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University Letter

April 11, 1997

Volume 34 No. 32



UNIVERSITY LETTER
UNIVERSITY LETTER


UNIVERSITY LETTER IS ALSO AVAILABLE ELECTRONICALLY in the Events and News
section of UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address
is: http://www.und.nodak.edu

The University Relations Office maintains an 
index for the University Letter.

**********
REMEMBER: Conversations About UND's Future: Friday, April 11, noon to 
2 p.m., Memorial Union Ballroom, and Monday, April 14, 7 to 9 p.m., Engelstad
Arena Loft.
**********

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Employees Granted Time Off To Fight Flood
     FLOOD INFORMATION
Protect Equipment From Flood Threat
Aerospace Provides Air Support For Flood Fight
Web Page Gives Flood Information
RWIC provides Flood Information On WWW, Cable
Volunteer Safely
Aviation Groups Cancel Annual Parents' Weekend To Focus On Flood
     EVENTS TO NOTE
Time Out and Wacipi Continues Through April 13
International Investigators To Present At Research Day
Earth Evolution Is LEEPS Lecture Topic
Psychology Schedules Colloquium
Blanket Ceremony Honors Graduates
Math Colloquium Considers Chebshev Sets
Talk To Examine Underrepresentation Of Minorities In Math
Psychology Sets Colloquium
Anthropologist Will Discuss Vikings In Minnesota
EPO Open Enrollment Meetings Set
Television Is Subject Of Free Satellite Seminars
History Schedules Luncheon Lecture
Faculty Candidate Will Present Seminar
Women Studies Salon Meets
High School Students Attend NIPA Conference Here
Open Meetings Set With Candidates For Assistant To Student Affairs
   VP/Multicultural Services Director
H.F. Schaefer III To Present 1997 Abbott Lecture Series
LEEPS Lecture Series Hosts Connecticut Scientist
Keillor, Flint Will Benefit UND Journal
Reception Will Honor Tom Robinson
Spring Commencements Set For May 10 And 11
Summer Seminar Explores Artificial Neural Networks
     OF ACADEMIC INTEREST
Integrated Studies Provides Information For Advisors
Peace Studies Nominations Sought
Applications Sought For Women Studies Affiliates
Doctoral Exam Set For Linda Holdman
     GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS
Fulbright Scholar Award Information Available
Proposals Invited For Purchase Of Minor Instructional Equipment
Four U Faculty Receive NIH Q-Grants
Faculty Research/Creative Activity Travel Applications Due
     BILLBOARD
University Senate Report
Balloting Results Reported For 1997-98 Senate Committees
Academic Catalog Pages Must Be Proofed By April 15
Health Sciences Library Celebrates Library Week
Some Alumni Offices Moved
Wet Sidewalks Won't Be Planked
Students To Conduct Free Health Screening
Computer Center Offers Win '95 Class
New Remote Dialin Facilities Available
Free Defensive Driving Course Offered
UND Space Studies Students, Faculty Head To Russia For
   Space Conference
     ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT
Traditional Musicians Will Perform
Witmer Gallery Lists Events
Burtness Theatre Presents "She Stoops To Conquer"
International Centre Lists Events
Feast Of Nations Will Be April 19
Collegium Musicum Performs April 25
Make Plans To Attend Alumni Days
     FYI
Garden Plots Currently Unavailable
Greeks Hold Kids Carnival Sunday
April 18 Is "Green And White Day"
     CALENDAR OF EVENTS
*******

ATTACHMENTS:
Professional Secretaries Benefit Luncheon
Bookstore Specials
*******


Employees Granted Time Off To Fight Flood

In order to help the City of Grand Forks prepare for the impending flood,
University employees who wish to participate in University-sponsored flood
fighting activities will be granted paid time off to help in the effort,
PROVIDED they work out details with their supervisors. Supervisors are
expected to be as flexible as possible so that as many employees who wish to
may volunteer their time to this crucial effort.

Currently, University-sponsored shuttles are transporting volunteers to the
sandbag filling station on the hour from the Memorial Union. Shuttles are also
leaving from the Union at a quarter-to-the-hour to the sites where dike
workers are needed. Employees are granted paid time off to participate in
these activities.

The University continues to urge students, faculty and staff to continue to
volunteer for flood fighting efforts during non-work hours, as well. Please
wear appropriate foot gear and outerwear.

In addition, the University is assembling an emergency response team to be
able to respond to separate emergency calls from the City of Grand Forks. This
team will be available to respond rapidly to specifically identified flood
emergencies at the University of North Dakota and/or within the City of Grand
Forks.  If you are interested in being part of this team, contact the Plant
Services Communication Center at 777-2591.

I very much appreciate your help and flexibility during this time of city-wide
crisis. -- Kendall Baker, President.
*******

FLOOD INFORMATION

Protect Equipment From Flood Threat

State Fire and Tornado provides the insurance coverage for all state-owned
facilities and equipment. Flood damage is a covered loss, but only at a
minimal level ($10,000 per occurrence). The University has obtained additional
flood insurance for three high-risk facilities on campus: Hughes Fine Arts
Center, Wilkerson and Smith Hall. This additional insurance is on the
structure only. Therefore, ALL departments are strongly encouraged to take the
necessary action to protect their equipment and supplies. Appropriate action
may include moving equipment from basement areas and/or raising equipment off
the floor. If you have any questions, please call. -- Pat Hanson, Director of
Payroll, 7-4228, or Leroy Sondrol, Director of Physical Plant, 7-2592.
*******

Aerospace Provides Air Support For Flood Fight

UND Aerospace is providing air support for the Grand Forks Emergency
Operations Center during the 1997 flood fight. Tuesday, UND Aerospace flew law
enforcement officers out over the English Coulee diversion and holding area,
and over the Red River.  When the Grand Forks Airport reopens, UND Aerospace
flight instructors and students will report on ice jams they spot on the Red
River and other area waterways.

"When we were asked to provide a helicopter today for aerial observation of
the English Coulee diversion system and Red River, we were happy to oblige,"
said UND Aerospace Dean John Odegard. "UND Aerospace, with our fleet of
helicopters and planes, is in a unique position to assist emergency officials
gather the best possible information."

UND Aerospace launched a Bell B206B3 Jetranger carrying Grand Forks Police
Chief Chet Paschke, Grand Forks County Sheriff Dan Hill, and UND Aerospace
Regional Weather Information Center (RWIC) Director Leon Osborne to determine
the threat over overland flooding from the west of Grand Forks, and the
condition of Red River north and south of the city.

"We are also asking our flight instructors and students to watch the Red and
other rivers for ice jams," said Odegard.  "We can put hundreds of pairs of
eyes in the air every day feeding up-to-the-minute information to the EOC."

The UND ice jam spotting system provides for pilots to radio information to
UND Flight Dispatch.  That information is relayed to the UND Aerospace
Regional Weather Information Center and on to the Grand Forks Emergency
Operations Center.

UND Aerospace continues to provide flood information to the public via the
RWIC WWW Flood Page (http://www.rwic.und.edu/flood) and on Grand Forks Cable
TV Channel 3 in cooperation with UND TV. -- John Odegard, Dean, UND Aerospace.
*******

Web Page Gives Flood Information

A World Wide Web page has been developed which contains the official
University flood policy and gives flood updates, as well as links to other
sites containing flood information. It may be accessed through UNDInfo at
http://www.und.edu. -- Jan Orvik, Co-Manager, UNDInfo.
*******

RWIC Provides Flood Information On WWW, Cable

The Regional Weather Information Center (RWIC) has developed a World Wide Web
site with the latest flood information for the Greater Grand Forks area and
emergency contact phone numbers. The address for the WWW site is:
http://www.rwic.und.edu/flood/ 

The website is developed and maintained by the staff of the Regional Weather
Information Center. We are working closely with the Grand Forks Emergency
Management Office to make available important information to the public
including emergency phone numbers and information about how to volunteer for
the sandbagging operation. When the dike walking effort begins, we'll also
have information online about how to volunteer for those activities.

Also available is the latest river level information. The automated system
collects the river level data directly from the river level gauge. Information
on river level change over the past hour, 12 hours, and 24 hours is also
presented. Flood safety information from the Red Cross and the Federal
Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and information from the City of Grand
Forks on how to prepare and protect your home from flood damage is posted on
the site.

Also scheduled to begin soon is flood information broadcast on UND Channel 3
on the TCI cable television system in the Grand Forks/East Grand Forks area.
The cable service will provide river level information, emergency phone
numbers and other information from the Grand Forks Emergency Management
Office. This service will also originate from RWIC and is made possible
through the cooperation of UND TV. 

-- Leon Osborne, Direction, Regional Weather Information Center.
*******

Volunteer Safely

Following are safety tips for flood volunteers.

Some flood assistance/work may be dangerous and physically challenging. If you
volunteer, be sure the tasks in which you participate will in no way present a
danger to your health and/or safety or the health and/or safety of others. 
Medications for colds, lack of sleep, and other circumstances may make you
feel less alert; if this is the case, please refrain from volunteering as the
flood waters and flood assistance/work may be hazardous.

IMPORTANT:  You should get a tetanus shot if you have not received one in the
last 10 years (students, faculty, and staff may receive a free tetanus shot
from Student Health in O'Kelly Hall).

Possible suggestions on how to volunteer safely:

Wear appropriate clothing

*Dress in appropriate layers of clothing so you may respond to weather
conditions (wear caps or other head gear)

*Wear water proof gear on top of other layers if working in wet conditions

*Should you need to remove a layer of clothing be sure to keep waterproof gear
as top layer

*Wear sturdy work shoes that go above the ankle if possible

*Outer protective foot covering(s) should have good tread and provide foot
protection

*Cover your hands with work gloves

*Do not wear contact lenses (wear safety glasses whenever possible or
appropriate)

*Wear snug fitting clothing that is less likely to catch on objects

*No short sleeves or short pants

Working Safely

*There are usually jobs for everyone; make sure the task(s) you are
undertaking is/are within your capabilities

*Use team lifting for anything over 30 pounds and for bulky items

*When performing a repetitive task, make sure to take frequent breaks and
change your position as often as possible

*Avoid walking in flood waters whenever possible; if you find yourself in
standing or flowing water, walk carefully and avoid splashing

*Always work in teams. Never attempt any tasks on your own

*When working around any moving equipment, exercise extreme caution

*If asked, operate only equipment you are qualified to operate and follow all
safety guidelines

*Do not eat, drink, smoke/chew, or apply cosmetics while working in the flood
effort until after you have thoroughly washed your hands and face

When you go home

*Immediately shower, washing thoroughly using an antibacterial soap (Life Boy,
Dial, etc.)

*Wash all clothing including undergarments using a disinfecting detergent (Arm
and Hammer etc.)

*Check yourself for any unnoticed cuts or scrapes; treat appropriately or if
necessary, contact your health care provider

*If you experience any gastrointestinal distress (stomach pain, diarrhea,
nausea), contact your health care provider.

-- Mark Thompson (Law), Flood Volunteer Coordinator.
*******

Aviation Groups Cancel Annual Parents' Weekend 
To Focus On Flood Effort

The two UND Aerospace student aviation organizations that sponsor the annual
Parents' Weekend program in Grand Forks have decided to cancel the activities
scheduled for this coming weekend. The UND chapter of the Ninety-Nines, an
international organization of licensed women pilots, and Alpha Eta Rho, the
international aviation fraternity, say they will now focus their energy on
helping the community flood fight effort.

"It's disappointing to cancel Parents' Weekend which has been a part of spring
aviation activities at UND Aerospace for 20 years, but we know it's the right
thing to do," said Lee Schneider, president of the UND Alpha Eta Rho chapter.
"Our main concern is for the safety of everyone and we don't think asking our
families into Grand Forks at this time in the midst of a flood fight is in
anyone's best interests."

Parents' Weekend annually attracts 300 to 400 parents and family members of
UND Aerospace aviation students to Grand Forks. The weekend includes tours and
an open house of UND Aerospace, aircraft flights with students flying their
parents, contests, and a dinner.

"This community is recovering from one disaster and trying to fight off
another potential disaster," said Ninety-Nines president Jennifer Anderson.
"We need to keep our priorities straight and right now that's helping Grand
Forks get ready." Jeff Kralik, chair of the Parents' Weekend program, says
once they get parents notified, they'll turn their energy to helping the
community. "We had planning and safety meetings scheduled this week which we
will now use to organize volunteer activities among the aviation students,"
Kralik said. "We look forward to bringing our families to Grand Forks, but
we'll just have to wait until next year." -- Tim Burke, UND Aerospace.
*******

EVENTS TO NOTE

Time Out And Wacipi Continues Through April 13

"Honoring Those Who Have Walked Before Us" is the theme of the Indian
Association 28th Annual Time Out and Wacipi, April 7-13.

The Time Out and Wacipi features a number of presentations and culminates with
the annual Pow Wow at the UND Hyslop Sports Center Saturday and Sunday, April
12 and 13.

The Time Out and Wacipi will feature sessions on "Earth Circles: Traditional
Wisdom," presented by Lorain Fox Davis; "Discrimination, Partiality and
Prejudice and Indigenous Controversy," presented by Vivian Delgado; films
"Look Into the Night" and "Follow Your Dreams"; Indian Health Service
Conference sponsored by INPSYDE, RAIN and TRIO Programs, Thursday, April 10,
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Memorial Union Sioux Room; Indian Economic Development
and Tribal Government Conference sponsored by the EAGLE Project, Thursday,
April 10, and Friday, April 11, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; "Indian Law and
Sovereignty," presented by Shirley Cain, attorney; Omnicye Run, Saturday,
April 12, 8 a.m., Hyslop Sports Center; and All Indian Basketball Tournament,
Saturday, April 12, 8 a.m. -- Alex Zenzick and Derrek Johnson, Co-Chairs, Time
Out and Wacipi.
*******

International Investigators To Present At Research Day

Jan Alexander, Deputy Head at Norway's National Institute of Public Health,
Oslo, will deliver the keynote address at the 17th annual Frank Low Research
Day Friday, April 11, in the Wold Center, Medical Science.

David Robinson, Director of the Vascular Research Program, National Heart,
Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md., will
deliver the Special Invited Guest Lecture during the event.

Dr. Robinson also will deliver an address, "The Social Consequences of the New
Biology," Saturday, April 12, at The Woodside Center for Interdisciplinary
Studies in Mentor, Minn. In this talk, he plans to discuss genetic research
and its social and cultural implications. For more information call (218) 637-6600.

The purpose of Frank Low Research Day is to provide a forum for faculty and
students to discuss research interests and activities. Held for the first time
in the spring of 1981, the day was dedicated in the name of Frank Low upon his
retirement as a gesture of recognition for his contributions to research at
the school. Dr. Low, who served 17 years in the school, joined the faculty as
a Hill Research Professor in 1964. He is continuing his research activities as
a Professor Emeritus of Anatomy at Louisiana State University.

The following events will be held in the Wold Center (poster session and
demonstration will be in the Fercho and Vennes atria):

April 11, Low Research Day: 8:25 a.m., Opening remarks, Dean H. David Wilson;
8:30 a.m., Willis Sampson (Physiology), "Brain and Pituitary Adrenomedullin: A
Physiologically Relevant Role in Fluid and Electrolyte Homoestasis and
Cardiovascular Function"; 9:15 a.m., Thomas Hill (Microbiology and
Immunology), "The End of DNA Replication as we Know It"; 10:30 a.m., Burroughs
Wellcome Visiting Professor: Jan Alexander, Deputy Head, Department of
Environmental Medicine and Section head, Division of Food Toxicology at the
National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway, "Heterocyclic Amines from
Cooked Meat - Biological Fate and Role in Colon Carcinogenesis"; 11:30 a.m. to
1:30 p.m., Poster Presentations; 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., The Harley E. French
Library of the Health Sciences will demonstrate updated facts and tips on the
utilization of the networked versions of "Reference Manager" and "Current
Contents." Library personnel will be available to share searching techniques
and provide technical advice in the cluster room area adjacent to the Fercho
Atrium; 1:30 p.m., William Newman (Internal Medicine, Fargo), "Glucose
Monitoring and Diabetes Mellitus"; 2:15 p.m., Special Invited Guest Lecturer:
David Robinson, Director, Vascular Research Program, National Heart, Lung and
Blood Institute, National Institute of health, Bethesda, Md., "Cardiovascular
Research: Now and in the 21st Century"; 3:15 p.m., Richard Wilsnack
(Neuroscience), "How Women Drink: Findings from 15 Years of National
Research"; 4 p.m., Announcement of Poster Awards and Closing Remarks. 

-- H. David Wilson, Dean, School of Medicine and Health Sciences.
*******

Earth Evolution Is LEEPS Lecture Topic

Two LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary Sciences) Lectures will be
presented by Richard Grieve, Geological Survey of Canada in Ottawa on Friday,
April 11.

At noon in Leonard Hall Lecture Bowl, Room 100, he will consider
"Extraterrestrial Impact: The Record and Consequences for Earth Evolution." At
3 p.m. in 109 Leonard Hall, he will discuss "Understanding the Origin and
Evolution of the Sudbury Structure: Then and Now."

The LEEPS lecture series is supported by the Department of Geology and
Geological Engineering, the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Office
of Research and Program Development, Office of Instructional Development and
the Advancing Science Excellence in North Dakota (ASEND) Program. All
interested persons are welcome to attend. For additional information contact
me. -- Dexter Perkins, Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering.
*******

Psychology Schedules Colloquium

The Psychology Department will hold a colloquium in which James Coyne,
University of Michigan, will present "Psychology's New Frontier? Depression in
Primary Care," at 11 a.m. Friday, April 11, in Room 102, Nursing Building.
Everyone is welcome. -- Joan Peterson, Psychology Department.
*******

Blanket Ceremony Honors Graduates

The Quentin N. Burdick Indian Health Programs (INMED, RAIN, and INPSYDE) will
hold their annual Blanket Ceremony and Honor Song for graduates during the
UNDIA Time Out powwow at the Hyslop Sports Center. The ceremony will take
place shortly after the 7 p.m. Grand Entry on Saturday, April 12. UND
students, faculty, staff and the public are invited to attend. -- Jill
Labatte, Indians Into Medicine (INMED).
*******

Math Colloquium Considers Chebyshev Sets

Robert Megginson, University of Michigan, will present a colloquium on
"Convexity of Chebyshev Sets and an Annoying Old Problem" at noon Monday,
April 14, in Witmer 307. A Set S in a metric space X is said to be Chebyshev
if, for every x in x, there is a unique point of S closest to x. Every non-empty closed convex set in the plane is Chebyshev, and, conversely, every
Chebyshev set is convex. Chebyshev sets in more general spaces, particularly
Banach spaces, will be considered. There is one nagging old problem concerning
Chebyshev sets in infinite dimensional Banach spaces. This problem will be
stated and some of its history and futile approaches to solving it will be
discussed. This talk is accessible to graduate students. No special knowledge
of the theory of Banach space will be assumed. Refreshments will be served in
the departmental conference room (Witmer 325) at 11:30 a.m. Everyone is
welcome. -- Bruce Dearden, Associate Professor of Mathematics.
*******

Talk To Examine Underrepresentation Of Minorities In Math

Robert Megginson, University of Michigan, will present a special talk on "The
Leaky Pipeline: Underrepresentation of Native Americans and Other Minorities
in Mathematics" at 3:30 p.m. Monday, April 14, in Witmer 307.

In the last 20 years some progress has been made on the problem of
underrepresentation of minorities in mathematics, particularly Native
Americans. It has been recognized that it is a "pipeline problem:" the
educational pipeline that should bring well-qualified minority students into
our college programs has been so leaky at the precollege levels that the
students are just not there in large enough numbers to be recruited.

This talk will include information on what the mathematics professional
organizations are doing to aid in the attack on the pipeline problem. A
program that is held in Belcourt, N.D., on the Turtle Mountain Reservation
every summer, in which the speaker has been involved for the last six years,
will also be discussed. Other programs that could be models of ways that
colleges and universities could be involved, such as a Mathematical
Association of America project for tribal college faculty, for which the
speaker is the Principal Investigator and which will be held at Arizona State
University this summer, will be mentioned.

Refreshments will be served in the Mathematics Conference Room (Witmer 325) at
3 p.m. Everyone is welcome. -- Bruce Dearden, Associate Professor of
Mathematics.
*******

Psychology Sets Colloquium

The University of North Dakota Psychology Department will hold a colloquium in
which Kristen Vickers, graduate student in Clinical Psychology, will present
"Optimism as a Predictor of Depressive Symptoms Over Time," at noon Monday,
April 14, Room 102, Nursing Building, from noon to 1 p.m. Everyone is welcome.
-- Joan Peterson, Psychology Department.
*******

Anthropologist Will Discuss Vikings In Minnesota

The Vikings, "Roots or Wrongs: Folk Past in the Midwest" will be presented by
Michael Michlovic, Department of Anthropology, Moorhead State University,
Tuesday, April 15, at 4 p.m. in the River Valley Room, Memorial Union. Dr.
Michlovic has had a long interest in the Kensington Runestone and the Viking
myth in Minnesota. He has presented several papers on his research and has
used the Viking myth in three publications on folk history. He will discuss
the Viking story in order to show how people construct their history much like
Levi Strauss said people use human society and its dimensions to create an
order in nature. He will suggest how native people in America and other parts
of the world develop their history for their own moral and ideological needs
in much the same way, and find the professional version of history
unsatisfying and distasteful. He will also offer some suggestions about the
place of the archaeologist/historian in light of these social realities. --
Fred Schneider, Professor and Chair of Anthropology, 777-4718.
*******

EPO Open Enrollment Meetings Set

Representatives from NDPERS and BCBSND, along with the area EPO Provider, will
be on campus to give a presentation on the EPO program and to answer any
questions. You are urged to attend a meeting and learn about the EPO and the
substantial improvements that have been made to the plan design. The meetings
are scheduled for Tuesday, April 15, at 10 a.m. and Wednesday, April 16, at 3
p.m. in the Lecture Bowl of the Memorial Union. -- Pat Hanson, Director of
Payroll.
*******

Television Is Subject Of Free Satellite Seminars

The Northern Interscholastic Press Association at the School of Communication
is sponsoring a series of satellite seminars focusing on "Television: The
Creative Process" this spring. The University Satellite Seminar Series
originates from The Museum of Television and Radio in New York and Los Angeles
and is free and open to the public.

The final seminar in the series, "Television and the Courts," will be held
Tuesday, April 15, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in the Memorial Union South Ballroom.
The presence of television cameras in the courtroom was a revolutionary
concept in 1977, when the Ronney Zamora case in Florida made history by
becoming the first complete trial to be televised. Since then, the climate has
changed dramatically, as evidenced by Court TV, a cable channel devoted to the
coverage of trials. A panel of media and legal professionals will discuss how
a court case is transformed into television programming and the differences
between observing a trial in the courtroom or on television. The panelists
will also address the legal and ethical issues raised by television's coverage
of the judicial process.

The University Satellite Seminar Series is made possible by General Motors,
and is sponsored in Grand Forks by the Northern Interscholastic Press
Association (NIPA), the high school journalism program, at UND. NIPA is
celebrating its 75th anniversary. For more information, contact me. -- Peter
Johnson, NIPA director, at 777-4317 or peter_johnson@mail.und.nodak.edu.
*******

History Schedules Luncheon Lecture

The History Department and Phi Alpha Theta will hold a brown bag lunch session
at noon in 217 Merrifield Hall Wednesday, April 16. Gordon Iseminger (History)
will present "Ireland's County Meath." Bring your lunch. There will be a
question and discussion period following the presentation, which is open to
all. For more information please contact me. -- David Rowley, Associate
Professor of History, 777-3380.
*******

Faculty Candidate Will Present Seminar

A seminar, "The What, Where, and Why of Intercellular Communication Via Gap
Junctions" will be presented by Michael Atkinson, Research Associate,
Department of Genetics and Cell Biology at the University of Minnesota, St.
Paul, on Thursday, April 17, at noon, in 1370 Bio-Information Learning
Resources Center, Medical Science. 

Dr. Atkinson is a candidate for a faculty position in the Departments of
Occupational Therapy/Physical Therapy/Anatomy and Cell Biology. -- Edward
Carlson, Chair, Anatomy and Cell Biology.
*******

Women Studies Salon Meets

Everyone is welcome to attend the next meeting of the Women Studies Salon at 4
p.m. Thursday, April 17, at the Women's Center, 305 Hamline St. This month's
reading is by Linda Kerber, "A Constitutional Right to be Treated Like
American Ladies: Women and the Obligations of Citizenship." Copies are on
reserve at the Library under "Salon," as well as at the Women's Center, and
outside the offices of 201 Merrifield Hall.
For more information, call me at 777-2705, or call the Women Studies Center at
777-4115. -- Rebecca Moore, Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy and
Religion.
*******

High School Students Attend NIPA Conference Here

More than 250 high school journalism students and advisers are expected to
take part in the Northern Interscholastic Press Association (NIPA) Spring
Conference and Journalism-In-Action Competition Sunday and Monday, April 20-21. The featured speaker this year is Garrison Keillor, well-known radio
personality, author and former staff member at "The New Yorker." Keillor and
Maryland Laureate Poet Roland Flint, a UND graduate, will read at the North
Dakota Quarterly benefit the evening of Sunday, April 20. Chuck Haga, former
"Grand Forks Herald" columnist and now columnist and an editor at the
Minneapolis "Star Tribune," is also tentatively scheduled to participate in
the conference. The UND School of Communication Chapter of the Society of
Professional Journalists is participating in this year's conference. This
marks the 75th year of the high school journalism program, which serves
students in North Dakota and western Minnesota. -- Peter Johnson, NIPA
Director, 7-4317.
*******

Open Meetings Set With Candidates For Assistant To Student Affairs 
VP/Multicultural Services Director

Three candidates will be visiting the UND campus to interview for the position
of Assistant to the Vice President for Student Affairs and Director of
Multicultural Student Services. Times have been set aside on all of their
schedules for an open meeting with the UND community. Please take this
opportunity to visit with these candidates and provide feedback to Gordon
Henry, Vice President for Student Affairs. A supply of their resumes is
available in Room 307, Twamley Hall, and evaluation forms will be available at
the interview sites. The schedule is:

Evon Walters, Ph.D., Education: 8 to 9:15 a.m. Tuesday, April 15, in the River
Valley Room, Memorial Union.

Maria Baxter-Nuamah, M.S., Rehabilitation Counseling: 8 to 9:15 a.m.,
Wednesday, April 23, in the Leadership Inspiration Center, third floor,
Memorial Union.

Lowell Robinson, M.S., Educational Media: 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Friday, April
25, in the Leadership Inspiration Center, third floor, Memorial Union.

Thanks for your help in interviewing these candidates for this important
position. -- DaLonna Bjorge, Office of Student Affairs.
*******

H.F. Schaefer III To Present 1997 Abbott Lecture Series

The annual Abbott Lecture Series in Chemistry is set for Thursday and Friday,
April 17 and 18, in 138 Abbott Hall. The lecturer for 1996-1997 is Henry F.
Schaefer III, Graham Perdue Professor of Chemistry and Director of The Center
for Computational Quantum Chemistry at the University of Georgia. Professor
Schaefer is a world-renowned chemist whose interests are in the use of state-of-the-art computational hardware and theoretical methods to solve important
problems in molecular structure and reactivity. He has authored more than 760
scientific publications and is the third most highly cited chemist in the
world. He will present "The Silicon-Carbon Double Bond: A Healthy Rivalry
Between Theory and Experiment" at noon Thursday; at noon on Friday he will
lecture on "Molecular Negative Ions." The formal Abbott Lecture, titled "The
Third Age of Quantum Chemistry," will be presented at 7:30 p.m. Friday. A
reception will follow the last lecture. Further information may be obtained
from the Chemistry Department at 777-2242. -- Lother Stahl (Chemistry), Chair,
Abbott Lecture Committee.
*******

LEEPS Lecture Series Hosts Connecticut Scientist

Dr. Suzanne O'Connell of the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences,
Wesleyan University, Middletown, Conn., will present two lectures in Leonard
Hall on Friday, April 18, for the LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary
Sciences) Lecture Series.

At noon in the Leonard Hall Lecture Bowl (Room 100), she will discuss "The
Word About Climate According to Ocean Cores." 

At 3 p.m. in 109 Leonard Hall, she will present "North Atlantic Thermohaline
Circulation and Climate Change: A Deep Sea Perspective."

Dr. O'Connell is a Joint Oceanographic Institutions/U.S. Science Advisory
Committee Distinguished Lecturer.

The LEEPS Lecture Series is supported by the Department of Geology and
Geological Engineering, the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Office
of Research and Program Development, Office of Instructional Development and
the Advancing Science Excellence in North Dakota (ASEND) Program. All
interested persons are welcome to attend. For additional information contact
me at 777-2991. -- Dexter Perkins, Professor of Geology and Geological
Engineering.
*******

Keillor, Flint Will Benefit UND Journal

Garrison Keillor, author of "Lake Woebegone Days" and host of "A Prairie Home
Companion," and Roland Flint, North Dakota native, poet, 1948 UND graduate,
and author of "Stubborn," will share their works, insights, and stories at a
benefit to raise funds for the acclaimed literary journal, "North Dakota
Quarterly." The benefit, "Roland Flint and Garrison Keillor: A Spring Poetry
Clearance" will be held Sunday, April 20, at 7:30 p.m. at the Chester Fritz
Auditorium; -- Peter Johnson, Media Relations Coordinator, Office of
University Relations.
*******

Reception Will Honor Tom Robinson

The Department of Mathematics will host a reception for Tom Robinson Thursday,
May 1, from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Alumni Center.
Dr. Robinson has been a faculty member of the department and the university
since 1958 and is retiring this year. Please join us to wish him well in
future pursuits. Everyone is welcome. -- Bruce Dearden, Associate Professor of
Mathematics.
*******

Spring Commencements Set For May 10 and 11

Preparations have begun for the University's annual round of spring
commencements. The Honorable Clarence Thomas, Associate Justice, United States
Supreme Court, will be the main speaker for the Law School Commencement at
1:30 p.m. Saturday, May 10, in the Chester Fritz Auditorium. John H. Stone
III, M.D., Associate Dean and Director of Admissions, Emory University School
of Medicine, will be the speaker at the Medical School Commencement at 4 p.m.
Saturday, May 10, in the Chester Fritz Auditorium. General Commencement will
take place at 1:30 p.m. Sunday, May 11, in the Hyslop Sports Center. President
Baker will give the Charge to the Class. -- Rita Galloway (University
Relations), Associate Commencement Coordinator.
*******

Summer Seminar Explores Artificial Neural Networks

In alternate summers, the North Central Section of the Mathematical
Association of America offers a summer seminar on a modern topic in
mathematics. The topic for this summer's seminar will be "Artificial Neural
Networks," hosted by Winona (Minn.) State University on June 16-18. Faculty or
students in science and engineering who may be interested in attending the
seminar should contact me by mail to Box 8376, phone 777-4604 or e-mail
uherka@plains.nodak.edu, for a copy of the seminar brochure and registration
form. The registration fee is $225. -- Dave Uherka, Mathematics.
*******

OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

Integrated Studies Provides Information For Advisors

In its 11th year, the Integrated Studies Program continues to help students
develop the skills defined in the University general education goals: critical
thinking, communication, creative thinking, recognizing relationships, and
recognizing and evaluating choices. Work in those areas is organized around a
broad semester theme rather than around a specific discipline, and is carried
out in a variety of ways including (but not limited to) the following:
discussions of  texts and library research work, written work, guest
presentations, field  trips, cooperative projects.  The majority of class
meetings are in a small group discussion format involving approximately 20
students and one faculty member. The Program is offering credits in each of
the four general education categories in fall 1997:

     English Composition I - 3 credits, Communications GER
     Social Problems - 3 credits, Social Science GER
     Humanities I - 4 credits, Arts and Humanities GER
     Integrated Studies Science - 3 credits, Math, Science & 
          Technology GER*

* The science course has been approved by the General Education  Requirements
Committee for fulfillment of a three credit science requirement.

The faculty in the Program for fall 1997 will be Pat Sanborn (Philosophy and
Humanities), Carl Barrentine (Biology and Humanities), Jan Moen (Sociology),
and Burt Thorp (English).

The fall program will be limited to the first 80 students who reserve a place.
If you have advisees or know of students who might be interested in more
information on the fall program, please have them call the Integrated Studies
office at 777-3622, or stop by the office at 301 Babcock Hall. -- Yvonne
Holter, Humanities and Integrated Studies.
*******

Peace Studies Nominations Sought

Each semester the Center for Peace Studies invites nominations for new
members. Currently, 45 faculty from seven UND schools and colleges and 19
departments are members of the Center. The faculty supervise the
interdisciplinary undergraduate program in the College of Arts and Sciences.
Membership may (but does not necessarily) include teaching courses which are
cross-listed between their department and Peace Studies (see pages 137-138 in
the Catalog).

The Peace Studies faculty recognizes its responsibilities to:

* Encourage research on issues related to peace, conflict, justice, and global
security and on methods of non-violent social change and conflict resolution;

* Encourage curricular developments which would better prepare all students to
assume the role of responsible citizens in formulating or judging public
policies which bear directly on issues of peace and war;

* Develop a program of studies at the undergraduate level for students who
wish to pursue an interdisciplinary major in peace studies; and

* Promote informational programs to help the general public become better
informed on issues of peace and war.

Any UND faculty or staff member interested in the Center for Peace Studies and
its programs, including adjunct faculty status, may contact me. The deadline
for nominations is Friday, April 25. Candidates will be presented to the Peace
Studies faculty at the April meeting. -- Janet Kelly Moen (Sociology), Peace
Studies Coordinator, phone 777-4414, Box 7136, e-mail
jamoen@badlands.nodak.edu.
*******

Applications Sought For Women Studies Affiliates

The Women Studies Program is establishing a roster of affiliates, members of
the University community who identify with and support the program in one or
all of the usual professional ways: teaching, research, service. Program
affiliates do not necessarily have to be faculty members. Accomplishments in
any or all of these areas would qualify a person for affiliate status.
Examples include teaching core or cross-listed courses in the program,
performing research and writing on women and/or gender, or undertaking service
and support activities focusing on women and/or gender.

Interested individuals are asked to submit a statement of no more than two
pages indicating their interest in the program, or a resume highlighting
appropriate activities, or a course outline, research proposal, or service
agenda. A list of applicants will be presented to the Executive Committee for
their approval; their recommendations will then be forwarded to the Vice
President for Academic Affairs and the President. Faculty affiliates may list
this designation on their contracts.

Please send applications to Women Studies, Box 7113. For a copy of the
guidelines for affiliation, please contact the Women Studies office at 777-4115. -- Sandra Donaldson, Professor of English and Director of Women Studies.
*******

Doctoral Exam Set For Linda Holdman

The final examination for Linda Holdman, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with
a major in Teaching and Learning, is set for 9 a.m. Friday, April 18, in 104
Education Building. The dissertation title is "Student Teaching From a Unique
Perspective: Portraits of Three Student Teachers with Learning Disabilities."
Lynne Chalmers (Teaching and Learning) is the committee chair.

Members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend. -- Harvey Knull, Dean,
Graduate School.
*******

GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

Fulbright Scholar Award Information Available

The information for 1998-1999 Fulbright Scholar Programs for U.S. faculty and
professionals is available from the International Programs Office. The
deadline is August 1997, and there are wide spectra of disciplines and
locations around the world. If seriously interested, please call 777-3301 for
further information and an application form. -- David Marshall, International
Programs.
*******

Proposals Invited For Purchase Of Minor Instructional Equipment

The Faculty Instructional Development Committee announces a special call for
proposals for the purchase of minor equipment (up to $750) dedicated to
instructional use. The Committee wishes to support purchases which will
enhance or upgrade technology used for instructional purposes as well as minor
equipment which may be used in learning activities such as laboratories and
clinical settings. Applicants should use the normal grant application form,
copies of which may be obtained from the Office of Instructional Development
(phone 777-3325). Faculty are reminded that grants are available for
instructional materials such as videotapes, CD-ROM disks, software, books and
manuals. While grants for travel to conferences and workshops will continue to
be available for the rest of this fiscal year, proposals for minor equipment
and materials will receive the highest priority. Applications should be
submitted to OID by Tuesday, April 15. -- Dan Rice, Director of Instructional
Development.
*******

Four U Faculty Receive NIH Q-Grants

The NIH IDeA Center has awarded five additional Q-grants (quick grants) to
researchers in health and behavioral sciences at North Dakota State University
and the University of North Dakota.  Q-grants are made available to help
investigators prepare grant proposals to the National Institutes of Health
(NIH).

Christine Burd, Nursing Professionalism and Practice Department at UND, was
awarded $2,848 to pilot test an assessment of day-to-day needs for diabetes
management in three Native American communities. Future goals are to develop
culturally appropriate prevention and treatment programs for people living
with non-insulin dependent diabetes.

Jim Deal, Child Development and Family Science at NDSU, received $1,228 to 
pursue research, using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth,
examining differences among sibling pairs in cognitive development, social and
emotional development, and health-related attitudes and behaviors. Special
attention will be given to children raised in poverty conditions, and
understanding factors that allow some siblings to thrive while others 
suffer.

F. Richard Ferraro, Psychology Department at UND, received $3,500 to prepare
an NIH proposal comparing the cognitive performance differences between people
who have and have not had occupational pesticide exposure. The research will
attempt to identify performance deficits linked to chronic pesticide exposure.

Willis Samson, Physiology at the UND School of Medicine, received a $2,800
award. Using an animal model, experiments will be conducted to investigate the
physiological mechanisms associated with salt regulation. The research has
implications for the  types of therapy most appropriate for persons with
salt-sensitive hypertension.

Andrea Zevenbergen, Psychology Department at UND, was given $2,050 to complete
a preliminary study examining differences between depressed and non-depressed 
mothers' educational interactions with their preschool children. The resulting
NIH  proposal will study parental variables which influence the home literacy
environment of children in Head Start.

These awards complete Q-grant allocations for this fiscal year. For more
information about the NIH IDeA Center, or to add your name to the electronic
listserv, contact Mark McCourt at mccourt@plains.nodak.edu or Kevin McCaul at
mccaul@badlands.nodak.edu, or call 701-231-8738. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, for
Beverly Martinson, Psychology, North Dakota State University.
*******

Faculty Research/Creative Activity Travel Applications Due

The third deadline for submission of applications to the Faculty Research and
Creative Activity Committee (FRCAC) is Tuesday, April 15. Travel applications
will be considered at that time only for travel that will occur between April
15, 1997, and Oct. 15, 1997. No research or publication applications will be
considered at that time.

The Committee reminds applicants to carefully prepare their proposals and be
specific and realistic in their budget requests. Although the FRCAC encourages
submission of travel requests, the Committee takes into consideration the most
recent FRCAC award granted to each applicant. Priority will be given to
beginning faculty and first-time applicants. Applications are available at the
Office of Research and Program Development, 105 Twamley Hall, 777-4279. THESE
FORMS HAVE BEEN REVISED (9/96). IF YOU HAVE THE APPLICATIONS ON DISK, PLEASE
STOP IN FOR COPIES OF THE REVISED FORMS. An original and seven copies of the
application must be submitted to ORPD prior to the deadline. Applications that
are not prepared in accordance with the directions on the forms will not be
considered by the Committee.

-- Brian Paulsen (Visual Arts), Chair, Faculty Research and Creative Activity
Committee.
*******

BILLBOARD

UNIVERSITY SENATE REPORT

University Senate conducted its regular monthly meeting April 3 with Chair
Sara Hanhan (Teaching and Learning) presiding. Business included approval of
the report of its Restructuring and Reallocation Committee's second semester
activities. Senate also rejected resolutions on organizational and financial
reforms in North Dakota higher education, with lack of clarity about meaning
and implementation among reasons for defeat. Fifty-six of the current 79
Senate members attended. The April meeting was adjourned at 
5:39 p.m. after a 4:07 p.m. call to order. Reports on proceedings follow.

Two Recommendations To President Are
In R&R Committee Report OKed By Senate

Two recommendations for UND President Kendall Baker to consider are included
in the Restructuring and Reallocation Committee's second semester report which
University Senate approved at its April 3 meeting.

One recommendation for the president's consideration asks that "the
application of the low enrollment course criteria be studied retrospectively
to determine the numbers of different types and levels of courses that do not
meet these criteria and the reasons that they do not" and that "these criteria
then be broadly discussed and considered for institutionalization according to
the findings of such a study."

The report's other recommendation for President Baker to consider asks "that a
plan be implemented for some of the following to meet with the 1997-98 SRRC
under 'retreat-type' conditions with a professional facilitator to address the
issues raised by this report concerning the future restructuring and
reallocation efforts and activities at the University: The President, Provost,
other Vice Presidents, The Dean's Council, Department Chairs, The Senate
Executive Committee, The University Planning Council, and The Office of
Institutional Analysis."

The report also includes responses to the Committee's and President Baker's
1996 restructuring and reallocation recommendations, activities undertaken
during the past winter, recommendations from Provost Marlene Strathe, a
summary of discussion on departments that had lost 30 percent of their credit
hour production over the past 10 years and departments that experienced more
than a 30 percent increase in credit hour production in the past 10 years, a
summary of discussion of low enrollment courses, a discussion of the
relationship between the committee and departments, and a discussion of how
the committee and UND should proceed in making decisions about restructuring
and reallocation of resources. A list of data considered by the committee this
past semester accompanies the report.

Senate's Doubts On Details Lead To Defeat
Of Higher Education Reform Resolutions

Doubts about broader intentions on one hand and finer details on the other led
to University Senate's defeat of two separate resolutions that called for
changes in governance and structure and in the financing system for higher
education in the state. The former resolution had been carried over from the
previous Senate meeting, and the finance one was originally introduced at the
October 1996, meeting but had been carried over since because of lack of time.

Parts of the original resolution on organizational changes through
constitutional reform were called contradictory and confusing by some
senators. Its proponent, Andrew Varvel (student member), agreed to discard
those areas. The remainder, which was defeated by a vote of 51 to 4 (plus 1
other), asked Senate to recommend to the Legislature, Board of Higher
Education, and citizens that "new options in higher education governance" be
explored and "fundamental constitutional reform" be strongly considered."

While some acknowledged a degree of need for such considerations, questions
about the breadth of the kind of changes which might be dealt with at the
University Senate and UND institutional levels and concerns about meanings of
terminology in the resolution prevented outright support. Monte Phillips
(Civil Engineering) said he was concerned about "lack of clarity and
specifics" in the proposal. Stephen Markovich (Political Science) remarked
that he was with it in spirit but needed more details.

The other defeated reform resolution (32 to 4, 7 abstentions, 1 other), also
presented by Varvel, asked for Senate's endorsement of higher education
finance changes as described in what he called a "Simplified Outline." It
basically called for turning higher education into an employee-owned
cooperative under contract with the state to provide education to citizens.
Cecilia Volden (Nursing) summarized attitudes of many senators on the
proposal, noting she would have to learn a lot more about the many aspects of
such an idea.

"The purpose is really to privatize higher education," said Scot Stradley
(Economics), adding "it would be a unique cooperative" because assets would
remain in the state's hands. He predicted the resolution was doomed to failure
because most don't know what a cooperative is and what it can do.

Maybe, he continued, this proposal is not exactly the kind of plan needed, but
there is a need to look at this sort of thing, at the macro issue, which is to
reorganize the whole system. Many complaints are made about that, he said, but
there is not action to move in a direction to initiate that which would affect
what we want changed. 

Conceding defeat for his own proposal, Varvel said "you will probably vote
against it, but if we don't like the present situation, we need to do
something."

Announcements, Comments

Donald Piper (Summer Sessions director), at the April 3 University Senate
meeting, announced that the Summer Sessions Office will provide resources so
the Chester Fritz Library will be open four nights a week this year, from 8
a.m. to 9 p.m., Monday through Thursday (Friday hours will be 8 a.m. to 4:30
p.m., with no opening on Saturday and Sunday). That schedule will be in effect
throughout the 12-week session. Last year, the Library closed at 5 p.m. on
week days. . . Senate was told that alternatives to the electronic e-mail mode
in which University Letter has been produced and delivered this semester will
be considered, with fund availability as a major factor. Considerations could
include the possibility of returning to hard (paper) copies. The statements
were in response to Dexter Perkins (Geology and Geological Engineering), who
asked if paper copy production of the weekly faculty-staff newsletter could be
revived "to make it a better communication vehicle."

Other Senate Business

Other business included the following: Members were elected to the 1997-98
Senate committees through approval of the report of the Committee on
Committees on the preference vote of Senate taken at the previous meeting (see
the item elsewhere in this issue of University Letter on results of the
committee elections). . . Recommendations from the Curriculum Committee for
new program requests, program terminations, changes in titles of programs, new
courses, course deletions, and requests to change program admission
requirements was approved. . . A change in the section in the Code of Student
Life on harassment, menacing, or terrorizing on University property or at a
University sponsored activity was approved as a clarification of what
constitutes that kind of behavior.

Senators present at the April 3 meeting were Jeanne Anderegg, James Antes,
Kendall Baker, Lyle Beiswenger, Albert Berger, Robert Boyd, Mary Brant, Chris
Carlson, Richard Crawford, Frank D'Andraia, Marc Docken, Sally Dockter, John
Ettling, Betty Gard, Elizabeth Hampsten, Sara Hanhan, Mary Harris, Thomasine
Heitkamp, Carla Wulff Hess, Charlotte Humphries, Eric Jorgenson, Scott
Knudsvig, Mary Kweit, David Lambeth, Gretchen Chesley Lang, W. Fred Lawrence,
Robert Lewis, Lynn Lindholm, Stephen Markovich, James McKenzie, E. John
Miller, Janet Kelly Moen, Elizabeth Nichols, Ben U. Nwoke, Marcia O'Kelly,
Thomas Owens, Dexter Perkins, David Perry, Thomas Petros, Monte Phillips,
Alice Poehls, Donald Poochigian, Ronald Pynn, Lana Rakow, Don Richard, Charles
Robertson, Tammy Schlinger, Daniel Sheridan, Larry Spain, Scot Stradley,
Marlene Strathe, Wayne Swisher, David Uherka, Andrew Varvel, Cecilia Volden,
DuWayne Wacker.

Senators absent from the April 3 meeting were Annie Claesson, W. Jeremy Davis,
Rebecca Engwicht, George Frein, Mary Lou Fuller, Mike Grosz, Gordon Henry, Al
Hoffarth, Susan Hunter, Bruce Jacobsen, Frank Karner, Harvey Knull, Brian T.
Lloyd, D. Scott Lowe, Chris Mickelson, Sheryl O'Donnell, John Odegard, Glenn
Olsen, Heather Phillips, Tina Richards, Beverly Uhlenberg, John A. Williams,
H. David Wilson. -- Jim Penwarden (University Relations).
*******

Balloting Results Reported For 1997-98 Senate Committees

New members were elected to the University Senate committees at the April 3,
1997-98 Senate meeting. Following are names of the new members of the 1997-98
Senate committees, which also have carry-over members in addition to these
recently elected.

ACADEMIC POLICIES: David Ramsett (Economics); ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES:
Ronald Apanian (Civil Engineering), William Wrenn (Biology); ADMISSIONS:
Michael Meyer (Criminal Justice), Thomas Mohr (Physical Therapy);
COMPENSATION: Robert Korbach (Economics), Ruth Paur (Medical Technology);
CONFLICT OF INTEREST/SCIENTIFIC MISCONDUCT: Katherine Sukalski (Biochemistry
and Molecular Biology), Curtis Stofferahn (Sociology); CONTINUING EDUCATION:
Harold Wilde (Accounting and Business), Theodore Pedeliski (Political
Science); CURRICULUM: Joseph De Filippo (Languages/Philosophy and Religion),
Cedric Grainger (Atmospheric Sciences), Anita Monsebroten (Visual Arts);
FACULTY ADVISORY BUDGET: Thomas Potter (Finance); FACULTY INSTRUCTIONAL
DEVELOPMENT: John Backes (Educational Leadership), Steven Williams (Space
Studies); FACULTY RESEARCH: Clifford Staples (Sociology), Timothy Koozin
(Music); GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: Betty Gard (Chester Fritz Library),
Audrey Glick (Communication Sciences and Disorders), Nels Forsman (Geology and
Geological Engineering); HONORARY DEGREES: Henry Slotnick (Neuroscience);
HONORS: Jeffrey Carmichael (Biology), Patricia Kelley (Geology and Geological
Engineering); INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS: Bruce Eberhardt (Management), Tim
Schroeder (Health, Physical Education and Recreation); LIBRARY: Gary Towne
(Music), Charles Robertson (Aviation), Donald Lemon (Educational Leadership);
ROTC: Dale Anderson (Health, Physical Education and Recreation); STUDENT
ACADEMIC STANDARDS: John Bridewell (Aviation), Kimberly Porter (History);
STUDENT POLICY: James Newell (Chemical Engineering), Larry Spain (Law/Legal
Clinic); SUMMER SESSIONS: Ronald Brinkert (Health, Physical Education and
Recreation), Richard Ludtke (Sociology). -- Jim Penwarden (University
Relations).
*******

Academic Catalog Pages Must Be Proofed By April 15

Final preparations are under way for production of the 1997-99 University of
North Dakota catalog. Department chairs (or designees) will be contacted by
the Office of Admissions and Records to schedule an appointment time for
proofing their departmental pages; proofing must be completed by April 15. If
you have any questions, please call Mary Bergstrom at 777-2148. -- Mary
Bergstrom, Office of Admissions and Records.
*******

Health Sciences Library Celebrates Library Week

The Library of the Health Sciences will observe National Library Week April
13-19. The highlight of the week will be the cookbook and used book sale on
Wednesday, April 16. Other events will include library tours and
demonstrations of electronic journals. Tours will be given on demand, while
demonstrations are scheduled on Tuesday, April 15 and Thursday, April 17 in
the Library classroom at 10 a.m., noon, and 3 p.m.  They are designed to
introduce library users to the world of electronic journals.  Highlighted
during the demonstrations will be Electronic Collections Online, which is now
available across campus through the university libraries.

There is still time to donate your used books for the book sale; donations
will be accepted through Tuesday, April 15. So far the variety matches last
year's sale. In addition to medical books, there are children's books,
romances, poetry, biographies, mysteries, dictionaries, textbooks from
aviation to zoology, and cookbooks old and new.

The featured cookbook will be the one compiled from the favorite recipes
contributed by faculty, staff and students of the School of Medicine and
Health Sciences and the College of Nursing. A wide variety of foods are
represented in more than 230 recipes. Categories include: Taste Ticklers and
Tummy Warmers (appetizers, snacks, soups); Lean, Mean and Green (salads,
vegetables, vegetarian dishes); Staff of Life (bread, rolls, cereals,
muffins); Put a Little meat on Your Bones (main dishes, casseroles); A Spoon
Full of Sugar Makes the Medicine Go Down (bars, cookies, desserts); Just What
the Doctor Ordered (favorites of deans and department chairs).

The sale will begin at 9 a.m. and run until 3 p.m. and will be held in the
corridor outside the Library. Proceeds will be used to purchase new books for
the Library. -- Judy Rieke and Lila Pedersen, Harley E. French Library of the
Health Sciences.
*******

Some Alumni Offices Moved

Some of the offices within the Alumni Center have moved to a new location.
Alumni mailing operations, computer retrievals, record updates, financial
records, special events, and public information have all moved to the former
United Campus Ministry building, 3100 University Ave., located across the
street from the J. Lloyd Stone Alumni Center. All development offices will
remain in their current location in the Stone Alumni Center. All phone numbers
will also remain the same. -- Cindy Filler, MIS Director, Alumni Center.
*******

Wet Sidewalks Won't Be Planked

Every spring, due to snow melt and frost boils, some low areas on sidewalks
will have water problems. Due to concerns with creating tripping hazards and
for individuals traveling across campus in wheelchairs, planking will not be
laid over ponding areas as done in the past.  

Water ponding in low areas will persist for three to four weeks, so we request
that everyone use proper footwear or take alternate routes whenever possible.
We apologize for the inconvenience, and we will do everything we can to drain
problem areas as quickly as possible. -- LeRoy Sondrol, Director of Plant
Services.
*******

Students To Conduct Free Health Screening

Community Health students from the College of Nursing, in cooperation with the
Safety Office, will conduct a blood pressure, blood sugar, hemoglobin, vision
and hearing clinic Wednesday, April 16, for faculty and staff, from 12:30 to 3
p.m. in the lunchroom of the Plant Services building. The hearing screening
portion will be in the Plant Services Cottonwood Room. The re-screening is
scheduled for Wednesday, April 23, from 12:30 to 
2:30 p.m., also in the lunchroom of Plant Services.

The only requirement for participating in this screening is that you not
smoke, drink coffee, or exercise for at least 30 minutes before having your
blood pressure measured. -- Carol Berg, Assistant Professor, Family and
Community Nursing, and Jack Glass, Director of Safety.
*******

Computer Center Offers Win '95 Class

A training session, "Windows 95 Transition," will be offered by the Computer
Center to faculty, staff, and students for a $20 fee. The fee will cover the
cost of a learning guide for each participant. The session will be held
Monday, Wednesday and Friday, April 21, 23, and 25 at 1:30 p.m. in
361 Upson II. You must register in advance by calling Bonnie or Shelly at
777-3171, and providing an account number to be charged. Requests for
accommodation related to disability need to be made when registering.

The course presents the new concepts of Windows 95 for Windows 3.x users.
Participants will be introduced to Windows 95 features and complete
corresponding step-by-step exercises in a learning guide that will be theirs
to keep. Topics covered include navigating the desktop, using online help,
using Windows Explorer, and using the find utility. -- Marlys Hanson,  User
Services Consultant, Computer Center.
*******

New Remote Dialin Facilities Available

The University of North Dakota Network Services has been working on a project
to implement additional higher-speed remote access dialin facilities. The new
facilities consist of 184 modems supporting speeds up to 33.6 kbs. and utilize
point-to-point protocol (PPP), allowing multiprotocol connectivity. The
addition of multiprotocol support provides simultaneous connectivity to Web
and Novell servers, similar to a workstation that is currently connected
directly to the campus network. PPP will also allow easier, more efficient
connection setup procedure and improved security to the UND campus network and
the Internet. The new dialin number and procedures for changing to the new
dialin facilities are available on the Computer Center user notes II (PPP
dial-up access with Windows 95), I2 (PPP dial-up access with Windows 3.1) and
I4 (PPP dial-up access with a Macintosh), and also online at
http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/CC/. The old dialin facilities (777-6701) will
be removed at the beginning of the summer minisemester on May 12. -- Kevin
Danielson, Computer Center.
*******

Free Defensive Driving Course Offered

A free Defensive Driving Course for UND employees and a member of their family
will be held Wednesday, April 23, from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m., and again on
Wednesday, May 14, from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the State Conference Room
(105) at the Energy and Environmental Research Center. It is open to all UND
employees who are authorized to drive state fleet vehicles. This course may
reduce your North Dakota insurance premiums and could possibly take away
points from your driving record. We will be holding subsequent classes the
second and fourth Wednesday of each month until November 26. The second
Wednesday will be 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and the fourth Wednesday will be
12:30 to 4:30 p.m. These will be held at the Rural Technology Center, Room
211, on 42nd Street and University Avenue. Please call the Safety Office to
register and get directions at 777-3341. -- Norma Haley, Safety Office.
*******

UND Space Studies Students, Faculty Head To Russia For Space Conference

Three UND Space Studies students and two faculty members are traveling to
Moscow to take part in the Second Annual International Workshop of the
organization called Friends and Partners in Space (FPSPACE). The meeting,
which is expected to draw up to 40 participants from Russia, the United
States, Australia and Europe, is designed to foster cooperation on space
projects and education between the West and the countries of the former Soviet
Union.

"It's a chance for western students and faculty to get together with their
Russian students and faculty from the old Soviet Union," said Jamie Dronen,
the UND Space Studies student who helped develop interest in attending the
conference among the UND group. "I attended the first Annual International
Workshop last year in Moscow held by Friends and Partners in Space. I really
liked it, so I told everyone here about it and now five of us are going," said
Dronen. 

This year's workshop will feature workshop sessions on "Space Policy and
Economics," "International Space Station," "Lunar/Mars Programs," and
"Internet Applications." Dronen will lead the session on "Internet
Applications" and will discuss the UND Space Studies master's degree program
which is now being delivered via the Internet. Space Studies faculty member
Joanne Gabrynowicz will chair the session on "Space Policy and Economics."

In addition to the workshop session, Dronen says attendees will also visit
Russian space facilities. "We get to go to Mission Control at the Russian
Space Agency, meet with the leaders of the Russian Space Agency, go to Star
City where they train the cosmonauts, and a few people will get to go to the
Baikonur Cosmosdrome in Kazakhstan to tour the launch facilities."

In addition to Dronen and Gabrynowicz, workshop attendees from UND include
Leslie Holmes, David Vaughn, and faculty member John Graham. Graham and
Gabrynowicz will also visit the Baikonur Cosmosdrome. -- Joanne Gabrynowicz,
Space Studies.
*******

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

Traditional Musicians Will Perform

North Country Traditional Music and Dance will present a group from Manitou,
Manitoba, On the Edge, who will perform a mixture of traditional and recent
folk, gospel, bluegrass, jazz, and original music at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April
12, in the Josephine Campbell Recital Hall, Hughes Fine Arts Center. Admission
is $4 for adults, and $1 for children. A dance will follow the concert with
music by On the Edge and North Country String Band. Folk and traditional
dances will be taught. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, for Jeanne O'Neil, North Country
Traditional Music and Dance, 773-3850.
*******

Witmer Gallery Lists Events

The Witmer Art Gallery, 2920 Fifth Ave. N., is holding a drawing. Come into
the gallery and register for a free stoneware mug of your choice. The drawing
will be held April 15; you do not have to be present to win.
Grand Forks artist Heidi Fisher has recently put her work in the gallery. She
is an advanced Visual Arts student of Ellen Auyong, and her jewelry consists
of silver pins and earrings, as well as semi-precious stones. 
One of the gallery rooms upstairs has just been sheetrocked and had new track
lighting added. The new addition has really enhanced the artwork. -- Sharon
Webb, Director, Witmer Art Gallery.
*******

Burtness Theatre Presents "She Stoops To Conquer"

The Department of Theatre Arts is proud to present the Restoration comedy,
"She Stoops to Conquer." Set in 18th century England, the production shows the
humorous relationship between an upper class lady who must present herself as
a commoner to win the heart of a gentleman who becomes incredibly shy around
women of the same social standing.

Although the play makes light of social situations found in the 1700s,
contemporary audiences will find the comedy just as funny today because many
of the same situations exist in the 1990s. 

The production is directed by Dean Bruce Jacobsen and runs Tuesday through
Saturday, April 15-19, at the Burtness Theatre. Curtain time is 7:30 p.m.
Tickets are $5; call 777-2587. -- Joel Svendsen, Burtness Theatre Publicity
Manager.
*******

International Centre Lists Events

The Thursday, April 17, program at 7 p.m. in the International Centre, 2908
University Ave., is practicing for the annual Feast of Nations, including the
entertainment, attire, music, and public relations. Students taking the Feast
of Nations for credit will present their educational perspectives. All are
welcome. Reservations for the Feast of Nations may be made by calling 777-4231. -- Sharon Rezac Andersen, Director, International Centre.
*******

Feast Of Nations Will Be April 19

Tickets are now on sale for the 36th Annual Feast of Nations to be held
Saturday, April 19, at 6 p.m. at the Grand Forks Civic Auditorium. Join us for
an international extravaganza including world vignettes, an international
candlelight dinner, intercultural entertainment, music, attire, and artifacts.
All are welcome. Tickets for non students are $15, $7 for students. Call the
International Centre for reservations at 777-4231. -- Sharon Rezac Andersen,
Director, International Centre, 777-4231.
*******

Collegium Musicum Performs April 25

The UND Collegium Musicum will present "Venice and the North: Music From
Italy, Germany, and Poland" Friday, April 25, at 7:30 p.m. in the Josephine
Campbell Recital Hall, Hughes Fine Arts Center. Admission is $4 ($2 for
students). The program will present sacred, secular and instrumental
masterpieces of the 16th and 17th centuries which show the growth of northern
European music under Italian influence.

The Renaissance Wind Band will present Intradas and Dances by Melchior Franck
and Johann Cristoph Demantius. The Collegium Singers will present Part-Songs
and Psalms by several Polish composers and Motets by Heinrich Schutz, as well
as Sacred Concertos and a Continuo Madrigal by Schutz and Claudio Monteverdi.
The ensembles will combine in a Chorale-Intrada on "A Mighty Fortress" by
Michael Altenburg and a double-choir Motet by Mikolaj Zielinski. The
performance will be a showcase for UND's collection of historic instruments,
and offers an opportunity to hear lute, harp, recorder, cornetto, shawm (the
oboist's revenge), and sackbut, as well as harpsichord and organ.

The UND Collegium Musicum specializes in authentic performance of rare and
historic music. The group includes a Vocal Ensemble, a Soft Consort, and a
Renaissance Wind Band. Now directed by Dr. Gary Towne, the Collegium Musicum
was founded by Dr. Tamar Read in the early 1960s as an outgrowth of her Music
History class. The group has done a very broad range of music, including the
American premieres of several major works. Don't miss "Venice and the North:
Music From Italy, Germany and Poland," Friday, April 25, at 7:30 p.m. in the
Josephine Campbell Recital Hall, Hughes Fine Arts Center. -- Gary Towne,
Associate Professor of Music.
*******

Make Plans To Attend Alumni Days

UND faculty and staff are invited to attend the annual Alumni Days celebration
Wednesday through Friday, May 21-23. The classes of 1937, 1942, 1947, and 1952
will be celebrating their 60-, 55-, 50-, and 45-year reunions. Many activities
have been planned to welcome alumni back to campus, including tours, banquets,
and special receptions. The activities begin Wednesday, May 21, with campus
tours, and class socials from 1:30 to 3 p.m. The Get Reacquainted Banquet ($15
per person) begins at 6:30 p.m. in the Ballroom of the Memorial Union. A
Reminiscent Rendezvous follows at 8:30 p.m. in the River Valley Room. There
will be big band music, dancing, and films about the University during the
1930s and 1940s.

On Thursday, May 22, from 8 to 9:45 a.m., the Schools of Medicine and Health
Sciences, Law, Engineering and Mines, Communication, and Education, and the
Departments of Accounting and Nutrition and Dietetics (Home Economics) will
host Recognition Breakfasts in the Memorial Union and Swanson Hall Concourse.
A campus tour will follow at 10 a.m. with a special performance and reception
at the Chester Fritz Auditorium. This year we are proud to honor the "Boys of
Camp Depression" at a Dedication Ceremony and Luncheon at 11:30 a.m. The
Dedication Ceremony will take place at the Camp Depression Memorial south of
the Chester Fritz Library. Following the ceremony, a luncheon will be held at
the River Valley Room in the Memorial Union. The annual Alumni Days Awards
Banquet will be held at the Westward Ho Thursday evening with a social
beginning at 6:30 p.m., followed by a dinner and program at 7 p.m. Tickets are
$17.50 per person.

Class Reunion Breakfasts ($8.50 per person) will be held on Friday, May 23, 8
to 9:45 a.m. in the Memorial Union. A memorial service in honor of friends and
classmates will be at 10:15 a.m. in the Swanson Hall Courtyard. The three-day
festivities conclude with the "Until We Meet Again" Buffet at 12:30 p.m. in
the Memorial Union Ballroom. Tickets for the buffet are $13 per person. To
make reservations or for more information, contact the Alumni Center at 777-2611. -- Kirsten Carolin, Special Events Coordinator, Alumni Association.
*******

FYI

Garden Plots Currently Unavailable

Most of the UND garden plots are in the flood zone. Because of the flood
conditions this year, plots will not be available for some time. Right now
everyone at Plant Services is preparing to fight the flood, so please be
patient. We will send out more information after the flood is over and the
garden plots are ready for planting. -- LeRoy Sondrol, Director of Plant
Services.
*******

Greeks Hold Kids Carnival Sunday

On Sunday, April 13, the Greek Community of the University of North Dakota
will hold its annual Kids Carnival from 1 to 4 p.m. in the Memorial Union
Ballroom. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, for Tom Balzer, Phi Delta Theta.
*******

April 18 Is "Green And White Day"

President Kendall Baker has approved Friday, April 18, as a "Green and White
Day." Employees may wear UND colors and jeans. Show support for our Sioux
baseball and softball teams. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, University Letter.
*******

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

APRIL 1997

(Please contact Mavis at the Office of University Relations, Box 7144, or call
777-4304, if you wish to make changes or have an event included.)

Through Sun., April 13 -- ART EXHIBITION, Maryland artist, David Kreuger, who
creates paintings on the bizarre world of fishing as he knew it in his native
North Dakota; large painting from his Parallel Duck Hunting series owned by
the Metropolitan Museum in New York, North Dakota Museum of Art.

Through Fri., April 11 -- STUDENT EMPLOYMENT WEEK; say "thank you" to your
student employees.

Through Sun., April 13 -- ANNUAL TIME-OUT AND WACIPI, "Honoring Those Who Have
Walked Before Us" is the theme of the Indian Association 28th Annual Time Out
and Wacipi, Memorial Union and Hyslop Sports Center; annual Powwow is Sat. and
Sun., April 12-13, in the Hyslop Sports Center.

Through Fri., May 9 -- REGISTRATION FOR THE 1997 SUMMER TERM.

Through Fri., Sept. 4 -- REGISTRATION FOR THE 1997 FALL TERM.

Tues. through Fri., April 8-11 -- LEAD CLASS, Environmental Training Institute
contractor/supervisor course (2973), Comfort Inn, Highway 2 East, East Grand
Forks, Minn.; cost is $650; call 777-3341 for more information.

Wed., April 9 -- 1997 FORKS AREA CAREER FAIR, National Guard Armory, 1501 S.
48th St., 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.; this is the first year that UND has cooperated
with the area entities which sponsor the Fair; shuttle buses will transfer
students to and from the Armory.

Wed., April 9 -- FEAST AND FOCUS PROGRAM, "Women and the Earth," Women's
Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

Wed., April 9 -- EXCLUSIVE PRE-SCREENING of Grosse Point Blank, an offbeat,
romantic movie, Midco 10 Theatre, 4:30 p.m.; free tickets will be given out at
the Student Government office, Memorial Union; sponsored by the University
Program Council.

Wed., April 9 -- SOFTBALL, UND at North Dakota State University (conference,
Fargo, N.D.

Thurs., April 10 -- LAST DAY TO FILE PRELIMINARY APPROVAL OF THESIS OR
DISSERTATION IN THE GRADUATE SCHOOL.

Thurs., April 10 -- PHI BETA KAPPA LECTURE, Dennis O'Brien, this year's Phi
Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar is President Emeritus of the University of
Rochester, and previously Professor of Philosophy at Rochester and Bucknell
Universities; he will present a lecture "The Logic of Cursing," at 8 p.m. in
101 Abbott Hall; at noon he will speak at the "Theology for Lunch" series on
"The Anger World and Theology," Christus Rex Lutheran Center, 3012 University
Ave.; both are free and open to the public.

Thurs., April 10 -- COUNSELING 565N TOPICS SEMINAR, "Volunteer Bias in Sex
Research: To Whom Do Our Results Apply?" with Joseph Plaud (Psychology), 318
Montgomery Hall, noon to 1:30 p.m.

Thurs., April 10 -- MEETING, Underrepresented Student Recruitment Committee,
305 Twamley Hall, 9 to 10 a.m.

Thurs., April 10 -- DEAN'S HOUR ADDRESS, "Environmental Medicine: A Norwegian
Perspective," by Jan Alexander, Deputy, Head, Department of Environmental
Medicine and Section head, Division of Food Toxicology at the National
Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway, Keller Auditorium, Wold Center,
School of Medicine and Health Sciences, noon.

Thurs., April 10 -- NATIONAL LIVE VIDEO CONFERENCE, UND Planning Council is
sponsoring UND's participation in the live conference on "The New Public
University: How Do We Compete in a Changing Environment?" United Hospital
Lecture Hall, 1370 Bio-LRC, Medical Science North, noon to 2 p.m.; free and
open to the public.

Thurs., April 10 -- ASSET BUILDING INFORMATION, Christus Rex will present
"What Kids Need to Survive: A Community Conversation on Asset Building," 210
Clifford Hall, 7 p.m.; presenter will be James Vollbracht from Search
Institute; free and open to the public (he will also speak Friday, April 11);
call 775-5581 for more information.

Thurs., April 10 -- LECTURE, John Vitton (Business and Public Administration)
will talk about his teaching experiences and general impressions about the
students, faculty and administrators in China, Room 1, Gamble Hall, 3 to 4
p.m.; talk is free and open to the public.

Thurs., April 10 -- FOR WOMEN ONLY PROGRAM, "Get Real: Straight Talk About
Women's Health" (Part 2), Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

Thurs., April 10 -- CELEBRATING MIDDLE EASTERN CULTURES featuring Middle
Eastern foods, artifacts, literature, music, attire, dance, historical,
technological and religious perspectives, UND International Centre, 2908
University Ave., 7 p.m.; all are welcome; call 777-4231 for more information.

Thurs., April 10 and 17 -- WORDPERFECT TRAINING, the Computer Center will
offer a training session, "WordPerfect for Windows," in 361 Upson II, from 6
to 8 p.m.; register in advance by calling Bonnie or Shelly at 777-3171.

Fri., April 11 -- FORUM, Planning Council hosts forum to solicit input on the
Planning Document that has guided much of UND's restructuring and reallocation
effort and which is in the process of being revised, North Ballroom, Memorial
Union, noon; also Monday, April 14, Engelstad Arena Loft, 7 p.m.; existing
planning document can be accessed on UND's World Wide Web home page at
http://und.nodak.edu, or by calling the President's Office at 777-2121.

Fri., April 11 -- NATIVE MEDIA CAUCUS: Keeping Traditions Alive Through
Communication continues on the UND campus with workshops held for tribal
college students and Native media professionals; call Mike at 777-2478 or Lucy
at 777-2670 for more information.

Fri., April 11 -- LECTURES, LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary
Sciences), presented by Richard Grieve, Geological Survey of Canada in Ottawa;
at noon in Leonard Hall Lecture Bowl, Room 100, he will consider
"Extraterrestrial Impact: The Record and Consequences for Earth Evolution"; at
3 p.m. in 109 Leonard Hall, he will discuss "Understanding the Origin and
Evolution of the Sudbury Structure: Then and Now"; all interested persons are
welcome to attend.

Fri., April 11 -- PRESENTATION, "A Call to Action Workshop on Asset Building,"
presented by James Vollbracht from the Search Institute, Christus Rex, 3012
University Ave.; registration begins at 8 a.m. and is required; call 775-5581
for forms and fee information.

Fri., April 11 -- PSYCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM, "Psychology's New Frontier?
Depression in Primary Care," presented by James Coyne, University of Michigan,
Room 102, Nursing Building, 11 a.m.

Fri., April 11 -- DEADLINE for nominations for Meritorious Service Awards for
staff employees to Personnel Services; call 777-4361 for more information.

Fri., April 11 -- 17TH ANNUAL FRANK LOW RESEARCH DAY, Jan Alexander, Deputy
Head at Norway's National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, will discuss
"Heterocyclic Amines from Cooked Meat - Biological Fate and Role in Colon
Carcinogenesis"; Wold Bio-Information Learning Resources Center, School of
Medicine and Health Sciences 10:30 a.m.; objective is to provide a forum
whereby faculty and students can be exposed to the recent research interests
and activities of their colleagues.

Fri., April 11 -- SOFTBALL, UND at Augustana College, Sioux Falls, S.D.

Fri., April 11 -- BASEBALL, UND at Morningside College (DII) (1-9 inn), Sioux
City, Iowa, 3:30 p.m.

Sat., April 12 -- AMERICAN COLLEGE TEST (ACT), place to be announced, 8 a.m.
(location cannot be determined until the University Counseling Center's move
back to McCannel Hall is set).

Sat., April 12 -- GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION (GRE), Room 7, Gamble Hall, 8
a.m. and 2 p.m.

Sat., April 12 -- BANKET CEREMONY, the Quentin N. Burdick Indian Health
Programs (INMED, RAIN, and INPSYDE) will hold their annual Blanket Ceremony
and Honor Song for graduates during the UNDIA Time Out powwow, Hyslop Sports
Center, shortly after the 7 p.m. Grand Entry; UND students, faculty, staff and
the public are invited to attend.

Sat., April 12 -- SPRING FANTASY, Greater Grand Forks Symphony Orchestra
featuring guest artist Paul Wirth, Chester Fritz Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.; Wirth
will play Robert Schumann's "Piano Concerto"; begin the evening at 7 p.m. with
a pre-concert mini-lecture on Stravinsky's ballet music by music professor Tim
Koozin and continue with the Symphony's performance of Stravinsky's "Firebird
Suite" and "Dramatic Overature" by UND music professor James Fry; then "Toast
the Season" with the closing night reception (call 777-3359 for ticket
information).

Sat., April 12 -- CONCERT, North Country Traditional Music and Dance presents
a group from Manitou, Manitoba, On the Edge, who will perform a mixture of
traditional and recent folk, gospel, bluegrass, jazz, and original music,
Josephine Campbell Recital Hall, Hughes Fine Arts Center, 7:30 p.m.; admission
is $4 for adults and $1 for children; a dance will follow the concert.

Sat., April 12 -- BASEBALL, UND at Wayne State College (DII), Wayne, Neb.

Sat. and Sun., April 12-13 -- SOFTBALL, UND at Augustana College Tournament,
Sioux Falls, S.D.

Sun., April 13 -- KIDS CARNIVAL, the Greek community will hold this annual
event, Memorial Union Ballroom, 1 to 4 p.m.

Sun. through Sat., April 13-19 -- NATIONAL LIBRARY WEEK, the Library of the
Health Sciences will observe the week with a cookbook and used book sale on
Wednesday, April 16; other events will include library tours and
demonstrations of electronic journals; sale will begin Wednesday at 9 a.m. and
run until 3 p.m., and will be held in the corridor outside the Library;
proceeds will be used to purchase new books for the Library.

Mon., April 14 -- FORUM, Planning Council hosts forum to solicit input on the
Planning Document that has guided much of UND's restructuring and reallocation
effort and which is in the process of being revised, Loft, Engelstad Arena, 7
p.m.; existing planning document can be accessed on UND's World Wide Web home
page at http://und.nodak.edu, or by calling the President's Office at 777-2121.

Mon., April 14 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for Claudia Odne Johannesson, a candidate for
the Ed.D. degree with a major in Educational Administration, 208 Education
Building, 9 a.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Mon., April 14 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for Jacqueline A. Badman, a candidate for the
Ph.D. degree with a major in Teaching and Learning, 104-E Education Building,
3:45 p.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Mon., April 14 -- MATH COLLOQUIUM, "Convexity of Chebyshev Sets and an
Annoying Old Problem," presented by Robert Megginson, University of Michigan,
307 Witmer Hall, noon; refreshments will be served in 325 Witmer Hall at 11:30
a.m.; everyone is welcome; the talk is accessible to graduate students.

Mon., April 14 -- SPECIAL MATH TALK, "The Leaky Pipeline: Underrepresentation
of Native Americans and Other Minorities in Mathematics," presented by Robert
Megginson, University of Michigan, 307 Witmer Hall, 3:30 p.m.; refreshments
will be served in 325 Witmer Hall at 3 p.m.; everyone is welcome.

Mon., April 14 -- PSYCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM, Kristen Vickers, graduate student in
Clinical Psychology, will present "Optimism as a Predictor of Depressive
Symptoms Over Time," Room 102, Nursing Building, noon to 1 p.m.; everyone is
welcome.

Mon., April 14 -- OPENING RECEPTION for Master of Fine Arts degree candidate
Sharon Linnehan, monotypes and screenprints, Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center,
7 to 9 p.m.

Mon., April 14 -- ASBESTOS CLASS, Environmental Training Institute refresher
course (2920), Comfort Inn, Highway 2 East, East Grand Forks, Minn.; cost is
$150; call 777-3341 for more information.

Mon., April 14, through Mon., May 5 -- MASTER OF FINE ARTS EXHIBIT, Sharon
Linnehan, monotypes and screenprints, Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center, 8 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m.

Tues., April 15 -- INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARD deadline for clincal proposals
(require Subcommittee and full Board review).

Tues., April 15 -- ANTHROPOLOGY LECTURE, The Vikings, "Roots or Wrongs: Folk
Past in the Midwest," presented by Michael Michlovic, Department of
Anthropology, Moorhead State University, River Valley Room, Memorial Union, 4
p.m.

Tues., April 15 -- MEETING WITH CANDIDATE for Assistant to Student Affairs
VP/Multicultural Services Director, Evon Walters, River Valley Room, Memorial
Union, 8 to 9:15 a.m.

Tues., April 15 -- FACULTY/STAFF BOOK STUDY, "The Death of Ivan Ilyich" by Leo
Tolstoy, Christus Rex, 3012 University Ave., noon; study held each Tuesday in
April; call 775-5581 for more information.

Tues., April 15 -- FACULTY RESEARCH/CREATIVE ACTIVITY TRAVEL APPLICATIONS DUE,
applications (revised forms) are available at the Office of Research and
Program Development, 105 Twamley Hall, 777-4279.

Tues., April 15 -- SATELLITE SEMINAR, "Television: The Creative Process"
sponsored by the Northern Interscholastic Press Association at the School of
Communication; the seminars originated from The Museum of Television and Radio
in New York and Los Angeles and are free and open to the public; this last
seminar, "Television and the Courts," will be from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in the
Memorial Union South Ballroom; a panel of media and legal professionals will
discuss how a court case is transformed into television programming and the
differences between observing a trial in the courtroom or on television.

Tues., April 15 -- ASBESTOS CLASS, Environmental Training Institute refresher
course for supervisors (2921), Comfort Inn, Highway 2 East, East Grand Forks,
Minn.; cost is $150; call 777-3341 for more information.

Tues., April 15 -- BASEBALL, UND at Northern State College (DII), Aberdeen
S.D., 2/4 p.m.

Tues., April 15 -- SOFTBALL, UND at St. Cloud State University (conference),
St. Cloud, Minn.

Tues. and Wed., April 15-16 -- EPO OPEN ENROLLMENT MEETINGS, representatives
from NDPERS and BCBSND, along with the area EPO Provider, will give a
presentation and answer questions, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, 10 a.m.
Tues., April 15, and 3 p.m. Wed., April 16; substantial improvements have been
made to the plan design.

Tues. through Sat., April 15-19 -- THEATRE, "She Stoops to Conquer," a raucous
and hilarious comedy of manners of the "idle rich" as they give way to their
mad-cap antics, a Restoration comedy that has been keeping audiences laughing
for over 300 years, Burtness Theatre; tickets are $5 and will be available at
the Burtness Box Office after April 1 by calling 777-2587.

Wed., April 16 -- FREE HEALTH SCREENING, Community Health students from the
College of Nursing, in cooperation with the Safety Office, will conduct a
blood pressure, blood sugar, hemoglobin, vision and hearing clinic for faculty
and staff, lunchroom, Plant Services building, 12:30 to 3 p.m.; only
requirement for participation is that you not smoke, drink coffee, or exercise
for at least 30 minutes before having your blood pressure taken; re-screening
is scheduled for Wed., April 23.

Wed., April 16 -- HISTORY AND PHI ALPHA THETA BROWN BAG LUNCH SESSION,
"Ireland's County Meath," presented by Gordon Iseminger (History), 217
Merrifield Hall, noon; bring your lunch; question and discussion period
follows the presentation.

Wed., April 16 -- FEAST AND FOCUS PROGRAM, "Truth Telling in Women's Lives,"
Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

Wed., April 16 -- PERFORMANCE, former lead singer of The Gear Daddies, Martin
Zellar, will perform, Ballroom, Memorial Union, 9:30 p.m. to 1 a.m.; opening
for Zellar will be the Billtones from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m.; cost is $5 at the
door and look for the $1 off coupon; sponsored by University Program Council.

Wed., April 16 -- ASBESTOS CLASS, Environmental Training Institute refresher
course for inspector management planners (2932), Comfort Inn, Highway 2 East,
East Grand Forks, Minn.; cost is $80; call 777-3341 for more information.

Wed., April 16 -- BASEBALL, UND at Bemidji State University (DII), Bemidji,
Minn., 1/3 p.m.

Wed., April 16 -- SOFTBALL, UND vs. North Dakota State University, Apollo
Complex, Grand Forks.
*******

ATTACHMENT 1 

Twin Forks Professional Secretaries International Benefit Luncheon recognizing
secretaries and support staff Wednesday, April 23, noon to 1:30 p.m., Holiday
Inn; benefits United Home Health Care Hospice; call 780-5258 for more
information; guaranteed reservations by Friday, April 18.

ATTACHMENT 2

______________Specials @ University Bookstore_______________

April 8, 1997


________University Bookstore________


SPECIALS INDEX:

16X CD-Roms are here! - Computer Service Department
New Dell Optiplex Price Lists - Computer Sales Department
National Champion Merchandise - Actionwear Department

________University Bookstore________

16X Hitachi Internal IDE CD-Roms $139
While Supplies last!

Computer Service Department
777-6224
Swanson Room 12

Limited Quantities ...
offer good while supplies last!

LIMITED TIME ONLY!

________University Bookstore________

New Dell Optiplex Price List Available Friday!

Stop by the University Bookstore to pick up your copy

or
Call the Computer Sales Department to have them faxed to you 
as soon as they become available!

Computer Sales & Service Department
777-2746

________University Bookstore________

Pick up your NATIONAL CHAMPION merchandise at the University
Bookstore!

Starting at $10.95!

Youth and Adult Sizes Available!

Pick up all your Official Fighting Sioux Championship Sweatshirts, T-Shirts,
Shorts and Caps!

Actionwear Department
777-2746

________University Bookstore________


The University Bookstore is located on the main floor of the Memorial Union.
We can be reached at . . .

(701) 777-2746, toll free 1-800-671-0948,

or by fax at (701) 777-3410

If you are online, please check out our web site at . . .

http://bookstore.und.nodak.edu/bookstore/

or send us email . . .

bookstor@operations.und.nodak.edu

Have a nice day and please check out our web site!

________University Bookstore________
*******


UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and
distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is
also available electronically through UNDInfo, the University's menu
system on the Internet. The addresses are http://www.und.nodak.edu for
World-Wide Web and uninfo.und.nodak.edu for gopher.
  
All articles submitted for publication should be labeled "University
Letter" and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic
submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu. Attachments to
University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number.
University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations,
Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.
  
UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.
  
*******


  





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