[University Letter logo]

University Letter

August 1, 1997

Volume 34 No. 41



UNIVERSITY LETTER
University of North Dakota at Grand Forks
Vol. 34, Number 41, August 1, 1997

UNIVERSITY LETTER IS ALSO AVAILABLE ELECTRONICALLY in the Events and News
section of UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address
is: http://www.und.nodak.edu

The University Relations Office maintains an index for the University Letter.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
UND's Richard Crawford To Be Named Chester Fritz
   Distinguished Professor At Commencement
Summer Schedule Listed For U Letter
Arts And Sciences Faculty Will Meet
Strategic Plan Annnounced
     EVENTS TO NOTE
Meetings Will Detail Recovery Status
EPSCoR Summer Poster Session Set At NDSU
Home Page Programming Class Offered
Computer Science Offers Faculty Enrichment Series
Staff Recognition Luncheon Set For Aug. 19
New Faculty Tour Set For Aug. 20-21
New Graduate Student And GTA Orientation Set
Orientation Events Listed
Involvement Expo Set For Aug. 27
     OF ACADEMIC INTEREST
Grade Report Forms Available
New Catalog Now Available
     GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS
May Grant Awardees Listed
NSF "GEO Science Plan" Released
NIH Announces New Review Criteria
Research, Grant Opportunities Listed
     MONEY MATTERS
Instructions Listed For Replacing Flooded Items
Motor Pool Rates Adjusted
     BILLBOARD
New "North Dakota Quarterly" Available
Ben Nwoke Resigns
Honors Program Moved
New Flexcomp Coordinator Hired
Chester Fritz Lists Hours
42nd Street Skyway Construction Set To Begin
One Twamley Entrance Temporarily Closed
Construction Progress Detailed
Free Counseling Offered
Web Space Available For Faculty
Items For Sale On Public Bids
     ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT
"Shakespeare In MY Park 1997" Is Heading To A Park Near You
Free Concert To Be Held Aug. 9
Hatton Community Theatre Will Perform At Burtness
     FYI
Jobs Open At Bookstore
     CALENDAR OF EVENTS
*******

RICHARD CRAWFORD TO BE NAMED
CHESTER FRITZ DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR
AT COMMENCEMENT

Professor of Biology Richard Crawford will be presented with UND's highest
honor for faculty members, the Chester Fritz Distinguished Professorship, at
the Spring/Summer Commencement Friday, Aug. 1, 7 p.m. at the Chester Fritz
Auditorium. UND's Congressional delegation has been invited to speak at the
exercises and to be honored for their work on behalf of the University and the
greater Grand Forks area during the spring flood.
Crawford will be presented with the Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor
medallion and a $2,000 stipend, which he has turned over to the Department of
Biology to help support student needs.

Crawford is "the complete University Professor, one who has significant
accomplishments in each face of the responsibilities of teaching, research and
service," according to Al Fivizzani, a Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor
himself and former chair of the Biology Department.

In fact, Crawford was awarded the UND Foundation Thomas J. Clifford Faculty
Achievement Award for Excellence in Research at Founders Day this past
February (1997). Crawford has received more than $789,000 for research
projects and another $147,000 to support student research. In 1983, he was
awarded the UND Foundation/B.C. Gamble Award for Individual Excellence in
Teaching and Service.

In his nomination letter, Fivizzani said Crawford's "production of graduate
students is the greatest of any current member of the Biology Department....
He believes in true mentoring of his graduate students ... He has also
routinely accepted an overload of teaching so that graduate and undergraduate
students will be provided with a broad background training in wildlife
biology. Rich Crawford's student evaluations are among the highest in the
Biology Department ... He is an exceptionally valued teacher."

During his 22 years at UND, Crawford has twice served as chair of the
department and as interim director of the Institute for Ecological Studies,
and has served as associate chair of the department since 1991. He also has
served a primary role in the development of the present Bachelor of Science in
Fisheries and Wildlife Biology curriculum and continues to be the principal
overseer of the program. He advised the UND Student Chapter of the Wildlife
Society and is extensively involved with wildlife activities and research at
the local, state and national levels. In 1992, the state Chapter of Wildlife
Society presented him with its prestigious North Dakota Award.

A UND faculty member since 1975, Crawford holds bachelor's and master's
degrees from Northeast Missouri State University and the Ph.D. in wildlife
biology from Iowa State University.

-- Kendall Baker, President.
*******

SUMMER SCHEDULE LISTED FOR U LETTER

The summer bi-weekly University Letter will be published Fridays, August 15,
22, and 29. Regular weekly production will begin with the Aug. 15 issue.
Deadlines remain at noon Tuesday of the week you wish the article published.
Submit items to me at Box 7144, drop them off in 411 Twamley Hall, or e-mail
them to me at jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu. --  Jan Orvik, Editor, University
Letter.
*******

ARTS AND SCIENCES FACULTY WILL MEET

There will be a meeting of the faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences at
2 p.m. Thursday, July 31, in 300 Merrifield Hall.  The purpose of the meeting
is to discuss the document, "North Dakota University System Strategic Plan,
1998-2004: Worksheet Draft: University of North Dakota Implementation Plan,
July 7, 1997." Its author, Vice President of Academic Affairs and Provost
Marlene Strathe, will attend the meeting and participate in the discussion.
Copies of the document are available in department offices. It is also posted
in this issue of University Letter. -- John Ettling, Dean, College of Arts and
Sciences.
*******

STRATEGIC PLAN ANNOUNCED

The first draft of a UND Implementation Plan for the North Dakota University
System Strategic Plan follows. As requested by the State Board of Higher
Education, each NDUS institution has been asked to identify institutionally
specific strategies to address each broad goal. These strategies are to be
drawn from the strategies identified in the NDUS plan, the planning document
of each individual campus, and the recommendations of the Bush panel.
Institutional plans are to be submitted to the Board by September 1, 1997. 

Also attached is the proposed time line for campus review and input at UND.  I
seek as much individual and collective input as possible in this short time
frame.  There are group meetings being scheduled by deans and directors.  Your
participation in these respective meetings is encouraged.  You may also submit
suggestions/comments directly to me.

I wish to stress this is a DRAFT document which is open to change, discussion,
and debate. I look forward to your input and help in developing our final
institutional plan.


Proposed Time Line & Process
UND Implementation Plan for the NDUS Strategic Plan
July 1997
Marlene I. Strathe, VPAA and Provost

JULY 14-16: Provost drafts an Institutional Implementation Plan for the NDUS
Strategic Plan to President Baker 7/16/97; JULY 1: Draft distributed to
University Planning Council, Council of Deans, Senate Executive Committee, and
appropriate Divisional Directors; JULY 21- AUGUST 1: College faculty meetings;
Planning Council Meeting; Council of Deans (July 22); Directors
Meeting/Division Meetings; AUGUST 4: Second draft prepared by Provost based on
institutional input; AUGUST 5-15: Individual input received; AUGUST 18-22:
Potential Senate meeting; Planning Council meeting; Council of Deans;
Directors meeting/Divisional meetings; AUGUST 23-29: Final copy completed and
forwarded to State Board of Higher Education.


NORTH DAKOTA UNIVERSITY SYSTEM
STRATEGIC PLAN, 1998-2004

WORKSHEET DRAFT
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA
IMPLEMENTATION PLAN
July 7, 1997

Table of Contents
WORKSHEET DRAFT
Section I - Purpose of Plan
Section II - Forces Affecting and Assumptions About Higher Education in North
Dakota
Section III - Resource Assumptions
Section IV - Vision Statement
Section V - Statement of Values
Section VI - The North Dakota University System Six year Plan Goals
Section VII - Strategies
   Goal 1 - Assure excellence and quality learning for students
   Goal 2 - Technology regular component for teaching and learning; stabilize
enrollments
   Goal 3 - Align programs/services with needs of business and communities
   Goal 4 - Research and development arm for the State of North Dakota
   Goal 5 - Environment for students, faculty, employees and public
   Goal 6 - Public confidence in the North Dakota University System
   Goal 7 - Encourage public service on the State Board of Higher Education
   Goal 8 - Cooperation and Collaboration among the campuses and other
entities. 

WORKSHEET DRAFT

I.  PURPOSE OF PLAN

* To articulate vision of the North Dakota University System.

* To present the goals, assumptions and strategies to direct the North Dakota
University System from 1998-2004.

* To develop a public agenda for higher education as recommended in the Bush
Panel Report.

* To focus priorities and resources.

* To meet the requirements of State law.


II. FORCES AFFECTING AND ASSUMPTIONS ABOUT HIGHER EDUCATION IN NORTH DAKOTA:

* The number of high school graduates will decline from 2000-2010.

* Telecommunicated instruction will increasingly bring competition from other
educational providers throughout the nation and world.

* North Dakota's economy will continue to be reliant on agriculture and
energy, however, more diversification will take place in the service and
manufacturing sectors.

* Attracting and retaining quality faculty and staff will continue to be the
key to providing quality programs.

* The share of the state general fund budget allocated to the North Dakota
University System has declined from 24 percent to 20 percent in the past 18
years primarily as the state has adjusted spending for health and human
service functions.  This is a shift in state spending of $40-50 million per
biennium.

* Faculty and staff salaries will continue to significantly lag the market.

* Students will be increasingly served by multiple education providers, often
at the same time.

* North Dakota's population will continue to move to urban areas.

* The Native American population will increase.

* A changing labor market will increasingly require continuous learning
opportunities throughout life.

* Technical skills will continue to be relevant for success.

* Employees proficient in communication, critical thinking, teamwork, and
interpersonal relations will continue to be in demand by employers.

* Policy makers will increasingly request documented accountability for
results.

* Traditional faculty roles will continue to be challenged.

* Convenient access to instruction will continue to increase in order to meet
the needs of a greater percentage of the population.

* Federal dollars will continue to be a major source of state income.

* Demand for vocational and professional training will continue to increase.

* Business and industry will increasingly demand on-time educational services.

* North Dakota will continue to support two major research campuses.

* The current number of campuses will continue to remain/exist unless
constitutional and statutory changes are made by the people and Legislature
and actions taken by the Board.

* The state will continue to have medical, pharmacy, and law schools. 

* The state will continue to invest significantly in agricultural research and
extension.

* One single governing Board will continue to be in place to govern all public
higher education.   



III.  RESOURCE ASSUMPTIONS:

* State general fund and student tuition and fees will continue to be the
major sources for instructional purposes, fixed costs, and capital outlay.

* State general fund support will continue at or increase from the current
_____ percent of the state budget.

* To support a high quality higher education system, with convenient access,
state general fund appropriations will increase 4-5 percent per year during
the next three biennia (1999-2001, 2001-2003, 2003-2005).  This is about $12-15 million per year. If this does not happen, the State Board of Higher
Education will recommend reducing access rather than quality or continuing to
pay low salaries.

* Student tuition will continue at the same proportion of the budget if state
resources increase 4-5 percent per year. If not, student tuition and fees will
increase as a percent of the budget to support a high quality higher education
system; however, access will be diminished.

* Campuses will continue to seek private and government funds to support
research and contract activities.



IV. VISION STATEMENT

The North Dakota University System will ensure that every citizen and
participant has the opportunity to receive the education which allows them to
be employed to the maximum of their capacity, to continue to learn throughout
their lifetime and to contribute to society.



V. STATEMENT OF VALUES - The North Dakota University System of the future
will:

* be student centered;

* provide excellent instruction and research;

* emphasize learner success;

* be accessible through life at any place;

* be accountable;

* be flexible;

* promote an environment for inquiry and tolerance of differing viewpoints and
people; and

* be responsive to needs of the state's economy.



VI. THE NORTH DAKOTA UNIVERSITY SYSTEM SIX-YEAR PLAN GOALS ARE:

1. to assure excellence and quality learning for students. Students of NDUS
will have outstanding, relevant and broad educational experiences that
emphasize communication skills, analytical thinking, use of technology, and
interpersonal skills that will be demonstrated by campus measurements and
indicators.

2. to improve convenient access to programs and services through distance
education emphasizing enhanced use of technology as a regular component for
teaching and learning thereby increasing enrollment of part-time students.

3. to align programs and services with needs of business and communities.

4. to serve as the research and development arm for the State of North Dakota.

5. to provide a safe and modern environment for students, faculty, employees
and the public, and provide services in an effective and efficient manner.

6. to improve public confidence in the North Dakota University System.

7. to encourage public service on the State Board of Higher Education.

8. to efficiently and effectively administer the resources and improve
services of the NDUS through cooperation and collaboration among and between
the campuses, K-12, and other entities.



VII. STRATEGIES


GOAL 1 - TO ASSURE EXCELLENCE AND QUALITY LEARNING 
FOR STUDENTS. GRADUATES OF NORTH DAKOTA UNIVERSITY 
SYSTEM CAMPUSES WILL HAVE A REPUTATION 
AS GRADUATES WITH OUTSTANDING, RELEVANT, 
AND BROAD EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCES.

* UND will maintain institutional accreditations and achieve specialized
accreditation in all disciplines where appropriate to a comprehensive research
institution.

* All students will demonstrate proficiency in communication skills,
analytical thinking, use of UND technology, and interpersonal skills upon
completion of an associate degree or upon completion of 60 semester hours of
course work.

* UND full-time faculty will have instructional responsibility for at least
one entry level disciplinary course per year.  

* UND will have incorporated the requirement/opportunity for internship,
clinical, practica, and cooperative education experiences in all its
undergraduate degree programs.

* UND will have a student help center.

* UND will participate in the NDUS student tracking and monitoring system.

* UND undergraduate degrees will demonstrate the inclusion of a learning
component requirement with an international perspective.

* UND undergraduate students will have two years of foreign language
instruction upon being admitted to a four-year degree program, or they will be
required to enroll in two semesters of foreign language course work prior to
receiving a degree. 

* Faculty and staff salaries will increase by five percent from internal
reallocation provided the legislature continues to fund higher education at a
reasonable level.

* UND faculty will have expanded professional development opportunities
ranging from topic specific seminars/workshops to full-year experiences.

* UND through the North Dakota University System will provide North Dakota
secondary schools with data on graduates who enter public colleges and
universities.

* UND will develop additional innovative graduate programs including those
designed for non-traditional and/or non-residential graduate degree students.

* UND, through the program review process, will identify undergraduate and
graduate programs to be enhanced, reduced or eliminated.

* Innovative undergraduate programs, especially those targeted to meet
identified state needs and demands, will continue to be developed.    


GOAL 2 - TO PROVIDE CONVENIENT ACCESS TO PROGRAMS 
AND SERVICE THROUGH ENHANCED USE OF TECHNOLOGY 
AS A REGULAR COMPONENT FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING; 
AND TO ALSO STABILIZE ENROLLMENTS.

* UND, through its division of continuing education will be an active
participant in the NDUS special task force to study the delivery of
instruction by IVN and to recommend specific steps to make such delivery
equally beneficial to the provider institution and receiver institution and to
maximize utilization and future convenient location of IVN facilities.

* UND will offer at least 25 percent of its courses using technological
delivery for externally delivered offerings and technological incorporation
for on-campus offerings.

* UND will expand undergraduate and graduate instructional offerings evenings
and on weekends by 15 percent.

* UND will identify and offer undergraduate programs which can be completed in
three years if desired.

* UND will identify and offer graduate degrees which can be completed in 18
months or less.

* UND will identify and offer those graduate degree programs which require
campus residency for the maintenance of educational quality and those where
residency is not necessary/appropriate.

* UND faculty will receive professional development to enable them to provide
technologically delivered education and to incorporate technology in on-campus
offerings.

* UND will provide on-line services for registration, transfer, advising,
library services, financial aid, bill paying, and all other related student
services.

* UND will provide on-line courses and other forms of telecommunicated
instruction to citizens throughout North Dakota.

* UND will offer a time to degree completion guarantee.

* UND will complete common course numbering for all 100-200 level courses.

* UND and its colleges and departments, will market programs to other regions
and internationally use technological delivery as a significant component of
such strategies.

* UND will increase the number of Native American students enrolled and will
develop articulation agreements with the North Dakota Tribal Colleges to
enhance Native American student transfer and success.

* UND will increase enrollment of international students by no less than five
percent.


GOAL 3 - TO ALIGN PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 
WITH NEEDS OF BUSINESS AND COMMUNITIES.

* All UND students will demonstrate proficiency in communication skills,
analytical thinking, use of technology, and interpersonal skills upon
completion of an associate degree or upon completion of 60 semester hours of
course work.

* UND will develop articulation agreements with other NDUS campuses to provide
graduate education offerings at other NDUS sites.

* UND will have incorporated the requirement/opportunity for internship,
clinical, practica, and cooperative education experiences in all its
undergraduate degree programs.

* All UND undergraduate degrees will demonstrate the inclusion of a learning
component requirement with an international perspective.

* UND will increase corporate training programs through the College of
Business and Public Administration and the School of Engineering and Mines.

* UND will develop articulation agreements which encourage other NDUS campuses
to offer associate degrees on the UND campus.


GOAL 4 - TO BE THE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ARM 
FOR THE STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA.

* UND will actively participate in the  State Board of Higher Education forum
of campus research leaders and the boards of directors of research and
development entities and the leaders of agriculture and manufacturing groups
to make recommendations to the State Board of Higher Education on how best the
University System can improve its role as the research and development engine
for the State of North Dakota.  

* UND will increase the research and development activities on the campus by
encouraging innovation, by seeking legislative funding, and by increasing
grant and contract activity by 10 percent.

* UND will engage in research and development activities which focus on
applied and practical research as well as basic research.

* UND will continue to seek appropriate levels of funding to support all areas
of research appropriate to a comprehensive research institution.

* UND will engage in research and development activities related to
technologically facilitated instruction and distance learning.


GOAL 5 - TO PROVIDE SAFE AND MODERN ENVIRONMENT 
FOR STUDENTS, FACULTY EMPLOYEES AND THE PUBLIC 
AND PROVIDE SERVICES IN THE MOST EFFICIENT MANNER.

* New administrative and student records systems at UND will be fully
operational.

* UND will study, develop, and present recommendations on out-sourcing food
service, housing, maintenance, bookstore, and other campus functions.  

* UND will seek capital requests in 1999-2001, 2001-2003, and 2003-2005
emphasizing maintenance, repair, renovation, and capital projects consistent
with the UND master plan.

* UND faculty and staff salaries will increase five percent from internal
reallocation and university development activities.

* UND will allocate at least 1.25 percent of its budget to capital repairs.

* UND will participate with the NDUS graduate degree institutions to develop
jointly offered course work in areas where duplicative graduate degrees exist.

* UND will improve pedestrian circulation, accessibility, and connectivity as
well as campus infrastructure.

* UND will increase the retention of new faculty by continued support of the
university established faculty mentoring program.


GOAL 6 - TO IMPROVE PUBLIC CONFIDENCE 
IN THE NORTH DAKOTA UNIVERSITY SYSTEM.

* UND will present an accountability report to the Chancellor and State Board
of Higher Education describing progress on each of the strategies identified
by UND in this plan.

* UND will coordinate the institutional marketing plan with NDUS marketing
plan.

* UND will assess satisfaction of employers, students, parents, alumni and
other constituents with the quality of graduates employed and services
provided by the campus.

* UND will report and make recommendations to enhance the relationship with
our branch campuses to more fully integrate programs, administrative services,
and outreach opportunities to and from the branch campuses.


GOAL 7 - TO ENCOURAGE PUBLIC SERVICE 
ON THE STATE BOARD OF HIGHER EDUCATION.

* UND will actively support the efforts of the State Board of Higher Education
to most effectively carry out its responsibilities.


GOAL 8 - TO EFFICIENTLY AND EFFECTIVELY ADMINISTER 
THE RESOURCES AND IMPROVE SERVICES OF NDUS 
THROUGH COOPERATION AND COLLABORATION 
AMONG AND BETWEEN THE CAMPUSES, K-12, AND OTHER ENTITIES.
*******


EVENTS TO NOTE

MEETINGS WILL DETAIL RECOVERY STATUS

President Baker and other University officials will conduct weekly briefings
at 9 a.m. every Wednesday in the Memorial Union Ballroom. Everyone is welcome
to attend and listen to updates on UND's flood recovery.
*******

EPSCoR SUMMER POSTER SESSION SET AT NDSU

ND EPSCoR and the NSF-sponsored Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU)
program, at the University of North Dakota, hosted the Fifth Annual Student
Research Poster Session Wednesday, July 30, at NDSU in Fargo.

The program featured summer research conducted by students and faculty and
sponsored by ND EPSCoR Science Outreach And Recruitment (SOAR) program.
Research sponsored by other programs from the North Dakota University System
and Tribally Controlled Community Colleges are an integral part of the annual
poster session.

The purpose of ND EPSCoR, a North Dakota University System program, is to make
North Dakota more competitive nationally in science, engineering, and
mathematics research and development.   Since 1987, 420 participants from over
70 communities and 34 counties in North Dakota have been supported by ND
EPSCoR Science Outreach And Recruitment and Technology Transfer programs.
Visit the ND EPSCoR homepage at http://www.ndsu.nodak.edu/epscor/index.html to
learn more.

-- David Givers, ND EPSCoR, NDSU, Fargo.

(EDITOR'S NOTE:  This article did not arrive in time for publication in the
last issue of University Letter.)
*******

HOME PAGE PROGRAMMING CLASS OFFERED

An html programming class, "Creating a Home Page," will be offered Thursday,
Aug. 14, from 9:30 a.m. to noon in 361 Upson II Hall. In this session you will
learn to create a Web Home Page with html (hypertext markup language) code
using a text editor and Netscape. This class is geared for the beginning
learner and is taught by the Computer Center staff. Pre-registration is
required, call 777-3171 to register. -- Doris Bornhoeft, Computer Center,
doris@sage.und.nodak.edu.
*******

COMPUTER SCIENCE OFFERS FACULTY ENRICHMENT SERIES

The Department of Computer Science will offer "How Do I Put My Syllabus on the
Web?" as part of a Faculty Enrichment Series, Monday, Aug. 18, from 10 a.m. to
noon and Tuesday, Aug. 19, from 10 a.m. to noon and 1 to 3 p.m. both days in
103 CAS II, Computer Science PC Lab. The presenter will be Bruce Maxwell
(Computer Science).

This two-part series is a hands-on tutorial that will give faculty the skills
to make syllabi, assignments, and other course materials available on the web.
As part of this tutorial we will present the basics of the html markup
language and some ideas on how to make effective use of the web in the
classroom. To see some examples of course materials check out
http://www.cs.und.edu/~maxwell and follow the links to the class home pages.

We will ask faculty to bring at least one syllabus for which they will develop
a web page. The overall purpose of this series is to give faculty a directed
environment in which to develop course materials for the web.

The morning series is now closed, but there are still 15-20 slots open in the
afternoon series (same days, same location). You can either e-mail Bruce
Maxwell at maxwell@cs.und.edu, or send a notice of interest indicating your
name, department, and e-mail address to him at the Department of Computer
Science, Box 9015. -- Bruce Maxwell, Assistant Professor of Computer Science.
*******

STAFF RECOGNITION LUNCHEON SET FOR AUG. 19

The 1997 Staff Recognition Luncheon Ceremony will be held at 11:30 a.m.
TUESDAY, AUG. 19, at the Memorial Union Ballroom.  Employees will be
recognized for years of service in five-year increments and the 10 Meritorious
Award winners will be announced. Tickets may be purchased in the Personnel
Services office, 313 Twamley Hall for $3 each.  Tickets must be purchased no
later than Wednesday, Aug. 13.  All members of the University community are
invited. -- Cheryl Osowski, Personnel Services.
*******

NEW FACULTY TOUR SET FOR AUG. 20-21

Attention, department chairs: The eighth annual New Faculty Tour of North
Dakota is set for Wednesday and Thursday, Aug. 20-21. Underwritten in part by
the UND Alumni Association, this bus tour offers a low-cost opportunity for
new faculty and professional staff to experience small-town and rural North
Dakota, visit the Capitol and State Heritage Center, talk to residents --
including Native Americans -- and learn more about the values, challenges and
opportunities of our state. Seating is limited, so priority will go to new
full-time faculty members and new full-time professional staff. Current
faculty members and professional staff are eligible to join on a "space
available" basis; they should contact the University Relations Office at 777-2731 as soon as possible to be placed on a waiting list. Invitations will be
mailed this summer to the "new hires" identified by the Academic Affairs
Office. The assistance of departmental chairs is requested in encouraging
participation. -- Rita Galloway, Special Projects Coordinator, Office of
University Relations.
*******

NEW GRADUATE STUDENT AND GTA ORIENTATION SET

Orientation will be held for new graduate students Thursday, Aug. 21. A
workshop for new graduate teaching assistants is scheduled for Tuesday,
Wednesday, and Friday, Aug. 19, 20 and 22. All new GTAs are expected to attend
the GTA sessions. Department chairs and graduate advisors are asked to alert
new graduate students and GTAs to this workshop as soon as they arrive on
campus. A copy of the schedule can be obtained by calling 777-2786. -- Harvey
Knull, Dean, Graduate School.
*******

ORIENTATION EVENTS LISTED

The New Student Orientation schedule of events is as follows:

FRIDAY, AUG. 22, 9 a.m., Residence Halls open; 1 to 7 p.m., Orientation check-in, Wilkerson Lobby; 5 to 7 p.m., Sub Sandwich Feed, Wilkerson Dining Center;
7 to 8:30 p.m., Meet Your Neighbors, Residence Hall wings; 7 to 8:30 p.m.,
Family Reception, President's residence; 8:30 p.m. to 1 a.m., New Student
Block Party, Memorial Union.

SATURDAY, AUG. 23, 8 a.m. to noon, Orientation check-in, Wilkerson Lobby; 8:30
a.m., Aerospace Orientation, CAS I, CAS II, Clifford Hall; 9 a.m. to 12:30
p.m., Selected campus offices open; 1 to 2:30 p.m., Opening Session, Chester
Fritz Auditorium; 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., Student Small Groups, leave from Chester
Fritz Auditorium (2:30 to 3:30 p.m. with faculty member, 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.
with student ambassador); 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., Family Session, Chester Fritz
Auditorium (2:30 to 3:30 p.m., Administrator/Faculty panel, 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.,
Small Group Discussions); 5 to 7 p.m., Barbecue, Wilkerson Gazebo; 9 p.m. to 1
a.m., ZOO Dance, Memorial Union.

SUNDAY, AUG. 24, Morning, Worship Services, campus churches; 1 to 5 p.m.,
Discovery Sessions (Academic Success, Creative Dating, Student Services,
Campus Community), Memorial Union; 5 to 7 p.m., President's Barbecue, Lawn of
the Coulee; 7:30 to 9 p.m., Hypnotist, Chester Fritz Auditorium.

WELCOME WEEK BEGINS MONDAY, AUG. 25, All Day, Campus Open House events; noon
to 3 p.m., Adult Learner Orientation, River Valley Room, Memorial Union; 2 to
4 p.m., Internet/E-Mail Training, Computer Labs.

TUESDAY, AUG. 26, 6 to 8 p.m., Transfer Transition Night, Sioux Room, Memorial
Union; 7 to 9 p.m., International Student Orientation, International Centre,
2908 University Ave.

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 27, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Involvement Expo, Memorial Union.
-- Cathy Buyarski, Director, Student Academic Services.
*******

INVOLVEMENT EXPO SET FOR AUG. 27

The Memorial Union and Student Academic Services, in conjunction with the
Grand Forks Chamber of Commerce, will organize the Involvement Expo '97. This
year's theme will be "New Challenges . . . New Chances."

The Expo is a great opportunity for University organizations and departments
to promote their programs and offer information to students. Both new and
returning students have been invited to participate in the Expo. In the past,
the event has attracted a large audience and has proven to be a fun and
interactive opportunity for UND students to learn about the services and
opportunities available on campus and the Greater Grand Forks community.

The Involvement Expo will be held Wednesday, Aug. 27, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
on the front lawn of the Memorial Union. For more information or to register,
please contact 777-3665 or 777-3620. -- Ben Subedi, Coordinator of Student
Organizations, Memorial Union.
*******


OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

GRADE REPORT FORMS AVAILABLE

The "Grade Report" forms are available in the Office of Admissions and Records
for pickup by the department offices. The procedures to follow and deadlines
will be noted in a memo attached to the report forms.
If you have questions regarding the above, please call 777-2711. -- Veriena
Garver, Admissions and Records Officer.
*******

NEW CATALOG NOW AVAILABLE

The new 1997-99 edition of the combined undergraduate and graduate Academic
Catalog has been issued.

Its contents include information on application, admission, registration, and
financial aid, requirements for degrees, descriptions of fields of study and
courses, and a listing of UND faculty members and administrative officials.

Copies may be obtained from the Office of Enrollment Services, 414 Twamley
Hall, P.O. Box 8135, telephone 777-4463.

Published by the UND Office of Admissions and Records and the Graduate School,
this is one of several academic catalogs issued by UND. Others include those
for the School of Law, the School of Medicine and Health Sciences,
Correspondence Study, Freshman Year, and Summer Session. -- Alice Poehls,
Director, Office of Admissions and Records.
*******


GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

MAY GRANT AWARDEES LISTED

The Office of Research and Program Development would like to congratulate the
following UND faculty/staff who were listed as principal or co-principal
investigators on awards received during the month of May 1997:

Ted Aulich (EERC), John Backes (Educational Leadership), Lyle Beiswenger (Vice
President for Finance), Cordell Fontaine (Social Science Research Institute),
Tim Gerlach (EERC), Dean Goebel (EERC), Ames Grisanti (EERC), Gerald
Groenewold (EERC), John Harju (EERC), Mary Harris (Education and Human
Development), David Hassett (EERC), Ann Henderson (EERC), Mark Henriksen
(EERC), John Hurley (EERC), Wilfred Jackson (Aviation), Mike Jones (EERC),
Steven Kelsch (Biology), Duane Klinner (Anthropology), David Lambeth
(Biochemistry and Molecular Biology), Sanku Mallik (Chemistry), Donald
McCollor (EERC), James Melland (Center for Innovation), Gale Meyer (EERC), Jan
Nowok (EERC), John Odegard (Aerospace), John Hurley (EERC), Dexter Perkins
(Geology and Geological Engineering), Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett (EERC), Michael
Poellot (Atmospheric Sciences), John Reid (Geology and Geological
Engineering), Neil Reuter (TRIO Programs), Lucia Romuld (EERC), Edward
Steadman (EERC), Daniel Stepan (EERC), Jeffrey Stith (Atmospheric Sciences),
Tina Strobel (EERC), Dennis Toom (Anthropology), Richard Vari (Physiology), 
Gregory Weber (EERC), Brian Young (EERC).

-- Carl Fox, Director of Research and Program Development.
*******

NSF "GEO SCIENCE PLAN" RELEASED

The Directorate for Geosciences (GEO) at the National Science Foundation (NSF)
has released the "GEO Science Plan," a document that outlines the strategies
that GEO will pursue to achieve its scientific goals over the five-year
planning period from FY 1998 to FY 2002.  

GEO's long-range planning for this period is based on a number of assumptions.
The amount of funding annually available to GEO is not anticipated to be
significantly different from the budgetary levels for FYs 1995 through 1997.
Funding pressures on GEO will intensify if other federal agencies that support
geoscience research experience budget reductions, because the number of
geoscientists seeking financial support is expected to remain relatively
constant over the planning period.
GEO has identified three strategic goals to be accomplished over this period:

ADVANCE FUNDAMENTAL KNOWLEDGE ABOUT THE EARTH SYSTEM. GEO will maintain strong
bases of support across all geoscience fields to have the flexibility to
respond to the highest-quality research identified by investigators while also
identifying opportunities where more focused support can play an especially
strong catalytic role in advancing scientific progress.   

ENAHNCE THE INFRASTRUCTURE FOR THE CONDUCT OF GEOSCIENCE RESEARCH. GEO will
identify and make investments in facilities and instruments that will be used
by a large number of geoscientists. GEO will facilitate interdisciplinary and
international collaborations necessary to accomplish the highest-quality
scientific projects, and pursue productive partnerships with other parts of
NSF, with other federal agencies, with organizations outside the federal
government, and with international partners both to conduct these projects and
to disseminate their results. 

IMPROVE THE QUALITY OF GEOSCIENCE EDUCATION AND TRAINING. GEO will advance
education and training for current geoscientists, facilitate the best
education and training for future generations of geoscientists drawn from all
segments of the population, and improve knowledge about the integrated
components of the Earth system by all people. 

The GEO Science Plan can be read in its entirety on the internet at 
http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/1997/nsf97118/nsf97118.htm

-- Carl Fox, Director of Research and Program Development.
*******


HIN ANNOUNCES NEW REVIEW CRITERIA

The Director of NIH recently announced that use of five explicitly-stated
review criteria will be implemented across the NIH, effective for unsolicited
research grant applications submitted on or after Oct. 1, 1997. The criteria
are being adopted as part of the NIH's goal to support high quality scientific
research. Within the peer review process at NIH, a single, global score will
be assigned by each reviewer for each scored application. The score should
reflect the overall impact the project may have on the field, with emphasis on
each criterion varying from one application to another, depending on the
nature of the application and its relative strengths. The review criteria
categories are: significance, approach, innovation, investigator, and
environment.
  
The complete text of the criteria statements is available on the NIH Grants
page at http://www.nih.gov/grants/peer/rgacriteria.htm or at ORPD.
Investigators may use these statements to more clearly focus their grant
applications. Comments regarding the criteria may be sent to dder@nih.gov.
-- Carl Fox, Director of Research and Program Development.
*******


RESEARCH, GRANT OPPORTUNITIES LISTED

Following are research and grant opportunities. For more information, call the
Office of Research and Program Development at 777-4278.

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
FIRST INDEPENDENT RESEARCH SUPPORT 
AND TRANSITION (FIRST) AWARD

First Awards provide research support for up to five years to newly
independent investigators to develop their research capabilities and
demonstrate the merit of their research ideas.  The principal investigator
must be a beginning investigator, not in training status at the time the award
will begin, and must not have been designated previously as principal
investigator on any peer-reviewed Public Health Service research project.  The
FIRST award is offered through the National Center for Human Genome Research,
the National Center for Nursing Research, the National Center for Research
Resources, the Library of Medicine, and the following institutes: Aging;
Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin
Diseases; Cancer; Child Health and Human Development; Deafness and Other
Communication Disorders; Dental Research; Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney
Diseases; Environmental Health Sciences; Eye; General Medical Sciences; Heart,
Lung and Blood; Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Drug Abuse; and Mental Health. 
Deadline: October 1, February 1, June 1.  Contact: Any of the
Institutes/Centers or ORPD.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

NATIONAL HUMAN GENOME RESEARCH INSTITUTE (NHGRI) 
RESEARCH PROJECT GRANTS

The mission of NHGRI is to characterize the structure of the human genome and
genomes of selected  model  organisms.  Primary objectives of the research
program are construction of genetic linkage and physical maps of genomes of
Homo sapiens and other organisms; acquisition of the complete sequence of the
DNA of those organisms; development of new technology necessary to achieve
these goals in a timely and cost-effective manner; development of informatics
capability to support large-scale mapping and sequencing projects, and to make
data obtained available to the scientific community; examination of
implications for individuals and society of the analysis and characterization
of the human genome; and support of interdisciplinary research training of
scientists to accomplish the goals of the Human Genome Project.  Contact:
301/402-0911; fax 301/402-1950.  Deadline: 10/1/97.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION
GRANT OPPORTUNITIES FOR ACADEMIC LIAISON WITH INDUSTRY (GOALI)

The aim of GOALI is to synergize university-industry partnerships by providing
funds to support a diverse mix of industry-university relationships.  Special
interest is placed on providing funds for: 1) faculty, students and
postdoctoral fellows to conduct research and gain experience with production
processes in an industrial setting; 2) industry scientists and engineers to
bring industry's perspective and skills to academe; and 3) interdisciplinary
university-industry teams to conduct long-term projects.  GOALI targets high-risk/high-gain research focusing on fundamental topics which would not have
been undertaken by industry, development of innovative collaborative industry-university educational programs, and direct transfer of new knowledge between
academe and industry.  Topics addressed need not focus on fundamental issues
only, but should address long-term, generic research.  The program also
emphasizes improvement of industry-university research linages in the design
of products and processes. A co-investigator or co-advisor from industry is
required in a collaborative project or industrial fellowship. Support may be
provided through a grant or a supplement to an eligible existing NSF award.
Deadline: None. Contact: Program director in a research/education area in CISE
related to the intellectual interest of the proposer(s); or
http://www.nsf.gov/sbe/; or http://www.nsf.gov/bfa/cpo/gpg/.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION
KNOWLEDGE MODELING AND COMPUTATIONAL 
INTELLIGENCE PROGRAM

This program supports creative research and education activities in
analytical, knowledge-based, and computational methods for modeling,
optimization, and control of engineering systems and to provide engineering
graduates with the diverse skills needed for productive careers. Emphasis is
on development of basic methodologies, tools, and designs motivated by a wide
variety of fundamental systems issues such as nonlinearity, scaleability,
complexity and uncertainty. The program supports research on learning and
intelligent systems, neural networks, nonlinear and hybrid control, and
advanced computational methods in distributed problem-solving and decision-making environments. Deadline: None.  Contact: 703/306-1339; fax 703/306-0305;
http://www.eng.nsf.gov/.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

THE GETTY GRANT PROGRAM

This program funds projects throughout the world promoting research in the
history of art and related fields, advancement of the understanding of art,
and conservation of cultural heritage.  Funds are provided for postdoctoral
fellowships; senior research grants for teams of scholars to collaborate on
interpretive research projects offering new explanations of art and its
history; publications; strengthening scholarly resources at independent
advanced research centers in the history of art; archival projects; and the
preparation and publication of reference works or corpora that provide
valuable art-historical resource materials.  The program promotes the
conservation of art by providing funds for surveys, treatment of individual
works of outstanding significance or groups of major importance, training to
advance the professional development of conservators and the practice of
conservation, and for the conservation of buildings of outstanding
architectural, historical, and cultural significance.  Funds are also provided
for museums and professional organizations.  Deadline: Varies.  Contact:
310/440-7320; fax 310/440-7703.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE 
ADMINISTRATION (NASA): 
UNSOLICITED RESEARCH PROPOSALS

NASA's Stennis Space Center provides support for unsolicited research
proposals in the following areas of interest: Active and Passive Nonintrustive
Remote Sensing of Propulsion Test Parameters; Advanced Propulsion Systems
Testing; Application of Parallel Computing to Data Analysis; Computational
Modeling and Simulation; Cryogenic Instrumentation and Cryogenic, High
Pressure, and Ultra High Pressure Fluid Systems; Earth Observation Technology;
Environmental Impact from Propulsion System Testing; Ground Test Facilities
Technology; Leak Detection, Sensors, Quantification and Visualization; LOX/GOX
Compatible Materials; Material and Fluid Science; Nondestructive Test and
Evaluation; Propellant and Pressurants Conservation, Recycling and Energy
Conservation; Propulsion System Testing Techniques, Simulation, Modeling, and
Methodologies; Propulsion Test Data Acquisition Systems; Spectroscopy;
Technology for Propulsion System Testing; Thermal Protection and insulation
Systems; and Vehicle Health Management/Rocket Exhaust Plume Diagnosis. 
Contact: John C. Stennis Space Center Procurement Office, DA00, Stennis Space
Center, MS 39529-6000 or NASA Headquarters at 202/358-2090.  Deadline: None.

The Kennedy Space Center will provide support for unsolicited research
proposals in the following areas: Artificial Intelligence/Expert Systems;
Atmospheric Science; CELSS Research; Communications/Fiber Optics; Computer
Aided Engineering; Computer Science; Earth Sciences Advanced Programs;
Engineering Advanced Programs; Flight Hardware Evaluation; Fluids;
Industrial/Business Management; Industrial Engineering; Instrumentation and
Hazardous Gas Monitoring; Life Sciences; Life Sciences Education; Material
Science; Remote Monitoring and Control; Quality Engineering; and Systems
Safety.  Contact: Kennedy Space Center Industry Asst./Acquisition Mgmt. Staff,
Mail Code OP-AMO, Kennedy Space Center, FL 32899-0001 or NASA Headquarters at
202/358-2090.  Deadline: None.

The Ames Research Center provides support for unsolicited research proposals
in the following areas: Advanced Instrumentation; Advanced Life Support;
Aeronautics; Aerothermal Materials and Structures; Aerothermodynamics;
Aircraft Conceptual Design; Applied Computational Fluid Dynamics; Atmospheric
Physics; Bioregenerative Life Support; Computational Fluid Dynamics;
Computational Materials Science; Control Algorithm for Wind Tunnel Support
Systems; Earth Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics; Ecosystem Science;
Ecosystem Science and Technology; Engineering and Technical Services;
Experimental Aerodynamics; Extravehicular Systems Research and Technology;
Flight Research; High Speed Computer Architectures; Human Factors;
Hypersonics; Infrared Astronomy and Astrophysics; Infrared Astronomy Projects
and Technology Development; Neuroscience; Physical-Chemical Closed Loop Life
Support; Planetary Biology; Planetary Science Rotary Wing Aeromechanics;
Rotorcraft Technology; Scientific Visualization and Interactive Computer
Graphics; Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence; Solar System Exploration;
Space Biology; Space Physiology; Space Projects; Spacecraft Data Systems;
Telecommunications; Theoretical Astrophysics; Turbulence Physics; Unsteady
Viscous Flows; Wind Tunnel Automation; and Wind Tunnel Composite Applications. 
Contact: Ames Research Center Contract Mgmt. Brch. For Ctr. Operations, Attn:
Grants Officer, M/S 241-1, Moffett Field, CA 94035 or NASA Headquarters at
202/358-2090.  Deadline: None.

The Goddard Space Flight Center provides support for unsolicited research
proposals in the following areas: Advanced Data Systems and Avionics;
Astronomy and Solar Physics; Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics;
Biogeochemical Cycles; Biospheric Studies; Climate Change; Cryogenics;
Detector Technology (Gamma-ray, x-ray, UV, Visible, Infrared, Microwave,
Radion); Environmental Sensors; Experimental Instrumentation; Flight Dynamics;
High Energy Astrophysics; Hydrospheric Process; Interdisciplinary Research;
Laser Instrumentation; Microwave Sensors; Ocean Bioproductivity; Optics;
Planetary and Extraterrestrial Physics; Precision Attitude Control; SeaWiFS
Project; Sensor and Instrument Calibration; Solid Earth Geophysics; Space
Geodesy; Terrestrial Physics; Thermal Systems; and Tropical Rainfall Measuring
Mission (TRMM).  Contact: Goddard Space Flight Center Grants Office, Code
216.1, Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771-0001 or NASA Headquarters at
202/358-2090.  Deadline: None.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES
PROGRAM PROJECT GRANTS

The Biological Response to Environmental Agents program is to develop better
understanding of mechanisms of injury and disease caused by environmental
factors; to identify, characterize, and evaluate hazardous biological,
chemical and physical factors and to establish the risk of exposure to these
factors in various situations.  Emphasis includes determination of rate of
entry into the body and metabolism and fate of toxicants, and mechanistic
research focused on perturbations by chemical and physical agents at
molecular, cellular, tissue and organ levels.  Problem areas include
neurological and behavioral disorders, respiratory diseases, cardiovascular
disease, biochemical and endocrine disturbances, kidney dysfunction,
carcinogenesis, mutagenesis, reproductive disorders and birth defects. 
Substances of interest cover a broad spectrum.

The Biometry and Risk Assessment program supports research in statistics,
biomathematics, epidemiology, and risk assessment directed at estimating
probable risks of cancer, reproductive effects, and other adverse effects from
exposure to various environmental factors.  Major emphases are on refining
existing methods for estimating human risk from data derived from studies on
laboratory animals and on quantitative aspects of short-term design and
interpretation of data from these tests.  Current epidemiology research
focuses on relationships between human disease and exposure to a variety of
harmful substances.  Field studies are supported to assess effects of air
pollutants, drinking water contaminants, breast milk contamination by
substances such as polychlorinated biphenylis (PCBs) and DDE, indoor air
pollution, effects of lead on children, effect of ultraviolet light on the
immune system, relationship between radon exposure in homes and lung cancer,
etc.  Some research deals with issues related to epidemiologic risk modeling,
improved dose response models for estimating teratogenic and carcinogenic
risk, and validity and usefulness of current cancer bioassay methodology in
estimating human risk.

Contact: 919/541-7723; sassaman@niehs.nih.gov; http://www.niehs.nih.gov/. 
Deadline: 10/1/97.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

THE W. M. KECK FOUNDATION

The Keck Foundation provides grants for studies and programs in earth
sciences, engineering, medical research and education, other sciences and
liberal arts.  Funds are provided for curriculum development, general
projects, and research grants.   Initial contact must be letter of inquiry
(accepted at any time).  Full proposals, if invited, are due by 9/15/97 or
3/16/98.  Contact: 213/680-3833; fax: 213/614-0934.  Deadline: None (letter of
inquiry); 9/15/97 or 3/16/98 for invited proposals.

-- Carl Fox, Director of Research and Program Development.
*******


MONEY MATTERS

INSTRUCTIONS LISTED FOR REPLACING FLOODED ITEMS

Departments replacing flood-damaged items which previously were purchased from
UND Central Stores should use a requisition and send the requisition and
related paperwork to Purchasing. The vendor would be UND Central Stores.
Currently, UND Central Stores has in stock file cabinets (two- and four-drawer). Eck Adams clerical chairs will be available in about two weeks. All
other Central Stores purchases will use the normal ID billing process. --
Linda Romuld, Director of Purchasing.
*******

MOTOR POOL RATES ADJUSTED

As of May 1, the North Dakota State Fleet has adjusted their motor pool rates
as follows:

Vehicle Type - Rate Per Mile*

Sedans, Compact - 0.199
Sedans, Midsize - 0.257
Minivan - 0.298
Van, 8 passenger - 0.354
Van, 12 passenger - 0.354
Van, 15 passenger - 0.354
Suburban, 6 passenger - 0.329
Chevy S-10 Pickup - 0.292
Cargo Van - 0.438
Mini Cargo Van - 0.292
Hi-Cube Cargo Van - 0.292
Trailer - $6/Day

*Note: Rates may be adjusted periodically.

Drivers for vans available upon request.

If there are any questions, please call Mary at 777-4123. -- Mary Metcalf,
Transportation.
*******


BILLBOARD

NEW "NORTH DAKOTA QUARTERLY" AVAILABLE

The latest issue of "North Dakota Quarterly" is now available in the
University Bookstore and the North Dakota Museum of Art. Featured in the
spring issue are two short stories by XuMin, the first translations into
English of this prominent Chinese writer. The translator, Toming Jun Liu, also
submitted an interview of XuMin.

Two moving memoirs by another Chinese writer, Xiao Xiaoda, tell of his
confinement in a labor camp for dissident behavior.

The issue contains seven poems, six essays, four short stories, nine book
reviews, and Graduate School Dean Harvey Knull's annual list of theses and
dissertations accepted at the University of North Dakota. One of the short
stories, "Girl in a Garter Sometime during the War," is by UND alumnus Reed
Karaim, and alumna Jill B. Gidmark wrote two of the reviews. Jane Varley and
Michael Anderegg (both of the English Department) are each represented by two
book reviews.

The single issue is $8, and subscriptions for four attractive and absorbing
issues remain at $25 a year. -- Robert Lewis, Editor, North Dakota Quarterly.
*******

BEN NWOKE RESIGNS

Ben Nwoke, Associate Professor/Chair of the Department of Industrial
Technology has resigned to accept another position in Virginia. He succeeded
Myron Bender as chair and will be replaced by James Navara, chair of the
Business and Vocational Education Department, on an interim basis. He has our
best wishes with his career move. -- Dennis Elbert, Dean, Business and Public
Administration.
*******

HONORS PROGRAM MOVED

The Honors Program sustained significant losses during the flood, including
the Honors House itself. The program is now permanently located in Robertson-Sayre Room 1-6 (previously Studio One and the Television Production Center).
All Honors classes and events will now be held in this space. Direct any
inquiries to Jeanne Anderegg or Tami Carmichael at 777-2219. -- Tami
Carmichael, Honors Program.
*******

NEW FLEXCOMP COORDINATOR HIRED

Heidi Vogel has joined the Payroll Office as the Flexcomp Coordinator. She
replaces Jean Daniel, who recently moved. Please contact Heidi with any
questions regarding your Flexcomp claim forms, reimbursement or balances. Her
direct number is 777-4423. -- Pat Hanson, Director of Payroll.
*******

CHESTER FRITZ LISTS HOURS

The Chester Fritz Library hours for Summer Intersession, Saturday, Aug. 2,
through Monday, Aug. 25, are: Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.;
Saturday and Sunday, closed; Tuesday, Aug. 26, resume regular hours. --
Patricia Berntsen, Assistant Director, Chester Fritz Library.
*******

42ND STREET SKYWAY CONSTRUCTION SET TO BEGIN

Construction of the 42nd Street Skyway that will connect Clifford Hall on the
east with Ryan Hall on the west is scheduled to begin next week.

It was announced in November that Tom and Joan Ryan contributed $1 million to
construct the overhead pedestrian walkway. 

The skyway will take seven to eight months to complete, with the structure
expected to be open to pedestrian traffic by early spring. Innes Construction
of Grand Forks is the general contractor on the project, which was designed by
Schoen Associates of Grand Forks.

"Tom and Joan Ryan's generous gift makes possible a skyway that will greatly
enhance the safety, efficiency and productivity of the faculty, staff and
students who use the UND Aerospace complex and the new Rural Technology
Center," said President Kendall Baker. "This skyway has been part of the UND
master plan for the west campus complex since it was conceived in the early
'80s and the Ryan's gift is now making it a reality."

The 410-foot skyway section will allow UND students to cross over North 42nd
Street and the railroad track which currently separates the two buildings.
Joining Clifford Hall and Ryan Hall, which were designed to accommodate the
skyway; it will complete the skyway system connecting the Aerospace complex
with the Rural Technology Center and provide for future expansion. The
pedestrian skyway system will connect five buildings and more than 250,000
square feet of advanced technology education, training, research, conference
and broadcast facilities on the west end of the UND campus.

The skyway will appear as a graceful, arching structure that clears the
Burlington Northern Sante Fe railroad tracks along 42nd Street by 21 feet.
Inside, the 10-foot wide walkway will be a series of gently sloped ramps and
landings which meet Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements for
accessibility.

A formal dedication of the skyway and renaming ceremony of the former
Aerospace Training and Research Center building as Ryan Hall will be scheduled
when the skyway is complete. The renaming of the ATRC building was approved
last fall by the North Dakota Board of Higher Education to acknowledge the
Ryans' gift that made the skywalk project possible.

-- John Odegard, Dean, UND Aerospace.
*******

ONE TWAMLEY ENTRANCE TEMPORARILY CLOSED

The main (southwest) entrance to Twamley Hall will be closed for the next two
weeks as UND continues to clean its buildings in preparation for the fall
semester. Three other entrances to the building will continue to provide
access for students, faculty, staff and the public.

The University plans to have all flood-related abatement projects finished by
the beginning of the fall semester. Twamley Hall is next on the post-flood
clean up list. The clean-up work started Monday, July 28.

Although there was no water on Twamley's ground level (there is no basement in
the building), the infrastructure tunnel which runs around the perimeter of
the building did take on water. The tunnel, which is 40 inches deep and 36
inches wide, will be thoroughly cleaned and sanitized as part of the process
and should be finished by mid-August.

-- LeRoy Sondrol, Director, Plant Services.
*******

CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS DETAILED

Following is a construction update condensed from "Onsite," the Plant Services
construction brief, from July 28.

Renovation of Abbott Hall

The renovation of Abbott Hall is continuing despite setbacks caused by the
flood. Progress slowed down during that time period, but the contractors have
made commitments to keep moving forward with the project. At this time, the
project is approximately 45 percent complete.

Presently, work is progressing on the main HVAC systems, ductwork and piping
installation in the penthouse and other floors for new ventilation and fume
hoods. The electrical and plumbing contractors are working on roughing in work
for new equipment, lights, plumbing and heating systems.
The original building was constructed in 1961-62. Much of the ventilation
system has become outdated and needed replacement to bring it up to current
standards. Along the same lines, many of the doors and walls are being changed
to provide improved fire separation between spaces. A new elevator will
replace the outdated freight elevator, new windows will be installed
throughout the building, and new seating will be installed in the Lecture
Bowl.

Some areas of the old building continue to be occupied. Despite the flood, the
anticipated completion of the building and potential occupancy is January
1998.

Completion of the Recycling Building

This new facility is located west of the transportation building and the bus
garage. There is a small connecting link between this building and the bus
garage. In the link, a restroom and an office were roughed-in and will be
completed later.

The building will allow the University to expand recovery of reusable and
recyclable resources. This addition to our campus has potential in the future
for our solid waste management program. Even before recycling became a formal
program on campus, Plant Services actively recycled out of necessity. In order
to keep costs down on construction projects, items such as door knobs,
windows, pipe, fixtures, etc., were, and still are, reused whenever possible.
Accounting for and maintaining this inventory will be made easier in this
building.

The program for recovering office paper and cardboard began with only a
handful of dedicated departments participating. This program has grown to
include all residence halls and academic buildings where any significant
amount of office paper and cardboard can be recovered. Collecting these
materials at one site will allow more control over contract services.

Recycling tips

Listed below are some tips on how you can be a part of the recycling program:

* Print (proofread on screen) and copy only what you need (make double-sided
copies).
* Post or route internal memos, route newspapers and magazines
* Use e-mail or voice mail
* Remove your name from unwanted mailing lists
* Print directly on envelopes instead of using labels
* Use once-used paper as scrap
* Donate old magazines to hospitals or nursing homes
* Reuse file folders, paper clips, rubberbands, etc.
* Return unneeded supplies

Flood Damage Renovations Update

Bob Nold, Director of Planning and Operations for Barton Malow, spent some
time with the "Onsite" staff discussing the reconstruction progress of the
buildings on campus. Barton Malow is the construction management firm that is
coordinating the rebuilding effort on campus. They manage between $600 to $800
million of construction annually and are nationally recognized for their work
on sports facilities like the Metrodome in the Twin Cities, Coors Field in
Colorado, and the Olympic Arena in Atlanta. Other B-M operating arms include
education and health care facilities.

The reconstruction effort is moving forward on a project-by-project basis. The
University's objective is to secure functional space by Aug. 18, when we
welcome our students back to campus. This means that utilities (lights, air
conditioning, heat) will be working and the building environment (such as the
air exchange system) will be safe and the space available for occupancy will
be able to support the required functions. This objective is being met with no
identifiable obstacles at this point. However, due to the extent of the flood
damage, repairs will be on-going through the fall. Therefore, a schedule is
being developed that will ensure minimum disruption to students, staff, and
faculty who use these facilities.

While there's a lot to be done, we're making great strides in the renovation
process. As a matter of fact, with the cooperation and skill of the Plant
Services staff, we've completed some repair phases faster than anyone
expected, by dividing the work at Medical Science North between unit price
contract work, Plant Services force account work, and normal renovation
contracts, the lab areas are nearly functional now.

While the individual projects that need to be completed are not complicated,
the sheer number of building repairs makes the job formidable. The far-reaching extent of the damage complicates daily, weekly and monthly
coordination issues. Numerous architects, contractors, engineers, government
agency personnel and UND staff are involved in the process of planning,
prioritizing, implementing and completing the work necessary. People are here
from all over the country working in different capacities.

In addition, the work is further complicated by time constraints. For example,
normal delivery time for materials takes time. In a typical scenario where
reconstruction starts in June, the design phase starts the previous September,
the bid process occurs in January, materials are ordered in March and the
delivery occurs in June. At this point, reconstruction begins. That's about a
nine-month cycle. As you can see, we are working on a much tighter time frame.
Work will be on-going for months to come because we can only compress the
design and delivery phases by so much.

Bob cites the support staff at UND as the "most outstanding team from top to
bottom that [he's] seen." Bob has worked all over the country on many projects
and the team effort he has experienced here has been one of the best, if not
the best. He attributes the quality of the staff as the primary reason for the
great amount of work that has already been accomplished.

McCannel Hall Nears Completion

McCannel Hall is nearly complete at the time of this writing. The departments
previously in McCannel have been moved into the building. The flood caused a
major setback to the building, however, the moves back into the building have
gone ahead.

Major replacements included new plumbing, heating and air conditioning
systems, and an entire new electrical system. Presently, the building's air
conditioning system is running in a temporary mode until the remaining pieces
of the mechanical system are replaced. All of the flood related repairs are
expected to be completed by Aug. 1.

Residence Hall Skywalk

Work on the skywalk connecting Johnstone to Hancock Hall and an underground
connecting link between Hancock and Squires is well under way. This skywalk
will be the third one for our campus and will provide students with a safe and
comfortable walkway to and from the Johnstone/Fulton/Smith Complex to the
Hancock/Squires Complex. Some residence hall rooms will be lost in each
building to accommodate the new skywalk and elevators, however both facilities
should be ready for occupancy.

Some of the remodeling of interior portions of each building will be completed
by the time school starts this fall. However, the exterior work for the
connecting link between Hancock, Squires and Skywalk will not be completed
until later this fall or early winter. The connecting link between Hancock and
Squires was necessitated to meet the constraints of the building elevations
not matching.

-- Plant Services Contract Construction Department.
*******

FREE COUNSELING OFFERED

The UND Psychological Services Center is offering free confidential crisis
counseling for flood-related issues. Please call 777-3691 for telephone or on-site appointments. -- Psychological Services Center.
*******

WEB SPACE AVAILABLE FOR FACULTY

World Wide Web space for use as an instructional tool is available for faculty
members. Instructors are finding that access to the World Wide Web augments
their ability to provide current information to their students. Some examples
of how instructors are using the Web include posting class information, study
guides for lab material, and links to other resources on the Internet.
Training in the html language used to create Web pages is offered on a regular
basis; contact Kevin at 777-2474 to find out when the next class is scheduled.
Application forms are also available from him in 411 Twamley Hall. -- Doris
Bornhoeft, Consultant, Computer Center, and Jan Orvik, Co-Manager, UNDInfo.
*******

ITEMS FOR SALE ON PUBLIC BIDS

The University is offering for sale to the public on a sealed high-bid basis
the following items: older computer equipment, deep fat fryers, and several
miscellaneous items. These items may be seen at the Central Receiving
warehouse on the southwest corner of the campus. Bids will be taken between 8
a.m. and 3 p.m. Monday through Thursday, Aug. 4-7. -- Lee Sundby, Storekeeper,
Central Receiving.
*******


ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

"SHAKESPEARE IN MY PARK 1997" IS HEADING TO A PARK NEAR YOU

The University of North Dakota's Shakespeare in MY Park is proud to present "A
Midsummer Night's Dream," at neighborhood parks in Grand Forks, East Grand
Forks and towns throughout the region. All of the performances are FREE and
will begin at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday evenings, with a 2 p.m. matinee
performance on Sundays. The performances will be scheduled as follows:

Aug. 2, University Park (GF); 
Aug. 3, O'Leary Park (EGF); 
Aug. 8, Mayville; 
Aug. 9, Grand Forks Air Force Base; 
Aug. 10, The Inn at Maple Crossing, Mentor, Minn.; 
Aug. 15, Optimist Park (GF); 
Aug. 16, Sertoma Park (GF); 
Aug. 17, Aneta, N.D.; 
Aug. 22, Larimore, N.D.; 
Aug. 23, University Park (GF); 
and Aug. 24, Grafton, N.D.

Under the direction of UND graduate student Darin Kerr, the cast and crew of
this summer's production are made up of UND students both past and present.
During the flood, company members were scattered throughout the country. But
they were drawn back to Grand Forks for a summer of theatrical fun and
adventure. "A Midsummer Night's Dream" provides us with a wonderful romantic
comedy that will prove fun for people of all ages. Audience members will
notice that this is not a typical Shakespearean production. They will get to
join with the company in attempting to make an extremely low budget film of
Shakespeare's classic tale of mischief and misbegotten love.

So come one, come all . . . and don't forget your favorite blanket or lawn
chair, and join us for "A Midsummer Night's Dream" in YOUR park. -- Laurie
Hinn, Theatre Arts Promotion Director.
*******

FREE CONCERT TO BE HELD AUG. 9

The Grand Forks Chapters of SPEBSQSA (Society for the Preservation and
Encouragement of Barbershop Quartet Singing in America) and the Sweet Adelines
are sponsoring a free concert at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 9, at the Chester
Fritz Auditorium. The two local choruses will open the concert and will be
followed by local and regional quartets who have volunteered their
performances to participate in the flood recovery.  The Fallcreek Quartet from
Grand Forks performs a special homage to the Flood of 97 that should not be
missed (watch them sandbag in four-part harmony!).  Prime Time (from
Minneapolis) is a District Champion Quartet and has competed on the
International level.  Other quartets that will be performing include the
Suburban Knights of Winnipeg; Small, Medium, Large and Oh-My-Gosh of Detroit
Lakes; and another to-be-announced championship quartet from the District. 
These performers will be some of the highest caliber Barbershop singers to
grace the Grand Forks scene in years.  The concert is free and no tickets are
required -- just show up and hear fun! -- Kevin Young (Microbiology and
Immunology), for SPEBSQSA.
*******

HATTON COMMUNITY THEATRE WILL PERFORM AT BURTNESS

The Hatton Community Theater will perform "Last Call" as part of the August
Rural Is Real conference. Local playwright, Kathy Coudle King, wrote the play
based loosely on an incident that happened in Hatton in January 1890. Angered
by the effect "demon rum" had on their farmer husbands, a group of women from
outlying Hatton marched into town and trashed the saloon. The performance is
scheduled for Saturday, Aug. 9 at 7 p.m. in Burtness Theatre. Tickets are $8
per person for general admission; call 777-2661 to reserve them. You must pick
up and pay for your tickets before 6:45 p.m. the evening of the performance. -- Dawn Botsford, Program Coordinator, Continuing Education.
*******


FYI

JOBS OPEN AT BOOKSTORE

The University Bookstore has position openings for temporary book rush help.
The primary duty will be to work as a cashier; applicants should be available
to work from approximately Aug. 19 until Sept. 5. We will be able to adjust
this schedule in some circumstances. If you have a spouse or friends who may
be interested, please give them this information. Applications are available
at the University Bookstore in the Memorial Union, or call 777-2746 for more
information.

The University Bookstore also has immediate position openings for students and
part-time non-students. We are currently filling part-time positions for our
three retail operations on campus. For student clerical and clerical assistant
job responsibilities, please see our attachment. Work schedules can vary from
15 to 40 hours per week, with some Saturday work when school is in session.
Starting salary is $5.15 to $5.40 per hour. If you or someone you know is
interested in any of these positions, please call Don or Leela at 777-2746.

-- Don Forbes, Manager, University Bookstore.
*******


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

AUGUST 1997

(Please contact Mavis at the Office of University Relations, Box 7144, or call
777-4304, if you wish to make changes or have an event included.)

Fri., Aug. 1 -- SUMMER COMMENCEMENT AND OFFICAL GRADUATION DAY, North Dakota's
entire Congressional delegation have been invited to speak, Sen. Kent Conrad,
Sen. Byron Dorgan and Congressman Earl Pomeroy; Chester Fritz Auditorium, 7
p.m.; a picnic for the graduates and their well wishers won the lawns of
nearby Wilkerson Hall will precede the commencement ceremony.

Sat.and Sun., Aug. 2-3 -- SUMMER THEATRE, "Shakespeare in MY Park 1997" will
present "A Midsummer Night's Dream," at neighborhood parks in Grand Forks,
East Grand Forks and towns throughout the region; all performances are free;
Sat., Aug. 2, University Park at 7 p.m., and 2 p.m. Sun., Aug. 3, at O'Leary
Park in East Grand Forks.

Mon. through Thurs., Aug. 4-7 -- LIFT OFF TO LEARNING WORKSHOP, action-packed
three-day workshop is filled with aviation and space information, activities
and experiences for teachers to use in their classrooms; workshop designed to
benefit elementary, middle school, and high school teachers; for more
information contact Dawn Botsford at 777-2663 or internet:
dawn_botsford@mail.und.nodak.edu.

Tues., Aug. 5 -- GRADES DUE FOR SUMMER SESSION.

Wed., Aug. 6 -- MEETING, Institutional Review Board, 305 Twamley Hall, 4 p.m.

Fri. through Sun., Aug. 8-10 -- 23RD ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF THE NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION FOR RURAL MENTAL HEALTH, Memorial Union; this program is designed
for mental health professionals and conference themes include mental health
programming in frontier areas, mental health dimensions of disasters, managed
care, inter- and multi-disciplinary mental health, and behavioral health care
with a specific focus on addictions. George McGovern, former U.S. Senator and
Democratic candidate for president in 1972, will deliver a keynote address on
Sunday, Aug. 10; contact Dawn Botsford at 777-2663 or
dawn_botsford@mail.und.nodak.edu for more information.

Fri. through Sun., Aug. 8-10 -- SUMMER THEATRE, "Shakespeare in MY Park 1997"
will present "A Midsummer Night's Dream," at neighborhood parks in Grand
Forks, East Grand Forks and towns throughout the region; all performances are
free; 7 p.m. Fri., Aug. 8, in Mayville; 7 p.m. Sat., Aug. 9, at the Grand
Forks Air Force Base; and 2 p.m. Sun., Aug. 10, at The Inn at Maple Crossing,
Mentor, Minn.

Sat., Aug. 9 -- HATTON COMMUNITY THEATER, "Last Call," as part of the August
Rural Is Real Conference, Burtness Theatre, 7 p.m. local playwright, Kathy
Coudle King, wrote the play based loosely on an incident that happened in
Hatton, N.D., in January 1890. Angered by the effect "demon rum" had on their
farmer husbands, a group of women from outlying Hatton marched into town and
trashed the saloon; tickets are $8 per person for general admission; call 777-2661 to reserve tickets.

Sat., Aug. 9 -- FREE CONCERT, Grand Forks Chapter of SPEBSQSA (Society for the
Preservation and Encouragement of Barbershop Quartet Singing in America) and
the Sweet Adelines along with local and regional quartets who have volunteered
their performances to participate in the flood recovery, Chester Fritz
Auditorium, 7:30 p.m. (no tickets are required).

Sun. through Tues., Aug. 10-12 -- 22ND ANNUAL NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON SOCIAL
WORK AND HUMAN SERVICES IN A RURAL ENVIRONMENT, Memorial Union; focus is on
changes in health and human services in rural areas, cultural diversity, and
services for elders, children and women. Keynote speaker is George McGovern,
former U.S. Senator from South Dakota and 1972 Democratic presidential nominee
on Sunday, Aug. 10; contact Dawn Botsford at 777-2663 or
dawn_botsford@mail.und.nodak.edu for more information.

Sun. through Tues., Aug. 10-12 -- 39TH ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF ALCOHOL
STUDIES, Memorial Union; George McGovern, former U.S. Senator from South
Dakota and the 1972 Democratic Presidential nominee will open the School
Sunday, Aug. 10. McGovern's latest book, "Terry, My Daughter's Life and Death
Struggle with Alcoholism" will be the essence of this address. The School has
secured nationally known speakers to discuss substance abuse treatment and
prevention strategies in rural areas; contact Dawn Botsford at 777-2663 or
dawn_botsford@mail.und.nodak.edu for more information.

Thurs., Aug. 14 -- HTML PROGRAMMING CLASS, "Creating a Home Page," 361 Upson
II Hall, 9:30 a.m. to noon, for beginning learner; taught by Computer Center
staff; pre-registration is required, call 777-3171 to sign-up.

Fri., Aug. 15 -- TEST, Multi-State Professional Responsibility Examination
(MPRE), Ballroom, Memorial Union, 12:30 p.m.

Fri. through Sun., Aug. 15-17 -- SUMMER THEATRE, "Shakespeare in MY Park 1997"
will present "A Midsummer Night's Dream," at neighborhood parks in Grand
Forks, East Grand Forks and towns throughout the region; all performances are
free; 7 p.m. Fri., Aug. 15, at Optimist Park, Grand Forks; 7 p.m. Sat., Aug.
16, at Sertoma Park, Grand Forks; and 2 p.m. Sun., Aug. 17, in Aneta, N.D.

Sat., Aug. 16 -- TEST, Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), Room 7, Gamble
Hall, 8 a.m.

Mon. and Tues., Aug. 18-19 -- FACULTY ENRICHMENT SERIES, Department of
Computer Science will offer "How Do I Put My Syllabus on the Web?" 103 CAS II,
Computer Science PC Lab, 10 a.m. to noon; presenter will be Bruce Maxwell
(Computer Science); participation is limited to 30 UND faculty on a first-reply basis; e-mail Bruce Maxwell at maxwell@cs.und.edu, or send a notice with
your name, department, and e-mail address to him at the Department of Computer
Science, Box 9015.

Tues., Aug. 19 -- ANNUAL RECOGNITION LUNCHEON for UND staff, Ballroom,
Memorial Union, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. (rescheduled due to flood); tickets
available in Personnel Services office, 313 Twamley Hall for $3 each (must be
purchased no later than Wednesday, Aug. 13).

Tues. and Wed., Aug. 19-20, and Fri., Aug. 22 -- WORKSHOP for new graduate
teaching assistants, Memorial Union; all new GTAs are expected to attend; a
copy of the schedule can be obtained by calling 777-2786.

Wed. and Thurs., Aug. 20-21 -- EIGHTH ANNUAL NEW FACULTY TOUR OF NORTH DAKOTA;
call University Relations at 777-2731 to reserve a spot on this guided bus
trip.

Thurs., Aug. 21 -- TEST, College-Level Examination Program (CLEP), Room 312,
O'Kelly Hall, 8:30 a.m.

Thurs., Aug. 21 -- NEW GRADUATE STUDENT ORIENTATION, Memorial Union, call 777-2786 to obtain a copy of the schedule.

Fri. through Sun., Aug. 22-24 -- NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION PROGRAM; 
FRIDAY, AUG. 22, 9 a.m., Residence Halls open; 1 to 7 p.m., Orientation check-in, Wilkerson Lobby; 5 to 7 p.m., Sub Sandwich Feed, Wilkerson Dining Center;
7 to 8:30 p.m., Meet Your Neighbors, Residence Hall wings; 7 to 8:30 p.m.,
Family Reception, President's residence; 8:30 p.m. to 1 a.m., New Student
Block Party, Memorial Union.
SATURDAY, AUG. 23, 8 a.m. to noon, Orientation check-in, Wilkerson Lobby; 8:30
a.m., Aerospace Orientation, CAS I, CAS II, Clifford Hall; 9 a.m. to 12:30
p.m., Selected campus offices open; 1 to 2:30 p.m., Opening Session, Chester
Fritz Auditorium; 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., Student Small Groups, leave from Chester
Fritz Auditorium (2:30 to 3:30 p.m. with faculty member, 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.
with student ambassador); 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., Family Session, Chester Fritz
Auditorium (2:30 to 3:30 p.m., Administrator/Faculty panel, 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.,
Small Group Discussions); 5 to 7 p.m., Barbecue, Wilkerson Gazebo; 9 p.m. to 1
a.m., ZOO Dance, Memorial Union.
SUNDAY, AUG. 24, Morning, Worship Services, campus churches; 1 to 5 p.m.,
Discovery Sessions (Academic Success, Creative Dating, Student Services,
Campus Community), Memorial Union; 5 to 7 p.m., President's Barbecue, Lawn of
the Coulee; 7:30 to 9 p.m., Hypnotist, Chester Fritz Auditorium.

Fri. through Sun., Aug. 22-24 -- SUMMER THEATRE, "Shakespeare in MY Park 1997"
will present "A Midsummer Night's Dream," at neighborhood parks in Grand
Forks, East Grand Forks and towns throughout the region; all performances are
free; 7 p.m. Fri., Aug. 22, in Larimore, N.D.; 7 p.m. Sat., Aug. 23, in
University Park; and 2 p.m. Sun., Aug. 24, in Grafton, N.D.

Mon., Aug. 25 -- REGISTRATION FOR FALL SEMESTER.

Mon., Aug. 25 -- COLLEGE OF NURSING DISASTER DEBRIEFING AND CATCHUP DAY for
spring semester students, River Valley Room, Memorial Union, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.;
picnic at 5 p.m. for all nursing, pre-nursing faculty and staff, University
Park (contact Linda Youngs at 777-4534 for more information).

Mon., through Wed., Aug. 25-27 -- WELCOME WEEK begins MONDAY, AUG. 25, All
Day, Campus Open House events; noon to 3 p.m., Adult Learner Orientation,
River Valley Room, Memorial Union; 2 to 4 p.m., Internet/E-Mail Training,
Computer Labs.
TUESDAY, AUG. 26, 6 to 8 p.m., Transfer Transition Night, Sioux Room, Memorial
Union; 7 to 9 p.m., International Student Orientation, International Centre,
2908 University Ave.
WEDNESDAY, AUG. 27, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Involvement Expo, Memorial Union.

Tues., Aug. 26 -- BEGINNING OF INSTRUCTION FOR FALL SEMESTER.

Tues., Aug. 26 -- LAST DAY FOR ADVANCEMENT TO CANDIDACY FOR ALL GRADUATE
STUDENTS PLANNING TO GRADUATE IN JANUARY.

Tues., Aug. 26 -- INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARD deadline for proposals requiring
full board review for Fri., Sept. 5, meeting.

Wed., Aug. 27 -- INVOLVEMENT EXPO, "New Challenges . . . New Chances,"
University organizations and departments promote their programs and offer
information to students, front lawn of the Memorial Union, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
(call 777-3665 or 777-3620 for more information).

Wed., Aug. 27, through Thurs., Sept. 11 -- ART EXHIBITION, Glenn Schaefer,
Linda Shoemaker, Installation, Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center.

Fri. and Sat., Aug. 29-30 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND at Valley City State University
Tourney, Valley City, ND, time to be announced.
*******


REMINDER! You will find the attachments with the paper copy.
  
UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and
distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is
also available electronically through UNDInfo, the University's menu
system on the Internet. The address is http://www.und.nodak.edu.
  
All articles submitted for publication should be labeled "University
Letter" and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic
submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu. Attachments to
University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number.
University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations,
Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.
  
UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.
*******


  





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