[University Letter logo]

University Letter

April 4, 1997

Volume 34 No. 31



UNIVERSITY LETTER
UNIVERSITY LETTER IS ALSO AVAILABLE ELECTRONICALLY in the Events and News
section of UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address
is: http://www.und.nodak.edu

The University Relations Office maintains an index for the University Letter.

UNIVERSITY LETTER TABLE OF CONTENTS

Attendance Encouraged At Planning Forums
Planning Council Sponsors Video Conference Forums
Meeting Will Discuss Faculty Research Exchange
     FLOOD INFORMATION
President Issues Flood Statement
Flood Coordination Team Named
Protect Equipment From Flood Threat
Web Page Gives Flood Information
RWIC Provides Flood Information On WWW, Cable
Volunteer Safely
Volunteers Sought For Flood Effort
     EVENTS TO NOTE
Dean's Hour Lecture Will Consider Euthanasia
Conference To Discuss Genetics
Grand Forks Native To Give Lecture
Soils Expert To Give LEEPS Lecture
Computer Science Sets Colloquium
Death And Dying Class Will Display Project At Mall
Honors Students To Host "End Of Science" Forum
Graduate Committee Sets Meeting
Biologist Will Discuss N.D. Wilderness
Psychology Announces Colloquium
White Coat Ceremony Set For Medical Students
Time Out And Wacipi Is April 7-13
Learning Disabilities Is Workshop Topic
News, Law Programming Subject Of Free Satellite Seminars
Native Media Caucus Schedule Listed
John Vitton To Talk About China Trip
Phi Beta Kappa Lecture Set
Christus Rex Presents Asset Building Information
International Investigators To Present At Research Day
Earth Evolution Is LEEPS Lecture Topic
Psychology Schedules Colloquium
Health Sciences Library Celebrates Library Week
Anthropologist Will Discuss Vikings In Minnesota
University Senate Set To Meet May 1
Reception Will Honor Tom Robinson
     OF ACADEMIC INTEREST
Integrated Studies Provides Information For Advisors
Summer, Fall Registration Begins April 7
Academic Catalog Pages Must Be Proofed By April 15
Art Exhibition Set For Linnehan
Doctoral Exam Set For Badman And Johannesson
     GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS
Faculty Research/Creative Activity Travel Applications Due
ORPD Lists Funding Opportunities
Department Of Defense To Seek Proposals
EPSCoR Makes Research Awards To Undergrads
NSF To Replace Bulletin List
     BILLBOARD
Internal Medicine Contacts Moved To Fargo
Some Alumni Offices Moved
Post Summer Jobs Soon; New Rehire Forms Available
April 7-11 Is Student Employment Week
Wet Sidewalks Won't Be Planked
Computer Center Offers Win '95 Class
Computer Center Offers WordPerfect Training
U2 Offers Development Hotline
Continuing Education Lists Workshops
Students To Conduct Free Health Screening
Students Will Provide Free Well Child Exams
Encourage Students To Attend Career Fair
Adult Children Of Alcoholics Sought For Research Study
Participants Needed For Memory Experiments
     ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT
Women's Center Lists Events
International Centre Lists Events
Traditional Musicians Will Perform
Burtness Theatre Presents "She Stoops To Conquer"
     FYI
Garden Plots Currently Unavailable
Credit Union Announces Interest Rate Changes
Items Offered For Public Bids
     CALENDAR OF EVENTS
*******

Attendance Encouraged At Planning Forums

All members of the UND community are encouraged to join me and the Planning
Council for two conversations about the future of our University. The sessions
will take place at noon Friday, April 11, in the Memorial Union Ballroom, and
at 7 p.m. Monday, April 14, in the Engelstad Arena Loft. This is an
opportunity for early input into the revision of the University Planning
Council's three-year planning document, which will be redrafted over the
summer for discussion and finalization in the fall. The existing planning
document can be accessed on UND's World Wide Web home page at
http://und.nodak.edu, or by calling the President's Office at 777-2121. --
Kendall Baker, President.
*******

Planning Council Sponsors Video Conference Forums

The University of North Dakota Planning Council is sponsoring UND's
participation in a national live video conference on Thursday, April 10 on the
subject of "The New Public University: How Do We Compete in a Changing
Environment?"  The session, from noon to 2 p.m., will take place in 1360 Bio-LRC, Medical Science North, and is free and open to the public. Please note
the change in location.

Produced by the Public Broadcasting Service, the video conference will feature
a panel made up of Constantine Curtis, President of Clemson University and a
member of the Kellogg Commission to explore the public university mission; Gil
Whitaker, Professor of Business Administration and former Provost of the
University of Michigan; Judith Eaton, Chancellor of the Minnesota Sate College
and Universities; and Colorado Governor Roy Romer, Chair of the National
Education Goals Panel. The panel will address the question, "If you could
design the ideal public university for today's world, what choices would you
make?" Among topics to be considered are expected to be the need to
restructure and re-order the public university; successful institutional
models that meet community and corporate needs; involving and motivating
faculty, students and community to change; competition outside the academy;
new delivery systems; ensuring diversity; and using alternative learning
assessments. -- Dave Vorland, Assistant to the President and Recording
Secretary to the Planning Council, 3-16-97.
*******

Meeting Will Discuss Faculty Research Exchange

There will be a meeting to discuss a preliminary proposal for the Faculty
Interdisciplinary Research Exchange (FIRE) from noon to 1:30 p.m. Tuesday,
April 8, in the Pembina Roosevelt Room, Memorial Union. Facilitators will be
Joseph Plaud (Psychology) and Serge von Duvillard (HPER).

The purpose of the exchange is to foster interdisciplinary research by the
faculty of the University. The mission of the University is a diverse one;
however, research activities are central to the foundation of UND and its
mission to promote a scholarship of discovery. Research activities enhance
undergraduate and graduate education, promote the state of North Dakota as a
leader in scientific advancement in multiple fields, is a significant
component in technological advancement, and serves to attract and retain the
best and brightest faculty and students in our geographical region.

Although faculty work diligently to conduct research and compose and submit
research and program grant proposals to private and public agencies, through
FIRE the Office of Research and Program Development (ORPD) can work with the
faculty to promote a more intensive and socially reinforcing environment for
faculty to interact and collaborate on research and grant-writing activities.
The Faculty Interdisciplinary Research Committee, a faculty-initiated project
with cooperation from ORPD and UND administration, will serve a number of
critical functions to promote the scholarship of discovery at UND, including:

1. Provide for faculty from all departments at UND to gather together and
discuss research projects, and be recognized by their colleagues for their
efforts. An interdisciplinary socially reinforcing atmosphere will optimize
efforts for faculty at UND to interact with each other, get to know each
other, and work together on research projects of mutual interest;

2. Provide an interdisciplinary faculty forum to identify and collaborate on
research projects that otherwise would not be undertaken in a more isolated
environment (i.e., at the level of individual departments);

3. Facilitate interdisciplinary grant-writing activities;

4. Set up seminars dedicated to research and grant-writing basics and advanced
issues so that faculty may be able to submit more competitive grants;

5. Allow ORPD to work more directly with faculty, and sponsor research-related
activities such as seed grants and research fellowships;

6. Bring the diverse UND campus together on a common theme of great
significance: research and its benefits to the people of North Dakota;

7. Allow faculty to have a forum to discuss and develop their research ideas,
ask questions, and receive feedback from their expert colleagues.
Therefore, the goal of FIRE is to "fire up" the faculty to work together in
the production of empirical research and grant-writing activities, which
should not only benefit the faculty involved, but also the University as a
whole. We hope to see you at our organizational meeting. -- Joe Plaud,
Assistant Professor of Psychology.
*******

FLOOD INFORMATION

President Issues Flood Statement

We anticipate that the University of North Dakota will remain open for the
remainder of the semester.  Classes will meet as usual during the flood
emergency, unless a specific announcement to the contrary is made by the
President as the result of unforeseen circumstances.  Students are encouraged
to volunteer for flood related duties at times they are not in class.  As is
the case generally, faculty are asked to be as accommodating as possible in
those individual instances when personal emergencies or impassible road
conditions make it impossible for students to get to campus.

University employees are encouraged to help the city prepare for the impending
flood, and to participate in flood control and flood fighting activities as
become necessary.  Employees who wish to take time off during work hours to
deal with personal flood emergencies or to assist as a volunteer should
arrange leave with their supervisors.  Unless UND closes due to severe flood
conditions, or unless the employee is participating in a flood-related
activity sponsored and coordinated by the University, annual leave must be
taken following normal procedures. -- Kendall Baker, President, 4-1-97.
*******

Flood Coordination Team Named

The University has appointed a three-person team to coordinate UND's 
response to the flood emergency. Al Hoffarth, vice president for operations,
will serve as over all manager of UND's flood fighting effort.  Reporting to
him will be LeRoy Sondrol, Director of Plant Services, who will be in charge
of protection of the UND campus, and Mark Thompson, Director of Career
Services, who will coordinate UND staff and student volunteers, UND-sponsored
community service activity, and liaison with the academic division and with
student government.--Kendall L. Baker, President.
*******

Protect Equipment From Flood Threat

State Fire and Tornado provides the insurance coverage for all state-owned
facilities and equipment. Flood damage is a covered loss, but only at a
minimal level ($10,000 per occurrence). The University has obtained additional
flood insurance for three high-risk facilities on campus: Hughes Fine Arts
Center, Wilkerson and Smith Hall. This additional insurance is on the
structure only. Therefore, ALL departments are strongly encouraged to take the
necessary action to protect their equipment and supplies. Appropriate action
may include moving equipment from basement areas and/or raising equipment off
the floor. If you have any questions, please call. -- Pat Hanson, Director of
Payroll, 7-4228, or Leroy Sondrol, Director of Physical Plant, 7-2592.
*******

Web Page Gives Flood Information

A World Wide Web page has been developed which contains the official
University flood policy and gives flood updates, as well as links to other
sites containing flood information.  It may be accessed through UNDInfo at
http://www.und.edu. -- Jan Orvik, Co-Manager, UNDInfo.
*******

RWIC Provides Flood Information On WWW, Cable

The Regional Weather Information Center (RWIC) has developed a World Wide Web
site with the latest flood information for the Greater Grand Forks area and
emergency contact phone numbers. The address for the WWW site is:
http://www.rwic.und.edu/flood/ 

The website is developed and maintained by the staff of the Regional Weather
Information Center. We are working closely with the Grand Forks Emergency
Management Office to make available important information to the public
including emergency phone numbers and information about how to volunteer for
the sandbagging operation. When the dike walking effort begins, we'll also
have information online about how to volunteer for those activities.

Also available is the latest river level information. The automated system
collects the river level data directly from the river level gauge. Information
on river level change over the past hour, 12 hours, and 24 hours is also
presented. Flood safety information from the Red Cross and the Federal
Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and information from the City of Grand
Forks on how to prepare and protect your home from flood damage is posted on
the site.

Also scheduled to begin soon is flood information broadcast on UND Channel 3
on the TCI cable television system in the Grand Forks/East Grand Forks area.
The cable service will provide river level information, emergency phone
numbers and other information from the Grand Forks Emergency Management
Office. This service will also originate from RWIC and is made possible
through the cooperation of UND TV. -- Leon Osborne, Direction, Regional
Weather Information Center. 
*******

Volunteer Safely

Following are safety tips for flood volunteers.

Some flood assistance/work may be dangerous and physically challenging. If you
volunteer, be sure the tasks in which you participate will in no way present a
danger to your health and/or safety or the health and/or safety of others. 
Medications for colds, lack of sleep, and other circumstances may make you
feel less alert; if this is the case, please refrain from volunteering as the
flood waters and flood assistance/work may be hazardous.

Important:  You should get a tetanus shot if you have not received one in the
last 10 years (students, faculty, and staff may receive a free tetanus shot
from Student Health in O'Kelly Hall).

Possible suggestions on how to volunteer safely:

Wear appropriate clothing

*Dress in appropriate layers of clothing so you may respond to weather
conditions (wear caps or other head gear)

*Wear waterproof gear on top of other layers if working in wet conditions

*Should you need to remove a layer of clothing be sure to keep waterproof gear
as top layer

*Wear sturdy work shoes that go above the ankle if possible

*Outer protective foot covering(s) should have good tread and provide foot
protection

*Cover your hands with work gloves

*Do not wear contact lenses (wear safety glasses whenever possible or
appropriate)

*Wear snug fitting clothing that is less likely to catch on objects

*No short sleeves or short pants

Working Safely

*There are usually jobs for everyone; make sure the task(s) you are
undertaking is/are within your capabilities

*Use team lifting for anything over 30 pounds and for bulky items

*When performing a repetitive task, make sure to take frequent breaks and
change your position as often as possible

*Avoid walking in flood waters whenever possible; if you find yourself in
standing or flowing water, walk carefully and avoid splashing

*Always work in teams. Never attempt any tasks on your own

*When working around any moving equipment, exercise extreme caution

*If asked, operate only equipment you are qualified to operate and follow all
safety guidelines

*Do not eat, drink, smoke/chew, or apply cosmetics while working in the flood
effort until after you have thoroughly washed your hands and face

When you go home

*Immediately shower, washing thoroughly using an antibacterial soap (Life Boy,
Dial, etc.)

*Wash all clothing including undergarments using a disinfecting detergent (Arm
and Hammer etc.)

*Check yourself for any unnoticed cuts or scrapes; treat appropriately, or if
necessary contact your health care provider

*If you experience any gastrointestinal distress (stomach pain, diarrhea,
nausea), contact your health care provider.

-- Mark Thompson (Law), Flood Volunteer Coordinator.
*******

Volunteers Sought For Flood Effort

The city of Grand Forks is seeking volunteers to help fill sand bags at the
Public Works Building to prepare for possible flooding. A shuttle van will run
between the Memorial Student Union bus shelter and the Public Works Building;
the schedule follows:

Weekday schedule (M-F)

Van leaves Union Bus Shelter       

9 a.m.    
10 a.m.   
11 a.m.   
12 p.m.   
1 p.m.    
2 p.m.    
3 p.m.    
No Van*   
5 p.m.    
6 p.m.    
7 p.m.    
8 p.m.    
9 p.m.    

*clean-up at Public Works Bldg.

Van leaves Public Works Building

9:50 a.m.
10:50 a.m.
11:50 a.m.
12:50 p.m.
1:50 p.m.
2:50 p.m.
3:50 p.m.
4:50 p.m.
5:50 p.m.
6:50 p.m.
7:50 p.m.
8:50 p.m.
9:50 p.m.

Sat. And Sun. Schedule

Leave Union Bus Shelter            
     
9 a.m.    
10 a.m.   
11 a.m.   
12 p.m.   
1 p.m.    
2 p.m.    
3 p.m.    
4 p.m.    

Leave Public Works Building

9:50 a.m.
10:50 a.m.
11:50 a.m.
12:50 p.m.
1:50 p.m.
2:50 p.m.
3:50 p.m.
4:50 p.m.

The schedule will allow students to volunteer and still attend class.

Students:

*Sign-in immediately upon arrival at the Public Works Building.

*Wear layers of clothing to be able to respond to temperature changes.

*Be prepared to catch return van to keep your class schedule.

If interested in volunteering to drive van, please contact Judy Rosinski 
at 777-4030. -- Mark Thompson (Law), Flood Volunteer Coordinator.
*******

EVENTS TO NOTE

Dean's Hour Lecture Will Consider Euthanasia

The School of Medicine and Health Sciences Dean's Hour seminar will feature a
presentation by Marsha Fowler, Professor of Theology and Nursing and Director
of Health Ministries Programs, San Francisco Theological Seminar. She will
discuss "Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia," at noon Friday, April 4, in the
Reed T. Keller Auditorium, Room 1350, Wold Bio-Information Learning Resources
Center, Health Sciences Building. -- Thomas Norris, Executive Associate Dean,
Academic Affairs and Research, School of Medicine and Health Sciences.
*******

Conference To Discuss Genetics

The Department of Pediatrics/Genetics will present a conference, "Practical
Genetics in Primary Health Care" on Friday, April 4, via Interactive Video
Network at Gamble Hall. Nationally known experts will present information on
gene testing for breast cancer, fetal alcohol syndrome screening, diabetes and
other common adult diseases, diabetes prevention trials in North Dakota,
sorting out the diagnosis of ADHD, DD, and MR, and harmful exposures during
pregnancy.

The conference is free to students. Please call Mary Ebertowski, Department of
Pediatrics, for more information, before April 1, at 777-4243. -- Mary
Ebertowski, Nurse Geneticist, Pediatrics/Genetics.
*******

Grand Forks Native To Give Lecture

The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology will present a special
lecture at 10 a.m. Friday, April 4, in 1360 Clifford Haugen Lecture Hall,
Medical Science. "Gene Expression Associated with Chromosome 6-Mediated Tumor
Suppression of Human Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma" will be presented by
Michael Ray, Department of Human Genetics, University of Michigan School of
Medicine in Ann Arbor. An informal reception will immediately follow the
presentation and all are invited.

Michael Ray is a native of Grand Forks and graduated at the top of his class
from Red River High School in 1986. He attended Concordia College in Moorhead,
and graduated summa cum laude in 1990. Dr. Ray then was accepted into the
M.D./Ph.D. Medical Scientist Training Program at the University of Michigan
School of Medicine. He recently completed his Ph.D. studies at the National
Center for Human Genome Research at the National Institutes of Health in
Bethesda, Md., under the direction of Dr. Jeffrey Trent. The work, begun in
the Human Genetics Department at the University of Michigan, transferred to
NIH when Dr. Trent was named scientific director of the Human Genome project
by Dr. Francis Collins, the project's director. Dr. Ray is co-author of eight
full professional papers and eight abstracts of papers presented at
professional meetings. He will lecture on studies constituting his Ph.D.
dissertation. He has recently returned to Ann Arbor where he is completing his
third year of Medicine. 

Dr. Ray is the son of Annette and Dr. Paul Ray, distinguished long-time
professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the UND School of Medicine
and Health Sciences. -- Robert Nordlie, Professor and Chair of Biochemistry
and Molecular Biology.
*******

Soils Expert To Give LEEPS Lecture

A LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary Sciences) lecture and workshop
will be presented by Jimmie Richardson, North Dakota State University, on
Friday, April 4. 

At noon in Leonard Hall Lecture Bowl, Room 100, he will consider "Soils and
Groundwater on the Lake Agassiz Plain." From 2 to 4 p.m. in 214 Leonard Hall,
he will conduct a Soils and Hydrogeology Workshop. 

Dr. Richardson is a dynamic lecturer with a broad base in both geology and
soils. The LEEPS Lecture Series is supported by the Department of Geology and
Geological Engineering, the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Office
of Research and Program Development, Office of Instructional Development and
the Advancing Science Excellence in North Dakota (ASEND) Program. All
interested persons are welcome to attend. For additional information, contact
John Reid at 777-2131. -- Dexter Perkins, Professor of Geology and Geological
Engineering.
*******

Computer Science Sets Colloquium

On Friday, April 4, the Computer Science Colloquium Series will present Erik
Altmann, Computer Science faculty candidate, from George Mason University. Dr.
Altmann will present "A Model of Episodic Memory for External Information" at
10 a.m. in 238 CAS II. All students and faculty are invited. Please join us. -- Bruce Maxwell, Assistant Professor of Computer Science.
*******

Death And Dying Class Will Display Project At Mall

A Sociology class, "Death and Dying," will hold a class project demonstration
at the South Forks Plaza Saturday, April 5, featuring a casket filled with
cigarette butts. The assignment for the class was to build a life-size casket
and make a social statement about some aspect of death and dying, and the
group decided to make a statement about smoking and death. The casket and
smoking related information provided by public health officials will be on
display from noon to 4:30 p.m. -- Morten Ender, Assistant Professor of
Sociology.
*******

Honors Students To Host "End of Science" Forum

Honors Program students will host a University-wide forum on "The End of 
Science" Sunday, April 6, at 6:30 p.m. in 1618 Swanson, Memorial Union.
Professors, students and anyone else interested in the topic are invited to
attend and share their views.  The forum will focus both on the  topic and on
the book "The End of Science" by John Horgan.  For more information, contact
me. -- Tami Carmichael, Honors Program, 777-2219. 
*******

Graduate Committee Sets Meeting

The Graduate Committee will meet Monday, April 7, at 3:05 p.m. in 305 Twamley
Hall. The agenda will include:

1. Report on Energy Engineering graduate program given by  Rashid Hasan.  

2. Continuation of the subcommittee's report on the Educational Leadership
graduate program.  

3.   Review of the subcommittee's report on the graduate program in
Psychology

4.   Review of the subcommittee's report on the graduate program in Clinical
Laboratory Science.

5.   Matters arising.

-- Harvey Knull, Dean, Graduate School.
*******

Biologist Will Discuss N.D. Wilderness

Kathy Armstrong Duttenhefner will present "Wilderness in North Dakota,"
Monday, April 7, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. in 172 Hyslop Sports Center. Duttenhefner
is a biologist with the North Dakota Park and Recreation Department's Nature
Preserve and Natural Heritage Inventory Program. She will discuss the status
of wilderness lands in North Dakota and the outlook for preserving these areas
for future generations. Everyone is welcome to join in the discussion. If you
have questions, call me. -- Lynn Anderson, Associate Professor, HPER, 777-2978.
*******

Psychology Announces Colloquium

The Psychology Department will hold a colloquium at which Mark Grabe
(Psychology) will present "Consequences of Personal Philosophies of Learning:
Educator Beliefs Determining Student Opportunities," Monday, April 7, in Room
102, Nursing Building, from noon to 1 p.m. Everyone is welcome. -- Joan
Peterson, Psychology Department.
*******

White Coat Ceremony Set For Medical Students

A white coat ceremony will be conducted at 4 p.m. Monday, April 7, for second-year medical students. The ceremony, set to take place in the Keller
Auditorium of the Wold Center, is a growing phenomenon in medical schools
throughout the country. It has been adopted as a means of placing a renewed
focus on compassion in the education of physicians.

The first white coat ceremony at the School of Medicine was held in August for
members of the M.D. Class of 2000. Second-year students, who will leave this
month for clinical training in 28 rural communities, will be cloaked in the
white coat, a mantle of their profession and a symbol of our belief in their
ability to carry on the noble tradition of doctoring. The ceremony is designed
to clarify and confirm that a physician's responsibility is not only to take
care of patients, but also to care for patients. All faculty, staff, friends
and family are invited to attend. -- H. David Wilson, Dean, School of Medicine
and Health Sciences.
*******

Time Out And Wacipi Is April 7-13

"Honoring Those Who Have Walked Before Us" is the theme of the Indian
Association 28th Annual Time Out and Wacipi, April 7-13.
In addition to the Native Media Caucus, April 9-11, (see separate article),
the Time Out and Wacipi features a number of presentations and culminates with
the annual Pow Wow at the UND Hyslop Sports Center Saturday and Sunday, April
12 and 13.

In addition to the Native Media Caucus events, the Time Out and Wacipi will
feature sessions on "Earth Circles: Traditional Wisdom," presented by Lorain
Fox Davis; "Discrimination, Partiality and Prejudice and Indigenous
Controversy," presented by Vivian Delgado; films "Look Into the Night" and
"Follow Your Dreams"; Indian Health Service Conference sponsored by INPSYDE,
RAIN and TRIO Programs, Thursday, April 10, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Memorial
Union Sioux Room; Indian Economic Development and Tribal Government Conference
sponsored by the EAGLE Project, Thursday, April 10, and Friday, April 11, from
8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; "Indian Law and Sovereignty," presented by Shirley Cain,
attorney; Omnicye Run, Saturday, April 12, 8 a.m., Hyslop Sports Center; and
All Indian Basketball Tournament, Saturday, April 12, 8 a.m. -- Alex Zenzick
and Derrek Johnson, Co-Chairs, Time Out and Wacipi.
*******

Learning Disabilities Is Workshop Topic

A faculty half-day workshop will be held Tuesday, April 8, from 12:30 to 4:30
p.m. at the Ramada Inn. The discussion topic will be "Bright Student/Poor
Paper: Sharing Ideas for Helping Writers with Learning Disabilities." The
workshop is co-sponsored by Disability Support Services (DSS) and the
University Writing Program (UWP). Lunch will be served and participants will
receive a $75 WAC stipend. Call Writing Across the Curriculum at 777-3600 to
sign up by noon Friday, April 4. -- Elizabeth Fletcher Lamb, Learning
Disabilities Specialist, Disability Support Services.
*******

News, Law Programming Subject of Free Satellite Seminars

The Northern Interscholastic Press Association (NIPA) at the School of
Communication is sponsoring a series of satellite seminars focusing on
"Television: The Creative Process."  It is free and open to the public.  The
final two seminars of the series will be held Tuesdays, April 8 and 15. 
"Creating a Prime-Time News Magazine: 60 Minutes," is scheduled for April 8
from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl.  "60 Minutes" has been
at the forefront of television journalism since it first aired in 1968.  The
show thrives on its eclectic mixture of stories ranging from world events and
trends in popular couture to small-town heroes and the famous investigations. 
Executive producer Don Hewitt, along with several "60 Minutes" on-air
personalities, will discuss what makes this Peabody Award-winning show tick.

The fourth and final seminar, "Television and the Courts," will be April 15
from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in the Memorial Union South Ballroom.  The presence of
television cameras in the courtroom was a revolutionary concept in 1977, when
the Ronney Zamora case in Florida became the first complete trial to be
televised.  Since then, the climate has changed, as evidenced by Court TV, a
cable channel devoted to the coverage of trials.  A panel of media and legal
professionals will discuss how a court case is transformed into television
programming the difference between observing a trial in the courtroom and on
television.  The panelists will also address the legal and ethical issues
raised by television's coverage of the judicial process.  

The University Satellite Seminar Series is made possible by General Motors,
and is sponsored in Grand Forks by NIPA, the high school journalism program at
UND which is celebrating its 75th anniversary.  For more information, contact
me. -- Peter Johnson, NIPA Director, 777-4317 or peter-johnson@mail.und.nodak.edu.
*******

Native Media Caucus Schedule Listed

The Native Media Caucus: Keeping Traditions Alive Through Communication, will
be held Wednesday through Friday, April 9-11. Journalism workshops will be
held for tribal college students and Native media professionals. Students from
each of the state's tribal colleges are invited to attend. The Native Media
Center will provide attendance scholarships for selected students from each
tribal college. This scholarship will include the workshops, campus housing
for April 10 and 11, meals (including the banquet) and mileage for one vehicle
from each tribal college site in North Dakota.

Journalism and media skills are necessary to address the barriers and
challenges facing Native people. We hope this workshop will facilitate the
growth and development of Native media and introduce students to the skills
necessary to begin their own college newspapers.

Participants will also have the opportunity to visit with the new executive
director of the Native American Journalists Association.

For Native media professionals, workshops in story development, writing
photography and design will give those people already working in the media the
opportunity to hone their journalism skills. Journalism professionals from the
Grand Forks Herald and the School of Communication will instruct the
workshops.

Northern Plains Media Consortium meetings will also be held. The Consortium
was formed in 1983 to encourage, inspire, enhance and empower Native
communications in the northern plains region. Membership and informational
meetings will be held during the Caucus.

The keynote speaker is Harley Straus Visiting Photographer Mary Annette
Pember. Pember, Red Cliff Ojibwe, is currently the Picture Editor at the
Lexington Herald-Leader, a daily newspaper in Lexington, Ky. She has won
numerous awards for her photography, and was one of 12 journalists of color to
cover the UN World Conference on Women in Beijing, China. She has been staff
photographer for the Oregonian, the Arizona Republic and the Cincinnati
Enquirer. Her work has also been published in Ms magazine and the book, "A
Circle of Nations, Voices and Visions of American Indians."

Harley Straus taught photojournalism at UND from 1980 until his death in 1989.
Shortly before his death, he and his wife, Zena Beth McGlashan, also a School
of Communication journalism professor, established the Harley Straus Visiting
Photographer Fund to bring outstanding photographers to UND to inspire
photography students. The Fund continues to support this endeavor in his
memory.

The Environmental Racism and the Media panel discussion will cover issues
including environmental policy-making, targeting of minority communities for
toxic waste facilities, presence of poisons and pollutants in our communities
and leadership of the environmental movement.
The conference schedules follows:

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9: 1 to 3 p.m., Conference registration, Native Media Center,
321 O'Kelly Hall; 3 to 5 p.m., Native Media Center Open House, 321 O'Kelly
Hall; 6:30 to 8 p.m., Gathering of Communicators and Prayer Ceremony, River
Valley Room, Memorial Union.

THURSDAY, APRIL 10: 8 to 9 a.m., Opening Prayer and Continental Breakfast,
Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, with welcome by Mike Saunders, Director of
Native Media Center; 9 to 11 a.m., Journalism Workshops, Native Media Center,
on Story Development" and "Interviewing Techniques"; 11 a.m. to noon, Panel on
Radio Production; 1 to 4 p.m., Journalism Workshops on "Writing the News" and
"Leads and Headlines"; 4:15 to 5 p.m., Northern Plains Media Consortium
Business Meeting, River Valley Room, Memorial Union; 7 to 9 p.m., Panel,
"Native Women and the Media," with Cheryl Red Eagle, Columnist, and Mary
Annette Pember, Photojournalist, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union.

FRIDAY, APRIL 11: 8 to 9 a.m., Opening Prayer and Continental Breakfast,
Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, with welcome by Harold Iron Shield, Northern
Plains Media Consortium; 9 to 11 a.m., Journalism Workshops, Native Media
Center, on "Visual Storytelling: Tips on Photography and Design"; 11 a.m. to
12:30 p.m., Panel on "Environmental Racism and the Media," Lecture Bowl,
Memorial Union; 1 to 5 p.m., Journalism Workshops, Native Media Center, on
"Writing Feature Stories," and "Newspaper Production"; 3 to 4 p.m., Northern
Plains Media Consortium Membership Meeting, River Valley Room, Memorial Union;
4 to 5 p.m., Native Media Press Conference, River Valley Room, Memorial Union;
5:30 to 7 p.m., Banquet (provided for paid participants), River Valley Room,
Memorial Union, speaker will be Loren Omoto, Executive Director of Native
American Journalists Association; 7 to 9 p.m., Presentation by Mary Annette
Pember, Red Cliff Ojibwe award-winning photojournalist, Lecture Bowl, Memorial
Union.

The conference is sponsored by the Native Media Center, School of
Communication; the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation; and the Northern
Plains Media Consortium, Moorhead, Minn. 

For more information, contact the Native Media Center, Mike Saunders at 777-2478, or Lucy Ganje at 777-2670, Box 7169, Grand Forks, ND 58202. -- Kim Lee,
Native Directions.
*******

John Vitton To Talk About China Trip

John Vitton (Business and Public Administration) will talk about his teaching
experiences and general impressions about the students, faculty and
administrators in China on Thursday, April 10, 3 to 4 p.m. in Room 1, Gamble
Hall. He spent more than two months teaching Strategic Management (long-range
planning) concepts to graduate students at the Beijing Institute of Machinery.
He also traveled to Xian, Guilin, Shanghai and Hong Kong. The talk is free and
is open to the public. -- Fred Lawrence, Dean, College of Business and Public
Administration.
*******

Phi Beta Kappa Lecture Set

This year's Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar is Dennis O'Brien, President
Emeritus of the University of Rochester, and previously Professor of
Philosophy at Rochester and Bucknell Universities. He will present a lecture
Thursday, April 10, at 8 p.m. in 101 Abbott Hall on "The Logic of Cursing."
The lecture will address the nature of primary religious discourse from the
perspective of its converse, cursing. He is also the speaker in the "Theology
for Lunch" series, Thursday, April 10. The noon discussion, at Christus Rex,
is on "The Anger World and Theology." Both events are free and open to the
public. Dr. O'Brien's visit is sponsored by the UND chapter of Phi Beta Kappa,
the Department of Philosophy and Religion, Christus Rex, the Newman Center,
the College of Arts and Sciences, and the Office of the President. -- Patricia
Kelley (Geology and Geological Engineering), Vice President, Phi Beta Kappa.
*******

Christus Rex Presents Asset Building Information

At 7 p.m. Thursday, April 10, Christus Rex will present "What Kids Need to
Survive: A Community Conversation on Asset Building," in 210 Clifford Hall.
Everyone is welcome to the program, which is free to the public. The presenter
will be James Vollbracht from Search Institute.

On Friday, April 11, he will present "A Call to Action Workshop on Asset
Building" at Christus Rex, 3012 University Ave. Registration will begin at 8
a.m. and is required. The forms and fee schedule are available at Christus
Rex. The presentation will take place from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 
Vollbracht is sponsored by The Center for Faithful Leadership of Christus Rex
with support from United Hospital and Lutheran Brotherhood Branch #8127. Call
775-5581 for more information. -- Tim Megorden, Pastor, Christus Rex.
*******

International Investigators To Present At Research Day

Jan Alexander, Deputy Head at Norway's National Institute of Public Health,
Oslo, will deliver the keynote address at the 17th annual Frank Low Research
Day Friday, April 11, in the Wold Center, Medical Science.

Alexander is deputy head of the Department of Environmental Medicine and
section head of the Division of food Toxicology at the National Institute of
Public Health in Norway. He also has experience as a rural physician in the
upper regions of Norway.

Alexander, who is visiting the School of Medicine and Health Sciences under
the prestigious Burroughs Wellcome Visiting Professor program, will also
present the Dean's Hour address at noon Thursday, April 10, in the Keller
Auditorium of the Wold Center. His address is titled "Environmental Medicine:
A Norwegian Perspective."

David Robinson, Director of the Vascular Research Program, National Heart,
Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md., will
deliver the Special Invited Guest Lecture during the event.
Dr. Robinson also will deliver an address, "The Social Consequences of the New
Biology," Saturday, April 12, at The Woodside Center for Interdisciplinary
Studies in Mentor, Minn. In this talk, he plans to discuss genetic research
and its social and cultural implications. For more information call (218) 637-6600.

The purpose of Frank Low Research Day is to provide a forum for faculty and
students to discuss research interests and activities. Held for the first time
in the spring of 1981, the day was dedicated in the name of Frank Low upon his
retirement as a gesture of recognition for his contributions to research at
the school. Dr. Low, who served 17 years in the school, joined the faculty as
a Hill Research Professor in 1964. He is continuing his research activities as
a Professor Emeritus of Anatomy at Louisiana State University.

The following events will be held in the Wold Center (poster session and
demonstration will be in the Fercho and Vennes atria):

APRIL 11, Low Research Day: 8:25 a.m., Opening remarks, Dean H. David Wilson;
8:30 a.m., Willis Sampson (Physiology), "Brain and Pituitary Adrenomedullin: A
Physiologically Relevant Role in Fluid and Electrolyte Homoestasis and
Cardiovascular Function"; 9:15 a.m., Thomas Hill (Microbiology and
Immunology), "The End of DNA Replication as we Know It"; 10:30 a.m., Burroughs
Wellcome Visiting Professor: Jan Alexander, Deputy Head, Department of
Environmental Medicine and Section head, Division of Food Toxicology at the
National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway, "Heterocyclic Amines from
Cooked Meat - Biological Fate and Role in Colon Carcinogenesis"; 11:30 a.m. to
1:30 p.m., Poster Presentations; 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., The Harley E. French
Library of the Health Sciences will demonstrate updated facts and tips on the
utilization of the networked versions of "Reference Manager" and "Current
Contents." Library personnel will be available to share searching techniques
and provide technical advice in the cluster room area adjacent to the Fercho
Atrium; 1:30 p.m., William Newman (Internal Medicine, Fargo), "Glucose
Monitoring and Diabetes Mellitus"; 2:15 p.m., Special Invited Guest Lecturer:
David Robinson, Director, Vascular Research Program, National Heart, Lung and
Blood Institute, National Institute of health, Bethesda, Md., "Cardiovascular
Research: Now and in the 21st Century"; 3:15 p.m., Richard Wilsnack
(Neuroscience), "How Women Drink: Findings from 15 Years of National
Research"; 4 p.m., Announcement of Poster Awards and Closing Remarks. 

-- H. David Wilson, Dean, School of Medicine and Health Sciences.
*******

Earth Evolution Is LEEPS Lecture Topic

Two LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary Sciences) Lectures will be
presented by Richard Grieve, Geological Survey of Canada in Ottawa on Friday,
April 11.

At noon in Leonard Hall Lecture Bowl, Room 100, he will consider
"Extraterrestrial Impact: The Record and Consequences for Earth Evolution." At
3 p.m. in 109 Leonard Hall, he will discuss "Understanding the Origin and
Evolution of the Sudbury Structure: Then and Now."

The LEEPS lecture series is supported by the Department of Geology and
Geological Engineering, the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Office
of Research and Program Development, Office of Instructional Development and
the Advancing Science Excellence in North Dakota (ASEND) Program. All
interested persons are welcome to attend. For additional information contact
me. -- Dexter Perkins, Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering.
*******

Psychology Schedules Colloquium

The Psychology Department will hold a colloquium in which James Coyne,
University of Michigan, will present "Psychology's New Frontier? Depression in
Primary Care," at 11 a.m. Friday, April 11, in Room 102, Nursing Building.
Everyone is welcome. -- Joan Peterson, Psychology Department.
*******

Health Sciences Library Celebrates Library Week

The Library of the Health Sciences will observe National Library Week April
13-19. The highlight of the week will be the cookbook and used book sale on
Wednesday, April 16. Other events will include library tours and
demonstrations of electronic journals. Tours will be given on demand, while
demonstrations are scheduled on Tuesday, April 15 and Thursday, April 17 in
the Library classroom at 10 a.m., noon, and 3 p.m.  They are designed to
introduce library users to the world of electronic journals.  Highlighted
during the demonstrations will be Electronic Collections Online, which is now
available across campus through the university libraries.

There is still time to donate your used books for the book sale; donations
will be accepted through Tuesday, April 15. So far the variety matches last
year's sale. In addition to medical books, there are children's books,
romances, poetry, biographies, mysteries, dictionaries, textbooks from
aviation to zoology, and cookbooks old and new.

The featured cookbook will be the one compiled from the favorite recipes
contributed by faculty, staff and students of the School of Medicine and
Health Sciences and the College of Nursing. A wide variety of foods are
represented in more than 230 recipes. Categories include: Taste Ticklers and
Tummy Warmers (appetizers, snacks, soups); Lean, Mean and Green (salads,
vegetables, vegetarian dishes); Staff of Life (bread, rolls, cereals,
muffins); Put a Little meat on Your Bones (main dishes, casseroles); A Spoon
Full of Sugar Makes the Medicine Go Down (bars, cookies, desserts); Just What
the Doctor Ordered (favorites of deans and department chairs).

The sale will begin at 9 a.m. and run until 3 p.m. and will be held in the
corridor outside the Library. Proceeds will be used to purchase new books for
the Library. -- Judy Rieke and Lila Pedersen, Harley E. French Library of the
Health Sciences.
*******

Anthropologist Will Discuss Vikings In Minnesota

The Vikings, "Roots or Wrongs: Folk Past in the Midwest" will be presented by
Michael Michlovic, Department of Anthropology, Moorhead State University,
Tuesday, April 15, at 4 p.m. in the River Valley Room, Memorial Union. Dr.
Michlovic has had a long interest in the Kensington Runestone and the Viking
myth in Minnesota. He has presented several papers on his research and has
used the Viking myth in three publications on folk history. He will discuss
the Viking story in order to show how people construct their history much like
Levi Strauss said people use human society and its dimensions to create an
order in nature. He will suggest how native people in America and other parts
of the world develop their history for their own moral and ideological needs
in much the same way, and find the professional version of history
unsatisfying and distasteful. He will also offer some suggestions about the
place of the archaeologist/historian in light of these social realities. --
Fred Schneider, Professor and Chair of Anthropology, 777-4718.
*******

University Senate Set To Meet May 1

The University Senate will meet Thursday, May 1, at 4:05 p.m., in Room 7,
Gamble Hall. Agenda items for this meeting are due in the Office of Admissions
and Records by 4 p.m. Thursday, April 17. It is recommended that some detail
be included in the agenda items submitted. -- Alice Poehls (Admissions and
Records), Secretary, University Senate.
*******

Reception Will Honor Tom Robinson

The Department of Mathematics will host a reception for Tom Robinson Thursday,
May 1, from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Alumni Center.

Dr. Robinson has been a faculty member of the department and the university
since 1958 and is retiring this year. Please join us to wish him well in
future pursuits. Everyone is welcome. -- Bruce Dearden, Associate Professor of
Mathematics.
*******

OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

Integrated Studies Provides Information For Advisors

In its 11th year, the Integrated Studies Program continues to help students
develop the skills defined in the University general education goals: critical
thinking, communication, creative thinking, recognizing relationships, and
recognizing and evaluating choices. Work in those areas is organized around a
broad semester theme rather than around a specific discipline, and is carried
out in a variety of ways including (but not limited to) the following:
discussions of  texts and library research work, written work, guest
presentations, field  trips, cooperative projects.  The majority of class
meetings are in a small group discussion format involving approximately 20
students and one faculty member. The Program is offering credits in each of
the four general education categories in fall 1997:

   English Composition I: 3 credits, Communications GER
   Social Problems: 3 credits, Social Science GER
   Humanities I: 4 credits, Arts and Humanities GER
   Integrated Studies Science: 3 credits, Math, Science & Technology GER*

* The science course has been approved by the General Education  Requirements
Committee for fulfillment of a three credit science requirement.

The faculty in the Program for fall 1997 will be Pat Sanborn (Philosophy and
Humanities), Carl Barrentine (Biology and Humanities), Jan Moen (Sociology),
and Burt Thorp (English).

The fall program will be limited to the first 80 students who reserve a place.
If you have advisees or know of students who might be interested in more
information on the fall program, please have them call the Integrated Studies
office at 777-3622, or stop by the office at 301 Babcock Hall. -- Yvonne
Holter, Humanities and Integrated Studies.
*******

Summer, Fall Registration Begins April 7

Registration for the 1997 summer term will be from Monday, April 7, through
Friday, May 9, and for the fall term from Monday, April 7, through Friday,
Sept. 4. Students will register and drop/add using the ALFI System (Access
Line For Information). Students who have proper signatures for registration
actions not permitted by ALFI may add these courses at the Office of
Admissions and Records, second floor, Twamley Hall, during normal office hours
starting April 7. Students may register on or after appointment times as
printed on their registration forms. -- Veriena Garver, Admissions and Records
Officer.
*******

Academic Catalog Pages Must Be Proofed By April 15

Final preparations are under way for production of the 1997-99 University of
North Dakota catalog. Department chairs (or designees) will be contacted by
the Office of Admissions and Records to schedule an appointment time for
proofing their departmental pages; proofing must be completed by April 15. If
you have any questions, please call Mary Bergstrom at 777-2148. -- Mary
Bergstrom, Office of Admissions and Records.
*******

Art Exhibition Set For Linnehan

The M.F.A. exhibition for Sharon Linnehan, a candidate for the Master of Fine
Arts degree, is set for Monday, April 14, through Monday, May 5, in the Hughes
Fine Arts Center. Linnehan will exhibit monotypes and screenprints. The
opening reception will be Monday, April 14, from 7 to 9 p.m. in the Hughes
Fine Arts Center. -- Jackie McElroy-Edwards, Professor and Chair of Visual
Arts.

Doctoral Exam Set For Badman And Johannesson

The final examination for Jacqueline A. Badman, a candidate for the Ph.D.
degree with a major in Teaching and Learning, is set for 3:45 p.m. Monday,
April 14, in 104-E Education Building. The dissertation title is "A
Qualitative Study of a College Visual Arts Course: A Multicultural
Perspective." Janet Ahler (Educational Foundations and Research) is the
committee chair.

The final examination for Claudia Odne Johannesson, a candidate for the Ed.D.
degree with a major in Educational Administration, is set for 9 a.m. Monday,
April 14, in 208 Education Building. The dissertation title is "The Role of
the Principal in the Transition From a Graded to a Nongraded Elementary
School." Gloria Jean Thomas (Educational Leadership) is the committee chair.

Members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend. -- Harvey Knull, Dean,
Graduate School.
*******

GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

Faculty Research/Creative Activity Travel Applications Due

The third deadline for submission of applications to the Faculty Research and
Creative Activity Committee (FRCAC) is Tuesday, April 15. Travel applications
will be considered at that time only for travel that will occur between April
15, 1997, and Oct. 15, 1997. No research or 
publication applications will be considered at that time.

The Committee reminds applicants to carefully prepare their proposals and be
specific and realistic in their budget requests. Although the FRCAC encourages
submission of travel requests, the Committee takes into consideration the most
recent FRCAC award granted to each applicant. Priority will be given to
beginning faculty and first-time applicants. Applications are available at the
Office of Research and Program Development, 105 Twamley Hall, 777-4279. THESE
FORMS HAVE BEEN REVISED (9/96). IF YOU HAVE THE APPLICATIONS ON DISK, PLEASE
STOP IN FOR COPIES OF THE REVISED FORMS. An original and seven copies of the
application must be submitted to ORPD prior to the deadline. Applications that
are not prepared in accordance with the directions on the forms will not be
considered by the Committee.

-- Brian Paulsen (Visual Arts), Chair, Faculty Research and Creative Activity
Committee.
*******

 
ORPD Lists Funding Opportunities

Following are several research items. For more information, call the Office of
Research and Program Development at 777-4278.

CENTER FOR INDOOR AIR RESEARCH
The Center provides research or dissertation funds.  Contact the Center at
1099 Winterson Road, Suite 280, Linthicum, MD 21090-2216; (410)684-3777; Fax
(410)684-3729; ciarinc@aol.com.  Deadline: 6/1/97.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

ALEXANDER VON HUMBOLDT FOUNDATION: SCHOLAR AWARD PROGRAMS
Up to 500 Humboldt Research Fellowships are granted annually for research in
Germany.  Scholars may be from any academic field.  Approximately 200 Humboldt
Research Prizes are granted annually to internationally recognized scholars
for research in Germany.  Deadline: Approximately 5 months before review in
March, June/July, November.

Approximately 10 Federal Chancellor Scholarships are awarded annually to
Americans for study in humanities, social sciences, law, and economics in
Germany.  Deadline: 10/31. Contact: Dr. Bernard Stein, Alexander von Humboldt
Foundation, 1055 Thomas Jefferson St., N.W., Suite 2030, Washington, DC 20007;
(202)296-2990, Fax (202)833-8514; humboldt@umail.umd.edu.

The TransCoop Program supports Canadian and American scholars conducting
collaborative research with German scholars in the humanities and social
sciences.  For information on this program, visit the WWW site of the German-American Academic Council Foundation at 
http://www.access.digex.net/~gaac/transco.html.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

RECEIPT DATES FOR NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH)
AREA GRANTS
June 25, 1997, is the next receipt day for NIH Area Grants.  Beginning in
September there will be three receipt dates a year for Area Grants: September
25, January 25, and May 25. The official program guidelines for the AREA
program will be published in the NIH Guide to Grants and Contracts in early
April.  
- - - - - - - - - - - -

RESEARCH ON THE ORIGINS AND PATHWAYS TO DRUG 
ABUSE/NOA -NIH
This program announcement encourages research exploring the origins of and
pathways to drug abuse. Of particular interest are multidisciplinary,
integrative and developmental approaches.  A keen understanding of the factors
and processes that predispose and protect an individual from drug abuse from
initial use through different stages of drug involvement is essential to the
successful prevention and treatment of drug abuse. Investigators from diverse
scientific disciplines are encouraged to apply either individually (e.g., as
individual projects) or collectively (e.g., as a program project). Support
mechanisms include: Project Grants (R01), Small Grants (R03), Exploratory
Grants (R21), First Independent Research Support and Transition Awards (R29),
Program Projects (P01) and Research Centers (P20, P30, P50, and P60). 
Deadline: Standard Application Deadlines. Contact: URL :
http://web.fie.com/htdoc/fed/nih/gen/any/proc/any/03149705.htm.  (NIH Guide,
Vol. 26, No. 8, 3/14/97; PA-97-043).
- - - - - - - - - - - -

PILOT PROJECTS OR FEASIBILITY STUDIES FOR GENOMIC 
MAPPING, SEQUENCING
NATIONAL HUMAN GENOME RESEARCH INSTITUTE

This program announcement supersedes the program announcement: PAR-94-046,
Pilot Projects or Feasibility Studies for Genomic Analysis, NIH Guide, Vol.
23, No. 10, March 11, 1994.  The National Human Genome Research Institute
(NHGRI), formerly the National Center for Human Genome Research, invites
applications for exploratory/developmental grants (R21) to develop new, and/or 
significantly improve existing, technologies that will accelerate the genome
mapping, sequencing and analysis goals of the Human Genome Project (HGP) in
the most expeditious and economical manner. The purpose of this program
announcement is to encourage high risk/potential high payoff applications that
are not yet developed fully enough to successfully compete for a standard R01
grant.  Deadline: Standard application deadlines.  Contact: NIH Grant Line
(data line 301/402-2221), NIH GOPHER (gopher.nih.gov), or URL:
http://web.fie.com/htdoc/fed/ nih/gen/any/proc/any/03149709.htm.  (NIH Guide,
Vol. 26, No. 8, 3/14/97; PA-97-045.)
- - - - - - - - - - - -

WOODROW WILSON INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR SCHOLARS

The main interest areas of this agency are the humanities and social sciences. 
Fellowships are tenable in residence at the Center; the Center will not
provide support for research elsewhere.  Contact: Research Scholarship Program
Director, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, Suite 704, Washington, DC 20024-2518;
(202)287-3000, ext. 330; Fax (202)287-3772; http://wwics.si.edu/.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

DEADLINES: NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION (NSF)

The following programs support research or dissertation activity:

Cross Disciplinary Interactions, Geosciences, Geography and Mathematical
Sciences. Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences.   Deadline:
None.  Contact: (703)306-1870 or http://www.nsf.gov/mps/start.htm.

Water-Energy-Atmosphere-Vegetative-Earth Interactions (WEAVE).  Directorate
for Geosciences.  Deadline: 6/1/97.  Contact: (703)306-1550 or
http://www.geo.nsf.gov/.

Climate Dynamics.  Directorate for Geosciences.  Deadline: 6/15/97; 8/9/97. 
Contact: (703)306-1520 or http://www.geo.nsf.gov/.

Solar-Terrestrial.  Directorate for Geosciences.  Deadline: 6/15/97; 8/9/97. 
Contact: (703)306-1520 or http://www.geo.nsf.gov/.

Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER).  Directorate for Biological Sciences,
Long-Term Projects in Environmental Biology Cluster.  Deadline: None.  
Contact: (703)306-1483; http://www.nsf.gov/bio/.

Cross Disciplinary Interactions, Global Change Research.  Directorate for
Mathematical and Physical Sciences.  Deadline: None.  Contact: (703)306-1870;
http://www.nsf.gov/mps/start.htm.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES (NIEHS)
ACADEMIC RESEARCH ENHANCEMENT AWARD (AREA)

AREA funds are intended to support new research projects or expand ongoing
research activities in areas related to the health sciences.  Deadline:
6/25//97.  Contact: Dr. Jerrold Heindel, NIEHS, P. O. Box 12233, North Campus,
MD3-03, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709; (919)541-0781; Fax (919)541-2843;
jh190f@nih.gov; http://www.niehs.nih.gov/.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

TAPPI FOUNDATION

The Tappi Foundation awards seed money for innovative fundamental research in
pulp, paper, and related industries.  Deadline: 6/30/97.  Contact: Jeffrey J.
Petro, Secretary, Research Funding Committee, Technology Park/Atlanta, P. O.
Box 105113, Atlanta, GA 30348-5113; (770)209-7211, Fax (770)446-6947;
foundation@tappi.org; http://www.tappi.org/.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE, BUREAU OF JUSTICE ASSISTANCE (BJA) 
FISCAL YEAR 1997 PROGRAM PLAN

Solicitation and application information for the following programs can be
obtained from the BJA Clearinghouse at 1-800-688-4252, the Department of
Justice Response Center at 1-800-421-6770, or the BJA home page at
www.ojp.usdoj.gov/BJA.

Addressing Issues in Law Enforcement, Addressing Criminal Justice Issues in
Rural Communities, Addressing Criminal Justice Issues in Tribal Communities,
Addressing Issues in the Adjudication Process, Adjudication Technical
Assistance Program, Substance Abuse and the Courts: Followup to the 1991
National Conference, Public Trust and Confidence in the Courts: Jury System
Improvement, Evaluation Partnership Challenge Grant Program.

-- Carl Fox, Director of Research and Program Development.
*******

Department Of Defense To Seek Proposals

The Department of Defense EPSCoR (DEPSCoR) is planning to publish an RFP from
all of the EPSCoR states. No official information is available but the
consulting group for the Coalition of EPSCoR States, Van Scoyoc and
Associates, offers the following appraisal of the upcoming RFP:

*  Each state will be allowed to submit 10 research proposals as part of their
submission. Awards, typically three years, are unlikely to exceed
$100,000 per year. DoD can choose to fund all, some or none of the research
proposals.

*  Each state will be required to submit an infrastructure proposal in
addition to the research proposals. This section will be evaluated separately
from the research proposals.

*  DoD is expected to put the announcement on the Web in early April and give
a deadline perhaps as early as May 15 but more likely to allow two months from
the notification date.

In anticipation of this very short deadline becoming a reality, ND EPSCoR
requests the following from interested researchers:

1. A one page synopsis of the proposed research (fax is ok: [(701)231-7947])
by noon, Friday, April 11. Selection of an appropriate review panel depends
heavily on the quality of information we can supply in advance of the
evaluation process. A list of the qualifications or the required expertise of
reviewers to review your proposal competently will be helpful to the panel
selection committee.

2.  If May 15 turns out to be the deadline for the EPSCoR states' submission
to DoD, full proposals will be due in the ND EPSCoR offices by noon Monday,
April 21. A detailed RFP will be distributed by our office when DoD publishes
the official guidelines.

Evaluation of the proposals and recommendation for inclusion in the North
Dakota submission will be conducted by an external review panel. At this time
ND EPSCoR is negotiating with the Geochemical and Environmental Research Group
(GERG), the same group that conducted the evaluations for our 1995 submission.
In the last round of DEPSCoR, North Dakota had seven of 15 proposals funded
for FY95 and FY96. The average for the EPSCoR states was six.

Based on discussions with DoD staff last year and the distributions of awards
in the EPSCoR states, mission relevance has a very high priority. It will very
likely be required that PIs included in the state submission document the
relevance of their research to the DoD mission.

The best reference is the program outline published for the FY95.

It is available from the ND EPSCoR offices and the web
(http://www.onr.navy.mil/sci_tech/special/onrdpscr.htm). Also available from
our offices are suggestions made by GERG based on their evaluations in 1995.
Information on format for FY97 proposals is unavailable but the format is
likely to be similar to that in the 1995 announcement.

Budget: North Dakota will have to match at least 33 percent (1:2) of the total
cost of the grant and perhaps as much as 50 percent (1:1). Please construct
two-column budgets, one for DoD funds and one for ND match. Allowable match:
cash, graduate student tuition, indirect costs and faculty time (e.g., two
months/academic year).

The official RFP is likely to come over the web at the above address. If not
there, it will probably be found by using your web search engine. Search
target: depscor.

At this stage of the process, one of the most important tasks for researchers
who wish to participate in DEPSCoR is the identification and documentation of
DoD relevance of their research. In the last round of competition, PIs were
required to name an appropriate Technical Point of
Contact in one of the agencies.

-- Philip Boudjouk, Department of Chemistry, North Dakota State University,
(701) 231-8601 or 8400, fax: (701) 231-7947.
*******

EPSCoR Makes Research Awards To Undergrads

The ND EPSCoR annual awards to undergraduates provide stipends to students
conducting research in a participating faculty member's science, engineering,
or mathematics laboratory.  Awards are made directly to the students who
select the mentor and research field interesting to them.

Awards are made to North Dakota residents and students enrolled at North
Dakota University System institutions.

Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) provides undergraduates
opportunity to experience academic research first-hand. REU students are
awarded a stipend for eight to 10 weeks during the summer to do research under
the guidance of a NDSU or UND faculty member. Mentors receive a $500 supply
budget.  There have been 136 awards and 318 applicants during the last five
years. The average GPA of award winners is 3.69.

The 1997 REU mentors at UND are: F. Richard Ferraro (Psychology), Serge von
Duvillard (HPER), Kenneth Ruit (Anatomy & Cell Biology), Sanku Mallik
(Chemistry), Steven Sternberg (Chemical Engineering), Ann Flower (Microbiology
and Immunology), Irina Smoliakova (Chemistry), Mark Henriksen  (Physics),
Douglas McDonald (Psychology), David Lambeth (Biochemistry and Molecular
Biology).

Science Bound is for entering freshmen. Students become research participants
under the supervision of a UND or NDSU faculty mentor. Science Bound pays for
up to 10 hours of research assistance per week during the academic year. 
Students also receive a summer-research stipend. Mentors receive a $500 supply
budget for the summer program. Successful students are eligible for a second
year of funding. There have been 64 awards and 108 applicants during the last
five years. The average GPA of award winners is 3.84.

The 1997-98 Academic Year Science Bound UND mentors are: Paul Lindseth
(Aviation), Tar-Pin Chen (Physics), Steven Sternberg (Chemical Engineering),
Richard Ferraro (Psychology), James Haselton (Physiology), Frank Karner
(Geology and Geological Engineering), Holly Brown-Borg (Physiology), Kathryn
Thomasson (Chemistry), David Lambeth (Biochemistry and Molecular Biology), Jon
Spanier (Microbiology and Immunology).

For information regarding Science Outreach And Recruitment (SOAR) programs
contact me. -- David Givers, ND EPSCoR Program Officer, North Dakota State
University, (701) 231-7516, e-mail: givers@badlands.nodak.edu OR ND EPSCoR
home page: http://www.ndsu.nodak.edu/epscor/index.html.
*******

NSF To Replace Bulletin List

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is migrating to a completely Web-based
information dissemination system.  They hope to retire the STIS system,
including the mailing lists, this summer.  They have created a Web-based
system, called "Custom News Service" that provides similar functions.  If you
have access to a Web browser, you'll want to move to this service soon.  The
new service provides the following features:

*  Weekly summary of all new documents on the NSF Web site.  If you select
this option, you'll receive a weekly e-mail with a list of URLs for new
documents. If your e-mail software allows, you can simply click on the URLs
for immediate access to the documents.  This feature is homologous to the
STSSUM-L mailing list.

*  Immediate notification when new documents are added.  You can fill out a
"profile" of the type of documents you are interested in, and the system will
send you e-mail when a document is added that matches your profile. The e-mail
notification will normally include just the URL of the document, but will
contain the full text for smaller publications, such as vacancy announcements
and press releases. You can modify your profile at any time from your custom
news page. You'll get an e-mail confirming each change.

*  A system called "OnLine Documents" provides Web access to the same
documents that exist on STIS, but with a more flexible and easier-to-use
access mechanism.

To subscribe to this free service, you need an Internet e-mail account. Your
e-mail address is your login for the Custom News Service. If you need help
subscribing to the service, contact NSF's Information Center at info@nsf.gov,
or call 703-306-1234.

To set up your profile, visit the NSF home page at http://www.nsf.gov. Click
on the Custom News Service button on the toolbar at the bottom of the home
page. Or go directly to the service at http://www.nsf.gov/home/cns/start.htm.
You will be prompted to provide your e-mail address. 

If this new service meets your needs, unsubscribe to BULLETIN by sending
e-mail to stislists@nsf.gov. In the text of the message, enter:

     unsubscribe BULLETIN

We hope you'll find the Custom News Service useful. If you have any questions
or comments, send them to webmaster@nsf.gov.

-- Carl Fox, Director of Research and Program Development.
*******

BILLBOARD

Internal Medicine Contacts Moved To Fargo

Effective April 1, anyone wishing to contact the chairperson of Internal
Medicine must call (701)293-4132. For information regarding Accounts Payable,
Payroll, Personnel, etc., contact Patty Mastel at (701)293-4156. All
correspondence must be mailed to: Department of Internal Medicine, UND Medical
Education Center, 1919 Elm Street North, Fargo, ND 58102.  There will no
longer be a contact person for Internal Medicine in Grand Forks. -- Roxanne
Korynta, Internal Medicine.
*******

Some Alumni Offices Moved

Some of the offices within the Alumni Center have moved to a new location.
Alumni mailing operations, computer retrievals, record updates, financial
records, special events, and public information have all moved to the former
United Campus Ministry building, 3100 University Ave., located across the
street from the J. Lloyd Stone Alumni Center. All development offices will
remain in their current location in the Stone Alumni Center. All phone numbers
will also remain the same. -- Cindy Filler, MIS Director, Alumni Center.
*******

Post Summer Jobs Soon; New Rehire Forms Available

It is time to think about summer work study and institutional jobs. Student
Financial Aid/Job Service will post jobs for summer on Wednesday, May 7, so
please submit your summer listings by April 25. Students must complete a
summer application and be awarded Federal Work Study (FWS) in order to qualify
for employment. Applications are available in the Financial Aid Office, 216
Twamley Hall. The employment eligibility dates for summer are from May 11 to
August 23. Please call Dorothy at 777-4411 to post FWS jobs and Dennis at 777-3013 to post institutional jobs.

New forms have been distributed to expedite rehire of current institutional
employees. Please use these forms in place of the "blue card" if you rehire
institutional student employees who worked for the department during Academic
Year 1996/1997, and who start summer employment before May 31. If you have
questions, or did not receive a form from which to make copies, please call
Student Financial Aid/Job Service at 777-3013. -- Student Financial Aid
Office.
*******

April 7-11 Is Student Employment Week

The week of April 7-11 has been designated as Student Employment Week. The
observance of this week provides us an opportunity as employers and educators
to recognize the contributions student employees make to our campus, and to
emphasize the benefits of the student employment programs to our students.
Please remember to say "Thank You" to your student employees. A special treat
or lunch is nice. -- Alice Hoffert, Director, Student Financial Aid.
*******

Wet Sidewalks Won't Be Planked

Every spring, due to snow melt and frost boils, some low areas on sidewalks
will have water problems. Due to concerns with creating tripping hazards and
for individuals traveling across campus in wheelchairs, planking will not be
laid over ponding areas as done in the past.  

Water ponding in low areas will persist for three to four weeks, so we request
that everyone use proper footwear or take alternate routes whenever possible.
We apologize for the inconvenience, and we will do everything we can to drain
problem areas as quickly as possible. -- LeRoy Sondrol, Director of Plant
Services.
*******

Computer Center Offers Win '95 Class

A training session, "Windows 95 Transition," will be offered by the Computer
Center to faculty, staff, and students for a $20 fee. The fee will cover the
cost of a learning guide for each participant. The three-part session will be
held Monday, Wednesday and Friday, April 21, 23, and 25 from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
in 361 Upson II. You must register in advance by calling Bonnie or Shelly at
777-3171, and providing an account number to be charged. Requests for
accommodation related to disability need to be made when registering.

The course presents the new concepts of Windows 95 for Windows 3.x users.
Participants will be introduced to Windows 95 features and complete
corresponding step-by-step exercises in a learning guide that will be theirs
to keep. Topics covered include navigating the desktop, using online help,
using Windows Explorer, and using the find utility. -- Marlys Hanson,  User
Services Consultant, Computer Center.
*******

Computer Center Offers WordPerfect Training

The Computer Center is offering a training session, "WordPerfect for Windows,"
Thursdays, April 10 and 17, from 6 to 8 p.m. in 361 Upson II. Please register
in advance by calling Bonnie or Shelly at 777-3171. -- Bonnie Snyder and
Shelly Stewart, Computer Center.
*******

U2 Offers Development Hotline

The University within the University (U2) offers a professional development
hotline.

You can dial 777-2000 to hear a complete listing of the professional
development opportunities currently scheduled on campus for UND faculty,
staff, and students.  This hotline operates much like the Career Mobility
Line.  Dial the number and then press the following numbers for the option you
would like to listen to:

#1 Computer Center seminars
#2 Safety and Environmental Training Institute seminars
#3 Supervisory and Administrative Seminars
#4 Conflict Resolution Center seminars
#5 Miscellaneous events and opportunities
#0 to be connected with Jo Coutts at the University within the University

Have a pencil ready to note the seminar title, and the person to contact for
registration.

If your department would like to have an event listed on this hotline, please
contact me at 777-4266.  Also note that it is a good time to begin the
planning for your fall seminars as the catalog will be printed in July and
distributed in August.  Call me for more information about additional services
available to hosting departments. -- Jo Coutts, Program Coordinator,
Continuing Education.
*******

Continuing Education Lists Workshops

Following are some workshops coordinated by the Division of Continuing
Education.

EPSCoR

The North Dakota Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research
(EPSCoR) is sponsoring a conference from May 29 to June 1 on UND's campus. The
research focus of the program is the study of protein-protein interactions
through a diversity of approaches and biological contexts. This diversity is
reflected in the interests of the internationally recognized scientists
invited to give talks.

The fee is $120 and includes all scientific sessions, program materials, an
opening reception, meals and refreshments. For more information or a detailed
brochure, please contact John Shabb, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular
Biology at 777-4946 or Dawn Botsford, Division of Continuing Education, 777-4260.

Substance Abuse

The North Dakota Addiction Counselors Association, the North Dakota Division
of Alcohol and Drug Abuse, and the Division of Continuing Education are
sponsoring a two-day workshop on "Substance Abusing Adolescents with ADHD and
Preventing Adolescent Relapse," and "A Clinical Supervision Workshop Using the
Eight Skills Groups," in Minot at the Ramada Inn. Dyer, a certified mental
health counselor and adjunct instructor at the College of DuPage and Grant
Hospital's Clinical Training Program for Addiction Counselors in Chicago,
Ill., is the day one speaker addressing the importance of assessing ADHD
adolescents who abuse substances and the management skills needed to work with
adolescents who are ADHD and abuse substances. His afternoon session will look
at adolescent relapse as the process of returning to drug and alcohol use and
the addictive environment. Participants will learn new skills to prevent and
treat relapse in adolescents. The day two Clinical Supervision Workshop, Using
the Eight Skill Groups, will give participants experience with a testing
instrument that can be used to develop training plans for addiction counselor
trainees. John Allen, director of Addiction Studies at Minot State University,
and Ron Hett, chief operating officer of Dakota Boys Ranch, are presenters for
the clinical supervision workshop. Participants attending the entire
conference can earn 12 contact hours for licensed addiction counselors and
licensed professional counselors. For more information or a detailed brochure,
contact Dawn Botsford or Monique Clifford at 777-4260.

Legal Education

The UND School of Law, the Northern Plains Tribal Judicial Training Institute
and Division of Continuing Education will hold a continuing legal education
seminar, "The Protection of Individual Rights and Business Interests in Indian
Tribal Courts" Friday, April 25, at the Grand Forks Ramada Inn. Federal and
state courts are abstaining from exercising jurisdiction over civil cases
arising in Indian country in a variety of contexts. This means that the Indian
Civil Rights Act, anti-discrimination laws and business contracts in tribal
courts have become the exclusive avenues of relief for those individuals and
businesses seeking to vindicate important personal and property rights. How
tribal courts are resolving disputes will be examined. The registration fee of
$125 include seven CLE hours, handout materials, instruction, refreshments and
lunch. For more information or a detailed brochure, contact Dawn Botsford or
Monique Clifford at 777-2663.

Mental Health

A three-day workshop for any mental health practitioner including
psychologists, social workers, psychiatric nurses, counselors, will be held
May 14-16 at the Radisson Inn, Bismarck. The workshop on "Brief Solution-Oriented Therapy: Quality, Collaboration and Results in Therapy" will be
presented by Bill O'Hanlon, a developer of brief solution-oriented therapy.
Brief Solution-Oriented Therapy is an approach which focuses on eliciting
strengths and solutions from people who seek therapy. The fee of $110 includes
instruction, handouts, CEUs and refreshments. For more information or a
detailed brochure, please call Dawn Botsford or Monique Clifford at 777-2663.

-- Dawn Botsford, Program Coordinator, Continuing Education.
*******

Students To Conduct Free Health Screening

Community Health students from the College of Nursing, in cooperation with the
Safety Office, will conduct a blood pressure, blood sugar, hemoglobin, vision
and hearing clinic Wednesday, April 16, for faculty and staff, from 12:30 to 3
p.m. in the lunchroom of the Plant Services building. The hearing screening
portion will be in the Plant Services Cottonwood Room. The re-screening is
scheduled for Wednesday, April 23, from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m., also in the
lunchroom of Plant Services.

The only requirement for participating in this screening is that you not
smoke, drink coffee, or exercise for at least 30 minutes before having your
blood pressure measured. -- Carol Berg, Assistant Professor, Family and
Community Nursing, and Jack Glass, Director of Safety.
*******

Students Will Provide Free Well Child Exams

The College of Nursing Family Nurse Practitioner students are providing free
well child exams.  Children ages one month to five years of age are needed to
be patient models on Mondays in April.  A complete health history is also
taken.  For more information or to schedule an appointment, please contact me.
-- Valerie Krogstad, Family and Community Nursing, 777-4556.
*******

Encourage Students To Attend Career Fair

The 1997 Forks Area Career Fair will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Wednesday, April 9, in the National Guard Armory, 1501 S. 48th St. This is the
first year that UND has cooperated with the area entities which sponsor this
Fair and we need your cooperation to make it a success. Shuttle buses have
been engaged to shuttle our students to and from the Armory. Those schedules
will be announced soon. 

The Career Fair schedule follows: 10 a.m., "I'm Graduating, What Do I Do
Now?," how to use the Internet to find a job and explore careers; 11 a.m.,
"Putting the Pieces Together: Job Search Basics," hot jobs for the future:
panel of industry representatives; 12:15 p.m., "Planning for Career Change";
1:30 p.m., "I'm Graduating, What Do I Do Now" (repeat); 2:30 p.m., "Putting
the Pieces Together: Job Search Basics" (repeat); continuous presentation,
"How to Get the Most out of the Career Fair." 
Shuttle buses will run on the following schedule: 

Depart from UND to Career Fair/Armory: 10 a.m., 11 a.m., noon, 1 p.m., 
2 p.m.

Depart from the Career Fair to UND: 10:45 a.m., 11:45 a.m., 12:45 p.m., 1:45
p.m., 2:45 p.m.

-- Terry Erickson, Cooperative Education, 7-4136.
*******

Adult Children of Alcoholics Sought For Research Study

Adult children of alcoholics are sought for participation in research at the
Department of Psychology. Participants, who should be between the ages of 21
and 40, will be paid. If you would like to learn more, please contact me at
777-3260. -- Tom Petros, Professor of Psychology.
*******

Participants Needed For Memory Experiments

Participants are needed for experiments dealing with memory and language.
Volunteers must be 55 or more years of age. The experiments will require about
an hour, and all participants will receive a small honorarium (between $5 and
$10) for participating. If you are interested or have questions, please call
me at 777-2414. -- Richard Ferraro, Assistant Professor of Psychology.
*******

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

Women's Center Lists Events

The Wednesday, April 9, Feast and Focus program at noon in the Women's Center,
305 Hamline St., is "Women and the Earth." Women have historically been and
are currently involved worldwide in environmental issues. They are often first
to be affected and first to respond to environmental degradation, and they
include indigenous women, women of color, and women in poverty. We will look
at women's roles in Earth care, historically, worldwide and in tribal areas in
this region. We will explore ecofeminism in part as a philosophical framework. 

The Thursday, April 10, For Women Only program is "Get Real: Straight Talk
About Women's Health," part two. Today, behavioral and lifestyle factors cause
more than 50 percent of the leading causes of death in American women. The
college years are a crucial time in a young woman's life. The decisions and
actions you make during this time will affect your health for the rest of your
life. Young women can make intelligent choices, given accurate information,
which will lead to healthier, happier and longer lives. Please join us for
this continuation of our February 20 discussion. 
-- Donna Oltmanns, Coordinator, Women's Center.
*******

International Centre Lists Events

The Thursday, April 10, program at 7 p.m. in the International Centre, 2908
University Ave., is "Celebrating Middle Eastern Cultures," featuring Middle
Eastern foods, artifacts, literature, music, attire, dance, historical,
technological, and religious perspectives.

Tickets are now on sale for the 36th Annual Feast of Nations to be held
Saturday, April 19, at 6 p.m. at the Grand Forks Civic Auditorium. Join us for
an international extravaganza including world vignettes, an international
candlelight dinner, intercultural entertainment, music, attire, and artifacts.
All are welcome. Tickets for non students are $15, $7 for students. Call the
International Centre for reservations at 777-4231. -- Sharon Rezac Andersen,
Director, International Centre, 777-4231.
*******

Traditional Musicians Will Perform

North Country Traditional Music and Dance will present a group from Manitou,
Manitoba, On the Edge, who will perform a mixture of traditional and recent
folk, gospel, bluegrass, jazz, and original music at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April
12, in the Josephine Campbell Recital Hall, Hughes Fine Arts Center. Admission
is $4 for adults, and $1 for children. A dance will follow the concert with
music by On the Edge and North Country String Band. Folk and traditional
dances will be taught. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, for Jeanne O'Neil, North Country
Traditional Music and Dance, 773-3850.
*******

Burtness Theatre Presents "She Stoops To Conquer"

The Department of Theatre Arts is proud to present the Restoration comedy,
"She Stoops to Conquer." Set in 18th century England, the production shows the
humorous relationship between an upper class lady who must present herself as
a commoner to win the heart of a gentleman who becomes incredibly shy around
women of the same social standing.

Although the play makes light of social situations found in the 1700s,
contemporary audiences will find the comedy just as funny today because many
of the same situations exist in the 1990s. 

The production is directed by Dean Bruce Jacobsen and runs Tuesday through
Saturday, April 15-19, at the Burtness Theatre. Tickets are $5 and will be
available at the Burtness Box Office beginning April 1; call 777-2587. -- Joel
Svendsen, Burtness Theatre Publicity Manager.
*******

FYI

Garden Plots Currently Unavailable

Most of the UND garden plots are in the flood zone. Because of the flood
conditions this year, plots will not be available for some time.  Right now
everyone at Plant Services is preparing to fight the flood, so please be
patient.  We will send out more information after the flood is over and the
garden plots are ready for planting. -- LeRoy Sondrol, Director of Plant
Services.
*******

Credit Union Announces Interest Rate Changes

The Credit Union board increased the interest rate paid on some accounts,
effective April 1. Those accounts with $10,000 or more will receive a daily
return of 3.75 percent annual interest rate or an APY of 3.80 percent. Those
members with a balance of $2,500 or more will receive an annual interest rate
of 3.50 percent or an APY of 3.55 percent. All accounts under $2,500 will
receive an annual rate of 3.30 percent or an APY of 3.34 percent. The APY is
accurate as of the date of publication. -- George Meister, Manager, University
Federal Credit Union.
*******

Items Offered For Public Bids

The University is offering for sale to the public on a sealed, high-bid basis
the following items: older computer equipment, refrigerators, older metal
desks, and several miscellaneous items. These items may be seen at the Central
Receiving warehouse on the southwest corner of the campus. Bids will be taken
between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m. Monday through Thursday, April 7-10. -- Lee Sundby,
Central Receiving.
*******

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

APRIL 1997

(Please contact Mavis at the Office of University Relations, Box 7144, or call
777-4304, if you wish to make changes or have an event included.)

Through Thurs., April 10 -- BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS EXHIBIT, Jane Feichtner,
drawings; John Lee, paintings; and Holly Resch, drawings; Gallery, Hughes Fine
Arts Center.

Through Sun., April 13 -- ART EXHIBITION, Maryland artist, David Kreuger, who
creates paintings on the bizarre world of fishing as he knew it in his native
North Dakota; large painting from his Parallel Duck Hunting series owned by
the Metropolitan Museum in New York, North Dakota Museum of Art.

Thurs., April 3 -- MEETING, University Senate, Room 7, Gamble Hall, 4:05 p.m.

Thurs., April 3 -- HONORS DAY LUNCHEON, Ballroom, Memorial Union, noon;
speaker will be Mary Muehlen Maring, North Dakota Supreme Court Justice; event
recognizes presidents and advisors of honor societies, seniors on the
President's Roll of Honor, and outstanding students recommended by departments
that do not have honor societies; tickets may be purchased ($5 each) in the
Office of University Relations, 411 Twamley Hall.

Thurs., April 3 -- LECTURE, AWU-DOE Distinguished Lecturer, Luiz B. Da Silva,
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, Calif., will present "Laser
Medicine," Reed T. Keller Auditorium, School of Medicine and Health Sciences,
noon; sponsored by the Office of Research and Program Development, Industrial
Technology and Physics.

Thurs., April 3 -- SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND MINES OPEN HOUSE, the School
invites the area schools, general public, and UND students and faculty to view
engineering students' activities; 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Thurs., April 3 -- COUNSELING 565N TOPICS SEMINAR, "The Effects of the Bug in
the Ear Technique on Counselor Efficacy and Training" with Shan Jumper, 318
Montgomery Hall, noon to 1:30 p.m.

Thurs., April 3 -- CELEBRATING TURKISH CULTURE featuring Turkish foods,
history, artifacts, and discussion of Turkish culture, UND International
Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; all are welcome; call 777-4231 for more
information.

Thurs., April 3 -- FOR WOMEN ONLY PROGRAM, Sue Goebel from Valley Health will
lead us in a discussion of women's sexuality issues, Women's Center, 305
Hamline St., noon.

Thurs., April 3 -- LECTURE, Sarah Weddington, the attorney who gained national
attention in the 1973 Roe vs. Wade case will speak on campus at 3 p.m.; call
the University Program Council at 777-4202 for location and more information.

Fri., April 4 -- MEETING, Institutional Review Board, 305 Twamley Hall, 4 p.m.

Fri., April 4 -- BIOLOGY SEMINAR, "The End of DNA Replication as We Know It,"
presented by Tom Hill (Microbiology), 141 Starcher Hall, noon; all are
welcome.

Fri., April 4 -- BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY SPECIAL LECTURE, "Gene
Expression Associated with Chromosome 6-Mediated Tumor Suppression of Human
Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma" will be presented by Michael Ray, Department of
Human Genetics, University of Michigan School of Medicine in Ann Arbor, 1360
Clifford Haugen Room, Medical Science, 10 a.m.; Dr. Ray is a native of Grand
Forks.

Fri., April 4 -- DEAN'S HOUR SEMINAR, "Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia,"
presented by Marsha Fowler, Professor of Theology and Nursing and Director of
Health Ministries Programs, San Francisco Theological Seminar, Reed T. Keller
Auditorium, Room 1350, Wold Bio-Information Learning Resources Center, Health
Sciences Building.

Fri., April 4 -- CONFERENCE, "Practical Genetics in Primary Health Care," via
Interactive Video Network, Gamble Hall; conference is free to students; call
Mary Ebertowski before April 1 at 777-4243 for more information.

Fri., April 4 -- LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary Sciences) LECTURE
by Jimmie Richardson, North Dakota State University, at noon in Leonard Hall
Lecture Bowl, Room 100, he will consider "Soils and Groundwater on the Lake
Agassiz Plain," and from 2 to 4 p.m. in 214 Leonard Hall, he will conduct a
Soils and Hydrogeology Workshop; call John Reid at 777-2131 for more
information.

Fri., April 4 -- COMPUTER SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM, "A Model of Episodic Memory for
External Information" presented by Computer Science faculty candidate Erik
Altmann from George Mason University, 238 CAS II, 10 a.m.; all students and
faculty are invited.

Fri. and Sat., April 4-5 -- BASEBALL, UND at Augustana College (DII), Sioux
Falls, S.D., 2/4 p.m. on Friday, and 11:30 p.m. Saturday.

Sat., April 5 -- DENTAL ADMISSION TEST (DAT), Room 114, Witmer Hall, 8 a.m.

Sat., April 5 -- SOCIOLOGY CLASS PROJECT DEMONSTRATION, "Death and Dying"
class will make a social statement with a casket filled with cigarette butts,
South Forks Plaza, noon to 4:30 p.m.

Sat., April 5 -- BASEBALL, UND vs. Wayne State College (DII) at Sioux Falls,
S.D., 1:30 p.m.

Sun., April 6 -- UNIVERSITY-WIDE FORUM, "The End of Science," 1618 Swanson,
Memorial Union, 6:30 p.m.; forum, hosted by Honors Program students, will
focus both on the topic and on the book "The End of Science" by John Horgan;
call Tami at 777-2219 for more information.

Sun. and Mon., April 6-7 -- GOLF, WOMEN'S, UND at Northeast Missouri State
University, Kirksville, Mo. (tentative).

Mon., April 7 -- PSYCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM, "Consequences of Personal Philosophies
of Learning: Educator Beliefs Determining Student Opportunities," Room 102,
Nursing Building, noon to 1 p.m.; everyone is welcome.

Mon., April 7 -- MEETING, Graduate Committee, 305 Twamley Hall, 3:05 p.m.

Mon., April 7 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for Michael Mann, a candidate for the Ph.D.
degree with a major in Energy Engineering, 360A Harrington Hall, 10 a.m.;
members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Mon., April 7 -- WHITE COAT CEREMONY for second-year medical students, Keller
Auditorium, Wold Center, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, 4:30 p.m.;
all faculty, staff, friends and family are invited to attend.

Mon., April 7 -- "WILDERNESS IN NORTH DAKOTA," presented by Kathy Armstrong
Duttenhefner, 172 Hyslop Sports Center, 6 to 7:30 p.m.; she is a biologist
with the North Dakota Park and Recreation Department's Nature Preserve and
Natural Heritage Inventory Program; everyone is welcome; call Lynn at 777-2978
for more information.

Mon., April 7 -- LEADERSHIP SERIES, "Presenting a Leadership Image," presented
by Leadership Inspiration Center staff, Leadership Inspiration Center, third
floor, Memorial Union, 3 p.m.; non-credit sessions are designed to help
students explore leadership from a variety of perspectives and develop an
understanding of themselves; sessions are free and open to the public.

Mon., April 7 -- LEAD REFRESHER CLASS, Environmental Training Institute
contractor/supervisor course (2976), Comfort Inn, Highway 2 East, East Grand
Forks, Minn.; cost is $150; call 777-3341 for more information.

Mon., April 7 -- BASEBALL, UND at Jamestown College (NAIA), Jamestown, N.D.,
1/3 p.m.

Mon. through Fri., April 7-11 -- STUDENT EMPLOYMENT WEEK; say "thank you" to
your student employees.

Mon., April 7, through Sun., April 13 -- ANNUAL TIME-OUT AND WACIPI, "Honoring
Those Who Have Walked Before Us" is the theme of the Indian Association 28th
Annual Time Out and Wacipi, Memorial Union and Hyslop Sports Center; annual
Powwow is Sat. and Sun., April 12-13, in the Hyslop Sports Center.

Mon., April 7, through Fri., May 9 -- REGISTRATION FOR THE 1997 SUMMER TERM.

Mon., April 7, through Fri., Sept. 4 -- REGISTRATION FOR THE 1997 FALL TERM.

Tues., April 8 -- MEETING to discuss a preliminary proposal for the Faculty
Interdisciplinary Research Exchange (FIRE), Pembina Roosevelt Room, Memorial
Union, noon to 1:30 p.m.; facilitators will be Joseph Plaud (Psychology) and
Serge von Duvillard (HPER).

Tues., April 8 -- FACULTY/STAFF BOOK STUDY, "The Death of Ivan Ilyich" by Leo
Tolstoy, Christus Rex, 3012 University Ave., noon; study held each Tuesday in
April; call 775-5581 for more information.

Tues., April 8 -- FACULTY HALF-DAY WORKSHOP, "Bright Student/Poor Paper:
Sharing Ideas for Helping Writers with Learning Disabilities," Ramada Inn,
12:30 to 4:30 p.m.; call Writing Across the Curriculum at 777-3600 to sign up
by noon Friday, April 4.

Tues., April 8 -- SATELLITE SEMINARS, "Television: The Creative Process"
sponsored by the Northern Interscholastic Press Association at the School of
Communication; the seminars originate from The Museum of Television and Radio
in New York and Los Angeles and are free and open to the public; the third
seminar, "Creating a Prime-Time News Magazine: 60 Minutes," will be from 6:30
to 8 p.m., Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union; this seminar features executive
producer Don Hewitt, along with several of the "60 Minutes" on-air
personalities, who will discuss what makes this Peabody Award-winning show
tick; the last seminar is Tuesday, April 15.

Tues., April 8 -- BASEBALL, UND at Southwest State University (DII), Marshall,
Minn., 2/4 p.m.

Tues. through Fri., April 8-11 -- LEAD CLASS, Environmental Training Institute
contractor/supervisor course (2973), Comfort Inn, Highway 2 East, East Grand
Forks, Minn.; cost is $650; call 777-3341 for more information.

Wed., April 9 -- 1997 FORKS AREA CAREER FAIR, National Guard Armory, 1501 S.
48th St., 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.; this is the first year that UND has cooperated
with the area entities which sponsor the Fair; shuttle buses will transfer
students to and from the Armory.

Wed., April 9 -- FEAST AND FOCUS PROGRAM, "Women and the Earth," Women's
Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

Wed., April 9 -- SOFTBALL, UND at North Dakota State University (conference,
Fargo, N.D.

Wed., through Fri., April 9-11 -- NATIVE MEDIA CAUCUS: Keeping Traditions
Alive Through Communication, for tribal college students and Native media
professionals, keynote speaker will be Harley Straus Visiting Photographer
Mary Annette Pember, Red Cliff Ojibwe, currently the Picture Editor at the
Lexington Herald-Leader, a daily newspaper in Lexington, Ky., Memorial Union.

Thurs., April 10 -- LAST DAY TO FILE PRELIMINARY APPROVAL OF THESIS OR
DISSERTATION IN THE GRADUATE SCHOOL.

Thurs., April 10 -- PHI BETA KAPPA LECTURE, Dennis O'Brien, this year's Phi
Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar is President Emeritus of the University of
Rochester, and previously Professor of Philosophy at Rochester and Bucknell
Universities; he will present a lecture "The Logic of Cursing," at 8 p.m. in
101 Abbott Hall; at noon he will speak at the "Theology for Lunch" series on
"The Anger World and Theology," Christus Rex Lutheran Center, 3012 University
Ave.; both are free and open to the public.

Thurs., April 10 -- COUNSELING 565N TOPICS SEMINAR, "Volunteer Bias in Sex
Research: To Whom Do Our Results Apply?" with Joseph Plaud (Psychology), 318
Montgomery Hall, noon to 1:30 p.m.

Thurs., April 10 -- MEETING, Underrepresented Student Recruitment Committee,
305 Twamley Hall, 9 to 10 a.m.

Thurs., April 10 -- DEAN'S HOUR ADDRESS, "Environmental Medicine: A Norwegian
Perspective," by Jan Alexander, Deputy, Head, Department of Environmental
Medicine and Section head, Division of Food Toxicology at the National
Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway, Keller Auditorium, Wold Center,
School of Medicine and Health Sciences, noon.

Thurs., April 10 -- NATIONAL LIVE VIDEO CONFERENCE, UND Planning Council is
sponsoring UND's participation in the live conference on "The New Public
University: How Do We Compete in a Changing Environment?" United Hospital
Lecture Hall, 1370 Bio-LRC, Medical Science North, noon to 2 p.m.; free and
open to the public.

Thurs., April 10 -- ASSET BUILDING INFORMATION, Christus Rex will present
"What Kids Need to Survive: A Community Conversation on Asset Building," 210
Clifford Hall, 7 p.m.; presenter will be James Vollbracht from Search
Institute; free and open to the public (he will also speak Friday, April 11);
call 775-5581 for more information.

Thurs., April 10 -- LECTURE, John Vitton (Business and Public Administration)
will talk about his teaching experiences and general impressions about the
students, faculty and administrators in China, Room 1, Gamble Hall, 3 to 4
p.m.; talk is free and open to the public.

Thurs., April 10 -- FOR WOMEN ONLY PROGRAM, "Get Real: Straight Talk About
Women's Health" (Part 2), Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

Thurs., April 10 -- CELEBRATING MIDDLE EASTERN CULTURES featuring Middle
Eastern foods, artifacts, literature, music, attire, dance, historical,
technological and religious perspectives, UND International Centre, 2908
University Ave., 7 p.m.; all are welcome; call 777-4231 for more information.
*******

  
UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and
distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is
also available electronically through UNDInfo, the University's menu
system on the Internet. The addresses are http://www.und.nodak.edu for
World-Wide Web and uninfo.und.nodak.edu for gopher.
  
All articles submitted for publication should be labeled "University
Letter" and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic
submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu. Attachments to
University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number.
University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations,
Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.
  
UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.
  
*******


  





Last Updated:Wednesday, September 4, 1996
Maintained by:Webmaster
Contact: Webmaster



Go To Top To Home Page