENT, "Springfest 1997," University Park, noon to 6 p.m.

Sat., April 25 -- ASIAN CULTURAL MONTH EVENT, Movie, "To Live," Era Bell Thompson Cultural Center, 2800 University Ave., 2 to 4 p.m.; free and open to the public.

Sat., April 25 -- BASEBALL, UND vs. North Dakota State University, Kraft Memorial Field, 1 p.m. (seven-inning doubleheader).

Sat. and Sun., April 25-26 -- FASTPITCH, UND at North Dakota State University Tournament, Fargo, N.D.

Sun., April 26 -- UND HONORS RECITAL, Josephine Campbell Recital Hall, Hughes Fine Arts Center, 2 p.m.

Sun., April 26 -- ANNUAL MASTERWORKS CONCERT, Grand Forks Master Chorale, Holy Family Catholic Church, 1001 17th Ave. S., 7:30 p.m.; the Master Chorale will be joined by the UND Concert Choir; call 777-3376 for ticket information.

Sun., April 26 -- ASIAN CULTURAL MONTH EVENT, Movie, "Shanghai Trias," Era Bell Thompson Cultural Center, 2800 University Ave., 2 to 4 p.m.; free and open to the public.

Mon., April 27 -- MEETING, General Education Committee, 303 Twamley Hall, 3 p.m.

Mon., April 27 -- DOCTORAL EXAM set for Ann R. Brummel, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Teaching and Learning, 104 Education Building, 9 a.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Mon., April 27 -- ASIAN CULTURAL MONTH EVENT, Lecture by Tom T. Oye, World War II veteran of the 442nd Battalion, Memorial Union Lecture Bowl, 10:30 a.m. to noon; reception at the Alumni House from noon to 1 p.m.; he will also speak at the Lecture Bowl from 7 to 9 p.m.; both events free and open to the public.

Mon., April 27, through Thurs., May 7 -- MASTER OF FINE ARTS EXHIBITION, David Harms, Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center.

Tues., April 28 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for Donald Earl Newberry, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Psychology, Room 203, Corwin-Larimore Hall, 3:45 p.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Tues., April 28 -- POP CONCERT (Varsity Bards, Allegro, Jazz Band), Memorial Union, 7:30 p.m.

Tues., April 28 -- ASIAN CULTURAL MONTH EVENT, 522nd documentary "From Hawaii to the Holocaust" and discussion, Era Bell Thompson Cultural Center, 2800 University Ave., 11 a.m. to noon; also movie, "Go For Broke" at the Center from 7 to 9 p.m.; free and open to the public.

Tues., April 28 -- BASEBALL, UND vs. Southwest State University, Kraft Memorial Field, 2 p.m. (seven-inning doubleheader).

Wed., April 29 -- DOCTORAL EXAM set for J. Ken Horton, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Teacher Education: Research Methodologies, 104 Education Building, 9 a.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Wed., April 29 -- ASIAN CULTURAL MONTH EVENT, "Asian Food Sampling," Era Bell Thompson Cultural Center, 2800 University Ave., 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.; "Chopstick Lessons," will be given at the Center from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.; free and open to the public.

Thurs., April 30 -- LAST DAY TO FILE FINAL REPORT ON DEGREE EXAMINATIONS AND INDEPENDENT STUDY COMPLETION IN THE GRADUATE SCHOOL.

Thurs., April 30 -- RETIREMENT RECEPTION for Gordon Henry, Vice President for Student Affairs, Dakota Lounge, Memorial Union, 3 to 5 p.m.

Thurs., April 30 -- VIDEO PRESENTATION, "Raising Careful Confident Kids in a Crazy World," featuring Paula Statman; Parent Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Rd., 12:10 to 1 p.m.; call 795-2765 to register or for more information; child care provided.

Thurs., April 30 -- CINQO DE MAYO CELEBRATION, a celebration of Mexican culture which will include music, dance, food and history behind Cinqo de Mayo, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; everyone welcome to this free event; call 777-4231 for more information.

*******

UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is also available electronically through UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address is http://www.und.nodak.edu.

All articles submitted for publication should be labeled "University Letter" and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu. Attachments to University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number. University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations, Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.

UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

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