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University Letter

April 3, 1998

Volume 35 No. 31

UNIVERSITY LETTER
University of North Dakota at Grand Forks
Vol. 35, Number 31, April 3, 1998

UNIVERSITY LETTER IS ALSO AVAILABLE ELECTRONICALLY in the Events and News section of UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address is: http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/our/uletter.htm

The University Relations Office maintains an index for the University Letter.

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CONTENTS

EVENTS TO NOTE

OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

BILLBOARD

Arts and Entertainment

EVENTS CALENDAR

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HONORS DAY TICKETS ON SALE NOW

The Honors Day luncheon is set for noon Wednesday, April 8, in the Memorial Union Ballroom. The event recognizes presidents and advisors of honor societies, seniors on the President's Roll of Honor, and outstanding students recommended by departments that do not have honor societies. All faculty, staff and students are invited to attend the luncheon; they may purchase tickets ($5 each) in the Office of University Relations, 411 Twamley Hall. The speaker will be Mike Jacobs, editor of the Grand Forks Herald and an Honors Program alumnus.

-- Rita Galloway, Special Projects Coordinator, University Relations.

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PRESIDENT OUTLINES PARAMETERS FOR BUDGET CUTS

At the University Council meeting Tuesday, President Baker outlined the expectations for both real and potential budget cuts. The cuts are occurring for three reasons (for more detail on these, please see last week's University Letter at http://www.und.edu):

1. The University suffered an enrollment decline as a result of the flood, resulting in a $2.8 million shortfall this year and an almost $3 million shortfall next year.

2. Gov. Schafer has requested all state institutions submit a budget for the 1999-2001 biennium that is 95 percent of current allocations, necessitating a $4.5 million cut.

3. If we were to receive a zero-increase budget (or less), there would be cost increases (e.g. in utilities, salaries, etc.) that we would have to cover through reallocation. These total about $3.5 million.

President Baker emphasized that the University is in the early stages of the budget process. The Governor has not said that the University will receive a 95 percent budget, only that he wants one developed. He will make recommendations to the Legislature based on that budget. We will not know our actual budget until a year from now.

However, the enrollment shortfall is real, and we must make up those monies.

Baker has established a process for the budget exercise, and has established targets for each division of the University, which he has divided into four areas: Academic Affairs, Student Affairs, Operations and Finance, and the President's Office. A list of cuts is due from each division by April 20. Baker and the vice presidents will review the cuts and submit a final version to the Chancellor's office the first week of May. The Board of Higher Education is scheduled to act on the cuts May 19, then submit them to the Governor. President Baker hopes that, though time is short, the University community will participate in budget conversations and be involved in the process to the maximum extent possible. He plans to involve advisory groups already in place (i.e. vice presidents, deans council, directors, chairs, and faculty), as well as use the faculty governance process, including the University Planning Council, Restructuring and Reallocation Committee, and the University Senate Executive Committee.

He outlined the following guidelines and parameters for the budget cuts:

1. Think in terms of programmatic change. We can't cut at the edges, because there are none left. We need to cut programs, functions, and services that we currently offer. Cuts cannot be across the board. He realizes that this is difficult, but the mandate from both the Governor and the Board of Higher Education requires programmatic cuts.

2. Think in terms of all funds available to the University, including the general fund, tuition dollars, auxiliary operations, local funds, etc.

3. Submit real possibilities for cuts. We can't put things on the list that we know the Governor and Board will not accept. For example, we cannot say we won't offer a liberal education or heat the University. We must put things on the list that we know may be lost. If we are not sincere and serious about the process, we will be abdicating our responsibility and inviting others to make the cuts.

4. Look to the future. Think of what the University will be like and will need in five years, 10 years, etc.. We need to maintain quality now and in the future, and meet the rapidly changing needs of students in the 21st Century. Technology, though expensive, is necessary for our future. What else is necessary?

Baker emphasized that making the budget cuts is by no means fun, and that it will be extremely difficult. But, he said, there is opportunity here. The University needs to change and have flexibility. If we can free some money, we can increase our flexibility and respond to new needs. And guiding us throughout the process should be this mandate: What can we do to strengthen our programs and the University in the future? How can we use this process to strengthen and enhance our quality and excellence?

President Baker then took questions from the audience. They included the following discussions:

-- Budget cuts will cause negative publicity and could result in further enrollment drops. That point has been expressed to the Governor and Board.

-- Anything that increases enrollment will help decrease budget cuts. All are encouraged to do whatever they can to attract students. One faculty member suggested admitting more graduate students without jeopardizing accreditation.

-- There is no collaboration between institutions on the cuts. The Governor has indicated to the Board of Higher Education that he wants the University System redesigned from the ground up, but not to close any campuses. Baker is talking to President Plough at NDSU and hopes to find creative ways to work together.

-- UND will not be offered any immunity to cuts because of flooding. Nine of the 11 institutions suffered enrollment drops this fall. The only increases were at Bismarck and Dickinson.

-- The hiring freeze should be lifted or modified the first week of May or so. Searches for candidates may continue, but no offers should be tendered until the freeze is lifted. There are about 88 positions currently unfilled.

-- There is concern that if UND drops a program, another institution will pick it up.

-- A statewide program retention and closure commission was suggested to look at programs throughout the entire University System. Baker noted that duplication is being looked at without a commission.

-- Budget reduction targets for each division are, in the first round, weighted to take some pressure off Academic Affairs. In round three, the Finance and Operations division would be protected because the utility increases would be too heavy. The budgets in Operations and Academic Affairs are largely salaries.

Baker closed by stating that he doesn't want to cut budgets, but has to. "I believe there are opportunities for our University in this. We need to be a different University. We are moving forward and changing. We must continue that change, painful as it is, and think of the future. We can design the University of the future, not have someone design it for us."

-- Jan Orvik, Editor.

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CILT JOINS NEW MEDIA CENTERS

The Center for Instructional and Learning Technologies (CILT) proposal to join New Media Centers has been reviewed and accepted. UND is one of only 100 in the world and the only one in the University System to join New Media Centers. Amherst College, Rutgers, Vassar College and Yale University number among the 16 colleges and universities invited to join New Media Centers.

New Media Centers is a non-profit, 501(c)(3) organization helping institutions of higher education enhance teaching and learning through the use of new media. Bringing together pioneers in the new media field from academia and industry, NMC creates a collaborative network of institutions and corporations serving as a catalyst to integrate new media into education.

New Media Centers identifies academic institutions around the world best suited to serve as models for innovation, both on campus and in their communities. NMC and its corporate members then help them acquire and use state-of-the-art new media technology to create hands-on laboratories. These laboratories offer an ideal setting for beta-testing, software development and the training of tomorrow's workforce.

Acting as the program hub for its members, the NMC national staff convenes both traditional conferences and electronic forums to discuss the key pedagogical, technological and legal issues facing educators and corporations in the new media realm. New Media Center institutions work with each other and with NMC corporate members to develop the new technology needed for education. Individual centers are also encouraged to develop community-based programs, such as in-service training workshops for primary and secondary school teachers and professional development courses for lifelong learning.

-- Kathy Smart, Director, Director, Center for Instructional and Learning Technologies.

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EVENTS TO NOTE

MEDICAL RESEARCH DAY SCHEDULE CHANGED

The 18th Annual Frank N. Low Research Day will be held Friday, April 3, in the Wold Learning Resources Center, School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

The schedule follows:

8:25 a.m., opening remarks; 8:30 a.m., "Liver and Pancreatic Islet Beta-Cell Enzymes in the Tuning and Retuning of Ambient Blood Glucose Levels in Health and Disease" presented by Robert Nordlie (Biochemistry and Molecular Biology); 9:15 a.m., "The Use of Mouse Models of Human Disease" presented by Paul Epstein (Pharmacology and Toxicology); 10:30 a.m., "Animal and Human Studies on the Relationship between Eating Disorders and Substance Abuse," presented by Blake Gosnell (Neuroscience); 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., poster presentations: staff members of the Harley E. French Library of the Health Sciences will demonstrate access to full text electronic journals, PubMed, MEDLINE through Webspirs, and the web version of ODIN. They will be available to share searching techniques and provide technical advice in the cluster room area adjacent to the Fercho Atrium; 2 p.m., "Immunological Studies with a Mouse Model of Giardiasis," presented by Martin Heyworth (Internal Medicine, Fargo) and at 2:45 p.m., announcement of poster award and closing remarks. -- School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

EDITOR'S NOTE: Keynote speaker John Hassell was forced to cancel his appearance due to a death in the family.

-- Jan orvik, Editor, University Letter.

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RECEPTION WILL HONOR REBECCA MOORE FOR BOOK

The Department of Philosophy and Religion invites all interested colleagues and friends to a reception honoring Rebecca Moore on the publication of her book, "Jews and Christians in the Life and Thought of Hugh of St. Victor" (University of South Florida Studies in the History of Judaism, 1998). The reception will be held Friday, April 3, from 4 to 5 p.m. at the J. Lloyd Stone Alumni Center.

-- Scott Lowe, Philosophy and Religion.

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PSYCHOLOGY CANDIDATES PRESENT COLLOQUIUMS

Amy Copeland, a candidate for a Clinical Psychology position in the Psychology Department will present a colloquium on Friday, April 3, at 3:30 p.m. in 302 Corwin/Larimore Hall. Dr. Copeland will present the results of her research on smoking cessation.

Jennifer Wiley, a candidate for a faculty position in Experimental Psychology, will present a colloquium on Monday, April 6, at 3:30 p.m. in 302 Corwin/Larimore Hall. Dr. Wiley will present the results of her research on the influence of domain knowledge on text-processing and problem solving. Everyone is welcome.

-- Tom Petros, Chair, Psychology Search Committee.

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INTEGRATED STUDIES INVITES COMMUNITY TO BOOK DISCUSSIONS

The Integrated Studies Program invites all interested members of the campus community to join the weekly seminar discussions held every Friday from 10 a.m. to noon in 116 O'Kelly Hall. This semester's remaining discussions will be on the following works: April 3, "The Yellow Wallpaper," Charlotte Perkins Gilman; April 17, "Sophie's World" (pp 149-403), Jostein Gaarder; April 24, "M. Butterfly," David Henry Hwang; May 1, "The End of Education," Neil Postman.

Please contact Pat Sanborn at 777-3015 or Carl Barrentine at 777-3058 for more details.

-- Yvonne Holter, Humanities and Integrated Studies.

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PHI BETA KAPPA SCHOLAR WILL PRESENT LECTURE

Murray Louis, an internationally renowned dancer and choreographer and the co-founder of the Nikolais and Murray Louis Dance Company, is this year's Phi Beta Kappa visiting scholar. He will present an evening lecture titled "A Conversation with Murray Louis," Monday, April 6, at 8 p.m. in the Fred Orth Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union. This event is free and open to the public.

His visit is sponsored by the UND chapter of Phi Beta Kappa and the Office of the President.

-- Edmund Clingan, Assistant Professor of History and Vice President, Phi Beta Kappa.

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GRAND NEW JOB FAIR IS APRIL 6

Faculty and staff are asked to encourage students to participate in the Grand New Job Fair Monday, April 6, in the Memorial Union Ballroom from 2 to 8 p.m. The Fair is part of the 1,000 UND Student Retention Initiative and is sponsored by the Offices of Workforce Development and Career Services. For more information regarding the Fair, call Career Services at 777-3904.

-- Mark Thompson, Director, Career Services.

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GABRYNOWICZ WILL GIVE FINAL TALK IN FACULTY SERIES

Space Studies Professor Joanne Gabrynowicz will deliver the final presentation in the Faculty Lecture Series on Tuesday, April 7. Her talk, "Of Faith, Framers and Farmers: A Space Odyssey," will begin at 5 p.m. Tuesday, April 7, in the North Dakota Museum of Art. The lecture will be preceded by a reception at 4 p.m. Earlier this year, Jeffrey Lang (Biology) spoke on "The Puzzle of Sex in Reptiles," Donald Miller (Visual Arts) spoke on "Thoughtful Impressions in Clay: The Cable Years," and Jay Meek (English) spoke on "Paul Cezanne and the Durango Kid: The House of Poetry."

From 1954 to 1988, about 160 faculty members delivered talks about their work to colleagues, students and friends as part of the University's most venerable lecture series.

At a gathering of UND's Chester Fritz Distinguished Professors in August 1997, a decision was made to resurrect the Faculty Lecture Series. Its goal is to enhance UND's academic atmosphere by showcasing the scholarly lives of several faculty selected from across the campus. The lectures aim to present, with some depth and rigor, the scholarly questions and goals of the faculty members. The series is funded through the UND President's Office.

Joanne Gabrynowicz received the Juris Doctor degree from Benjamin Cardozo School of Law, studying constitutional law under the eminent Constitutional scholar Telford Taylor. She testified before the National Commission on Space and was a member of the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment Earth Observation Advisory Panel and the National Research Council Committee on Issues in the Transborder Flow of Scientific Data.

Gabrynowicz has received research fellowships from the NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Program and the USGS EROS Data Center/National Satellite Land Sensing Data Archive. In 1997 she became the first woman to serve as Dean for the NASA Summer Space Academy.

-- Faculty Lecture Series Committee.

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SEMINAR DISCUSSES SLEEP DISORDERS

A seminar, "Sleep and Sleep Disorders: What Is It and Do You Really Need It?" will be presented by Jane Popovich, Sleep Investigation Unit, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, at noon Wednesday, April 8, in 141 Starcher Hall.

-- William Sheridan, Biology, Seminar Coordinator.

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ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COLLOQUIUM SERIES SET

The Electrical Engineering Department invites everyone to attend its Colloquium Series. Jeff Scheoss from Honeywell will be our guest speaker. He will give two presentations, the first at 11 a.m. Tuesday, April 7, in 217 Harrington Hall. He will discuss diagnosing faults through acoustic emission technology where bearing failures, crack detection, and interfacial friction are monitored to provide the means for real-time, continuous measurement and assessment of vehicle health, or machinery condition. He will also discuss the application of sensors, distributed sensor architecture, instrumentation, and analysis techniques to reduce maintenance time and costs and to perform an actual maintenance-on-demand.

The second presentation is Tuesday, April 7, at 2 p.m. in 217 Harrington Hall. Scheoss will talk about project management techniques in industry.

Please contact me at hsalehfa@sage.und.nodak.edu or at 777-4432 if you have questions or if you would like to give a colloquium.

-- Hossein Salehfar, Electrical Engineering.

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WAC WILL DISCUSS ESSAY EXAMS

The next meeting of the Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) Discussion Group will be Wednesday, April 8, from noon to 1 p.m. The topic for the meeting will be "Essay Tests: Writing Them, Grading Them, and Preparing Students to Take Them." For more information on the meeting, or to sign up to attend, call the WAC office at 777-3600 or e-mail to hawthorn@badlands.nodak.edu.

-- Joan Hawthorne, WAC/WC Coordinator.

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RECEPTION WILL HONOR CAROL RYGG

On Wednesday, April 8, a reception will be held in the Edna Twamley Room from 2 to 4 p.m. to honor Carol Rygg, who is retiring. Please come and wish Carol well on her retirement.

-- Darin Lee, Campus Postal Services.

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CHEMISTRY SEMINAR FEATURES FOOTBALLS

"Footballs as Catalysts and Superbases," a chemistry seminar, will be presented by John Verkade of Iowa State University at 4 p.m. Thursday, April 9, in 138 Abbott Hall. Dr. Verkade is an internationally-recognized nonmetals chemist and an expert on the element phosphorus. He is also known for his entertaining lecturing style and for his highly readable book on molecular orbital theory. The public is invited. Please note special day and time.

-- Lothar Stahl, Assistant Professor of Chemistry.

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FACULTY WORKSHOP TO DISCUSS STUDENT WRITING

"When Bad Writing Happens to Good Students" is the topic of a workshop scheduled for 3 to 5 p.m. Wednesday, April 15, in 114 Merrifield Hall. Open to faculty and GTAs in all disciplines, the session is designed to address questions such as: Why do students who seem to understand the material in class have trouble articulating their understanding in writing? What is the relationship between learning new concepts and being able to write about those concepts in clear, coherent language? How do we respond when this happens? Do we send students to the Writing Center to work on their writing? Or do we regard the writing problems as a sign of positive growth -- evidence of a mature student's natural and inevitable struggle to make sense of new learning?

Presenting at the workshop will be Tom Steen (HPER), SuEllen Shaw (Teaching and Learning), and Joan Hawthorne (University Writing Program). Each will share brief examples of writing produced by students struggling to apply newly learned concepts in their disciplines. Workshop participants will then have the opportunity to discuss what is going on in the writing, why the problems may have occurred, and how the instructor might respond to the writing. Refreshments will be provided.

If you plan to attend, please call the University Writing Program at 777-3600 or e-mail rankin@badlands.nodak.edu.

-- Libby Rankin, University Writing Program.

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FIRST UND PRESIDENT IS TOPIC OF TALK

At noon Wednesday, April 15, in 300 Merrifield Hall, the History Department will present a talk by Kenneth Smith, doctoral candidate in History, "Christian Civilization and Higher Education on the Northern Plains: The Case of William Maxwell Blackburn, First President of UND." There will be a question and discussion period following the talk, which is open to all. Bring your lunch. Regular attendees: please note the room change. For more information please contact me.

-- David Rowley, History, 777-3380.

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UND TO CELEBRATE CULTURAL PLURALISM DAY APRIL 20

The University will celebrate Cultural Pluralism Day Monday, April 20. Co-sponsored by the UND Cultural Awareness Committee and the UND Multicultural Awareness Committee as their first joint project, the day is intended to celebrate diversity.

The day starts with a gathering in the Chester Fritz Auditorium, 9 a.m. to noon. In addition to opening remarks from President Kendall Baker, Grand Forks Mayor Pat Owens and East Grand Forks Mayor Lynn Stauss, the morning will feature the musical group "Jazz Poets Society" and an inter-cultural play, as well as other activities.

The day's events will spread to the Memorial Union Ballroom and the cultural centers on campus for the afternoon. The Ballroom will open at noon and will feature information booths highlighting student organizations and cultural groups on campus.

A "Feast of Cultures" is slated for 5 to 7 p.m. on the lawn of the Memorial Union (weather permitting). The "Jazz Poets Society" will play from 10 p.m. to midnight in the Ballroom.

Related activities are: Wednesday, April 8, "Day of Silence," 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Wednesday, April 15, "In Whose Honor," noon and 5 and 6 p.m., Memorial Union Lecture Bowl; and Monday, April 20, "Jack Hagerty Lecture," sponsored by the UND School of Communication and the Grand Forks Herald, 1 p.m. at the Holiday Inn. This year the lecture features Bob Hagerty, editor/reporter of the Wall Street Journal in Atlanta, Ga. Until March, Hagerty lived in Hong Kong as the managing editor of the Asian Wall Street Journal. He is the son of the late Jack and Marilyn Hagerty. Jack, for whom the lecture is named, was the long-time editor of the Grand Forks Herald. Marilyn continues to write for the Herald.

-- Sharon Rezac Andersen, Director, International Centre.

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EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP FORUM SET

A forum for the discussion of issues facing educational leaders in elementary, secondary, and postsecondary institutions, "Educational Leadership for a New Millennium," featuring Terrence E. Deal, Vanderbilt University, author of "Leading with Soul: An Uncommon Journey of Spirit" (1995), and "Reframing Organizations: Artistry, Choice, and Leadership" (1991), and other books and articles will be held Friday, April 24, in the River Valley Room of the Memorial Union.

Topics to be discussed include: 10 to 11:30 a.m., "Leadership and Change in Higher Education"; 2 to 4 p.m., "Leadership: Standards and Soul"; and 4:30 to 6 p.m., reception.

For more information about session content, please call John Backes (Educational Leadership) at 777-3249. Please call Tom at 777-3574 to confirm your attendance.

The program is sponsored jointly by the Department of Educational Leadership, the Office of the President, the Office of Instructional Development, the College of Education and Human Development, Division of Continuing Education, UND Educational Leadership Association (UNDELA) and Grand Forks Public Schools.

-- Dave Vorland, Assistant to the President.

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OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

SUMMER, FALL REGISTRATION BEGINS APRIL 6

Registration for the 1998 summer term will be from Monday, April 6, through Friday, May 8, and for the fall term from April 6 through Friday, Sept. 4. Students will register and drop/add using the ALFI System (Access Line For Information). Students who have proper signatures for registration actions not permitted by ALFI may add these courses at the Office of Admissions and Records, second floor, Twamley Hall, during normal office hours starting Tuesday, April 7. Students may register on or after appointment times as printed on their registration forms.

--- Veriena Garver, Admissions and Records Officer.

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STUDENT EVALUATION FORMS AVAILABLE

All colleges have received UND Student Evaluation Forms and departments have been notified that they can ask for copies at their respective Deans' Office. Departments have received directions on how faculty are to administer the forms and how students are to complete them. Faculty are reminded to inform students to fill in the numbers for the course call number. If you are unsure of the call number please check with your department. If you have questions about any procedures related to the evaluation forms please feel free to contact the office of Institutional Analysis at 777-4358.

-- Dean Schieve, Office of Institutional Analysis.

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MUSIC COURSE OMITTED FROM SUMMER COURSE LISTING

A summer session course for non-majors was accidentally omitted from the summer course schedule. MUS 220: Music in America carries three credits, General Education, Arts and Humanities with Gary Towne; call #92240.

The course covers basic listening skills, Jazz, Rock, Folk, Blues, Popular, Classical, Historical, and Native American Music, and has a cassette for home listening with book. It will be held May 11 to June 5, MTWR from 9 a.m. to noon, 164 Hughes Fine Arts Center. Call me at 777-2826 or 772-1982 for more information.

-- Gary Towne, Associate Professor of Music.

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DOCTORAL EXAM SET FOR CAROLE MILNER

The final examination for Carole Milner, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Teaching and Learning (Special Education), is set for 9 a.m. Wednesday, April 8, in 104 Education Building. The dissertation title is "Paraprofessionals in Inclusive Classrooms: Working Without a Net." Myrna Olson (Teaching and Learning, Special Education) is the committee chair.

Members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

-- Harvey Knull, Dean, Graduate School.

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FRCAC APPLICATIONS DUE APRIL 14

The third deadline for submission of applications to the Faculty Research and Creative Activity Committee (FRCAC) is Tuesday, April 14. Travel applications will be considered at that time only for travel that will occur between April 14 and Oct. 15. No research or publication applications will be considered at that time.

The Committee reminds applicants to carefully prepare their proposals and be specific and realistic in their budget requests. Although the FRCAC encourages submission of travel requests, the Committee takes into consideration the recent FRCAC awards granted to each applicant. Priority will be given to beginning faculty and first-time applicants.

Applications are available at the Office of Research and Program Development, 105 Twamley Hall, 777-4279. An original and seven copies of the application must be submitted to ORPD prior to the deadline. Applications that are not prepared in accordance with the directions on the forms will not be considered by the Committee.

-- Harmon Abrahamson (Chemistry), Chair, Faculty Research and Creative Activity Committee.

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NOT JUST FOR ADVISORS: RAISING A "D" GRADE

To raise a D grade, a student may have the alternative of retaking a final examination at the time of the first regularly scheduled final examination in the subject if it meets with the approval of the department and dean of the course and the student's advisor, except in the Schools of Law, Medicine, and Nursing. If a student decides to retake the final examination, approval must be obtained from the instructor and department chair of the course and the dean of the college offering the course. No re-examination will be given except at the time of the regularly scheduled examinations at the end of each semester.

-- Student Academic Services.

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GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

RESEARCH, GRANT OPPORTUNITIES LISTED

Following are research and grant opportunities. For more information, contact the Office of Research and Program Development at 777-4278.

CENTER FOR CREDIT UNION RESEARCH

Support is provided for established academic researchers to conduct research projects that provide independent analyses of key issues faced by the credit union movement and consumers of financial services. Current topics of special interest to the sponsor are analysis of the non-profit sector (economics); customer detection (marketing); expansion into business lending; analysis of corporate taxation (finance); and smart cards and advanced delivery systems. Researchers from all disciplines are encouraged to submit innovative proposals. Funding is available up to $40,000. Projects that can be completed within 12 months are preferred. Interested researchers should send a one-two page description of a proposed project and a vitae. Deadline: None. Contact: Dr. William A. Kelly, Jr., Director, 608/263-6907; fax 608/265-2736. bkelly@bus.wisc.edu.

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CALGARY INSTITUTE FOR THE HUMANITIES

Senior Research Fellowships provide support for humanities scholars who either retire regularly or take early retirement, but who still wish to be fully active research scholars. Any work in the traditional humanities is eligible. Fellowships are tenable at the University of Calgary; duration is one year. Applications must be made in the year immediately prior to retirement.

Visiting Research Fellowships, tenable at the University of Calgary for 4-12 months, provide support for humanities scholars of established reputation, although less-established scholars are eligible if they will have held a doctorate or equivalent qualification at least 2 years prior to the fellowship's tenure. Any work in the traditional humanities is eligible.

Traditional humanities include disciplines such as languages and literatures, philosophy, history, and the philosophical and historical aspects of the social sciences, arts, sciences, and professional studies. Deadline: 11/28/98. Contact: Director, 403/220-7238; fax 403/282-7822; CIH@acs.ucalgary.ca.

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ENERGY FOUNDATION

The Foundation Grants Program provides support for projects to assist the nation's transition to a sustainable energy future by promoting energy efficiency and renewable energy. Awards are made in the following areas: utilities, buildings, transportation, renewable energy, and integrated issues. Special emphasis is placed on regional initiatives. Grants range from $2,000-$850,000. Deadline: None. Contact: 415/561-6700; fax 415/561-6709; energyfund@ef.org; http://www.ef.org.

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DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE)

The Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Research Program (98-15) supports the analysis of costs and benefits of potential actions with respect to the control of greenhouse gases and possible climate change. A common theme to topics funded is support of integrated assessment of global climate change, which is defined as analysis of climate change from the cause, such as greenhouse gas emissions, through impacts, such as changed energy requirements for space conditioning due to temperature changes. It may be implemented as a computer model. High priority topics are: Technology Innovation and Diffusion, Emissions Trading, Supply Curves for Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gases, Supply Curves for Land Use, and Representation of Carbon Management Technologies. Support may be requested for up to 3 years; annual budgets are expected to range from $30,000-$150,000. Collaboration with researchers in other institutions is encouraged. Deadline: 4/20/98 (Preapplication); 5/21/98 (Formal Application). Contact: John Houghton, 301/903-8288; fax 301/903-8519; john.houghton@oer.doe.gov; http://www.er.doe.gov/production/grants/fr98_15.html.

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH)

The Neurosciences Technology Development (PA-98-050; supersedes PA-98-012) Program encourages submission of new research project grant (R01) and exploratory/developmental research grant (R21) applications to develop innovative technologies, methodologies, or instrumentation for the study of the biology of the brain. Research is solicited that will explore new approaches, test imaginative new ideas, and challenge existing paradigms in technologies to study the development, structure, function, and aging of the brain in both human and animal models. Also solicited is research that will develop significant enhancements to existing technologies important to neuroscience, and that will translate a scientific concept into the basis for a future technology that may advance understanding of important neuroscience research problems. Research solicited can include tools and approaches that relate to any and all aspects of neuroscience. Deadlines: 6/1/98, 10/198, 2/1/98. Contact: ORPD or the NIH homepage (http://www.nih.gov) for the complete announcement and list of contact persons.

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NATIONAL CENTER FOR RESEARCH RESOURCES

The Innovative Approaches to Developing New Technologies (PAR-98-047) Program solicits exploratory/developmental grant (R21) applications to support innovative approaches to the development of technologies exploring new research paradigms in engineering, instrumentation, physical sciences, mathematics or computer science applicable to all areas of biomedical research. The projects should provide the opportunity to develop new technologies, methods, devices, and materials that can be used in research aimed at gaining a greater understanding of fundamental elements of biological phenomena as well as potentially providing a basis for the development of new products useful in all aspects of biomedical research and health care. These efforts should lead to new approaches to the solution of basic research questions in order to prevent, diagnose, and treat disease and disability and ultimately to improved human health. Deadlines: 6/1/98, 10/1/98. Contact: ORPD or the NIH homepage (http://www.nih.gov) for the complete announcement and list of contact persons.

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TAPPI FOUNDATION

The Research Funding Program provides support for grants to initiate non-proprietary, precompetitive research in fundamental sciences and engineering of importance to the paper and related industries. Seed money will be provided up to $40,000 for one year. Current research needs of the industry include: energy, environmental concerns, fibrous raw materials, papermaking processes, pulping, recycling, sensors and process control, surface and structure treatments. Advances in these process areas are dependent upon developments in the fields of engineering, physics, chemistry, and the biological, material, and informational sciences. A dedicated effort is being made to fund proposals from a wide range of research institutions, particularly those not traditionally associated with the pulp and paper industry. Investigators who are new to the pulp and paper industry are especially encouraged to participate. Deadline: 6/30/98. Contact: Patricia A. Stiede, 770/209-7211/7266; fax 770/446-6947; http://www.tappi.org.

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JOHN M. OLIN FOUNDATION

Grants are offered in the following areas: 1) research on the formulation, implementation and evaluation of public policy in the social and economic fields (e.g., regulatory policy, tax policy, fiscal policy, monetary policy, welfare policy); 2) American Institutions--to promote understanding of the moral, cultural, and institutional foundations of free government (e.g., studies of the American Constitution, the operation of American political institutions, and moral and cultural principles underlying these institutions); 3) law and the legal system--public interest law and studies related to the judicial system, jurisprudence, and the relationship between law and economics; 4) strategic and international studies--projects that address the relationship between American institutions and the international context in which they operate (e.g., national security affairs, strategic issues, American foreign policy, and the international economy). Support may be provided for research, institutional support, fellowships, professorships, lectures and lecture series, books, scholarly journals, journals of opinion, conferences and seminars, or television and radio programs. Deadline: None. Contact: Janice B. Riddell, William Voegeli, or Damon A. Vangelis, Program Officers, 212/661-2670; fax 212/661-5917; jriddell@jmof.org, wvoegeli@jmof.org, dvangelis@jmof.org, or inquiry@jmof.org; http://www.jmof.org/.

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NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION (NASA)

The ROSAT Guest Observer Program (AN 98-OSS-01) solicits proposals for participation in the NASA OSS program to acquire and analyze scientific data from the R”ntgensatellit (ROSAT). Proposals are sought for observations to be carried out beginning about November 10, 1998, and lasting 12 months. The announcement is available at http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/oss by selecting "Research Opportunities." Printed copies may be requested from arida@rosserv.gsfc.nasa.gov or from Office of Guest Investigator Programs, Code 660.1, Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA, Greenbelt, MD 20771; 301/ 286-2291. Obtain additional programmatic information from Dr. Paul Hertz, Code SR, 202/358-0351; paul.hertz@hq.nasa.gov. Deadline: 6/30/98.

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COUNCIL FOR INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE OF SCHOLARS

Fulbright Scholar Awards for US Faculty and Professionals. An array of country and regional programs offer a variety of opportunities for lecturing and research abroad. Many awards are not restricted by discipline. Awards are made in the following disciplines: agriculture, American history, American literature, anthropology and archaeology, architecture and urban planning, area studies, art, art history, biological sciences, business administration, chemistry, communications and journalism, computer science, creative writing, economics, education, engineering, environmental sciences, geography, geology, history (non-U.S.), language and literature (non-U.S.), law, library science, linguistics, mathematics, medical sciences, music, philosophy, physics and astronomy, political science, psychology, public administration, religious studies, sociology and social work, TEFL/applied linguistics, and theater and dance. Opportunities range from 2-12 months. Contact: 202/686-7877 or -4000; cies1@ciesnet.cies.org; http://www.cies.org/. Deadline: 8/1/98.

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DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE: INVESTIGATOR-INITIATED RESEARCH

The Creating the Tools Program (document #SL000240) provides support to develop, test, and evaluate new and transferable technologies, practices, and techniques for the criminal justice system. Priority will be given to proposals to improve the abilities of criminal justice agencies to perform critical missions or enhance performance. Both the developmental function and the evaluative realm are of interest, including needs assessment and field testing of new technologies and their impacts on the performance of personnel and organizations. Improved and affordable information management within and across all justice functions is of particular interest. Technology programs and topics of ongoing interest are: Nonintrusive Concealed Weapons and Contraband Detection Technology, Vehicle-Stopping Technology, Investigative and Forensic Science, Enhanced DNA Testing Technology, Officer-Protection Technology, Less-than-lethal Incapacitation Technology, Information Data Management, Counterterrorism Technology, Crime Mapping and Crime Analysis, Location and Tracking Technology, Secure Communications, Noninvasive Drug Detection.

The Understanding the Nexus Program (#SL000240) challenges researchers from the social and behavioral sciences to explore and develop further the theoretical linkages between criminal activity and other social phenomena and to verify the correlations and temporal connections through empirical observation and analysis. Examples of topics encouraged are: Effects of drug consumption on criminal activity and of criminal activity on drug consumption; connections between disorder offenses (and rule breaking) and the commission of felonies; the influence of child abuse and neglect on the victim's potential for future criminal behavior; connections among such factors as community labor markets, unemployment, poverty, and race, as well as the development of criminal lifestyles within families and communities; juvenile drug use and the escalation of juvenile firearms violence; research on drugs and alcohol and their connections with domestic violence; and involvement of juveniles in criminal infrastructures (e.g., gangs and consignment thefts).

The Rethinking Justice Program (#SL000240) encourages studies to improve the delivery of justice and public safety by building upon the existing base of research and technology knowledge and by testing key hypotheses. Studies should examine ways to achieve the purposes of the justice system, such as swift and certain apprehension of criminals, fair and speedy trials, appropriate punishments, and concern for crime victims. Investigators could also consider new ways to conceptualize and deliver justice as well as enhance the responsiveness of the justice system in modern society. Sample topics are: Redefining the Missions of Criminal Justice Agencies, Involving the Community in Delivering Justice, Benefitting from Victims' Perspectives on Justice System Outcomes, Exploring the Role of the Courts, Integrating Justice Concepts, or Incorporating Technological Innovations.

Applicants are encouraged to take their own approach or suggest their own topics of interest. Grants generally range between $25,000-$300,000 and for 1-2 years. Deadlines: 6/16/98, 12/15/98. Contact: 800/851-3420, 800/421-6770; askncjrs@ncjrs.org; http://www.ncjrs.org.

-- Sally Eckert-Tilotta, Assistant to the Director of Research and Program Development.

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BILLBOARD

GOOD FRIDAY IS HOLIDAY

In accordance with State Board of Higher Education directives, Friday, April 10, will be observed as Good Friday by faculty and staff members of the University. Only those employees designated by their department heads will be required to work on this holiday.

-- Marlene Strathe, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, and Diane Nelson, Director, Personnel Services.

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HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY HOURS:

Library of the Health Sciences Easter hours are: Thursday, April 9, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Friday, April 10, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, April 11, 1 to 5 p.m.; Sunday, April 12, closed; Monday, April 13, 8 a.m. to midnight.

-- April Byars, Library of the Health Sciences.

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MEMORIAL UNION HOURS:

The Memorial Union will be closed Friday, Saturday and Sunday, April 10-12, for the Easter Break. Regular hours will resume Tuesday, April 14. The schedule for Thursday, April 9, and Monday, April 13 are: Lifetime Sports Center, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Info Center, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Service Center, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 9 and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 13; Copy Stop, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 9 and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 13; Union Food Court, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. April 9 and closed April 13; Bookstore, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Administrative Office, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Craft Center/Sign and Design Studio, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Dining Center, 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 9 and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 13; Barber Shop, 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Corner Deli, 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 9 and closed April 13; University Learning Center, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Computer Learning Lab, 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.; Building Hours, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

-- Marsha Nelson, Facilities Coordinator, Memorial Union.

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MEDICAL STUDENTS DIE IN BOATING ACCIDENT

It is with deep sadness the School of Medicine and Health Sciences announces the deaths of Buckley Zahradka, a first-year resident-physician in family medicine, Fargo, and Craig Cameron, a graduate student in the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Grand Forks. They were among three victims of a boating accident Sunday, March 29, near Hillsboro.

Dr. Zahradka, son of Shirley Zahradka of Grand Forks and the late William Zahradka, was a graduate of the school's M.D. Class of '97. Last week, he had completed half of an eight-week rotation in obstetrics at Altru Hospital in Grand Forks. He was engaged to be married to Jody Thompson, a classmate and first-year resident-physician in the school's internal medicine residency program in Fargo. Jody's brother, Trevor Thompson of Minot, was the third victim in the tragedy.

Cameron, son of David and Carol Cameron of Staples, Minn., was completing work on his Ph.D. degree under the advisorship of Kenneth Ruit (Anatomy and Cell Biology). He had been accepted to medical school at the University of Minnesota-Duluth. He is survived by his wife, Rhonda, and eight-year-old son, Justin.

-- H. David Wilson, dean of the UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

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COMPUTERS AVAILABLE FOR TRANSFER

The Computer Center has available for transfer 13 IBM-PC computers. All computers are in good working order and have the following specifications: IBM Value Point PC with VGA monitor Model 425SX/SI, 486SX 25 MHz processor with 16 meg. of ram, hard drives range in size from 125 meg to 170 meg., Quad speed CD-ROM installed with 3 «" floppy drive (one computer does not have CD-ROM), keyboard and PS/2 mouse included, Ethernet card installed for internet connection.

These computers have Windows 3.1 and basic internet applications like Netscape 3.0, telnet and Eudora installed. They are capable of running MSOffice 4.3 and WordPerfect 6.1. Hard drive size will limit the number of applications that can be installed. The processors are not upgradeable. They are not capable of running Windows 95.

By April 9, please send your request to Dorette Kerian at dorette_kerian@mail.und.nodak.edu, P.O. Box 9041, specifying quantity and use. Academic use will have higher priority.

-- Dorette Kerian, Associate Director, Computer Center.

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HEALTH SCREENING SET FOR APRIL 8

Community health students from the College of Nursing, in cooperation with the Safety Office, will conduct a blood pressure, blood sugar, hemoglobin, vision and hearing clinic Wednesday, April 8, for UND faculty and staff, from 12:45 to 3 p.m. in the lunch room of the Plant Services building. The hearing screening portion will be in the Plant Services Cottonwood Room. The re-screening is scheduled for Wednesday, April 15, from 12:45 to 2 p.m., also in the lunch room of Plant Services.

The only requirement for participating in this screening is that you not smoke, drink coffee or exercise for at least 30 minutes before having your blood pressure measured.

-- Carol Berg, Assistant Professor, Family and Community Nursing, and the Safety Office.

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"REHIRE LETTERS" DISTRIBUTED FOR STUDENT EMPLOYEES

"Rehire Letters" for Summer and Fall 1998 have been distributed to departments who hired a new student in the past year using institutional funds. If you will be rehiring a student through TCC 312 (institutional) monies, but did not receive a letter, we can send you one. Please call Job Service at 777-4395.

-- Dennis Junk, Job Service.

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NEW STAFF HANDBOOKS DISTRIBUTED

New UND Staff Employee Handbooks are now being distributed by Personnel Services. The handbook, which is in a new format, contains the current NDUS Human Resource Policy Manual as well as other information pertinent to staff employees and their supervisors. The handbooks are being sent to departments for distribution to each staff employee. They will also be provided to new employees as they begin employment. If additional Handbooks are needed, please contact Personnel Services at 777-4361 or personnel_services@mail.und.nodak.edu.

-- Diane Nelson, Director, Personnel Services.

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FUNDS SOUGHT FOR UND HABITAT FOR HUMANITY PROJECT

This week marks the beginning stages of preparation for "The House the UND Community Built," a project that incorporates UND with the works of Habitat for Humanity. The overall goal of this project is to encourage UND students, faculty, and staff to raise funds and volunteer in the construction of a Habitat home located in Grand Forks.

UND students are working this week to raise a portion of the $10,000 goal that has been set for the UND Habitat house. Some of the fund raisers that are planned for this week are a "Money War" competition between the Greek chapters and a donation and awareness drive being conducted by the UND Habitat chapter. Those wishing to show their support for these fund raisers can stop by the main floor of the Memorial Union from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, April 3.

The House the UND Community Built is a project that was started by the Red River Valley Habitat for Humanity affiliate, the UND chapter of Habitat for Humanity, and United Campus Ministries. Co-chairs and supporters of the project are Marilyn Hagerty, writer for the Grand Forks Herald, and Toby Baker, UND First Lady and voice of radio show "Toby Talk." The construction of the Habitat house will be planned in conjunction with the Homecoming 98 festivities next fall. Actual building on the house is scheduled to begin on Sept. 14 and wrap up during the week of Homecoming which is Oct. 6-10. A majority of the construction will take place on campus. The house will be moved to its permanent location a few blocks north of campus after Homecoming weekend. Students, faculty, and staff will register this spring to participate in fall construction.

With the recent housing shortage in Grand Forks due to the spring flood of 1997, there couldn't be a more appropriate time for this project, which is the first of its kind for the University. The House the UND Community Built was initially scheduled to take place during 1997 Homecoming, but plans were postponed a year due to flooding.

-- UND Habitat President Tracey Turner, 772-2889, and Vice President Jana Sandin, 795-4829.

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APRIL U2 COURSES LISTED

April University Within The University classes include:

Search Engines: Avoiding Road Kill on the Information Superhighway, Tuesday, April 7, 108 Chester Fritz Library, contact Joanne Evanoff, 777-4638.

Analyzing Conflict, Tuesday, April 7, Conflict Resolution Center, call 777-3664.

Office Ergonomics, Wednesday, May 6, from 9 to 10 a.m. and again from 1 to 2 p.m., 235 Rural Technology Center, call Kara at 777-2128 to register.

CILT SEMINARS

Power Point 1, Tuesday, April 7, 1 to 4 p.m.; Thursday, April 16, 9 a.m. to noon.

Power Point 2, Wednesday, April 22, 9 a.m. to noon.

Power Point 3, Friday, April 3, 1 to 4 p.m.

Technology in the Classroom: Orientation to Media Equipped Classrooms: Wednesday, April 15, 8 Sayre Hall.

MS Publisher, Wednesday, April 29, 1 to 4 p.m.

Digital Camera, Friday, April 3, 11 to noon; and Monday, April 20, 3 to 4 p.m.

Adobe Pagemill, Wednesday, April 8, 2 to 4 p.m.; Tuesday, April 14, 3 to 5 p.m.; Monday, April 27, 10 to noon.

Slide and Flat Copy Scanning, Monday, April 6, 9 to 10 a.m.; Tuesday, April 28, 11 a.m. to noon.

Macromedia Director 6.0, Thursday, April 16, Session I, 1 to 5 p.m.; Wednesday, April 22, Session II, 1 to 5 p.m.; Thursday, April 23, Session III, 1 to 5 p.m.

Contact Lynn Weiner at 777-4150 for all CILT seminars.

Defensive Driving, Wednesday, April 8, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and Wednesday, April 29, 12:30 to 4:30 p.m., 211 Rural Technology Center. Call Norma at 777-3341 to register.

Legal Issues in Public Employment, Wednesday, April 22, 8 to 11 a.m., 235 Rural Technology Center. Call Kara at 777-2128 to register.

-- Jo Coutts, University Within the University, Continuing Education.

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STATE FLEET OPERATORS SHOULD TAKE DRIVING COURSE

A free Defensive Driving Course for UND employees and a member of their family will be held Wednesday, April 8, from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at 211 Rural Technology Center, and again on Wednesday, April 22, from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m., also at RTC. This course is required in accordance with a memo received from Paul Feyereisen, State Fleet manager in Bismarck. The following criteria was given for any UND employee who is authorized to drive State fleet vehicles:

1. Any individual who operates a State Fleet vehicle daily;

2. Any individual who operates a State Fleet vehicle at least once a month;

3. Any individual who has received a traffic violation or had an accident while operating a State Fleet vehicle within the past calendar year;

4. Any operator of seven-, 12-, or 15 passenger vans transporting four or more passengers at least once per month.

This course may reduce your North Dakota insurance premiums and could possibly take away points from your driving record. We will be holding subsequent classes the second and fourth Wednesday of each month until May. The second Wednesday will be 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and the fourth Wednesday will be 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. These will be held at the Rural Technology Center. Please call the Safety Office at 777-3341 to register and get directions.

-- Norma Haley, Safety Office.

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FREE COUNSELING OFFERED

The UND Psychological Services Center is offering free confidential crisis counseling for flood-related issues. Please call 777-3691 for telephone or on-site appointments.

-- Psychological Services Center.

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PSYCHOLOGICAL AND EDUCATIONAL ASSESSMENT CENTER OPENED

Tom Petros and Andrea Zevenbergen (Psychology) announce the opening of the University of North Dakota Center for Psychological and Educational Assessment. The Center provides comprehensive assessment services for children, adolescents, and adults. These assessments focus on learning, attention, and memory. Psychological difficulties (e.g., depression, anxiety) that can impact upon intellectual and educational functioning will also be examined. The Center accepts insurance payments from Blue Cross/Blue Shield of North Dakota, Medicare, and Medicaid. In addition, private payment will be accepted on a sliding scale fee basis. Appointments at the Center can be arranged by calling 777-4215.

-- Tom Petros and Andrea Zevenbergen, Psychology.

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RESEARCH PARTICIPANTS SOUGHT

Participants are needed for research projects dealing with language and memory. You must be over 55 years of age to participate. All projects take less than one hour, are conducted on the UND campus, and participants will make $5 to $10 for their time and effort. If interested please call me.

-- F. Richard Ferraro, Psychology, 777-2414.

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WOMEN SOUGHT FOR STUDY

Women who are experiencing feelings of sadness or depression are needed for a study about parenting. To participate, you must be a mother of a child (or children) ages 3 to 5. You will be paid $20 for one hour of participation. In the study, you will fill out questionnaires and be interviewed about your thoughts and feelings regarding parenting. If you are interested in participating or would like to find out more information, please contact me.

-- Andrea Zevenbergen, Psychology, 777-3017.

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ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

TIME-OUT AND WACIPI SCHEDULE LISTED

The UND Indian Association will hold its 29th Annual Time-Out and Wacipi Tuesday through Sunday, April 14-19, at the Hyslop Sports Center and Memorial Union. The theme is "A Time of Pride, A Time of Celebration."

The schedule is as follows:

Time-Out Week, Tuesday through Sunday, April 14-17:

Tuesday, April 14: 11 a.m., Opening Ceremonies, Chuck Ross Opening Prayer, Honor song by Catfish Bay, Red River Valley Room, Memorial Union; noon, "In Whose Honor" video, Theresa Brockie, Memorial Union basement; 1 p.m., presentation by Chuck Ross, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union; 3 p.m., "A Team Named Sioux" video, Vaughn Three Legs, Don Greyday and David Dodds, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union; 6 p.m., "In Whose Honor" video, Theresa Brockie, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union.

Wednesday, April 15, 10 a.m., Presentation, Rick Thomas, "Parenting: How To Help Our Youth With Alcohol and Drug Problems," Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union; 2 p.m., presentation, Frank Sage, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union; 7 p.m., Fashion Show, "Indians/Cowboys," Ballroom, Memorial Union.

Thursday, April 16, 9:30 a.m., presentation, "The Interface of Western Medicine and Traditional Holistic Healing," Marilyn Youngbird, sponsored by INMED, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union; 1:30 p.m., presentation, "The Philosophy of Native American Wellness," Marilyn Youngbird, sponsored by INMED, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union; 5:30 p.m., Banquet, "Honoring the Youth," with speakers Chance Rush and Sarah Jumping Eagle, performance by Bobbi Rae Sage and Catfish Bay, South Ballroom, Memorial Union; 8 p.m., Youth Dance sponsored by B.R.I.D.G.E.S., South Ballroom, Memorial Union; 9 p.m., Adult Dance, Sensations Night Club.

Friday, April 17, Morning and afternoon schedule to be announced; 7 p.m., Grand Entry, Pow Wow starts.

Pow-Wow/Wacipi, Friday through Sunday, April 17-19:

Saturday, April 18, 5K Run and Walk (Contact: Frank Sage, 777-9529).

Saturday and Sunday, April 18-19, Men's Basketball Tournament, Hyslop Sports Center (Contact: Derrick Dauphanais, 777-9786).

For more information on Time-Out Week, call Dan Henry or Merry Ketterling at 777-4314.

Pow-Wow/Wacipi:

Announcer: Tom Iron, Standing Rock; Arena Director, Russ McDonald, Spirit Lake; Host Drum: TBA each session; Drum split to first 25 registered drums;

Grand Entries: Friday, April 17, 7 p.m.; Saturday, April 18, 1 and 7 p.m.; Sunday, April 19, 1 and 6 p.m.; Admission is $7/weekend or $5/day, six and under and 60 plus are free. Saturday Feast during supper break. Craft stands will be on the second floor, Hyslop Sports Center.

Gordon Henry, Vice President for Student Affairs, will be honored Saturday, April 18, after the 1 p.m. Pow-Wow's Grand Entry.

For more information on the Pow-Wow/Wacipi, call Shannon or Michelle Fox at 772-4706.

-- UND Indian Association.

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STUDIO ONE LISTS GUESTS

Wayne Fox is the University of North Dakota's Indian Association President, a student and a hoop dancer. He will be featured on the Thursday, April 2, edition of Studio One. Fox will discuss different types of traditional dancing which will be featured live on Studio One. He will tell us what the dances mean, the training that is involved, his experience as a dancer and why it's so important for Native American awareness and unity.

Fox also counsels young people in the summer and promotes positive thinking. He is helping out with "Time-Out Week" at UND where dancers from all over the United States and Canada come to take "time out" to dance, celebrate, and have togetherness among family and friends. Fox and other dancers will demonstrate some of the traditional dances in the Native American culture.

Studio One is an award-winning one-hour weekly afternoon show featuring news, weather, sports and interviews produced at the UND Television Center. The program airs live on Channel 3 at 5 p.m. on Thursdays. Rebroadcasts can be seen Fridays at noon and 7 p.m., Saturdays at 10 a.m. and noon, as well as Monday through Wednesday at 7 p.m. Studio One also airs in Fargo, Bismarck/Mandan, Minot and Minneapolis.

-- Nicole Ruhn, Studio One Marketing Team.

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GERMAN FILM FESTIVAL CONTINUES

The German Film Festival continues on Friday, April 3, and Sunday, April 5. The films being shown are "David Caspar Friedrich" on Friday and "Fruhlingssinfonie" (Spring Symphony) on Sunday. The films will be shown in 300 Merrifield Hall, beginning at 7 p.m. Both films are in German, with English subtitles. Admission is free.

-- Jerome Bakken, Department of Languages.

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WOMEN'S CENTER LISTS EVENTS

Programs at the Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., include Feast and Focus at noon, Wednesday, April 8, "Bigger, Better and Busier Than Ever!" and Soup for the Soul at 12:15 p.m. Thursday, April 9. Also Wednesday, April 8, at 7 p.m. is "Heather Bishop in Concert" in the Memorial Union Ballroom. Everyone is welcome.

-- Donna Oltmanns, Coordinator, Women's Center.

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INTERNATIONAL CENTRE LISTS EVENTS

The Thursday, April 9, 7 p.m. program at the International Centre, 2908 University Ave., will be "Celebrating the Culture of Canada." Canadians from all across the Great White North at UND will help celebrate their home and native land. Music, artifacts, history and food will help articulate the Canadian spirit. Similarities and differences between Canadians and their American counterparts will be discussed. Please join us.

-- Sharon Rezac Andersen, Director, International Centre.

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SKATE WITH THE SIOUX SET FOR APRIL 8

Attention faculty and staff with kids grades K-6! Bring your kids to the 11th annual "Skate with the Sioux" event. Here's your opportunity to meet and skate with the Fighting Sioux hockey team and the UND Dance Team! The event will be held Wednesday, April 8, from 5 to 6:30 p.m. at Engelstad Arena. Bring your own skates. No sticks or pucks will be allowed on the ice. A milk and cookie break will be sponsored by the American Dairy Association. "Skate with the Sioux" is free to the public. This event is sponsored by Telesis, the Student Alumni Association.

-- Kirsten Carolin, Telesis Co-Advisor, 777-2611.

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DRIVE-IN MOVIE EVENT POSTPONED

The University Program Council regretfully announces the postponement of the Great College Drive-in Movie that was scheduled for April 8. Due to a booking conflict the Great College Drive-in Movie will be postponed until September. An exact date has not been determined. The University Program Council hopes that students and community members will look forward to this event and attend in September. We apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused. For more information contact 777-4202.

-- Tara Wilkens, University Program Council Public Relations.

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GRAD STUDENT DIRECTS EGF HIGH PLAY

East Grand Forks Senior High School will present "The Musical Comedy Murders of 1940," by John Bishop as their spring production. Under the direction of UND graduate student Laurie Hinn, the production will run Thursday through Saturday, April 16, 17, and 18, at 7:30 p.m. each evening. All performances will be held in the Performing Arts Center located within the high school. Ticket prices are $5 for adults and $3 for students.

The play centers on a select group of actors, director, librettist, lyricist, and producer, gathering in an old mansion on a dark and stormy December night, to sell a new Broadway script to the mansion's owner. But when one of the characters winds up dead, there is a frantic search for the killer. The twists and turns of the plot and the elimination of murdered suspects will keep you guessing until the curtain falls. For more information, or to make reservations for "The Musical Comedy Murders of 1940," please call the Performing Arts Center at East Grand Forks Senior High School, 773-3070.

-- Jan Orvik, Editor, for Laurie Hinn.

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IN THE NEWS

"In the News" will be published next week. We had hoped to run it this week, but time and space constraints did not permit it.

-- Jan Orvik, Editor.

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EVENTS CALENDAR

APRIL 1998

(Please contact Mavis at the Office of University Relations, Box 7144, or call 777-4304, if you wish to make changes or have an event included.)

Through Sat., April 4 -- SWIMMING & DIVING, USS Senior National Championships, Minneapolis, Minn.

Through Thurs., April 9 -- MASTER OF FINE ARTS EXHIBITION, Curtis Flexhaug, Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center.

Thurs., April 2 -- MEETING, University Senate, Room 7, Gamble Hall, 4:05 p.m.

Thurs., April 2 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for Paulette Stronczek, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Clinical Psychology, 210 Corwin-Larimore Hall, 8 a.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Thurs., April 2 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for James Daniels, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Biology, 103 Starcher Hall, 2 p.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Thurs., April 2 -- SOUP FOR THE SOUL, Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., 12:15 to 1 p.m.; everyone is welcome.

Thurs., April 2 -- CELEBRATING THE CULTURE OF KOREA, Korean food, artifacts, music, literature, language, and heritage will be presented by Korean students and faculty, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; everyone is welcome to this free event; call 777-4231 for more information.

Thurs., April 2 -- CONCERT, Jazz Ensemble, Ballroom, Memorial Union, 7:30 p.m.

Thurs., Fri. And Sun., April 2, 3 and 5 -- GERMAN FILM FESTIVAL, 300 Merrifield Hall, beginning at 7 p.m.; "Brigitta" will be shown Thursday, "David Caspar Friedrich" on Friday, and "Fruhlingssinfonie" (Spring Symphony) on Sunday; films are in German, with English sub-titles; admission is free.

Thurs. through Fri., April 2-4 -- HOCKEY, National Collegiate Athletic Association Championship, Boston, Mass.

Fri., April 3 -- MEETING, Institutional Review Board, 305 Twamley Hall, 4 p.m.

Fri., April 3 -- FRANK LOW RESEARCH DAY, Wold Learning Resources Center, School of Medicine and Health Sciences. The schedule is: 8:30 a.m., "Liver and Pancreatic Islet Beta-Cell Enzymes in the Tuning and Retuning of Ambient Blood Glucose Levels in Health and Disease," presented by Robert Nordlie (Biochemistry and Molecular Biology); 9:15 a.m., "The Use of Mouse Models of Human Disease," presented by Paul Epstein (Pharmacology and Toxicology); 10:30 a.m., "Animal and Human Studies on the Relationship Between Eating Disorders and Substance Abuse," presented by Blake Gosnell (Neuroscience); 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., poster presentations; 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., Harley E. French Library of the Health Sciences staff will demonstrate access to full text electronic journals, PubMed, MEDLINE through WebSpirs, and the web version of ODIN; 2 p.m., "Immunological Studies with a Mouse Model of Giardiasis," presented by Martin Heyworth (Internal Medicine); 2:45 p.m., announcement of poster award and closing remarks. (NOTE: Keynote speaker John Hassell was forced to cancel his appearance due to a death in the family.)

Fri., April 3 -- PSYCHOLOGY CANDIDATE COLLOQUIUM, Amy Copeland, a candidate for a Clinical Psychology position in the Psychology Department will present a colloquium in 302 Corwin/Larimore Hall at 3:30 p.m.; she will present the results of her research on smoking cessation; everyone is welcome.

Fri., April 3 -- GERMAN FILM FESTIVAL, "David Caspar Friedrich," 300 Merrifield Hall, 7 p.m.; film is in German with English subtitles; admission is free.

Fri., April 3 -- INTEGRATED STUDIES WEEKLY SEMINAR DISCUSSION, "The Yellow Wallpaper," Charlotte Perkins Gilman, 116 O'Kelly Hall, 10 a.m. to noon; call Pat at 777-3015 or Carl at 777-3058 for more information.

Fri., April 3 -- RECEPTION honoring Rebecca Moore (Philosophy and Religion) on the publication of her book, "Jews and Christians in the Life and Thought of Hugh of St. Victor," J. Lloyd Stone Alumni Center, 4 to 5 p.m.

Fri., April 3 -- SATELLITE BROADCAST, the Welfare Reform Academy has scheduled a series of conferences on various topics of welfare reform on the first Friday of each month, from February through June; the conferences will be broadcast from the American Enterprise Institute in Washington, D.C., and will be viewed in 130 Gamble Hall, noon to 3 p.m.; there is no fee to participants; please register by contacting Mike Jacobsen (Social Work) at 777-3768 or mike_jacobsen@mail.und.nodak.edu.

Fri., April 3 -- FASTPITCH, UND at Augustana College, Sioux Falls, S.D.

Fri. And Sat., April 3-4 -- WORKSHOP, "The Art and Culture of French Cuisine," International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 5 to 9 p.m. on Fri., April 3, and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sat., April 4; instructor is Chef Daniel DeGavrillac who grew up in the Pyrenees and Paris; contact Monique, Division of Continuing Education, at monique_clifford@mail.und.nodak.edu for more information.

Fri. and Sat., April 3-4 -- BASEBALL, UND at University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, Colo., 1 p.m. both days (seven-inning doubleheaders).

Sat., April 4 -- TEST, American College Test (ACT), McCannel Hall, 8 a.m.

Sat., April 4 -- TEST, Graduate Record Examination (GRE-General and Subject Examinations), 7 Gamble Hall; 8 a.m. and 2 p.m.

Sat., April 4 -- TEST, Dental Admission (DAT), 114 Witmer Hall, 8 a.m.

Sat., April 4 -- BENEDIKTSON LECTURE SERIES IN ASTRONOMY, "Life in the Universe," presented by George Seielstad, Professor and Associate Dean of the John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences and recently named to the School's Benediktson Chair in Astrophysics, Clifford Hall Auditorium, 10:30 a.m.; call Suezette at 777-4856 for more information.

Sat., April 4 -- FESTIVAL OF WOMEN'S VOICES, United Lutheran Church, 324 Chestnut St., 4 p.m.

Sat., April 4 -- UNIVERSITY PROGRAM COUNCIL EVENT, comedian Eric O'Shea, Ballroom, Memorial Union, 8 p.m.; free admission.

Sat., April 4 -- HANDS-ON LEARNING FAIR, Purpur Arena, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.; an opportunity for children ages 1 « to 7 years and their parents to engage in a variety of fun-loving experiences; call 795-2765 to register or for more information; sponsored by Parent Education Resource Center (PERC).

Sat. and Sun., April 4-5 -- FASTPITCH, UND at Augustana College Tournament, Sioux Falls, S.D.

Sun., April 5 -- PIANO CONCERT by Jane Solose (Music), Josephine Campbell Recital Hall, Hughes Fine Arts Center, 2 p.m.; Solose leads an active career as a featured concerto soloist, recitalist, chamber musician, duo pianist, and master teacher in the United States and Canada.

Sun., April 5 -- CONCERT, Varsity Bards and Allegro, United Lutheran Church, 324 Chestnut St., 3 p.m.

Sun., April 5 -- GERMAN FILM FESTIVAL, "Fruhlingssinfonie" (Spring Symphony), 300 Merrifield Hall, 7 p.m.; film is in German with English subtitles; admission is free.

Mon., April 6 -- PHI BETA KAPPA VISITING SCHOLAR LECTURE, Murray Louis, dancer, teacher, choreographer, and artistic director of the Nikolais and Murray Louis Dance Company of New York will speak,Fred Orth Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, 8 p.m.; free and open to the public; call 777-4381 for more information.

Mon., April 6 -- MEETING, General Education Committee, 303 Twamley Hall, 3 p.m.

Mon., April 6 -- GRAND NEW JOB FAIR, Memorial Union Ballroom, 2 to 8 p.m.; call Career Services at 777-3904 for more information.

Mon., April 6 -- PSYCHOLOGY CANDIDATE COLLOQUIUM, Jennifer Wiley, a candidate for a faculty position in Experimental Psychology, will present a colloquium in 302 Corwin/Larimore Hall at 3:30 p.m.; she will present the results of her research on the influence of domain knowledge on text-processing and problem solving; everyone is welcome.

Mon., April 6 -- VIDEO PRESENTATION, "Understanding Attention Disorders: Preschool Through Adulthood"; Parent Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Rd., 1 to 2:30 p.m.; child care provided.

Mon. And Tues., April 6-7 -- PARENT UNIVERSITY, Eielson Elementary School, GFAFB, 6 to 8:45 p.m.; contact Family Advocacy Outreach Services at 747-7337 for more information; sponsored by Parent Education Resource Center (PERC).

Mon. Through Fri., April 6-10 -- STUDENT EMPLOYMENT WEEK; an opportunity as employers and educators to recognize the contributions student employees make to our campus, and to emphasize the benefits of the student employment programs to our students.

Tues., April 7 -- FACULTY LECTURE SERIES, "Of Faith, Framers and Farmers: A Space Odyssey," presented by Joanne Gabrynowicz, Professor of Space Studies, North Dakota Museum of Art, 5 p.m.; reception at 4 p.m.

Tues., April 7 -- ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COLLOQUIUM SERIES with Jeff Scheoss of Honeywell as the guest speaker; he will give two presentations at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. in 217 Harrington Hall; call Hossein Salehfar at 777-4432 for more information.

Tues., April 7 -- ANALYZING CONFLICT, seminar offered by the UND Conflict Resolution Center, Memorial Union, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; designed to teach participants the major components influencing a conflict and its outcome; cost is $62.500 for students and staff, and includes materials and lunch; call the Conflict Resolution Center at 777-3664 or udcrc@badlands.nodak.edu to register or for more information.

Tues., April 7 -- VIDEO PRESENTATION, "Multiple Intelligences: Discovering the Giftedness in All," featuring Thomas Armstrong, Parent Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Rd., 1 to 2:30 p.m.; call 795-2765 to register or for more information; child care provided.

Tues., April 7 -- SIX-WEEK SERIES, "Parenting for Prevention," offered Tuesday evenings from 7 to 9 p.m.; Parent Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Rd.; call 795-2765 to register or for more information; child care provided.

Tues., April 7 -- UNIVERSITY PROGRAM COUNCIL EVENT, "Chris Miller, father of the movie 'Animal House,'" Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, 7 p.m.; free admission.

Tues., April 7 -- UNIVERSITY PROGRAM COUNCIL EVENT, acoustic guitar Coffeehouse performer, Ballroom, Memorial union, 8 p.m.; free admission.

Tues., April 7 -- BASEBALL, UND at Southwest State University, Marshall, Minn., 1:30 p.m. (seven-inning doubleheader).

Wed., April 8 -- HONORS DAY LUNCHEON, Memorial Union Ballroom, noon; this event recognizes presidents and advisors of honor societies, seniors on the President's Roll of Honor, and outstanding students recommended by departments that do not have honor societies; all faculty, staff and students are invited to attend the luncheon; tickets may be purchased ($5 each) in the Office of University Relations, 411 Twamley Hall; the speaker will be Mike Jacobs, editor of the Grand Forks Herald and an Honors Program alumnus.

Wed., April 8 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for Carole Milner, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Teaching and Learning (Special Education), 104 Education Building, 9 a.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Wed., April 8 -- INTERACTIVE FORUM DISCUSSING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL), International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7:30 p.m.; forum will feature three Fulbright scholars from Russia; call 777-3273 or 777-2663 for more information.

Wed., April 8 -- WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM (WAC) MEETING, "Essay Tests: Writing Them, Grading Them, and Preparing Students to Take Them," noon to 1 p.m.; call the WAC office at 777-3600 to sign up to attend or for more information.

Wed., April 8 -- "DAY OF SILENCE," 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Activity related to Cultural Pluralism Day April 20).

Wed., April 8 -- SEMINAR, "Sleep and Sleep Disorders: What Is It and Do You Really Need It?" presented by Jane Popovich, Sleep Investigation Unit, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, 141 Starcher Hall, noon.

Wed., April 8 -- FEAST AND FOCUS PROGRAM, "Bigger, Better and Busier Than Ever!" Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon to 1 p.m.; everyone is welcome.

Wed., April 8 -- VIDEO PRESENTATION, "Winning at Parenting," featuring Barbara Coloroso, Parent Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Rd., 9 to 11:15 a.m.; call 795-2765 to register or for more information; child care provided.

Wed., April 8 -- HEALTH SCREENING, community health students from the College of Nursing, in cooperation with the Safety Office, will conduct a blood pressure, blood sugar, hemoglobin, vision and hearing clinic for UND faculty and staff, Plant Services lunch room, 12:45 to 3 p.m.; re-screening scheduled for Wed., April 15, from 12:45 to 2 p.m. in the same location.

Wed., April 8 -- RETIREMENT RECEPTION for Carol Rygg (Campus Postal Services), Edna Twamley Room, fourth floor, Twamley Hall, 2 to 4 p.m.

Wed., April 8 -- WOMEN'S CENTER PROGRAM, "Heather Bishop in Concert," Ballroom, Memorial Union, 7 p.m.; everyone welcome.

Wed., April 8 -- UNIVERSITY PROGRAM COUNCIL EVENT, "Breaking-Up," Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, 9 p.m.; free admission.

Wed., April 8 -- FREE DEFENSIVE DRIVING COURSE for UND employees and a member of their family, 211 Rural Technology Center, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. (Also Wed., April 22, from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m.); call the Safety Office at 777-3341 to register and get directions.

Wed., April 8 -- 11TH ANNUAL SKATE WITH THE SIOUX, faculty and staff may bring children grades K-6 to meet and skate with the Fighting Sioux hockey team and the UND Dance Team, Engelstad Arena, 5 to 6:30 p.m.; bring your own skates, but no sticks or pucks will be allowed on the ice; free to the public.

Thurs., April 9 -- LAST DAY TO FILE PRELIMINARY APPROVAL OF THESIS OR DISSERTATION IN THE GRADUATE SCHOOL.

Thurs., April 9 -- CHEMISTRY SEMINAR, "Footballs as Catalysts and Superbases," presented by John Verkade of Iowa State University, 138 Abbott Hall, 4 p.m.

Thurs., April 9 -- SOUP FOR THE SOUL, Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., 12:15 to 1 p.m.; everyone is welcome.

Thurs., April 9 -- VIDEO PRESENTATION, "Learning Disabilities and Self Esteem: Look What You've Done!" featuring Robert Brooks; Parent Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Rd., 12:10 to 1 p.m.; call 795-2765 to register or for more information; child care provided.

Thurs., April 9 -- CELEBRATING THE CULTURE OF CANADA, Canadians from all across the Great White North at UND will help celebrate their home and native land with music, artifacts, history and food, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; everyone is welcome to this free event; call 777-4231 for more information.

Thurs., April 9 -- BASEBALL, UND vs. Augustana College, Kraft Memorial Field, 1 p.m. (seven-inning doubleheader).

Fri., April 10 -- HOLIDAY, GOOD FRIDAY.

Fri., April 10 -- BASEBALL, UND vs. South Dakota State University, Kraft Memorial Field, 1 p.m. (seven-inning doubleheader).

Sat. and Sun., April 11-12 -- FASTPITCH, UND at University of Nebraska at Omaha.

Sun., April 12, through Thurs., April 23 -- BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS SHOW, Brian Earp, Brandon Gunderson, Jon Olson, Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center.

Mon., April 13 -- STUDENT HOLIDAY, EASTER MONDAY.

Mon., April 13 -- PARENT EDUCATION RESOURCE CENTER PROGRAM, "Positive Parenting II," also offered Monday, April 20 and 27; Parent Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Rd., 1 to 2:30 p.m.; call 795-2765 to register or for more information.

Mon., April 13 -- PARENT EDUCATION RESOURCE CENTER PROGRAM, "Strengthening Your Stepfamily," also offered Monday, April 20, 27, and May 4 and 11; Parent Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Rd., 7 to 8:30 p.m.; call 795-2765 to register or for more information.

Tues., April 14 -- INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARD DEADLINE for clinical proposals that require subcommittee and full board review.

Tues., April 14 -- THIRD DEADLINE for submission of applications to the Faculty Research and Creative Activity Committee (FRCAC); travel applications will be considered at that time only for travel that will occur between April 14 and Oct. 15.

Tues., April 14 -- BASEBALL, UND at Bemidji State University, Bemidji, Minn., 1:30 p.m. (seven-inning doubleheader).

Tues., April 14 -- FASTPITCH, UND vs. Moorhead State University (non conference), Apollo Complex.

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Tues. through Sun., April 14-19 -- UND INDIAN ASSOCIATION 29TH ANNUAL TIME-OUT AND WACIPI, "A Time of Pride, A Time of Celebration," Memorial Union and Hyslop Sports Center.

The schedule is as follows:

Time-Out Week, Tuesday through Sunday, April 14-17:

Tuesday, April 14: 11 a.m., Opening Ceremonies, Chuck Ross Opening Prayer, Honor song by Catfish Bay, Red River Valley Room, Memorial Union; noon, "In Whose Honor" video, Theresa Brockie, Memorial Union basement; 1 p.m., presentation by Chuck Ross, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union; 3 p.m., "A Team Named Sioux" video, Vaughn Three Legs, Don Greyday and David Dodds, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union; 6 p.m., "In Whose Honor" video, Theresa Brockie, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union.

Wednesday, April 15, 10 a.m., Presentation, Rick Thomas, "Parenting: How To Help Our Youth With Alcohol and Drug Problems," Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union; 2 p.m., presentation, Frank Sage, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union; 7 p.m., Fashion Show, "Indians/Cowboys," Ballroom, Memorial Union.

Thursday, April 16, 9:30 a.m., presentation, "The Interface of Western Medicine and Traditional Holistic Healing," Marilyn Youngbird, sponsored by INMED, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union; 1:30 p.m., presentation, "The Philosophy of Native American Wellness," Marilyn Youngbird, sponsored by INMED, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union; 5:30 p.m., Banquet, "Honoring the Youth," with speakers Chance Rush and Sarah Jumping Eagle, performance by Bobbi Rae Sage and Catfish Bay, South Ballroom, Memorial Union; 8 p.m., Youth Dance sponsored by B.R.I.D.G.E.S., South Ballroom, Memorial Union; 9 p.m., Adult Dance, Sensations Night Club.

Friday, April 17, Morning and afternoon schedule to be announced; 7 p.m., Grand Entry, Pow Wow starts.

Pow-Wow/Wacipi, Friday through Sunday, April 17-19:

Saturday, April 18, 5K Run and Walk (Contact: Frank Sage, 777-9529).

Saturday and Sunday, April 18-19, Men's Basketball Tournament, Hyslop Sports Center (Contact: Derrick Dauphanais, 777-9786). For more information on Time-Out Week, call Dan Henry or Merry Ketterling at 777-4314.

Pow-Wow/Wacipi, April 17-19:

Announcer: Tom Iron, Standing Rock; Arena Director, Russ McDonald, Spirit Lake; Host Drum: TBA each session; Drum split to first 25 registered drums; Grand Entries: Friday, April 17, 7 p.m.; Saturday, April 18, 1 and 7 p.m.; Sunday, April 19, 1 and 6 p.m.; Admission is $7/weekend or $5/day, six and under and 60 plus are free. Saturday Feast during supper break. Craft stands will be on the second floor, Hyslop Sports Center.

Gordon Henry, Vice President for Student Affairs, will be honored Saturday, April 18, after the 1 p.m. Pow-Wow's Grand Entry.

For more information on the Pow-Wow/Wacipi, call Shannon or Michelle Fox at 772-4706.

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Wed., April 15 -- FACULTY WORKSHOP, "When Bad Writing Happens to Good Students," 114 Merrifield Hall, 3 to 5 p.m.; open to faculty and GTAs in all disciplines; call 777-3600 if you plan to attend.

Wed., April 15 -- HISTORY FOR LUNCH, "Christian Civilization and Higher Education on the Northern Plains: The Case of William Maxwell Blackburn, First President of UND," presented by Kenneth Smith, doctoral candidate in History, 300 Merrifield Hall, noon; bring your lunch (note room change).

Wed., April 15 -- "IN WHOSE HONOR," Memorial Union Lecture Bowl, noon, 5 and 6 p.m. (Related activity to Cultural Pluralism Day April 20).

Wed., April 15 -- FEAST AND FOCUS PROGRAM, "The River Ran Through Us," Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon to 1 p.m.; everyone is welcome.

Wed., April 15 -- PARENT EDUCATION RESOURCE CENTER PROGRAM, "Parents Guide to Temperament," also Wed., April 22 and 29; Parent Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Rd., 9:30 to 11 a.m.; call 795-2765 to register or for more information; child care provided.

Wed., April 15 -- BASEBALL, UND at Northern State College, Aberdeen, S.D., 1 p.m. (seven-inning doubleheader).

Wed., April 15 -- FASTPITCH, UND vs. North Dakota State University (conference), Apollo Complex.

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UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is also available electronically through UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address is http://www.und.nodak.edu.

All articles submitted for publication should be labeled "University Letter" and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu. Attachments to University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number. University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations, Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.

UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

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