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University Letter

August 15, 1997

Volume 34 No. 42



UNIVERSITY LETTER
University of North Dakota at Grand Forks
Vol. 34, Number 42, August 15, 1997

UNIVERSITY LETTER IS ALSO AVAILABLE ELECTRONICALLY in the Events and News
section of UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address
is: http://www.und.nodak.edu

The University Relations Office maintains an index for the University Letter.

          TABLE OF CONTENTS
Meetings Will Detail Recovery Status
Families Sought To Host Students
UND Foundation Receives Record Gifts
     EVENTS TO NOTE
White Coat Ceremony Establishes Professional Role Of Medical Students
Fall Info Session Set For Staff
Computer Science Offers Faculty Enrichment Series
Conflict Resolution Center Will Hold Seminar
Staff Luncheon Tickets Available
Reception Will Honor Mel Foster
New Faculty Orientation Set For Aug. 22
Orientation Events Listed
Reception Will Honor Olive Weber
Involvement Expo Set For Aug. 27
45th Annual Communication Day Slated For Friday, Sept. 12
     OF ACADEMIC INTEREST
New Catalog Now Available
New Graduate Student and GTA Orientation Set
Teaching Newsletter Available At Subsidized Rate
     GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS
Research Grant Opportunities Listed
     MONEY MATTERS
1997-98 Tuition And Fees
     BILLBOARD
Employees May Take UND Courses At Low Cost
Honors Program Moved
Web Space Available For Faculty
Free Counseling Offered
Residence Hall Calendars Available
     ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT
New Zealand Artist To Exhibit At Museum
Collegium Musicum Seeks Members
Sioux Club Offers Special Rates
New "North Dakota Quarterly" Available
     CALENDAR OF EVENTS
*******

MEETINGS WILL DETAIL RECOVERY STATUS

The last of President Baker's weekly briefings will be held at 9 a.m. Friday,
Aug. 22, in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. Everyone is welcome to attend and
listen to updates on UND's flood recovery. The meetings will be held monthly
starting in September.
*******

FAMILIES SOUGHT TO HOST STUDENTS

The University is seeking area families interested in housing a UND student on
a short-term, semesterly or even year-long basis.
The program is the Off-Campus Family Living Program, and is designed to
connect students with families who would be willing to provide a sleeping room
or more for students who return this fall and need a short-term or semester-long living arrangement. 

Although the University has been busy this summer matching students' needs
with available housing in the community, not all apartments in the city will
be ready for occupancy when the semester begins. Some students may need short
term or even semester-long housing as the city continues to get back on its
feet. A survey of UND students conducted this summer indicates that about 100
of those students who plan to come back hadn't yet secured housing and were
willing to enter the Off-Campus Family Living Program.
The program allows students and families to make their own arrangements, to
come to their own terms, including rental payments. The program matches the
students' needs with family living opportunities.

Any Grand Forks area families interested in the program are encouraged to
contact the UND Off-Campus Housing Office at 777-2046 to obtain the program
application form. -- Jerry Bulisco, Off-Campus Housing Director.
*******

UND FOUNDATION RECEIVES RECORD GIFTS

The UND Foundation received nearly $10.6 million, a new record, from alumni
and friends during its fiscal year which ended June 30. Included in this total
is $1.8 million in donations (10,943 gifts) to the Annual Sustaining Drive.
There were 1,994 new contributors and 11,250 total gifts.

The UND Foundation also recorded more than $1.3 million in new pledges which
bring the total of known future gift commitments to nearly $36 million. Total
assets of the UND Foundation now exceed $80 million, not including outstanding
pledges.

The University of North Dakota Foundation, incorporated in 1978 to be a sister
corporation to the Alumni Association, is the organization designated to
receive alumni and other private gifts for the benefit of the University.

Every college, department and activity at UND is strengthened by private
support. Alumni and special friends for UND continue to have a significant
beneficial impact on the University and the educational opportunities which
are available for the students.

Alumni, friends and the business community also provided support to the UND
Flood Recovery Campaign. More than 3,300 gifts totaling nearly $900,000 have
been received by the UND Foundation, three months after the University was
inundated by floodwaters.

The historic 21st Century Campaign, a five-year effort which began in July
1995 to raise $50 million for the University of North Dakota by the turn of
the century, has also been successful. As the Campaign moves into its third
year this July, almost half of the goal has been met. Over $23 million has
been raised so far to strengthen UND in four key areas: student scholarships,
technology, faculty enhancement, and library resources.

The UND Foundation administers more than 1,500 separate accounts, including
600 individual named endowments, and also serves as the trustee and remainder
beneficiary for a number of charitable life income trusts. The UND Foundation
will publish its Annual Report in October, detailing the fiscal year financial
records and allocations to UND. -- Earl Strinden, Executive Vice President,
Alumni Association and Foundation.
*******


EVENTS TO NOTE

WHITE COAT CEREMONY ESTABLISHES PROFESSIONAL 
ROLE OF MEDICAL STUDENTS

A white coat ceremony will be conducted at 4 p.m. in the Keller Auditorium,
School of Medicine and Health Sciences Friday, Aug. 15, for freshman medical
students. The ceremony clarifies and confirms that a physician's
responsibility is not only to take care of patients, but also to care for
patients.

Former assistant dean for the school's northeast campus, Casey Ryan, will
address the new medical students, family and friends, and faculty and staff
members. Ryan, who recently resigned from the school's administration to
accept the presidency of Altru Health System in Grand Forks, is an Associate
Professor of Internal Medicine.

The ceremony is a growing phenomenon in medical schools throughout the
country. It has been adopted to place a renewed focus on compassion in the
education of physicians. The first such ceremony was held in August 1996.
The event will be held as part of Family Day, the final day of Phase I, a two-week transition and orientation period for freshman medical students. Sessions
on this day are designed to provide an understanding of the challenges and
opportunities medical students face in the next four years.
First-year medical students will be cloaked in the white coat, a mantle of
their profession and a symbol of our belief in their ability to carry on the
noble tradition of doctoring. Each student will receive a pin bearing the
words, "Humanism in Medicine."

The event will be followed by the Dean's Picnic for students, family members,
the school's faculty and staff members on the east lawn of the school. -- H.
David Wilson, Dean, School of Medicine and Health Sciences.
*******

FALL INFO SESSION SET FOR STAFF

A staff information session will be held Monday, Aug. 18, from 10 to 11:30
a.m. in the River Valley Room, Memorial Union. Updates on the fall semester
will be provided. Topics include academic advising, registration, fee payment,
financial aid, parking, the bookstore, housing and more. Make sure you're
prepared to help students! -- Cathy Buyarski, Director of Student Academic
Services.
*******

COMPUTER SCIENCE OFFERS FACULTY ENRICHMENT SERIES

The Department of Computer Science will offer "How Do I Put My Syllabus on the
Web?" as part of their Faculty Enrichment Series, Monday, Aug. 18, from 10
a.m. to noon and Tuesday, Aug. 19, from 10 a.m. to noon in 103 CAS II,
Computer Science PC Lab. The presenter will be Bruce Maxwell (Computer
Science).

This two-part series is a hands-on tutorial that will give faculty the skills
to make syllabi, assignments, and other course materials available on the web.
As part of this tutorial we will present the basics of the html markup
language and some ideas on how to make effective use of the web in the
classroom. To see some examples of course materials check out
http://www.cs.und.edu/~maxwell and follow the links to the class home pages.

We will ask faculty to bring at least one syllabus for which they will develop
a web page. The overall purpose of this series is to give faculty a directed
environment in which to develop course materials for the web.

Participation is limited to 30 UND faculty on a first-reply basis. You can
either e-mail Bruce Maxwell at maxwell@cs.und.edu, or send a notice of
interest indicating your name, department, and e-mail address to him at the
Department of Computer Science, Box 9015. If there is sufficient demand, we
will run a session from 1 to 3 p.m. on Aug. 18-19 in the same location. --
Bruce Maxwell, Assistant Professor of Computer Science.
*******

CONFLICT RESOLUTION CENTER WILL HOLD SEMINAR

Attorneys, administrators, and counselors will gather next week at UND to gain
training in mediation, an increasingly popular technique to resolve divorce
and child-custody disputes. President of the Academy of Family Mediators,
attorney Dorothy Della Noce, will present "Basic Divorce Mediation Training,"
a 40-hour seminar sponsored by the Conflict Resolution Center (CRC). The
seminar is scheduled for Monday through Friday, Aug. 18-22.

While mediation is not new (the CRC has been practicing mediation for almost a
decade), it has gained increased acceptance as an effective tool for resolving
seemingly intractable problems. In divorce and child custody cases, mediation
is a voluntary process in which an impartial third person assists the parties
in developing a new relationship based on their shared goals. The objective is
to move the parties from a marital relationship to more of a business-like
relationship in which the interests of the children are of highest priority.
Mediation does not replace the need for divorce attorneys but can drastically
reduce the number of thorny issues to be resolved in court.

The seminar is approved by the Academy of Family Mediators, by the Minnesota
Supreme Court, and by the North Dakota Commission for Continuing Legal
Education. Presenter Della Noce is an attorney at law, mediator, president of
the Academy of Family Mediators, editorial board member of Mediation
Quarterly, and a faculty member of the National Judicial College in Reno, Nev.
-- Jim Antes, Director, Conflict Resolution Center.
*******

STAFF LUNCHEON TICKETS AVAILABLE

Tickets are still available for the Staff Recognition Luncheon scheduled for
11:30 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 19, in the Memorial Union Ballroom. Staff members
scheduled to receive Years of Service Certificates receive a free luncheon
ticket, but this ticket must be picked up no later than Thursday, Aug. 14. If
you haven't  picked up  your ticket, please stop by Personnel Services or call
us at 777-4361 and we will hold it for you to pick up at the Luncheon or we
will mail it to you. -- Cheryl Osowski, Personnel Services. 
*******

RECEPTION WILL HONOR MEL FOSTER

The Operations Division invites the University community to a farewell
reception in honor of Mel Foster on Wednesday, Aug. 20, from 2:30 to 4 p.m. in
the Edna Twamley Room, 404 Twamley Hall.  Mel has worked for the University
since 1990 as Supervisor of Mailing and Duplicating Services. Mel's plans are
to move to the East Coast and enjoy retirement. Please join us in wishing him
good luck in the future. -- Al Hoffarth, Vice President for Operations.
*******

NEW FACULTY ORIENTATION SET FOR AUG. 22

An orientation program for all new faculty will be held on the morning of
Friday, Aug. 22, in Room 211, Rural Technology Center. The academic
orientation will begin with registration at 8:15 a.m., followed by a welcome
by President Baker and information and discussions related to University of
North Dakota faculty expectations in the areas of teaching, scholarship, and
service. Discussions will be led by Marlene Strathe, Vice President for
Academic Affairs and Provost, Dan Rice, Director of Instructional Development,
Harvey Knull, Dean of the Graduate School, Carl Fox, Director of Research and
Program Development, and Cec Volden, Professor of Nursing. Deans and
chairpersons are asked to encourage new faculty members to attend the
orientation. -- Marlene Strathe, Vice President for Academic Affairs and
Provost.
*******

ORIENTATION EVENTS LISTED

The New Student Orientation schedule of events is as follows:
Friday, Aug. 22, 9 a.m., Residence Halls open; 1 to 7 p.m., Orientation check-in, Wilkerson Lobby; 5 to 7 p.m., Sub Sandwich Feed, Wilkerson Dining Center;
7 to 8:30 p.m., Meet Your Neighbors, Residence Hall wings; 7 to 8:30 p.m.,
Family Reception, President's residence; 8:30 p.m. to 1 a.m., New Student
Block Party, Memorial Union.

SATURDAY, AUG. 23, 8 a.m. to noon, Orientation check-in, Wilkerson Lobby; 8:30
a.m., Aerospace Orientation, CAS I, CAS II, Clifford Hall; 9 a.m. to 12:30
p.m., Selected campus offices open; 1 to 2:30 p.m., Opening Session, Chester
Fritz Auditorium; 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., Student Small Groups, leave from Chester
Fritz Auditorium (2:30 to 3:30 p.m. with faculty member, 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.
with student ambassador); 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., Family Session, Chester Fritz
Auditorium (2:30 to 3:30 p.m., Administrator/Faculty panel, 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.,
Small Group Discussions); 5 to 7 p.m., Barbecue, Wilkerson Gazebo; 9 p.m. to 1
a.m., ZOO Dance, Memorial Union.

SUNDAY, AUG. 24, Morning, Worship Services, campus churches; 1 to 5 p.m.,
Discovery Sessions (Academic Success, Creative Dating, Student Services,
Campus Community), Memorial Union; 5 to 7 p.m., President's Barbecue, Lawn of
the Coulee; 7:30 to 9 p.m., Hypnotist, Chester Fritz Auditorium.
Welcome Week Begins Monday, Aug. 25, All Day, Campus Open House events; noon
to 3 p.m., Adult Learner Orientation, River Valley Room, Memorial Union; 2 to
4 p.m., Internet/E-Mail Training, Computer Labs.

TUESDAY, AUG. 26, 6 to 8 p.m., Transfer Transition Night, Sioux Room, Memorial
Union; 7 to 9 p.m., International Student Orientation, International Centre,
2908 University Ave.
Wednesday, Aug. 27, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Involvement Expo, Memorial Union.

-- Cathy Buyarski, Director, Student Academic Services.
*******

RECEPTION WILL HONOR OLIVE WEBER

A reception honoring Olive Weber will be held Wednesday, Sept. 24, at the
Alumni Center from 2 to 4 p.m. Olive retired June 30 after 18 years of service
to UND, the last 15 with TRIO Programs. Please join us as we honor Olive for
her exemplary service over the years, and wish her well in retirement. -- Don
Vangsnes, TRIO Programs.
*******

INVOLVEMENT EXPO SET FOR AUG. 27

The Memorial Union and Student Academic Services, in conjunction with the
Grand Forks Chamber of Commerce, will organize the Involvement Expo '97. This
year's theme will be "New Challenges . . . New Chances."

The Expo is a great opportunity for University organizations and departments
to promote their programs and offer information to students. Both new and
returning students have been invited to participate in the Expo. In the past,
the event has attracted a large audience and has proven to be a fun and
interactive opportunity for UND students to learn about the services and
opportunities available on campus and the Greater Grand Forks community.

The Involvement Expo will be held Wednesday, Aug. 27, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
on the front lawn of the Memorial Union. For more information or to register,
please contact 777-3665 or 777-3620. -- Ben Subedi, Coordinator of Student
Organizations, Memorial Union.
*******

45TH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION DAY
SLATED FOR FRIDAY, SEPT. 12

The School of Communication's 45th Annual Communication Day, Friday, Sept. 12,
in the River Valley Room of the Memorial Union, will bring together leading
journalists from North Dakota, Minnesota and Manitoba to tell how they covered
the 1997 Red River Valley Flood. The first panel begins at 10:30 a.m.; the
luncheon is at noon.

The day will also bring together public relations practitioners to talk about
the task of communicating in a crisis -- especially one involving a 500-year
flood -- and will include, among others, Lt. Byron Sieber, Grand Forks
Emergency Operations Center spokesman, Becky Koch, North Dakota State
University Extension Service Information Specialist, and Peter Johnson, UND
Media Relations Coordinator. The "Communicating in a Crisis" public relations
panel is co-sponsored by North Dakota Professional Communicators.

Also taking part in Communication Day will be Dennis Wenger of Texas A&M
University's Hazard Reduction and Recovery Center. Wenger is an international
expert on hazard and disaster relief. He has observed and written about the
role of communication in disaster around the globe. Mercedes de Uriarte of the
University of Texas will discuss issues including audience responses to hazard
and disaster reporting and public information. -- Richard Shafer, Assistant
Professor of Communication.
*******


OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

NEW CATALOG NOW AVAILABLE

The new 1997-99 edition of the combined undergraduate and graduate Academic
Catalog has been issued.

Its contents include information on application, admission, registration, and
financial aid, requirements for degrees, descriptions of fields of study and
courses, and a listing of UND faculty members and administrative officials.

Copies may be obtained from the Office of Enrollment Services, 414 Twamley
Hall, P.O. Box 8135, telephone 777-4463.

Published by the UND Office of Admissions and Records and the Graduate School,
this is one of several academic catalogs issued by UND. Others include those
for the School of Law, the School of Medicine and Health Sciences,
Correspondence Study, Freshman Year, and Summer Session. -- Alice Poehls,
Director, Office of Admissions and Records.
*******

NEW GRADUATE STUDENT AND GTA ORIENTATION SET

Orientation will be held for new graduate students Thursday, Aug. 21. A
workshop for new graduate teaching assistants is scheduled for Tuesday,
Wednesday, and Friday, Aug. 19, 20 and 22. All new GTAs are expected to attend
the GTA sessions. Department chairs and graduate advisors are asked to alert
new graduate students and GTAs to this workshop as soon as they arrive on
campus. A copy of the schedule can be obtained by calling 777-2786. -- Harvey
Knull, Dean, Graduate School.
*******

TEACHING NEWSLETTER AVAILABLE AT SUBSIDIZED RATE

Faculty and departments may subscribe to the newsletter, "The Teaching
Professor," at a subsidized rate of $23 per year by contacting the Office of
Instructional Development, (777-3325 or intracampus mail box 7104) by Friday,
Sept. 5. This is an excellent monthly newsletter which focuses on teaching
issues in higher education. -- Dan Rice, Director of Instructional
Development.
*******


GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

RESEARCH GRANT OPPORTUNITIES LISTED

Following are some research and grant opportunities. For more information,
contact the Office of Research and Program Development at 777-4278.

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION 
INTEGRATIVE GRADUATE EDUCATION 
AND RESEARCH TRAINING (IGERT)

The goal of the IGERT program is to enable the development of innovative,
research-based, graduate education and training activities that will produce a
diverse group of new scientists and engineers well prepared for a broad
spectrum of career opportunities.  Supported projects must be based upon a
multidisciplinary research theme (either existing or new area for the
institution), and organized around a diverse group of investigators.  NSF
organizations participating in the IGERT Program include the Directorates of
Biological Sciences (BIO), Computer and Information Science and Engineering
(CISE), Education and Human Resources (EHR), Engineering (ENG), Geosciences
(GEO), Mathematical and Physical Sciences (MPS), Social, Behavioral, and
Economic Sciences (SBE), and the Office of Polar Programs (OPP).  Preproposals
are due 9/8/97.  Contact ORPD for more information or visit the NSF homepage
at http://www.nsf.gov.
- - - - - - - - - - -

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND 
SPACE ADMINISTRATION (NASA): 
UNSOLICITED RESEARCH PROPOSALS

The Johnson Space Center provides support for unsolicited proposals in the
following areas: Advanced Extravehicular (EV) Systems; Advanced Software
Technology; Biomedical and Nutritional Research; Biotechnology and
Bioprocessing; Computer Graphics Research; Endocrine Biochemistry;
Environmental Physiology/Biophysics Research; Exercise Physiology; Flight Data
Systems; Guidance, Navigation, and Control; Immune Responses to Space Flight;
Intelligent Robotics; Life Support Systems; Orbital Debris; Pharmacokinetics
Research; Physiologic Research; Planetary Materials Analysis; Propulsion and
Power; Psychological Research; Regenerative Life Support Systems; Risk
Management Robotic Applications; Robotic Simulation; Space Food Development;
Space Radiation; Space Station Systems; Spacecraft Thermal Management Systems;
Technology Development for New Initiatives; Telerobotics and Autonomous
Robotic Systems; and Tracking and Communications.  Contact: Johnson Space
Center Unsolicited Proposal Office, Code BD 35, Houston, TX 77058-3696 or NASA
Headquarters at 202/358-2090.  Deadline: None.

NASA's Lewis Research Center provides support for unsolicited research
proposals in the following areas: Advanced Composite Mechanics; Aerospace
Applications of High Temperature Superconductivity; Aircraft Icing; Aircraft
Power Transfer Technology; Aircraft Propulsion Systems Analysis; Ceramic
Matrix Composites; Computational Fluid Mechanics; Computational Structures
Technology; Computational Technology; Concurrent Engineering Simulation;
Controls and Dynamics; Digital Systems Technology; Electrochemical Space and
Storage; Emissions Technology; Environmental Durability of Advanced Materials;
Experimental Fluid Mechanics; Fan/Propeller Aerodynamics and Acoustics; High
Performance Aircraft Propulsion Technology; High Performance Computing and
Communications/Numerical Propulsion Simulation; High Temperature Electronics
Technology; Hypersonic Propulsion Technology; InSpace Technology Experiments;
Instrumentation and Sensors; Liquid Rocket Propulsion; Low Noise Nozzle
Technology; Low Thrust Propulsion Fundamentals; Metal Matrix and Intermetallic
Matrix Composites; Microgravity Materials Science; Microgravity Science and
Applications; MMIC Technology; Molecular Computational Fluid Dynamics; Phased
Array Antenna Technology; Photovoltaic Space Systems; Polymers and Polymer
Matrix Composites; Power Materials Technology; Power Systems Technology;
Probabilistic Structural Mechanics; Rocket Engine System Monitoring; Solar
Dynamic Power Systems; Structural Analysis and Life Prediction; Structural
Dynamics; Structural Integrity; Thermal Management Technologies for Space
Power Systems; Tribiology; Turbine Engine Technology; and Vacuum Electronics. 
Contact: Lewis Research Center Grants Office, MS 500315, 21000 Brookpark Road,
Cleveland, OH 44135-3191 or NASA Headquarters at 202/358-2090.  Deadline:
None.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

THE BUNTING (MARY INGRAHAM) INSTITUTE

The Bunting Institute Berkshire Summer Fellowship provides support to women
historians, at the postdoctoral level in any field of history, to study at the
Institute.  Preference is given to junior scholars and those who do not have
access to Boston-area resources.  A stipend of $3500 will be provided for the
summer of 1998.  Deadline: 1/15/98.

The Institute Fellowship Program will provide 8-10 one-year fellowships
($36,500 each) for women scholars, researchers, creative writers, and visual
and performing artists to study at the Institute.  Eligible applicants must
have received a Ph.D. or appropriate terminal degree at least 2 years prior to
appointment in September 1998 and must have at least 2 years of work in their
respective fields after receiving their degree.  Artists must have had solo or
group shows; writers must have published.  Especially encouraged are projects
relevant to women, work and the economy; women in politics; and gender,
policy, and the media.  Deadline: 10/15/97.

The Science Scholars Fellowship Program provides support ($42,700 each) to
women scientists who hold the Ph.D. for one year of research at the Institute
in astronomy; computer science; mathematics; cognitive/neural science;
molecular/cellular biology; electrical/mechanical/aerospace engineering;
materials science; chemistry; physics; biochemistry; naval architecture; ocean
engineering; oceanography; and geology.  Deadline: 10/15/97. 

Contact: the Institute at 617/495-8212; fax 617/495-8136.  
- - - - - - - - - - - -

CENTER FOR HELLENIC STUDIES

The Center, a unit of Harvard University, is interested in  postgraduate
ancient Greek studies.  Awards are made for fellowships and visiting scholars. 
Resident Junior fellowships are awarded for research in ancient Greek
literature, language, history, philosophy and religion to be conducted at the
Center.  Deadline: 10/15/97 for Junior Fellow
ships; 2/15/98 for Summer Scholars Program.  Contact: the Center at 202/234-3738; fax: 202/797-3745; cd99@umail.umd.edu.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COUNCIL
MACARTHUR FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIPS 
IN INTERNATIONAL PEACE AND SECURITY

The Council's area of interest is the social sciences.  Awards are made for
dissertation and postdoctoral training and research fellowships (full time for
at least 2 years) in international peace and security.  Training may occur in
any setting or nation and may consist of formal course work, tutorials,
internships, senior apprenticeships or supervised study with senior faculty. 
Contact: 212/377-2700; fax 212/377-2727; http://www.ssrc.org/fellowsh.htm. 
Deadline: 11/14/97.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

AMERICAN MUSICOLOGICAL SOCIETY

The Alfred Einstein Award ($400) honors a musicological article of exceptional
merit by a scholar in the early stages of his/her career.  Deadline: 6/1/98.

The Otto Kinkeldey Award ($400) honors a work of musicological scholarship
deemed by a committee to be the most distinguished of those published during
the previous year.

The Noah Greenberg Award (up to $2,000) is intended as a grant-in-aid to
stimulate cooperation between scholars and performers by recognizing and
fostering outstanding contributions to historical performing practices.  The
award may subsidize the publication costs of articles, monographs, editions,
performance, recordings, etc.  Deadline: 3/1/98.

The Paul A. Pisk Prize ($1,000) is awarded annually to a graduate music
student for a scholarly paper, to be read at the Annual Meeting of the
Society.  Deadline: 8/1/98.

The Philip Brett Award ($500) honors exceptional musicological work (article,
book, edition, annotated translation, paper read at a conference, teaching
materials, etc.) in the field of gay, lesbian, bisexual,
transgender/transsexual studies.  Deadline: 7/1/98.

AMS Dissertation Fellowships ($12,000, 12-month stipend) are intended to
encourage the advancement of research in various fields of music and are
intended for full time study.  Deadline: 10/1/97 statement of application;
1/15/98 for final application.

The Howard Mayer Brown Fellowship, intended to increase the presence of
minority scholars and teachers in musicology, supports one year of graduate
work for a member of a historically underrepresented group in musicology. 
Deadline: 4/1/98.

American Musicological Society Monographs (one or two volumes each year) is a
series published by the University of Nebraska Press.  Criteria is inherent
academic excellence and balance of subjects for the series as a whole. 
Submissions in criticism, ethnomusicology, historical musicology, music
theory, etc., are welcome.

Contact: 215/898-8698; ams@mail.sas.upenn.edu;
http://musdra.ucdavis.edu/documents/ams/ams.html.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

PROCTER AND GAMBLE: UNIVERSITY 
EXPLORATORY RESEARCH PROGRAM

This program is expressly designed to provide access to new, scientific
understanding, especially in areas new to the Company.  The focus of the
program is Exploratory Research which might be seen as too speculative to be
funded otherwise.  The goal is to fund projects that aim to provide an
important and needed advance in basic understanding, i.e., radically new
knowledge.  Multidisciplinary project proposals are encouraged.  Research
supported falls under the broad areas of chemistry, the biological sciences,
chemical engineering, and process technology.  Up to five proposals will be
selected for funding in 1998 (up to $50,000 per year each, for up to three
years).  Funds are intended to be sufficient for one independent unit of basic
research and may be expended for that purpose in whatever way is determined
most effective by the principal investigator within the policy of the
university.  Deadline: 1/15/98.  Contact: extresprigm@pg.com or fax 513/627-1153.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (USDA) 

A portion of the discretionary funds available under the Fund For Rural
America Program will be used for telecommunications research.  The purpose of
the program is to examine ways to improve the delivery of rural economic,
community development and agricultural knowledge to rural communities. 
Projects should fall under one of the following categories:  Rural
Telecommunications Technologies and Systems; Information Infrastructure; or
Human Capacity Building.  Deadline: 9/29/97.  Contact: ORPD; Cathy Bridwell
(USDA) at 202/720-6084; or http://www.reeusda.gov/fra/fundrfa.htm.

The USDA's North Central Region Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education
(SARE) in partnership with EPA's Agriculture in Concert with the Environment
(ACE) is requesting preproposals for research and education that address
issues of sustainable agriculture including environmentally sound management
practices.  Deadline: 9/12/97.

In addition, SARE is requesting proposals for research and education that
address innovative marketing strategies in sustainable agriculture.  Proposals
should address issues of developing and maintaining marketing infrastructure
for sustainable products of current and potential importance to the region and
nation.  Deadline: 1/23/98.

Information on SARE programs can be obtained from ORPD or on the Web at
http://www.reeusda.gov/funding.htm.
- - - - - - - - - -

THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES 

Teaching with Technology supports projects to strengthen humanities education
by developing and using information technologies (Internet, video imaging,
digital audio, etc.).  Under this program, the following areas are being
funded:  Humanities Focus, Materials Development, Curriculum Development and
Demonstration, and Dissemina
tion and Diffusion.  Deadlines: 9/15/97 for Humanities Focus Grants; 10/1/97
for all other areas.  Contact: NEH Education and Development Program, 202/606-8380; education@neh.fed.us; or ORPD.

-- Carl Fox, Director of Research and Program Development.
*******


MONEY MATTERS

1997-98 TUITION AND FEES

Costs are for one academic year (two semesters) of Fall 1997 and Spring 1998


State Residency -- Student Classification
     Undergraduate / Graduate
North Dakota -- $2,677 / $2,887    
Minnesota -- $2,863 / $3,407
Contiguous &             
Western Undergraduate 
Exchange States* -- $3,795 / $4,111     
Non-Resident -- $6,411 / $6,973

State Residency -- Student Classification
     Law / Medicine 
North Dakota -- $4,097 / $  9,661       
Minnesota -- $4,407 / 
Contiguous &             
Western Undergraduate 
Exchange States* -- $5,425 /       
Non-Resident -- $8,533 / $25,059

Room (double), $1,216 
Meal Plan (14 meals/week), $1,901

*Contiguous and Western Undergraduate Exchange (WUE) states include South
Dakota, Montana, Alaska, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico,
Oregon, Utah, and Wyoming, and provinces of Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

Fees total $441 per academic year or $40.46 per credit hour. Per credit hour
charges (not including fees) are:

          Undergraduate -- Graduate     
North Dakota    $93.17/semester -- $101.92/semester
Minnesota    $ 100.92/semester -- $123.58/semester
Contiguous &             
Western Undergraduate 
Exchange States*    $139.75/semester -- $152.92/semester         
Non-Resident    $248.75/semester -- $272.17/semester   

Additional program fees apply for majors in Engineering, Law, Nursing, and
Physical Therapy.
*******


BILLBOARD

EMPLOYEES MAY TAKE UND COURSES AT LOW COST

For just $4.17 per credit hour, UND employees may enroll in one university
course per semester. You may take up to three academic courses each calendar
year, and are granted work release time upon arrangement with your supervisor.
You must have successfully completed your probationary period. You can
continue your education, earn a degree, or improve your skills.  Staff members
can work toward a degree; faculty may take courses for credit.

You can choose from hundreds of courses, ranging from management and sciences
to languages and music, from exercise and ceramics to first aid and financial
management. Here's how to enroll:

1.  Pick up admissions materials, registration materials and a tuition waiver
form at the Office of Admissions, 205 Twamley Hall (phone 7-3821) or at the
Graduate School, 414 Twamley (phone 7-2784).

2.  Choose the course you'd like to take. Prerequisites or other factors may
affect registration.

3.  Fill out the forms and return them to Admissions (undergraduates) or the
Graduate School, and have your supervisor/dean sign the tuition waiver forms.

4.  Return the completed waiver forms to Admissions.

5.  Register according to instructions in the Time Schedule of Classes.
If you are enrolling for the first time, you need to complete and return an
"Application for Admission" form, available from the Admissions office, 205
Twamley Hall, or the Graduate School, 414 Twamley Hall. There is a $25
matriculation fee for an employee who has not previously enrolled. You may
need to file transcripts from schools that you have previously attended.
Please note that some colleges have additional fees that cannot be waived.
Take advantage of your $1,000 Benefit! -- Diane Nelson, Director of Personnel,
and Alice Poehls, Director of Admissions and Records. 
*******

HONORS PROGRAM MOVED

The Honors Program sustained significant losses during the flood including the
Honors House itself. The program is now permanently located in Robertson-Sayre
Room 1-6 (previously Studio One and the Television Production Center). All
Honors classes and events will not be held in this space. Direct any inquiries
to Jeanne Anderegg or Tami Carmichael at 777-2219. -- Tami Carmichael, Honors
Program.
*******

WEB SPACE AVAILABLE FOR FACULTY

World Wide Web space for use as an instructional tool is available for faculty
members. Instructors are finding that access to the World Wide Web augments
their ability to provide current information to their students. Some examples
of how instructors are using the Web include posting class information, study
guides for lab material, and links to other resources on the Internet.
Training in the language used to create Web pages is offered on a regular
basis; contact Kevin at 777-2474 to find out when the next class is scheduled.
Application forms are also available from him in 411 Twamley Hall. -- Doris
Bornhoeft, Consultant, Computer Center, and Jan Orvik, Co-Manager, UNDInfo.
*******

FREE COUNSELING OFFERED

The UND Psychological Services Center is offering free confidential crisis
counseling for flood-related issues. Please call 777-3691 for telephone or on-site appointments. -- Psychological Services Center.
*******

RESIDENCE HALL CALENDARS AVAILABLE

The 1997-98 Residence Hall Calendar/Handbook is now available for purchase at
the Bookstore. This year's edition includes important academic and UND
athletic dates and is laid out in a weekly planner format. -- Renee Hauschulz,
Housing.
*******


ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

NEW ZEALAND ARTIST TO EXHIBIT AT MUSEUM

An exhibition of a New Zealand artist's works examining the duality of his
European and Maori roots opens Sunday, Aug. 17, at the North Dakota Museum of
Art.

Greg Whitecliffe, an artist, educator, and founding family member of the
Whitecliffe College of Art and Design in Auckland, New Zealand, traces his
colorful family roots in oil paintings of Maori images. In New Zealand it is
common to be born to two cultures, both European and Maori. Whitecliffe
embraces his Maori culture through his second name, Kerehi Tikihana Pararaki
Wikiriwhi, and through his figurative works which imitate traditional Maori
forms.

Oil paint did not arrive in New Zealand until a little more than 100 years
ago. Before the use of oil paint, Maori artifacts were stained with vegetable
juices or earth pigments. In Whitecliffe's works oil paint is used to imitate
those traditional forms, not only in color but in form; the figurative
anatomy, tilt of the heads, and angular bodies all exist in Maori conventions.

It has been written that Whitecliffe's works are not only about his ancestry;
indeed, they are his ancestors. Maori tradition holds that if an artist makes
a representation of an ancestor with skill and respect for tribal traditions,
then the work is imbued with "amuri," with life force. For Maori,
Whitecliffe's paintings are alive.

Whitecliffe also embraces his European ancestry. Many of his ancestors have
held positions as royal court painters in England. Whitecliffe himself
received the honor of being elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts
in the United Kingdom in 1994. Currently he is a board member of the
International council of Fine Arts Deans.

It was in that capacity that he met Dean Bruce Jacobsen of UND's School of
Fine Arts. Since that meeting, UND and Whitecliffe College have set up an
exchange program for graduate students of the two schools.

Whitecliffe's exhibition will be located on the mezzanine level of the Museum
beginning Aug. 17. An exhibition of the Museum's permanent collection will
continue to be exhibited on the Museum's main floor. -- Ian Swanson, North
Dakota Museum of Art.
*******

COLLEGIUM MUSICUM SEEKS MEMBERS

Singers and instrumentalists interested in great, unusual music, small
ensemble and solo opportunities and the opportunity to learn historic
instrumental and vocal techniques are invited to join the UND Collegium
Musicum. The Collegium performs music from the Middle Ages and Renaissance,
and rare works of other periods, from fourth century chants through 19th
century American Christmas carols. This year, we hope to perform a full
Renaissance mass, as well as other sacred music, part-songs, and instrumental
music.

The vocal group varies in size from four to 16 singers, and exceptional
singers have solo opportunities. The instrumental group varies. The most
constant group is a Renaissance Loud Band, with sackbuts (the ancestral
trombone), shawms (a loud Renaissance oboe, often successfully played by
modern sax players, and cornetts (a woodwind-like instrument with a tiny
trumpet-like mouthpiece). From time to time, we have also had additional
ensembles of medieval strings, recorders, and krummhorns, depending on student
interest.

Interested singers or players should attend the first rehearsals Wednesday,
Aug. 27, and Wednesday, Sept. 3, at 4:30 p.m. in Josephine Campbell Recital
Hall. Interviews/auditions will be arranged at those times. (Rehearsal time
may vary according to the group's needs.) Call or leave a message for Gary
Towne at 777-2826, or 772-1982 (home) for more details. Good intonation,
sight-reading, and initiative are important qualifications. Community members
and non-music majors are welcome.

The UND Collegium Musicum was founded in the early 1960s by Professor Tamar
Read as an outgrowth of her Music History course. The ensemble developed as
students performed the music they studied. The group was revived by Gary Towne
after Dr. Read's retirement in 1988. The group's firsts include the American
premieres of Cavalieri's "Rappresentazione di Anima e di Corpo" (under Tamar
Read) and Bermudez' "St. John Passion" (under Gary Towne). Other unique
offerings have included "Renaissance Music from Scandinavia," "A Vespers of
the Blessed Virgin from Renaissance Bergamo," "Music of the Spanish Empire,"
"The History of the Madrigal," and Adam de la Halle's "Play of Robin and
Marion."

-- Gary Towne, Director, Collegium Musicum.
*******

SIOUX CLUB OFFERS SPECIAL RATES

The Fighting Sioux Club is offering a special membership benefit for UND
faculty and staff. The half-price benefit at various membership levels
includes priority seating and parking at Fighting Sioux athletic events, The
Sioux Signal Newsletter, a 10 percent discount on Sioux Booster merchandise,
an FSC window decal and an invitation to Club social events. If you are
interested in joining the Fighting Sioux Club to help fund scholarships for
UND student athletes, please contact Rob Bollinger at 777-2611 or Gerald Bass
(Education), faculty/staff volunteer captain at 777-3577. -- Rob Bollinger,
Executive Director, Fighting Sioux Club.
*******

NEW "NORTH DAKOTA QUARTERLY" AVAILABLE

The latest issue of "North Dakota Quarterly" is now available in the
University Bookstore and the North Dakota Museum of Art. Featured in the
spring issue are two short stories by XuMin, the first translations into
English of this prominent Chinese writer. The translator, Toming Jun Liu, also
submitted an interview of XuMin.

Two moving memoirs by another Chinese writer, Xiao Xiaoda, tell of his
confinement in a labor camp for dissident behavior.

The issue contains seven poems, six essays, four short stories, nine book
reviews, and Graduate School Dean Harvey Knull's annual list of theses and
dissertations accepted at the University of North Dakota. One of the short
stories, "Girl in a Garter Sometime during the War," is by UND alumnus Reed
Karaim, and alumna Jill B. Gidmark wrote two of the reviews. Jane Varley and
Michael Anderegg (both of the English Department) are each represented by two
book reviews.

The single issue is $8, and subscriptions for four attractive and absorbing
issues remain at $25 a year. -- Robert Lewis, Editor, North Dakota Quarterly.
*******

CALENDAR OF EVENTS


AUGUST 1997

(Please contact Mavis at the Office of University Relations, Box 7144, or call
777-4304, if you wish to make changes or have an event included.)

Thurs., Aug. 14 -- HTML PROGRAMMING CLASS, "Creating a Home Page," 361 Upson
II Hall, 9:30 a.m. to noon, for beginning learner; taught by Computer Center
staff; pre-registration is required, call 777-3171 to sign-up.

Fri., Aug. 15 -- TEST, Multi-State Professional Responsibility Examination
(MPRE), Ballroom, Memorial Union, 12:30 p.m.

Fri., Aug. 15 -- WHITE COAT CEREMONY FOR FRESHMAN MEDICAL STUDENTS, School of
Medicine and Health Sciences, 4 p.m.; former assistant dean for the school's
Northeast Campus, Dr. Casey Ryan, will give the address; the event will be
followed by the Dean's Picnic for students, family members, the school's
faculty and staff members on the east lawn of the school.

Fri. through Sun., Aug. 15-17 -- SUMMER THEATRE, "Shakespeare in MY Park 1997"
will present "A Midsummer Night's Dream," at neighborhood parks in Grand
Forks, East Grand Forks and towns throughout the region; all performances are
free; 7 p.m. Fri., Aug. 15, at Optimist Park, Grand Forks; 7 p.m. Sat., Aug.
16, at Sertoma Park, Grand Forks; and 2 p.m. Sun., Aug. 17, in Aneta, N.D.

Sat., Aug. 16 -- TEST, Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), Room 7, Gamble
Hall, 8 a.m.

Sun., Aug. 17 -- ART EXHIBITION OPENS, Greg Whitecliffe, an artist, educator,
and founding family member of the Whitecliffe College of Art and Design in
Auckland, New Zealand, traces his colorful family roots in oil paintings of
Maori images, mezzanine level, North Dakota Museum of Art.

Mon., Aug. 18 -- STAFF INFORMATION SESSION, River Valley Room, Memorial Union,
10 to 11:30 a.m.

Mon. and Tues., Aug. 18-19 -- FACULTY ENRICHMENT SERIES, Department of
Computer Science will offer "How Do I Put My Syllabus on the Web?" 103 CAS II,
Computer Science PC Lab, 10 a.m. to noon; presenter will be Bruce Maxwell
(Computer Science); participation is limited to 30 UND faculty on a first-reply basis; e-mail Bruce Maxwell at maxwell@cs.und.edu, or send a notice with
your name, department, and e-mail address to him at the Department of Computer
Science, Box 9015.

Mon. through Fri., Aug. 18-22 -- BASIC DIVORCE MEDIATION TRAINING, a 40-hour
seminar sponsored by the Conflict Resolution Center for attorneys,
administrators, and counselors to gain training in mediation, an increasingly
popular technique to resolve divorce and child-custody disputes; presenter is
Dorothy Della Noce, attorney at law, mediator, president of the Academy of
Family Mediators, editorial board member of Mediation Quarterly, and a faculty
member of the National Judicial College in Reno, Nev.

Tues., Aug. 19 -- ANNUAL RECOGNITION LUNCHEON for UND staff, Ballroom,
Memorial Union, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. (rescheduled due to flood); tickets
available in Personnel Services office, 313 Twamley Hall for $3 each (must be
purchased no later than Wednesday, Aug. 13).

Tues. and Wed., Aug. 19-20, and Fri., Aug. 22 -- WORKSHOP for new graduate
teaching assistants, Memorial Union; all new GTAs are expected to attend; a
copy of the schedule can be obtained by calling 777-2786.

Wed., Aug. 20 -- FAREWELL RECEPTION for Mel Foster, Supervisor of Mailing and
Duplicating Services, Edna Twamley Room, 404 Twamley Hall, 2:30 to 4 p.m.

Wed. and Thurs., Aug. 20-21 -- EIGHTH ANNUAL NEW FACULTY TOUR OF NORTH DAKOTA;
call University Relations at 777-2731 to reserve a spot on this guided bus
trip.

Thurs., Aug. 21 -- TEST, College-Level Examination Program (CLEP), Room 312,
O'Kelly Hall, 8:30 a.m.

Thurs., Aug. 21 -- NEW GRADUATE STUDENT ORIENTATION, Memorial Union, call 777-2786 to obtain a copy of the schedule.

Fri., Aug. 22 -- NEW FACULTY ORIENTATION, Room 211, Rural Technology Center,
registration begins at 8:15 a.m.; deans and chairpersons are asked to
encourage new faculty members to attend.

Fri. through Sun., Aug. 22-24 -- NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION PROGRAM; 
Friday, Aug. 22, 9 a.m., Residence Halls open; 1 to 7 p.m., Orientation check-in, Wilkerson Lobby; 5 to 7 p.m., Sub Sandwich Feed, Wilkerson Dining Center;
7 to 8:30 p.m., Meet Your Neighbors, Residence Hall wings; 7 to 8:30 p.m.,
Family Reception, President's residence; 8:30 p.m. to 1 a.m., New Student
Block Party, Memorial Union.
Saturday, Aug. 23, 8 a.m. to noon, Orientation check-in, Wilkerson Lobby; 8:30
a.m., Aerospace Orientation, CAS I, CAS II, Clifford Hall; 9 a.m. to 12:30
p.m., Selected campus offices open; 1 to 2:30 p.m., Opening Session, Chester
Fritz Auditorium; 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., Student Small Groups, leave from Chester
Fritz Auditorium (2:30 to 3:30 p.m. with faculty member, 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.
with student ambassador); 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., Family Session, Chester Fritz
Auditorium (2:30 to 3:30 p.m., Administrator/Faculty panel, 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.,
Small Group Discussions); 5 to 7 p.m., Barbecue, Wilkerson Gazebo; 9 p.m. to 1
a.m., ZOO Dance, Memorial Union.
Sunday, Aug. 24, Morning, Worship Services, campus churches; 1 to 5 p.m.,
Discovery Sessions (Academic Success, Creative Dating, Student Services,
Campus Community), Memorial Union; 5 to 7 p.m., President's Barbecue, Lawn of
the Coulee; 7:30 to 9 p.m., Hypnotist, Chester Fritz Auditorium.

Fri. through Sun., Aug. 22-24 -- SUMMER THEATRE, "Shakespeare in MY Park 1997"
will present "A Midsummer Night's Dream," at neighborhood parks in Grand
Forks, East Grand Forks and towns throughout the region; all performances are
free; 7 p.m. Fri., Aug. 22, in Larimore, N.D.; 7 p.m. Sat., Aug. 23, in
University Park; and 2 p.m. Sun., Aug. 24, in Grafton, N.D.

Mon., Aug. 25 -- REGISTRATION FOR FALL SEMESTER.
*******

  
UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and
distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is
also available electronically through UNDInfo, the University's menu
system on the Internet. The address is http://www.und.nodak.edu.
  
All articles submitted for publication should be labeled "University
Letter" and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic
submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu. Attachments to
University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number.
University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations,
Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.
  
UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.
*******


  





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