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University Letter

February 14, 1997

Volume 34 No. 24



UNIVERSITY LETTER

UNIVERSITY LETTER INDEX

Buy Founders Day Tickets Soon
Meeting Will Discuss University, Community Partnerships
University Senate Set To Meet March 6
North Dakota's First Solar Car To Be Unveiled
     EVENTS TO NOTE
Four Candidates Will Present Ecology Seminars
Legislative Forum Set
Dean's Hour Series Will Consider Tolstoy Story
Shannon Fox Painting Will Be Unveiled
Promotion And Tenure Forum Set
Television Is Subject Of Free Satellite Seminars
Award-Winning Marketing Team Will Present
Richard Vari Highlights UND TRIO Day Celebration
Women Studies Salon Continues
English Will Host Book Fair
Libraries Will Explain Current Contents Database
History Schedules Brown Bag Lunch Session
Computer Science Colloquium Will Discuss Trends
Cooperative Learning Is LEEPS Lecture Topic
IRB Slated To Meet March 5
     OF ACADEMIC INTEREST
World Cultures GER Courses Named
Workshop Considers Higher Ed In Minnesota, North Dakota
Faculty Invited To Use Feedback Process To Improve Instruction
Encourage Students To Attend Career Fair
Students Needed As Camp Counselors
     GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS
FRCAC Lists Awards
ORPD Lists Funding Opportunities
Graduate Research Fellowships Available
     UNIVERSITY SENATE
University Senate Report
     BILLBOARD
Presidents Day Is Holiday; Libraries/Computer Center List Hours
Memorial Union Lists Hours For Presidents Day Holiday
Workshops Target People Who Are Uncomfortable With Computers
Submit Flexcomp Claims Soon
Free Defensive Driving Course Offered
Preschool Mothers Sought For Study
Adult Children Of Alcoholics Sought For Research Study
Web Space Available For Faculty
     ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT
Theatre Arts Will Present "Remembrance"
Women's Center Lists Events
International Centre Lists Events
World Music Featured At Master Chorale Folk Concert
Burtness Theatre Hosts Thesis Shows
Celebrated Pianist To Perform At Museum Of Art
Fine Arts Lecture Series Features Alumni
     FYI
Kids Invited To Skate With The Sioux
COSE Will Hold Puzzle Drive
Newman Center Seeks Assistance
Feb. 21 Is "Green And White Day"
Credit Union
     CALENDAR OF EVENTS
*******

ATTACHMENT:  Bookstore Specials
*******

Buy Founders Day Tickets Soon

Tickets for the annual Founders Day Banquet are on sale now at the President's
office, third floor, Twamley Hall.  They are expected to sell out soon.  The
6:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 27 event will feature the presentation of awards for
teaching, research, and service, as well as the recognition of faculty and
staff with 25 years of service and retired and retiring faculty and staff with
15 or more years of service.  If you have invited guests to the ceremony,
please make certain that each guest has a ticket.  Because space is so
limited, we cannot allow entrance to anyone without a ticket.  Tickets are $5
each. -- Lorna Jacobson, Administrative Officer, President's Office.
*******

Meeting Will Discuss University, Community Partnerships

Due to inclement weather on Jan. 16, the Grand Forks Business/Government
Alliance has rescheduled its quarterly meeting for Wednesday, Feb. 26, from
7:30 to 9:30 a.m. at the Best Western Town House, 710 First Ave. N. The
quarterly meetings are designed to discuss contemporary issues and
opportunities facing the Grand Forks region and to meet with community
leadership representatives including the four local political subdivisions,
congressional representatives, and the media.

The topic for this forum will be "University-Community Partnerships." The
University is a strategic asset of the Grand Forks region, enriching our lives
with educational, cultural, recreational and social value. The University of
North Dakota has a significant economic impact on the region as well.
Aerospace Sciences, Medicine, Energy and Environmental Research, Engineering,
and Business curriculums provide opportunities for our community to broaden
its economic development horizons. Grand Forks is equally important to the
University's success.

A panel of business and education representatives will discuss what we must do
to create the conditions for more effective University-Community Partnerships.
A discussion session will follow.

We invite you to attend this meeting and look forward to your participation. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, for Randy Newman, Chair, Business/Government Alliance,
Grand Forks Chamber of Commerce.
*******

University Senate Set To Meet March 6

The University Senate will meet Thursday, March 6, at 4:05 p.m., in Room 7,
Gamble Hall. Agenda items for this meeting are due in the Office of Admissions
and Records by 4 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 20. It is recommended that some detail be
included in the agenda items submitted. -- Alice Poehls (Admissions and
Records), Secretary, University Senate.
*******

North Dakota's First Solar Car To Be Unveiled

Designing, building, and testing a solar-powered car in a state that expects
snow eight months of the year was an irresistible challenge for a group of
optimistic Engineering students. Unfortunately, sunshine was not the only
commodity in short supply. Time and money were equally elusive. Nevertheless,
in the span of about a year, members of UND's Society for Energy Alternatives
raised the necessary funding, researched solar design requirements, designed
and built North Dakota's first solar-powered car, the Subzero.

Subzero will be unveiled in a public ceremony this Valentine's Day, Friday,
Feb. 14, in the Memorial Union Ballroom, at 10:30 a.m. The keynote speaker,
Byron Stafford, a project leader from the National Renewable Energy
Laboratory, will address the future of renewable energy and the viability of
solar-powered consumer automobiles.

Subzero will be entered this summer in Sunrayce '97. Sponsored by the U.S.
Department of Energy, EDS, and General Motors, Sunrayce '97 is a national
collegiate competition challenging students to design, build and race a road-worthy solar car. The race begins in Indianapolis, Ind., on June 19, and ends
when the first car crosses a line 1,230 miles away in Colorado Springs, Colo.
-- Barb Steadman, Media Relations, Society for Energy Alternatives.
*******

EVENTS TO NOTE

Four Candidates Will Present Ecology Seminars

The Department of Biology will present four seminars on various aspects of
Ecology as part of the interview process to hire a new faculty member.
All talks will be at noon in 141 Starcher Hall; all interested parties are
encouraged to attend and see who may become a new colleague. The schedule
follows: 

On Friday, Feb. 14, Bryan Foster will present "Plant Competition and Diversity
in Relation to Productivity in Successional Grassland."

On Friday, Feb. 21, Jim Cronin will present "Movement and the Formation of
Spatial Patterning in a Pine Beetle-Predator System."

On Friday, Feb. 28, David Siemens will present a talk "Ecological Consequences
of Genetic Variation in Secondary Plant Metabolites."

And on Monday, March 3, Andy McCollum will present "Predator-Induced
Phenotypic Plasticity in Larval Amphibians." 

-- Colin Hughes, Assistant Professor of Biology.
*******

Legislative Forum Set

The Grand Forks Chamber of Commerce will hold a Legislative Forum with Grand
Forks legislators at 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 15, at the Grand Forks City
Council Chambers, third floor, City Hall, 255 Fourth St. N. The focus is on
water issues.
*******

Dean's Hour Series Will Consider Tolstoy Story

Five panel members will discuss the short story, "The Death of Ivan Ilyich" by
Leo Tolstoy, at the next Dean's Hour Lectures Series Tuesday, Feb. 18, at noon
in the Reed T. Keller Auditorium of the Wold Bio-Information Learning
Resources Center, School of Medicine and Health Sciences. The public is
invited.

Panel members are:  H. David Wilson, Dean of the School of Medicine; Pastor
Tim Megorden, Director of the Christus Rex Lutheran Center; Ralph Koprince,
Associate Professor of Languages; Sheryl O'Donnell, Professor of English; and
Rolf Paulson, Associate Professor of Internal Medicine.

Copies of the short story, "The Death of Ivan Ilyich," are on reserve at the
Library of the Health Sciences, can be purchased through the School of
Medicine and Health Sciences Bookstore, or the internet version can be viewed
at the following address:  ftp://users.aol.com/tolstoy28/ivan.txt.

This presentation is the fifth in the series of Dean's Hour presentations for
the 1996-97 academic year. Initiated in Feb. 1995, the Dean's Hour Lecture
Series is a forum for presenting ideas and issues related to the practice of
medicine and health care. For more information contact the Office of Academic
Affairs and Research, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, 7-2515. --
Thomas Norris, Executive Associate Dean, Academic Affairs and Research, School
of Medicine and Health Sciences.
*******

Shannon Fox Painting Will Be Unveiled

An open house and unveiling of a painting by Native American artist Shannon
Fox will be held from 1:30 to 3 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 18, in the Counseling
Department, Montgomery Hall. The reception will be hosted by Winona Simms and
the Multicultural Counseling class. Everyone is welcome to attend. -- Cheryl
Kingsbury, Student Support Services.
*******

Promotion And Tenure Forum Set

All faculty are invited to attend the second Promotion and Tenure Forum at 3
p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 19, in the Sioux Room of the Memorial Union. Panelists
are Mary Cutler (Theatre Arts), Bruce Dearden (Mathematics), and Jacob
Wambsganss (Accounting and Business Law). Panel members have recently
completed the tenure or promotion process. For additional information, contact
me. -- Jan Zahrly, Associate Professor of Management, 7-4697.
*******

Television Is Subject Of Free Satellite Seminars

The Northern Interscholastic Press Association at the School of Communication
is sponsoring a series of satellite seminars focusing on "Television: The
Creative Process" this spring. The University Satellite Seminar Series
originates from The Museum of Television and Radio in New York and Los Angeles
and is free and open to the public.

The second seminar is "Creating Prime-Time Drama: Steven Bochco," Wednesday,
Feb. 19, from 7:30 to 9 p.m. in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. This seminar
looks at the career of writer/producer Steven Bochco, who revitalized familiar
genres with a series of hit shows including "Hill Street Blues," "L.A. Law,"
"NYPD Blues" and "Murder One."

A third seminar, "Creating a Prime-Time News Magazine: 60 Minutes," is
scheduled for Tuesday, April 8, from 6:30 to 8 p.m., location to be announced.
"60 Minutes" has been at the forefront of television journalism since it first
aired in 1968. The show thrives on its eclectic mixture of stories ranging
from world events and trends in popular culture to small-town heroes and the
famous "60 Minutes" investigations. Executive producer Don Hewitt, along with
several of the "60 Minutes" on-air personalities, will discuss what makes this
Peabody Award-winning show tick.

The final seminar, "Television and the Courts," will be held Tuesday, April
15, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in the Memorial Union South Ballroom. 

The University Satellite Seminar Series is made possible by General Motors,
and is sponsored in Grand Forks by the Northern Interscholastic Press
Association (NIPA), the high school journalism program, at UND. NIPA is
celebrating its 75th anniversary. For more information, contact me. -- Peter
Johnson, NIPA director, at 7-4317 or peter_johnson@mail.und.nodak.edu. 
*******

Award-Winning Marketing Team Will Present

The student team from UND's Marketing Department, which participated in the
Manitoba International Marketing Competition (MIMC), will present their
marketing strategy for Viper Technologies in the Lecture Bowl at the Memorial
Union Thursday, Feb. 20, at 3 p.m. The five-member team from UND placed second
for their presentation, and third overall in their industry in the MIMC
competition. MIMC is an international marketing competition hosted by the
University of Manitoba, comprising 25 to 30 teams from universities around the
world. This year's competition had teams from universities in Australia,
Canada, Germany, and the U.S. The competition spans a 15-week period, in which
student groups are assigned firms to manage in various industries. Groups
develop marketing strategies for their firms and submit their decisions weekly
over the Internet to the administrator at the University of Manitoba. At the
end of the simulation, student groups are required to generate an annual
report of their firm's performance and present to the judges at the University
of Manitoba. -- Jacob Chacko, Associate Professor of Marketing.
*******

Richard Vari Highlights UND TRIO Day Celebration

Richard Vari (Physiology), a former Upward Bound student, will be the keynote
speaker at a luncheon celebrating National TRIO Day Thursday, Feb. 20. The
luncheon is being held to both honor and thank people from UND and around the
region who help the five TRIO Programs at the University. Dr. Vari has been a
strong supporter of UND's Upward Bound Program, serving as a motivational
speaker and mentor. Attending the luncheon will be teachers and counselors
from various area schools, and students from the five TRIO Programs. In
addition to the luncheon, TRIO Programs will have displays set up in the
Memorial Union to provide information to the UND community. For more
information on the TRIO Day activities, or the programs in general, contact
Neil Reuter at 7-3427. -- Don Vangsnes, Assistant Director, TRIO Programs.
*******

Women Studies Salon Continues

On Thursday, Feb. 20, at 4 p.m. in the Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., the
Women Studies Salon will meet to discuss readings in feminist literature. The
feature selection is by Susan Griffin, from a book titled "Coming Into Our
Fullness: On Women Turning Forty," edited by C. Rountree. Griffin will take
part in the Writers Conference next month, so this is a chance to read and
discuss some of her work.

The Salon meets on the third Thursday of every month, from 4 to 5 p.m. at the
Women's Center, 305 Hamline St. Copies of the reading are on reserve at the
Library under "Salon," and from the Women Studies Center. For more information
call Rebecca Moore, 7-2705 or the Women Studies Center, 7-4115. -- Rebecca
Moore, Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies.
*******

English Will Host Book Fair

The English/Composition Department will host a  Book Fair Thursday, Feb. 20,
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on the first floor of Merrifield Hall. Book
representatives will be setting up tables to display their books and will be
available to answer questions. Please join us. -- Bill Archibald, English.
*******

Libraries Will Explain Current Contents Database


The Harley E. French Library of the Health Sciences and the Chester Fritz
Library invite faculty, staff and students to informational sessions on the
Current Contents Database. 

The first one will be Thursday, Feb. 20, from noon to 1 p.m. in the classroom
in the Library of the Health Sciences.  The focus will be on the sciences,
including basic, life, physical, and biological science as well as clinical
medicine. The second session will concentrate on the social sciences and
humanities and will be held on Tuesday, March 4, from noon to 1 p.m. in Room
202 of the Chester Fritz Library.  

Current Contents is a database that covers more than 7,000 of the
world's most prestigious, peer-reviewed scientific and scholarly
journals. It provides the critical current and retrospective information
needed to stay up-to-date with the research literature. The sessions will
highlight how to utilize Current Contents in the most effective and efficient
ways.

Please contact us for further information. -- Judy Rieke, Library of the
Health Sciences, 7-4129, and Cynthia Shabb, Chester Fritz Library, 7-4623.
*******

History Schedules Brown Bag Lunch Session

The History Department and Phi Alpha Theta will hold a brown bag lunch session
at noon Wednesday, Feb. 26, in 217 Merrifield Hall. Vadim Koukouchkine will
present "Contemporary Trends in Post-Soviet Russian Historical Studies:
Problems and Perspectives." Bring your lunch. There will be a question and
discussion period following Professor Koukouchkine's presentation, which is
open to all. For more information please contact me. -- David Rowley,
Associate Professor of History, 7-3380.
*******

Computer Science Colloquium Will Discuss Trends

All students and faculty are invited to the Computer Science Colloquium
Series, which features speakers talking about current research in computer
science and related fields. The next presentation will be Thursday, Feb. 20,
at 4 p.m. in 106 CAS II.  Mark Grabe (Psychology) will present "Trends in
Education and Educational Technology:  Implementation Challenges for Software
Designers."

This presentation will outline several key issues raised by influential
cognitive and constructivist theories. Such issues may influence which
instructional applications of technology will be regarded as desirable and
what new software capabilities may be in demand. He will provide a few "low
level" examples in an attempt to encourage speculation about future learning
tools. 

-- Bruce Maxwell, Assistant Professor of Computer Science.
*******

Cooperative Learning Is LEEPS Lecture Topic

A LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary sciences) Lecture and workshop on
cooperative learning will be presented by Dean McManus, School of
Oceanography, University of Washington, Seattle, on Friday, Feb. 28.
At noon in 109 Leonard Hall, he will consider "Oceanographic Studies at the
University of Washington."

>From 2 to 4 p.m. in 215 Leonard Hall, he will conduct a workshop, "Changing a
Lecture Course to Cooperative Learning: Nuts and Bolts."
Those interested in participating in the workshop are asked to notify Gloria
Pederson at 7-2248.

Dr. McManus is a National Association of Geology Teachers Distinguished
Speaker and has been giving cooperative learning workshops at schools across
the country. He was originally scheduled to be at UND last fall, but his visit
was postponed.

The LEEPS Lecture Series is supported by the Department of Geology and
Geological Engineering, the Department of Space Studies, the Energy and
Environmental Research Center, the Office of Research and Program Development,
the Office of Instructional Development, and the Advancing Science Excellence
in North Dakota (ASEND) Program. All interested persons are welcome to attend.
For additional information, contact me. -- Dexter Perkins, Professor of
Geology and Geological Engineering, 7-2991.
*******

IRB Slated To Meet March 5

The Institutional Review Board will meet at 4 p.m. Wednesday, March 5, in 305
Twamley Hall, to consider all research proposals submitted to the Office of
Research and Program Development before Monday, Feb. 24. Proposals received
later will be considered only if a quorum has reviewed them and time permits.  

Clinical medical projects must be reviewed by the Clinical Medical Subcom-
mittee before being brought to the full Board. Proposals for these projects
are due in the Office of Research and Program Development Feb. 17.

Notes from the meeting will be available in ORPD approximately one week after
the meeting. -- F.R. Ferraro (Psychology), Chair, Institutional Review Board.
*******

OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

World Cultures GER Courses Named

The following courses have been approved to meet the World Cultures General
Education Requirement at the University of North Dakota:

Anth 171  Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Anth 375  North American Indians
Engl 361  American Indian Languages I
Engl 362  American Indian Languages II
Engl 365  Black American Writers
Engl 367  American Indian Literature
Geog 151  Cultural Geography
Geog 161  World Regional Geography
Hist 101  Western Civilization to 1500
Hist 106  Middle Eastern Civilization from Islam to present time
Hist 214  Latin America to 1825
Hist 215  Latin America: The National Experience since 1825
Hist 221  The Scandinavian Countries since 1500
Hist 343  Ancient Greece
Hist 416  Russia to 1855
Hist 417  Russia since 1855
IS 121    Introduction to Indian Studies
IS 151    White Images of Native Americans
IS 255    Survey of Native American Art
IS 330    Contemporary Plains Indian Culture
IS 345    Contemporary American Indian Issues
Lang C102 First-Year College Latin
Lang C201 Second-Year College Latin
Lang C251 Introduction to Greek
Lang F102 Beginning French
Lang F201 Second-Year French
Lang G102 Beginning German
Lang G201 Second-Year German
Lang I102 Beginning Italian
Lang N102 Beginning Norwegian
Lang N201 Second-Year Norwegian
Lang R102 Beginning Russian
Lang R201 Second-Year Russian
Lang S102 Beginning Spanish
Lang S201 Second-Year Spanish
Mus 227   Popular and Classical Music of the World
N&D 335   World Food Patterns
PSci 220  International Politics
PSci 225  Comparative Politics
Rel 101   Introduction to Religion (West)
Rel 102   Introduction to Religion (East)
Rel 203   World Religions
Rel 247   Introduction to Judaism
Rel 250   East and West in Religions
Soc 250   Diversity in America
Soc 340   Sociology of Gender and Sex Roles
VA 110    Introduction to the Understanding of Art

-- John Bridewell (Aviation), for the General Education Requirements
Committee.
*******

Workshop Considers Higher Ed In Minnesota, North Dakota

The "First Workshop on Higher Education Issues in North Dakota and Minnesota"
is set for Saturday, Feb. 15, at North Dakota State University in Fargo. The
workshop, which will run from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., will focus on current
issues and bring together faculty and administration to help secure and
advance higher education in the two states. It will consist of several invited
presentations, followed by a panel and open discussion. North Dakota
University System Chancellor Larry Isaak is expected to discuss "Legislation
Today." Other invited speakers include John Hopper, ASC chair, "The Chapter
Builder's Ten Commandments and AAUP in Perspective"; Bob Bard, Committee A
chair, "Academic Freedom and Tenure Protection"; and members of the Board of
Higher Education. Jon Lindgren of the NDSU faculty will be the workshop chair.
The fee is $10. UND faculty on the working committee are Robert Kweit and John
Williams; other committee members are Lyle Prunty, NDSU; George Slanger, Minot
State University; Mitzi Brunsdale, Mayville State University; Barbara Laman,
Dickinson State University; and Bill Laskowski, Jamestown College. For more
information, please contact Jayantha Herath at herath@acc.jc.edu. -- Dorette
Kerian, Computer Center, for Jayantha Herath.
*******

Faculty Invited To Use Feedback Process To Improve Instruction

Faculty members are encouraged to make use of the Small Group Instructional
Diagnosis (SGID) student feedback process to improve instruction. SGID is a
confidential peer consultation service which generates helpful student
feedback from individual classes. The process is best used at mid-semester,
which enables the instructor to make mid-course improvements in the class.
SGID documentation may be included by the faculty member in the promotion file
as evidence of attention to effective teaching. To schedule an SGID or for
more information about the process, contact the Office of Instructional
Development, 7-3325. -- Dan Rice, Director of Instructional Development.
*******

Encourage Students To Attend Career Fair

The 1997 Forks Area Career Fair will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Wednesday, April 9, in the National Guard Armory, 1501 S. 48th St. This is the
first year that UND has cooperated with the area entities which sponsor this
Fair and we need your cooperation to make it a success. Shuttle buses have
been engaged to shuttle our students to and from the Armory. Those schedules
will be announced soon. 

The Career Fair schedule follows: 10 a.m., "I'm Graduating, What Do I Do
Now?," how to use the Internet to find a job and explore careers; 11 a.m.,
"Putting the Pieces Together: Job Search Basics," hot jobs for the future,
panel of industry representatives; 12:15 p.m., "Planning for Career Change";
1:30 p.m., "I'm Graduating, What Do I Do Now" (repeat); 2:30 p.m., "Putting
the Pieces Together: Job Search Basics" (repeat); continuous presentation,
"How to Get the Most out of the Career Fair." 

-- Terry Erickson, Cooperative Education, 7-4136.
*******

Students Needed As Camp Counselors

Faculty are asked to inform students in the fields of Occupational Therapy,
Physical Therapy, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Education, Special
Education, Recreation Therapy and Health, Physical Education and Recreation
that camp counselor cooperative education positions are available at Camp
Buckskin in Ely, Minn. Camp Buckskin is a camp for young men and women ages 6
to 18 who are gifted/talented or who have special academic and social skill
needs (ADD and ADHD). Camp session begins in June and ends in August, lasting
four weeks.

For more information, students should contact the Cooperative Education Office
in 120 Hyslop Sports Center and/or stop by the main area of the Memorial Union
on Tuesday, Feb. 25, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and talk to the Camp Director. --
Terry Erickson, Cooperative Education.
*******

GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

FRCAC Lists Awards

The Faculty Research and Creative Activity Committee, chaired by Brian Paulsen
(Visual Arts), received 32 proposals in the last round of applications (eight
research, 24 travel). The following awards were made at the Faculty Research
and Creative Activity committee meeting of Jan. 30.

RESEARCH AWARDS

Morten Ender, Sociology, $1,300, "Electric Snowballs: Problems and Techniques
of Computer Mediated Chain Referral Sampling of Isolated Populations"; 
James Fry, Music, $2,500, "Kaleidoscope: The Music of James Fry. A Compact
Disc Recording of Various Compositions";
Fredricka Gilje, Statewide Psychiatric Nursing Education Program, $600,
"Decision Making in U.S. Psychiatric Nurses";
Ju Kim, Physics, $2,500, "Origin of Magnetic Breakdown in Two-Dimensional
Organic Conductors";
Evguenii Kozliak, Chemistry, $1,427, "Theoretical Studies of the Chemical
Models of Cytochrome P-450";
John LaDuke, Biology, $500, "PCR Authorization";
Rebecca Moore, Philosophy and Religion, $786, "Christians and Jews in the
Middle Ages";
Serge von Duvillard, Health, Physical Education and Recreation, $2,290,
"Cholesteryl Ester Metabolism in Exercising and Non-Exercising Miniature
Swine."

TRAVEL AWARDS

The following individuals were awarded $300 each for domestic travel:
Daniel Biederman, Economics; Kathleen Bonn, Teaching and Learning; Tony
Borgerding, Chemistry; Joel Iiams, Mathematics; Jeong Wan Lee, Finance; Denise
Markovich, Finance; Vikki McCleary, Physiology; Michael Meyer, Criminal
Justice Studies; Theron Nelson, Finance; Michael Poellot, Atmospheric
Sciences; Thomas Potter, Finance; Judith Rieke, Library of the Health
Sciences; James Rodde, Music; Kathleen Rodde, Music; William Schwalm, Physics;
Henry Stinnett, Physiology; Kathryn Thomasson, Chemistry; Richard Vari,
Physiology; John Joseph Vitton, Management; Serge von Duvillard, Health,
Physical Education and Recreation; John Allan Williams, Anthropology.

-- Brian Paulsen (Visual Arts), Chair, Faculty Research and Creative Activity
Committee.
*******

ORPD Lists Funding Opportunities

Following are several research funding opportunities. For more information on
these grants, please call the Office of Research and Program Development at 7-4278.

American Heart Association Application Forms

The Office of Research and Program Development has just received application
packets for the following 1998 American Heart Association (AHA) National
Research Programs:

*  Scientist Development Grant -- to support beginning scientists,

*  Established Investigator Grant -- to support clinician-scientists and
Ph.D.s who have recently acquired independent status by funding innovative
research projects for which no previous financial support has been obtained
from other granting agencies,

*  Grant-in-Aid -- to fund the most innovative and meritorious research
projects from independent investigators.

The forms are also available on disk for IBM (WordPerfect 5.x for Windows or
Microsoft Word 6.0 for Windows) and for MacIntosh (Microsoft Word 6.0). The
forms also are available from the AHA via World Wide Web at
http://www.amhrt.org.
The AHA application receipt deadline for ALL programs is June 15, 1997. Call
Colleen at 7-4278 to request an application packet.

American Cancer Society

The Office of Research and Program Development has received application
packets (as well as diskette version) for the following American Cancer
Society grants:

Program Deadline

Cancer Control Career Development Awards for Primary Care Physicians, Oct. 1;
Clinical Research Professorship, Oct. 1; Clinical Research Training, March 1,
Oct. 1; Institutional Research Grant, Oct. 1; Physician Training Awards in
Preventive Medicine, Jan. 24, 1998; Postdoctoral Fellowship, March 1, Oct. 1;
Professorships in Clinical Oncology, March 1, Oct. 1; Professorship in
Oncology Nursing, March 1, Oct. 1; Research Professorship, March 1; Research
Project Grant, April 1, Oct. 15; Scholarships in Cancer Nursing, Oct. 1;
Training Grants in Clinical Oncology Social Work, Oct. 1. 
 
AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY TRAVEL AWARDS FOR WOMEN

The American Chemical Society (ACS) is seeking applications for the 1997 ACS
Women Chemistry Committee (WCC) travel awards. The awards provide funding for
undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral women chemists to travel to
scientific meetings within the United States in 1997 to present the results of
their research. Preference is given to those who have not previously presented
at ACS national meetings or other major scientific meetings.  

DEADLINE: March 15, 1997 for meetings to be held between July 1 and Dec. 31,
1997. Applications for meetings between Jan. 1 and June 30, 1997 were due Oct.
1.  
For more information read the article in C&EN or contact Cheryl H. Brown,
Women Chemists Committee, American Chemical Society, 1155 -16th St., NW,
Washington, DC 20036; phone (800) 227-5558, ext. 8729.  (Chemical &
Engineering News, 12 Aug. 1996, p. 44).

FULBRIGHT DEADLINE IS AUG. 1

Opportunities for lecturing or advanced research in more than 135 countries
are available to college and university faculty and professionals outside
academe.  U.S. citizenship and a doctorate or comparable professional
qualifications are required.  Foreign language skills are needed for some
countries, but most lecturing assignments are in English.

DEADLINES: May 1 for chairs in western Europe and Canada; Aug. 1 for lecturing
or research grants (the regular Fulbright program); Nov. 1 for seminars for
international education and academic administrators.
For information contact USIA Fulbright Senior Scholar Program, 3007 Tilden St.
NW, Suite 5M, Washington, DC 20008-3009; 202/686-7877, cies1@ciesnet.cies.org,
http://www.cies.org.  (Agronomy News, Feb. 1997).

HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH ON ALCOHOL-RELATED PROBLEMS

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) seeks health
services research grant applications aimed at developing a knowledge base to
improve the delivery of services for alcohol-related problems.  Such a
knowledge base includes both treatment and preventive interventions.  The
Request for Applications invites research project grants (R01), First
Independent Research Support and Transition (FIRST) (R29) awards,
exploratory/developmental (R21) grants, and Interactive Research Project
Grants (IRPG) related to improving the availability, accessibility, delivery,
quality, effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and outcomes of alcohol-related
treatment and prevention services.  

The Request for Applications may be obtained electronically at 301/402-2221,
gopher.nih.gov, http://www.nih.gov, or by contacting Colleen at ORPD, 7-4278.

DEADLINE: March 21, 1997 for Letter of Intent; April 24, 1997 for Application
Receipt.

NASA RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES IN SPACE LIFE SCIENCES

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Life Sciences
Division solicits proposals for research investigations in support of Research
Opportunities in Space Life Sciences.  This announcement is specific to the
Gravitational Biology and Biomedical Research and Countermeasures Programs
within Space Life Sciences.  Proposals may be for ground-based research
investigations and limited types of space flight experiments designed for the
Shuttle middeck or for the earliest phase of utilization of the International
Space Station. This solicitation is open until April 1, 1997. Proposals may be
submitted at any time throughout the period. The solicitation is available at
http://peer1.idi.usra.edu/. Paper copies are available by calling
202/358-4180.  Questions should be directed to NASA Headquarters, Code UL/Life
Sciences Division, Washington, DC 20546, ATTN: Ms. Pat Southerland, telephone
202/358-2207, e-mail Patricia.Southerland@hq.nasa.gov. 

COMBINED BEHAVIORAL/PHARMACOLOGIC TREATMENT OF ALCOHOLISM

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) invites
applications from institutions wishing to participate in a multi-center,
cooperative clinical trial to assess the efficacy of combined behavioral and
pharmacologic interventions in the treatment of alcohol dependence. The goal
of the research is to determine if improvement in treatment outcomes can be
achieved by therapeutic strategies that integrate various combinations of
pharmacotherapy and behavioral interventions. Applications are solicited for
Clinical Research Units and a Coordinating Center.
The Request for Applications may be obtained electronically at 301/402-2221,
gopher.nih.gov, http://www.nih.gov, or by contacting Colleen at ORPD, 7-4278.

DEADLINE: March 21, 1997 for Letter of Intent; April 24, 1997 for application
receipt.

EISENHOWER FACULTY FELLOWSHIPS

This announcement is for the Eisenhower Faculty Fellowships, one of six awards
of the Dwight David Eisenhower Transportation Fellowship Program.  The purpose
of the Eisenhower Faculty Fellowships is to provide talented faculty in fields
related to transportation an opportunity to improve, update and upgrade their
transportation knowledge. The Fellowships are intended for faculty at colleges
or universities that have established or are in the process of establishing
transportation programs.  
Graduate Fellowships enable students to pursue master's degrees or doctorates
in transportation-related fields. Grants for Research Fellowships are to
acquaint undergraduate and graduate students with transportation research,
development and technology transfer activities at the U.S. Department of
Transportation.  Eisenhower Faculty Fellowships provide talented faculty in
transportation fields with opportunities to improve their transportation
knowledge by attending conferences, courses, seminars or workshops.  

For further information contact Dr. Ilene D. Payne, 703/235-0538; Director,
Universities and Grants Programs; National Highway Institute, HHI-20; 901
North Stuart Street, Suite 300; Arlington, VA 22203.

DEADLINE: April 15, 1997; Oct. 15, 1997


MARC FELLOWSHIPS

The MARC Visiting Scientist Fellowship provides financial support for
outstanding scientist-teachers from a major research university to spend up to
one year working at a minority institution.  The intent is to strengthen
research and teaching programs in the biomedically-related sciences for the
benefit of students and faculty. Individuals nominated should be recognized
biomedical/behavioral scientist-scholars. The visiting scientist and faculty
of the host institution jointly develop a program of teaching, seminars,
and/or research workshops. The MARC Faculty Fellowship Program provides
predoctoral and senior faculty at minority institutions with the opportunity
to train away from the home institution. The MARC Faculty Predoctoral
Fellowship provides an opportunity for eligible faculty who lack the Ph.D. (or
equivalent) to obtain a research doctorate.

The MARC Faculty Senior Fellowship provides eligible faculty with the
opportunity to update their research skills and/or move into new areas of
research through a year-long period of intensive research in a
state-of-the-art research environment.  The faculty member would have only
minimal responsibilities at the home institution.
For further information contact Adolphus P. Toliver, Ph.D., 301/594-3900;
Chief, Minority Access to Research Careers Branch; National Institute of
General Medical Sciences; 45 Center Drive MSC 6200; Natcher Building, Room
2AS-43C; Bethesda, MD 20892-6200.  E-mail: tolivera@gml.nigms.nih.gov.  Or
call Colleen in ORPD, 7-4278.

DEADLINE: April 5, 1997; Dec. 5, 1997 


NSF: TRANSFORMATIONS TO QUALITY ORGANIZATIONS PROGRAM

The objective of this program is to support interdisciplinary or
multidisciplinary research (i.e., involving engineering and management and/or
social science disciplines) on quality.  Research supported by this program
must be based on partnerships between researchers and firms or other
organizations. The objectives are to support research to develop theories,
concepts, and methodologies for improved transformations to quality
organizations, and to encourage the development of new tools or processes
leading to quality improvements in organizations.  Research funded by this
program must use rigorous methodologies to answer important questions about
quality transformations, and must make a clear contribution to the literature
in this area.
For further information call Colleen in ORPD at 7-4278.

DEADLINE: March 17, 1997.

-- Carl Fox, Director of Research and Program Development.
*******

Graduate Research Fellowships Available

The North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute invites applications for
Summer Research Fellowships for 1997, which are offered to support water
resources research by graduate students at UND and NDSU. The award is $3,000
for the period from May 16 to Aug. 15, 1997. A travel grant of $200 will also
be available to each fellow. The student's advisor must provide a two-to-one
match from non-federal (typically in-kind) sources. Selection of fellows will
be based on the following criteria: completeness and clarity of the letter
application, scholastic standing and accomplishments, and faculty
recommendations. Three fellowships will be awarded. Interested students or
advisors should contact G.J. McCarthy at (701) 231-7193 or
gmccarth@prairie.nodak.edu for application details. The deadline for receipt
of applications is Friday, March 7. 

-- Jan Orvik, Editor, for G.J. McCarthy, Distinguished Professor and Chair of
Chemistry; Director, North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute;
Director, Center for Main Group Chemistry, 104B Ladd Hall, Department of
Chemistry, NDSU.
*******

UNIVERSITY SENATE

UNIVERSITY SENATE REPORT

University Senate conducted its regular monthly meeting Feb. 6 with Chair Sara
Hanhan (Teaching and Learning) presiding. Fifty-seven of the current 79 Senate
members attended. Action centered on a resolution supporting continuation of a
Norwegian major and accompanying resources, about which some members wondered
if it was not a needless re-visiting of Senate backing already clarified last
semester. The February meeting was adjourned at 4:25 p.m. after a 4:10 p.m.
call to order. Reports on proceedings follow.

Reaffirmation To-Do Brings On       
Some University Senate Deja Vu       
          
Despite a "been there, done that" reaction by some members to a resolution
that appeared to repeat previous meeting reactions to a portion of the
University Restructuring and Reallocation Committee report, University Senate
approved a reaffirmation of support for a UND major in Norwegian and
additional resources at its February meeting.

The resolution, an addition to the regular agenda, asked that Senate "reaffirm
its endorsement of the Senate Restructuring and Reallocation Committee
Recommendations 12A and 12B." To achieve that, it asked President Baker to
reconsider his initial response to those items and asked that this additional
Senate endorsement of them be forwarded to the Chancellor of the North Dakota
University System and the State Board of Higher Education before its Feb. 21
meeting.

With introduction of the reaffirmation resolution at the February Senate
meeting, Carla Hess (Communication Sciences and Disorders), who is chair of
the R and R Committee, noted that Senate reaction to that committee's report
already included such support at its December meeting, and that action is
already accompaning the report as it goes to state higher education officials.
Scot Stradley (Economics) asked, "Is there some important reason for
reaffirmation?"

Sheryl O'Donnell (English), who introduced the resolution on behalf of a
larger group, replied they wanted it at this time, calling it an "underlining"
of earlier Senate support. She said the Norwegian major is one of only a few
such in the United States, and the courses through the 200 level, which UND
President Baker recommends the Norwegian offerings be limited to, are only
remedial. Supporters also cited values of retaining ties to the Scandinavian
culture of the region and to some UND student and program exchanges involving
Norway.

The original Restructuring and Reallocation Committee report supported
continuation of the Norwegian major and encouraged exploring of the
possibility of increasing resources to support it. A Senate motion supporting
those was one of the few actions it took regarding the R and R Committee
report when it reviewed it at its December meeting before UND President Baker
received and responded to the report. (NOTE: Among her responses to each part
of the R and R Report, Academic Affairs Vice President and Provost Marlene
Strathe had recommended discontinuance of the Norwegian major.)

At a January University Council meeting, his announcement that he was
recommending support for the Norwegian languages program only at the 100 and
200 course levels was one of President Baker's reactions which accompanied his
forwarding of the R and R Committee recommendations to North Dakota University
System Larry Isaaks. The R and R Committee, appointed by Senate at the request
of the University Council and the UND Planning Council to involve faculty in
the institutional planning processes, had reviewed low enrollment academic
programs in its first round of charges since meeting from last summer into
late autumn before formulating its first set of recommendations.

Dexter Perkins (Geology and Geological Engineering) responded to a comment by
Al Berger (History) about the UND president not concurring with this aspect of
the R and R Committee report and Senate wishes expressed at the December
meeting. Perkins said, "We have a lot of valuable programs but limited
resources. If we want the strong programs to grow, we need to cut somewhere.
It's incumbent upon the president and vice presidents to make hard decisions"
that cannot best be otherwise determined.

Regardless of comments and hesitation about restating Senate's support of the
Norwegian major, the "underlining" resolution passed by a vote of 35 to 18,
with one abstention.

Senate Tables Resolution On Higher Ed 
Funding, Governance For Clarification
Confusion about the actual content and breadth on the introductory side and
about parliamentary action on the closing end highlighted University Senate
consideration and eventual tabling of a resolution on higher education finance
and governance at its February meeting.

Student member Andrew Varvel placed the resolution on the October meeting
agenda, but time restraints prevented its consideration then. It was
accompanied by a detailed, multi-paged document that Varvel said then was an
explanation and summary "to explain in a cursory fashion what higher education
finance reform is all about."

The basic resolution said "It is resolved that University Senate recommends to
the North Dakota Legislature and the people of North Dakota that they
seriously consider constitutionally reforming higher education fnancing and
the governance processes for higher education." That resolution was repeated
on the February meeting agenda, with a reference to the "Full document
attached to October Senate Agenda."

Varvel submitted a substitute resolution asking that Senate forward the matter
to the Restructuring and Realloction Committee and request a report by the May
1997 Senate meeting. A friendly motion changed that timeline to September.
Discussion included remarks by R and R Committee members about the
unlikelihood of meeting such a deadline, and doubt that the subject relates to
current charges to the committee, which takes much of its direction from the
UND Planning Council. Some confusion was also indicated about exactly what the
Senate was being asked to vote on.

After voting down the substitute motion, even as amendeded to extend the
timeline to September, Senate went on to the next agenda item. When it
completed that action, a parliamentary question was raised asking whether or
not proceedings had indeed been completed on Varvel's resolution.

Concluding that it had not been, Senate returned to consideration of the
original motion, at which time Varvel attempted to clarify some apparent
confusion among some senators on exactly what they were being asked to
consider. He pointed out that he was not asking that last October's
comparitively lengthy document be included, but, rather, that Senate discuss
and approve the shorter resolution that was included on the current agenda "to
open the question to the public and the legislature."
Still, senators expressed reluctance. Elizabeth Hampsten (English) said she
considered it "meaningless because it is so vague, and this is what the
legislature is [already] doing."

Senate's final resolving of the somewhat misunderstood resolution was approval
of a motion by Al Berger (History) to table the Varvel motion indefinitely to
give him time to make it more specific. The vote was 51 to 2 with one
abstention.

Other Senate Business

Other business at the Feb. 6 University Senate meeting included the following:

Senate approved a resolution from the University Curriculum Committee that
changes the policy for course suspension so that courses not offered in a
three-year instead of the previous five-year) cycle be automatically suspended
for two years. It applies only to undergraduate courses and will be effective
in the fall of 1997. The revised policy, which still allows department chairs
to submit a request to reverse suspension of a course, aligns this UND policy
with that of the State Board of Higher Education
. . . Senate passed a resolution supporting submission of a grant proposal by
the Bush Planning Grant Task Force titled "Making Connections: Students,
Faculty and Community" for $25,000 to be used in the planning year 1997-98 for
development of a major grant proposal to the Bush Foundation for a new faculty
development initiative. Funds will be used for on-site visits to other
campuses, consultants, and  meetings and workshops for University-wide,
college, and departmental planning activities. . . Announced as members of the
Interdisciplinary Studies Task Force, which Senate recommended be formed as a
result of part of its considerations of the Restructuring and Reallocation
Committee's report in December, are Jeanne Anderegg (Honors Program), Carl
Barrentine (Humanities and Integrated Studies), Sandra Donaldson (English),
Janet Moen (Sociology), Thomas O'Neil (Computer Science), Tom Rand
(Humanities), Pat Sanborn (Humanities and Integrated Studies), Dan Sheridan
(English), and two students. . . Members were announced for a new Task Force
for Eligibility for Senate Membership, formed as result of concerns raised at
the October meeting that changing University-wide organizational structures
and policy and procedural practices prompt a neeed for a review of Senate
membership eligibility. Members, selected by the Senate Executive Committee,
are Frank D'Andraia (Library), Johnny Grant (student), Susan Hunter (Adult
Health Nursing), Don Lemon (Educational Leadership), Brian Lloyd (student),
Richard Ludtke (Sociology), Denise Markovich (Finance), Jackie McElroy-Edwards
(Visual Arts), Elizabeth Nichols (Nursing), Marcia O'Kelly (Law), Monte
Phillips (Civil Engineering), and Jeffrey Stith (Atmospheric Sciences). The
Medical School remains vacant. . . . Faculty Athletic Representative DuWayne
Wacker (Accounting) reported that for the first time in history, UND student
athletes achieved a cumulative semester grade point average of over 3.00 (B),
with a 3.04 mark. The over-all University undergraduate grade point average
this past fall semester was 2.85. He said the cross-country women's team had a
3.51 average GPA; the women's basketball team a 3.32, and the hockey team a
3.07.  He also noted that 61 percent of the teams have above a 3.00 average
GPA and 48 individuals (10 percent) had a 4.0 GPA, adding that UND is the only
Division II school to receive two individual postgraduate scholarships from
the NCAA; the students who received these scholarships are Tim Tibesar and Tom
Langer.

. . . Senate Chair Hanhan announced that the Senate email listserv has been
created and may be utilized for agendas and minutes by fall of 1997, and the
technology of PowerPoint may be available during Senate meetings next year. 

Senators present at the Feb. 6 meeting were Jeanne Anderegg, James Antes,
Albert Berger, Robert Boyd, Mary Brant, Chris Carlson, Annie Claesson, Richard
Crawford, W. Jeremy Davis, Sally Dockter, John Ettling, Mary Lou Fuller, Betty
Gard, Mike Grosz, Elizabeth Hampsten, Sara Hanhan, Thomasine Heitkamp, Carla
Wulff Hess, Al Hoffarth, Charlotte Humphries, Susan Hunter, Eric Jorgenson,
Frank Karner, Scott Knudsvig, David Lambeth, David Lambeth, Gretchen Chesley
Lang, Robert Lewis, Brian T. Lloyd, Stephen Markovich, James McKenzie, E. John
Miller, Janet Kelly Moen, Elizabeth Nichols, Sheryl O'Donnell, Marcia O'Kelly,
Glenn Olsen, Thomas Owens, Dexter Perkins, David Perry, Thomas Petros, Heather
Phillips, Monte Phillips, Alice Poehls, Ronald Pynn, Lana Rakow, Don Richard,
Daniel Sheridan, Larry Spain, Scot Stradley, Marlene Strathe, Wayne Swisher,
David Uherka, Beverly Uhlenberg, Andrew Varvel, Cecilia Volden, DuWayne
Wacker, John A. Williams.

Senators absent from the Feb. 6 meeting were Kendall Baker, Lyle Beiswenger,
Frank D'Andraia, Rebecca Engwicht, George Frein, Kari Gjovik, Mary Harris,
Gordon Henry, Bruce Jacobsen, Harvey Knull, Mary Kweit, W. Fred Lawrence, Lynn
Lindholm, D. Scott Lowe, Chris Mickelson, Ben U. Nwoke, John Odegard, Donald
Poochigian, Tina Richards, Charles Robertson, Tammy Schlinger, H. David
Wilson. -- Jim Penwarden (University Relations).
*******

BILLBOARD

Presidents Day Is Holiday

In accordance with State Board of Higher Education directives, Monday, Feb.
17, will be observed as Presidents Day by faculty and staff members of the
University. Only those employees designated by their department heads will be
required to work on this holiday. -- Marlene Strathe, Vice President for
Academic Affairs and Provost, and Diane Nelson, Director, Personnel Services.
*******

Chester Fritz Library:

Presidents Day holiday hours for the Chester Fritz Library are: Saturday, Feb.
15, 1 to 5 p.m.; Sunday, Feb. 16, closed; Monday, Feb. 17 (Presidents Day), 1
p.m. to midnight. -- Patricia Berntsen, Assistant Director, Chester Fritz
Library.
*******

Health Sciences Library:

The Library of the Health Sciences hours for the Presidents Day holiday are:
Friday, Feb. 14, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, Feb. 15, 1 a.m. to 
5 p.m.; Sunday, Feb. 16, 1 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Monday, Feb. 17, 10 a.m. to 
11 p.m. -- Judy Rieke, Assistant Director, Library of the Health Sciences.
*******

Computer Center:

The Computer Center will close for the Presidents Day holiday at midnight
Sunday, Feb. 16, and will reopen at midnight Monday, Feb. 17. -- Nadine
Kotowicz, Operations Manager, Computer Center.
*******

Memorial Union Lists Hours For Presidents Day Holiday:

Lifetime Sports Center: Fri., Feb. 14, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sat. and 
Sun., Feb. 15-16, noon to 5 p.m.;  Mon., Feb. 17, noon to 6 p.m. (okay for
leagues).

Info Center: Fri., Feb. 14, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sat. through Mon., Feb. 15-17,
noon to 5 p.m.

Service Center: Fri., Feb. 14, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sat. through Mon., Feb.
15-17, noon to 5 p.m.

Copy Stop: Fri., Feb. 14, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sat. and Sun., Feb. 15-16, Closed;
Mon., Feb. 17, noon to 5 p.m.

Burger King: Fri., Feb. 14, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sat., Feb. 15, 11 a.m. to 5
p.m.; Sun., Feb. 16, noon to 5 p.m.; Mon., Feb. 17, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Bookstore: Fri., Feb. 14, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sat. through Mon., Feb. 15-17,
Closed.

Administrative Office: Fri., Feb. 14, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Sat. through Mon.,
Feb. 15-17, Closed.

Craft Center/Sign and Design Studio: Fri., Feb. 14, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Sat.
through Mon., Feb. 15-17, Closed.

Dining Center: Fri., Feb. 14, 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Sat. through Mon., Feb. 15-17,
Closed    

Barber Shop: Fri., Feb. 14, 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Sat. and Sun. Feb. 15-16,
Closed; Mon., Feb. 17, 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Centennial Room: Fri., Feb. 14, 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.; Sat. through Mon., Feb.
15-17, Closed.

Espresso Bar: Fri., Feb. 14, 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.; Sat. through Mon., Feb. 15-17, Closed.

Corner Deli: Fri., Feb. 14, 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Sat. through Mon., Feb. 15-17, Closed.

Learning Services: Fri., Feb. 14, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Sat. through Mon., Feb.
15-17, Closed.

Union Station: Fri., Feb. 14, 9 a.m. to 4:50 p.m.; Sat. through Mon., Feb. 15-17, Closed.

Passport IDs: Fri., Feb. 14, 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.; Sat. through Mon., Feb. 15-17, Closed.

Computer Learning Lab: Fri., Feb. 14, 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.; Sat., Feb. 15, 11
a.m. to 5:45 p.m.; Sun., Feb. 16, noon to 5:45 p.m.; Mon., Feb. 17, 11 a.m. to
5:45 p.m.

Building Hours: Fri., Feb. 14, 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sat. through Mon., Feb. 15-17, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

-- MaryAnne Lustgraaf, Director, Memorial Union.
*******

Workshops Target People Who Are Uncomfortable With Computers

The University Learning Center will present "Make Friends with the Computer,"
a four-session seminar designed for anyone who has minimal experience with or
a fear of using a computer. We will show them how to use the computer as a
word processor, teaching only the basics.

Each session will meet from 3 to 4:30 in 361 Upson II Hall. The dates are: 
     
Session 1, Monday, Feb. 24; 
Session 2, Wednesday, Feb. 26; 
Session 3, Monday, March 3;   
Session 4, Wednesday, March 5.

Encourage anyone interested in participating in this program to sign up early
as space is limited. To register, visit the University Learning Center, Room
201A, Memorial Union, or call 7-4406. This seminar is open to students,
faculty and staff. -- Jeanne Matson, University Learning Center, 7-4406.
*******

Submit Flexcomp Claims Soon

This reminder is for all employees who enrolled in the UND Flexcomp plan for
the short-year 1996 and still have funds remaining. All receipts for medical
and/or dependent care expenses incurred from July 1, 1996 to Dec. 31, 1996,
must be submitted to the Payroll Office by Friday, March 14. 
Any remaining balances after that date will be forfeited. Reminders have been
sent to employees with balances over $10. If you have any questions or
concerns, please call Jean Daniel at 7-4423. -- Pat Hanson, Director of
Payroll.
*******

Free Defensive Driving Course Offered

A free Defensive Driving Course for UND employees and a family member will be
held in Room 16-18 of Swanson Hall Monday, Feb. 24. It will last four hours,
running from 10 a.m. to noon, and 1 to 3 p.m. with an hour lunch break. It is
open to all UND employees who are authorized to drive state fleet vehicles.
This course may reduce your North Dakota insurance premiums and could possibly
take away points from your driving record. Please call the Safety Office at 7-3341 to register. -- Norma Haley, Safety Office.
*******

Preschool Mothers Sought For Study

Mothers of preschool-aged children (aged 3-5) are needed for a study of
parents' thoughts and feelings about parenting. The study also focuses on
interactions between mothers and their preschoolers. Mothers who experiencing
feelings of depression and also mothers who are not experiencing feelings of
depression are invited to participate. Participants will be paid $15. If you
are interested in participating or have questions, please call me at 7-3017. -- Andrea Zevenbergen, Assistant Professor of Psychology.
*******

Adult Children Of Alcoholics Sought For Research Study

Adult children of alcoholics are sought for participation in research at the
Department of Psychology.  Participants, who should be between the ages of 21
and 40, will be paid.  If you would like to learn more, please contact me at
7-3260. -- Tom Petros, Professor of Psychology.
*******

Web Space Available For Faculty

World Wide Web space for use as an instructional tool is available for faculty
members. Instructors are finding that access to the World Wide Web augments
their ability to provide current information to their students. Some examples
of how instructors are using the Web include posting class information, study
guides for lab material, and links to other resources on the Internet.
Training in the HTML language used to create Web pages is offered on a regular
basis; contact Deanne at 7-2474 to find out when the next class is scheduled.
Application forms are also available from her in 411 Twamley Hall. -- Doris
Bornhoeft, Consultant, Computer Center, and Jan Orvik, Co-Manager, UNDInfo.
*******

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

Theatre Arts Will Present "Remembrance"

The Department of Theatre Arts is proud to present the drama, "Remembrance,"
by Graham Reid. The play tells the story of a Catholic woman and a Protestant
man from Northern Ireland who meet and fall in love while tending their sons'
graves -- in spite of the hatred that has dominated their community for so
long.

"Remembrance," the fourth production of the 1997-97 season, is directed by
Sandra Lindberg (Theatre Arts). The production also features special
appearances by Theatre Arts professors Gregory Gillette and Mary Cutler. The
show runs Tuesday through Saturday, Feb. 18-22 and 25-28 at the Burtness
Theatre; curtain rises at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are general admission and are
available for $5 at the Burtness Theater Box Office or by calling 7-2587. --
Joel Svendsen, Burtness Theatre Publicity Manager.
*******

Women's Center Lists Events

The Wednesday, Feb. 19, Feast and Focus program at noon in the Women's Center,
305 Hamline St., is "Violence in the Workplace." Whether we work on a college
campus or one of many hundreds of work settings, we all realize that the
potential for violence exists. The college campus consists of a slice of
society that could include the good as well as the violent. How can we prepare
for, prevent and/or react to the potentially dangerous workplace situation?
Join us for this discussion. 

The Thursday, Feb. 20, For Women Only program will be "Get Real: Straight Talk
About Women's Health," part one of two (second part will be presented April
10). Today, behavioral and lifestyle factors can cause more than half of the
top 10 leading causes of death in American women. The college years are a
crucial time in a young woman's life. The decisions and actions you make
during this time will affect your health for the rest of your life. Young
women can make intelligent choices, given accurate information, which will
lead to healthier, happier and longer lives. -- Donna Oltmanns, Coordinator,
Women's Center.
*******

International Centre Lists Events

The Thursday, Feb. 20, 7 p.m. program will be "Celebrating Norwegian Culture,"
featuring Norwegian attire, music, literature, artifacts, historical
perspectives, and food. Experiences at Moss will be facilitated by Norway's
Director of the Moss program, Krista Lauritzen. All are welcome; please join
us. -- Sharon Rezac Andersen, Director, International Centre, 7-4231.
*******

World Music Featured At Master Chorale Folk Concert

The Grand Forks Master Chorale, directed by James Rodde (Music), will present
a festival of folk songs, "Folk on the Red," on Sunday, Feb. 23, 
at 4 p.m. at United Lutheran Church, 324 Chestnut St. The concert will be
followed by a reception featuring folk arts displays and food prepared by area
cultural heritage groups. The Grand Forks Sixth Grade Honor Chorus and the
choirs of Central and Red River High Schools will also participate in the
program.

Guest artist at this year's concert is Nick Page, founder of Massachusetts'
Mystic Chorale. Page is a conductor, teacher, composer and multicultural music
specialist who refers to himself simply as "song leader." He is widely known
for his ability to involve the audience in a concert, based on his belief in
"the West African notion that there should be no separation between the
performers and the audience."

Eastern Europe, Scandinavia, and Africa provide the origins for many songs on
the program. There will be American songs and a performance of "A Prayer for
Africa (N'kosi Sikelel'i Afrika)," the Pan-African hymn made familiar by the
Graceland concert of Paul Simon and Ladysmith Black Mambazo. Several of Nick
Page's songs and arrangements are included in the program.

The Master Chorale's presentation of "Folk on the Red" is supported by the
North Valley Arts Council, Target Stores, American Federal Bank, and the East
Grand Forks Arts and Crafts Council, with promotional assistance from The
Grand Forks Herald and the Greater Grand Forks Convention and Visitors Bureau.
Tickets are $8 for general admission, $7 for seniors and $5 for students, and
will be available at the door. For more information, call 7-3376. -- Jan
Orvik, Editor, for Ruth Marshall, Master Chorale.
*******

Burtness Theatre Hosts Thesis Shows

The Burtness Theatre will host two graduate thesis shows, presented by the
Department of Theatre Arts in the College of Fine Arts and Communication.
"Ficky Stingers," by Eve Lewis, is the graduate work of Marcie Gallagher. It
is a rehearsal-oriented piece that deals with the various dynamics of the
victims and the power relations encompassing the issue of rape. Because of its
rehearsal nature, the production is free of charge and adult language is used. 

The production runs Sunday and Monday, Feb. 23 and 24, in the Chandler
Movement Studio located on the second floor of Chandler Hall. Curtain rises at
7:30 p.m. Discussions of the acting theory used in the process will follow
both performances.

"How to be Popular in Six Easy Steps and Other Lies They Told Us" is an
experimental theatre piece that looks at media images of women in the late 50s
and early 60s. The show runs Tuesday through Thursday, March 25-27 in the
Burtness Studio Theatre located in the basement of Burtness Theatre. Tickets
are $2 and can be purchased at the door. Curtain rises at 7:30 p.m. The
production is a collaborative effort between director Andrea Harris-Weir, and
the actors and designers, all of whom are women. Inspiration for the text is
derived from women's magazines, movies and music from the era. Fragmented and
nonlinear, the piece hopes to link images of womanhood that many look back on
with amusement, fondness and sometimes longing, to images that are still
present in popular culture today. "How to be Popular in Six Easy Steps and
Other Lies They Told Us" hopes to make both women and men begin to ponder
these ideas of womanhood put forth by mass culture.

-- Joel Svendsen, Publicity, Burtness Theatre.
*******

Celebrated Pianist To Perform At Museum Of Art

Acclaimed pianist Adam Neiman, winner of the 1996 Young Concert Artists
International Auditions, will perform in the galleries of the North Dakota
Museum of Art Sunday, Feb. 23, at 2 p.m.

Neiman has won awards for his performances across the United States and Europe
since playing his first piano concerto with an orchestra at the age of nine in
Royce Hall in Los Angeles. Since then he has given recitals at Ambassador
Auditorium in Pasadena, the Philip Lorenz Memorial Keyboard Concerts in
Fresno, San Francisco's Bay Area Pianists Series, the Sarasota Opera House,
and the Dame Myra Hess Memorial Concert Series in Chicago. His performances
abroad include a recital at the 1994 International Chopin Festival in Nohant,
France, which was broadcast on Polish National Radio and Television. Neiman's
1996-97 schedule includes performances at the New Hampshire Music Festival and
Florida's Museum of Fine Arts. He recently made his New York recital debut by
opening the 36th Young Concert Artists Series.

Neiman's performance is a part of the Museum's Concert Series, which each year
brings visiting musicians to Grand Forks. The performances are underwritten by
a major grant from the Myra Foundation, with special funding provided by the
city of Grand Forks. The Guild Trio will conclude the 1996-97 season March 23.

Admission for Neiman's performance is $12 general, $5 for students. Children
12 and under are admitted free. For more information contact the Museum of Art
at 7-4195. Currently on exhibition at the Museum of Art is the Piper Jaffray
Collection: Regional Expressions. -- Marsy Schroeder, North Dakota Museum of
Art.
*******

Fine Arts Lecture Series Features Alumni

The 1996-97 College of Fine Arts and Communication Lecture Series will offer
"A Celebration of Alumni Achievement."  All presentations will be given in the
Hughes Fine Arts Center, Room 227 (Barr Lecture Room).

Walter Piehl, who has received two master's degrees from UND, will contemplate
"Sweethearts and Roping Fools, or Why It's Difficult to Get There From Here." 
A former rodeo rider and announcer, the rodeo has been a principal source of
inspiration for his artwork for more than 20 years.  An opening reception for
an exhibition of his work is set for 7 to 9 p.m. Monday, Feb. 24, 1997, in the
Hughes Fine Arts Center Gallery; his lecture is set for 2 p.m. Tuesday, Feb.
25.  Apart from an overview of his work, Piehl will also use his lecture to
review the challenges facing artists who live in relatively remote, rural
areas.  Piehl has been a member of the Minot State University faculty since
1970.

The lectures are free, and all are invited. -- Brian Paulsen (Visual Arts),
Lecture Series Coordinator, College of Fine Arts and Communication.
*******

FYI

Kids Invited To Skate With The Sioux

Faculty and staff are invited to bring your children, kindergarten through
sixth grade, to the 10th annual "Skate with the Sioux" event. Here's your
opportunity to meet and skate with the Fighting Sioux hockey team, Head Coach
Dean Blais, and the UND Dance Team Sunday, Feb. 23, from 4 to 5:30 p.m. at the
Ralph Engelstad Arena. Bring your own skates; no sticks or pucks will be
allowed on the ice. "Skate with the Sioux" is free to the public and is
sponsored by telesis, UND's Student Alumni Association. -- Kirsten Carolin,
Special Events Coordinator, UND Alumni Association.
*******

COSE Will Hold Puzzle Drive

The UND representatives of the Council of State Employees are sponsoring a
puzzle drive for area retirement and life care homes and the Grand Forks
Senior Citizens Center.  Bring in slightly used (no pieces missing, please) or
new jigsaw puzzles to the drop boxes in the Memorial Union office area, the
Plant Services office area or to Mailing Services in Twamley Hall.  The
puzzles will be distributed to the Senior Center, Good Samaritan Center in
East Grand Forks, Almonte Living Center, Tufte Manor, and Parkwood Place. This
is our opportunity to brighten someone's long winter days. The drive will run
through the month of February. Thank you for your support with this project. -- Shelly Kain (Vice President for Finance Office), Council of State Employees.
*******

Newman Center Seeks Assistance

There was a major fire at the Newman Center a couple of weeks ago. The Newman
Center serves the Catholic students and some faculty and staff of UND. It is
not part of the University. Many staff and students have been helpful in
assisting the students that live (or did so) at the Center in relocating, in
the movement of offices, and providing meeting and liturgical space so that we
can begin the long process of rebuilding. We are very thankful for all your
help.

While the chapel is insured, the cost of the fire and smoke damage is
estimated to be several hundred thousand dollars. As you can imagine, students
are able to provide limited financial assistance but it is the 60 or so
permanent families who are largely responsible for keeping the doors open.
Anyone who would like to assist financially at this time may do so by writing
to the Newman Center, Box 7034. -- Jan Goodwin (Nursing), Newman Center.
*******

Feb. 21 Is "Green And White Day"

President Kendall Baker has approved Friday, Feb. 21, as a "Green and White
Day." Employees may wear UND colors and jeans. The Swimming North Central
Conference Championships will take place over the weekend. -- Jan Orvik,
Editor, University Letter.
*******

Credit Union:

The University Federal Credit Union Service Center at 2800 South Washington
St. will be open Presidents Day, Feb. 17, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. The Service
Center will be open only as a paying and receiving station. There will be no
loan processing at the center.

The main office in 403 Twamley Hall will be closed Feb. 17. Loan processing
will be available on Tuesday, Feb. 18. -- George Meister, Manager, University
Federal Credit Union.
*******

CALENDAR OF EVENTS


FEBRUARY 1997

(Please contact Mavis at the Office of University Relations, Box 7144, or call
777-4304, if you wish to make changes or have an event included.)

Through Thurs., Feb. 20 -- EXHIBITION, paintings and drawings of Walter Piehl,
Professor at Minot State University and former Master of Fine Arts student,
Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center.

Through Sun., Feb. 23 -- ART EXHIBITION, Piper Jaffray Collection, a regional
collection assembled in states where Piper Jaffray does business, North Dakota
Museum of Art.

Through Sun., Feb. 23 -- 1997 ANNUAL JURIED STUDENT ART EXHIBITION BEGINS,
North Dakota Museum of Art; exhibition opens Feb. 9, with a program including
awards, music and food from 2 to 4 p.m.; contact Angie at 777-9964 for more
information.

Wed. through Sun., Feb. 12-16 -- SWIMMING AND DIVING, Phillips 66 National
Swimming Championships, Seattle, Wash.

Thurs., Feb. 13 -- COUNSELING COLLOQUIUM, "Reality Therapy: Choice in
Counseling," with Judy Comstock, 318 Montgomery Hall, noon to 1:30 p.m.;
presented by the Department of Counseling Topics in Counseling and Counseling
Psychology Research and Practice Colloquium; everyone is welcome, whether or
not you are taking the seminar for credit.

Thurs., Feb. 13 -- FOR WOMEN ONLY PROGRAM, "15 Ways to Clean the Kitchen
Floor," we will examine various approaches to situations in life that require
change, Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

Thurs., Feb. 13 -- COMPUTER SCIENCE ENRICHMENT SERIES, "Computer Science:
Neural Networks and Genetic Algorithms," the second session, "All You Ever
Wanted to Know About Genetic Algorithms and Population-Based Learning," will
be presented by Bruce Maxwell (Computer Science), 238 CAS II, 4 to 5:30 p.m.;
contact Bruce Maxwell at 777-4982 for more information.

Thurs., Feb. 13 -- "CELEBRATING INTERNATIONAL DANCE" featuring dances and
dance lessons from around the world," International Centre, 2908 University
Ave., 7 p.m.; all are welcome; call 777-4231 for more information.

Fri., Feb. 14 -- NORTH DAKOTA'S FIRST SOLAR CAR WILL BE UNVEILED in a public
ceremony, Ballroom, Memorial Union, 10:30 a.m.; Byron Stafford, project leader
from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, will address the future of
renewable energy and the viability of solar-powered consumer automobiles.

Fri., Feb. 14 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for James Warren Stenehjem, a candidate for the
Ed.D. degree with a major in Educational Administration, Room 208, Education
Building, 10 a.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Fri., Feb. 14 -- BIOLOGY CANDIDATE ECOLOGY SEMINAR, "Plant Competition and
Diversity in Relation to Productivity in Successional Grassland," presented by
Bryan Foster, 141 Starcher Hall, noon; all interested parties are encouraged
to attend.

Fri., Feb. 14 -- MEETING, Institutional Review Board, 305 Twamley Hall, 4
p.m.; to consider all research proposals submitted to the Office of Research
and Program Development before Tuesday, Feb. 4.

Fri., Feb. 14 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND at Augustana College, Sioux Falls,
S.D.

Fri., Feb. 14 -- BASKETBALL, WOMEN'S, UND at Augustana College, Sioux Falls,
S.D.

Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14-15 -- HOCKEY, UND at Northern Michigan University,
Marquette, Mich.

Sat., Feb. 15 -- UND HIGH SCHOOL SPEECH TOURNAMENT, UND campus (hosted by
School of Communication); call Mary Haslerud Opp at 777-2160 for more
information.

Sat., Feb. 15 -- SATURDAY MORNING LEGISLATIVE FORUM, Moine Gates, Governmental
Affairs chair, will moderate discussions; Grand Forks legislators will be
present to discuss legislative topics of interest to the citizens; forum is
open to the public (held every other Saturday, also March 1 and 15); City
Council Chambers, third floor, City Hall, 255 Fourth St. N., 10 a.m.

Sat., Feb. 15 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND at South Dakota State University,
Brookings, S.D., 8 p.m.

Sat., Feb. 15 -- BASKETBALL, WOMEN'S, UND at South Dakota State University,
Brookings, S.D., 6 p.m.

Sat., Feb. 15 -- WRESTLING, UND vs. North Dakota State University, Hyslop
Sports Center, 7 p.m.

Mon., Feb. 17 -- HOLIDAY, PRESIDENTS DAY.

Mon., Feb. 17 -- INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARD deadline for clinical proposals
(require Subcommittee and full Board review).

Tues., Feb. 18 -- MEDICAL SCHOOL DEAN'S HOUR PRESENTATION, panel discussion on
"The Death of Ivan Ilych" by Leo Tolstoy, Reed T. Keller Auditorium, Room
1350, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, noon; public is invited.

Tues., Feb. 18 -- THEOLOGY FOR LUNCH, "Faith and Life: Our Story" series with
members of the University community sharing their faith and telling about the
role it has in their life and work; Paul Wright (Professor Emeritus,
Psychology) will be the speaker, Christus Rex, 3012 University Ave., noon.

Tues., Feb. 18 -- SHANNON FOX PAINTING UNVEILED, painting by Native American
artist Shannon Fox will be unveiled at an open house in the Counseling
Department, Montgomery Hall, 1:30 to 3 p.m.; everyone is welcome to attend.

Tues., Feb. 18, through Sat., Feb. 22 -- THEATRE, "Remembrance" by Graham
Reid, this warm drama played against the hatred in Northern Ireland charts the
love that develops between a Protestant father and a Catholic mother who meet
in the cemetery where their sons are buried, both victims of violence,
Burtness Theatre, 7:30 p.m.; call 777-2587 for ticket information (also Feb.
25-28).

Wed., Feb. 19 -- FEAST AND FOCUS PROGRAM, "Violence in the Workplace," Women's
Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

Wed., Feb. 19 -- FACULTY PROMOTION/TENURE FORUM, Sioux Room, Memorial Union, 3
to 4:30 p.m.; all faculty members are invited to attend this forum, sponsored
by the President's Advisory Council on Women (PAC-W); panelists will be
faculty members who have recently been promoted or tenured; call Jan Zahrly at
777-4697 for more information.

Wed., Feb. 19 -- SATELLITE SEMINARS, "Television: The Creative Process"
sponsored by the Northern Interscholastic Press Association at the School of
Communication; the seminars originate from The Museum of Television and Radio
in New York and Los Angeles and are free and open to the public; the second
seminar, "Creating Prime-Time Drama: Steven Bochco," will be in the Memorial
Union Lecture Bowl from 7:30 to 9 p.m.; this seminar looks at the career of
writer/producer Steven Bochco, who revitalized familiar genres with a series
of hit shows including "Hill Street Blues," "L.A. Law," "NYPD Blues" and
"Murder One"; other seminars are Tuesday, April 8, and Tuesday, April 15.

Wed. through Sat., Feb. 19-22 -- SWIMMING AND DIVING, North Central Conference
Championships, Hyslop Sports Center.

Thurs., Feb. 20 -- COLLEGE-LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP), Room 312, O'Kelly
Hall, 8:30 a.m.

Thurs., Feb. 20 -- MARKETING TEAM PRESENTATION, student team from UND's
Marketing Department which participated in the Manitoba International
Marketing Competition (MIMC) will present their marketing strategy for Viper
Technologies, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, 3 p.m.; UND placed second for
their presentation, and third overall in their industry, in the competition
comprised of 25 to 30 teams from universities around the world.

Thurs., Feb. 20 -- COMPUTER SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM, "Trends in Education and
Educational Technology: Implementation Challenges for Software Designers,"
presented by Mark Grabe (Psychology), 106 CAS II, 4 p.m.

Thurs., Feb. 20 -- INFORMATIONAL SESSION ON THE CURRENT CONTENTS DATABASE, the
Harley E. French Library of the Health Sciences and the Chester Fritz Library
invite faculty, staff and students to this informational session in the
classroom in the Library of the Health Science from noon to 1 p.m.; the focus
will be on the sciences, including basic, life, physical, and biological
science as well as clinical medicine; also Tues., March 4; call Judy Rieke at
777-4129 or Cynthia Shabb at 777-4623 for more information.

Thurs., Feb. 20 -- NATIONAL TRIO DAY LUNCHEON, Richard Vari (Physiology), a
former Upward Bound student, will be the keynote speaker; the luncheon honors
and thanks people from UND and around the region who help the five TRIO
Programs at the University; contact Neil Reuter at 777-3427 for more
information.

Thurs., Feb. 20 -- BOOK FAIR, first floor, Merrifield Hall, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.;
the English/Composition Department is hosting the event; book representatives
will have a book display.

Thurs., Feb. 20 -- FOR WOMEN ONLY PROGRAM, "Get Real: Straight Talk About
Women's Health," Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon; first of two parts,
second will be presented April 10).

Thurs., Feb. 20 -- MEETING, Underrepresented Student Recruitment Committee,
305 Twamley Hall, 9 to 10 a.m.

Thurs., Feb. 20 -- WOMEN STUDIES SALON, the Women Studies Program will
inaugurate this reading group to discuss selected readings by feminist
writers; called "Salon" after 19th-century meetings of intellectuals in
patrons' parlors and salons, the group meets monthly at the Women's Center,
305 Hamline St. from 4 to 5 p.m.; call 777-4115 for more information.

Thurs., Feb. 20 -- "CELEBRATING NORWEGIAN CULTURE" featuring Norwegian attire,
music, literature, artifacts, historical perspectives, and food; experiences
at Moss will be facilitated by Norway's Director of the Moss program, Krista
Lauritzen, UND International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; all are
welcome; call 777-4231 for more information.

Thurs. and Fri., Feb. 20-21 -- MEETING, State Board of Higher Education,
Bismarck State College, Bismarck, N.D.

Fri., Feb. 21 -- ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING, Americans with Disabilities Act
(ADA), 305 Twamley Hall, 8:45 to 9:45 a.m.

Fri., Feb. 21 -- BIOLOGY CANDIDATE ECOLOGY SEMINAR, "Movement and the
Formation of Spatial Patterning in a Pine Beetle-Predator System," presented
by Jim Cronin, 141 Starcher Hall, noon; all interested parties are encouraged
to attend.

Fri., Feb. 21 -- GENETICS CANDIDATE SEMINAR, "Saltatorial Genetics: Variation
Above and Below the Species Level," presented by Anne Gerber, 141 Starcher
Hall, 3 p.m.; everyone is welcome.

Fri., Feb. 21 -- GREEN AND WHITE DAY, President Baker has approved wearing
jeans and UND colors (swimming, North Central Conference Championships).

Fri., Feb. 21 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND vs. University of Nebraska at Omaha,
Hyslop Sports Center, 6:30 p.m.

Fri., Feb. 21 -- BASKETBALL, WOMEN'S, UND vs. University of Nebraska at Omaha,
Hyslop Sports Center, 4:30 p.m.

Fri. and Sat., Feb. 21-22 -- HOCKEY, UND vs. University of Alaska Anchorage,
Ralph Engelstad Arena, 8:05 p.m.
*******

  




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