[University Letter logo]

University Letter

February 21, 1997

Volume 34 No.25



UNIVERSITY LETTER


UNIVERSITY LETTER IS ALSO AVAILABLE ELECTRONICALLY in the Events and News
section of UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address
is: http://www.und.nodak.edu

UNIVERSITY LETTER INDEX

Meeting Will Discuss University, Community Partnerships
     EVENTS TO NOTE
Counseling Topics Seminars Listed
Genetics Candidate Will Present Seminar
Graduate Committee Lists Agenda
History Schedules Brown Bag Lunch Session
Teaching With Writing Group Sets Meeting
Dakota Conference On Rural And Public Health Set
Curriculum Committee Sets Meeting
Cooperative Learning Is LEEPS Lecture Topic
Psychology Sets Colloquium
Faculty To Discuss Active Learning
     GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS
Faculty Research/Creative Activity Travel Applications Due
ORPD Lists Funding Opportunities
     BILLBOARD
Workshops Target People Who Are Uncomfortable With Computers
Disability Issues
Submit Flexcomp Claims Soon
Workshop Will Discuss Families
Students Needed As Camp Counselors
Preschool Mothers Sought For Study
     ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT
Theatre Arts To Host Conference
Canadian Dances Featured In Performance
Celebrated Pianist To Perform At Museum Of Art
World Music Featured At Master Chorale Folk Concert
Burtness Theatre Hosts Thesis Shows
Fine Arts Lecture Series Features Alumni
Women's Center Lists Events
International Centre Lists Events
Theatre Hosts Resident Performance Artists
Theatre To Host High School Play Festival
     FYI
Kids Invited To Skate With The Sioux
COSE Will Hold Puzzle Drive
Newman Center Seeks Assistance
Bookstore Plans Textbook Information Fair
Feb. 21 Is "Green And White Day"
     CALENDAR OF EVENTS
*******

ATTACHMENTS:
     
Dining Services menus
*******

Meeting Will Discuss University, Community Partnerships

Due to inclement weather on Jan. 16, the Grand Forks Business/Government
Alliance has rescheduled its quarterly meeting for Wednesday, Feb. 26, from
7:30 to 9:30 a.m. at the Best Western Town House, 710 First Ave. N. The
quarterly meetings are designed to discuss contemporary issues and
opportunities facing the Grand Forks region and to meet with community
leadership representatives including the four local political subdivisions,
congressional representatives, and the media.

The topic for this forum will be "University-Community Partnerships." The
University is a strategic asset of the Grand Forks region, enriching our lives
with educational, cultural, recreational and social value. The University of
North Dakota has a significant economic impact on the region as well.
Aerospace Sciences, Medicine, Energy and Environmental Research, Engineering,
and Business curriculums provide opportunities for our community to broaden
its economic development horizons. Grand Forks is equally important to the
University's success.

A panel of business and education representatives will discuss what we must do
to create the conditions for more effective University-Community Partnerships.
A discussion session will follow.

We invite you to attend this meeting and look forward to your participation. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, for Randy Newman, Chair, Business/Government Alliance,
Grand Forks Chamber of Commerce.
*******

EVENTS TO NOTE

Counseling Topics Seminars Listed

The Department of Counseling 565N Topics Seminar will present "The
Relationship of Health Status and Social Support to Quality of Life in Female
Systemic Lupus Erythematosis Patients," at noon Thursday, Feb. 20, in 318
Montgomery Hall. Seanne Tyson will present.

A second seminar, "Eating Disorders" will be given by Judy Haynes (Counseling
Center) at noon Thursday, Feb. 27, in 318 Montgomery Hall. -- Linda Winter,
Coordinator, Counseling 565N Topics Seminar Coordinator.
*******

Genetics Candidate Will Present Seminar

The Department of Biology will present a seminar from a candidate for the
geneticist faculty position Friday, Feb. 21, at 3 p.m. in 141 Starcher Hall.
Anne Gerber will present "Saltatorial Genetics: Variation Above and Below the
Species Level." Everyone is welcome. -- Colin Hughes, Assistant Professor of
Biology.
*******

Graduate Committee Lists Agenda

The Graduate Committee will meet Monday, Feb. 24, at 3:05 p.m. in 305 Twamley
Hall. The agenda will include:

1.  Consideration of a request by Computer Science to change courses and
program requirements.

2.  Consideration of a request by Industrial Technology to change courses and
program requirements.

3.  Consideration of a request by Biology for a program change.

4.  Consideration of a request by Geography for a new course, Geography 537,
Co-op.

5.  Consideration of a request by Sociology for a new course, Sociology 537,
Co-op.

6.  Consideration of a request by Geology to delete Geology 517.

7.  Consideration of a request by Civil Engineering for a new course, Civil
Engineering 535, Hazardous Waste Management.

8.   Matters arising.

-- Harvey Knull, Dean, Graduate School.
*******

History Schedules Brown Bag Lunch Session

The History Department and Phi Alpha Theta will hold a brown bag lunch session
at noon Wednesday, Feb. 26, in 217 Merrifield Hall. Vadim Koukouchkine will
present "Contemporary Trends in Post-Soviet Russian Historical Studies:
Problems and Perspectives." Bring your lunch. There will be a question and
discussion period following Professor Koukouchkine's presentation, which is
open to all. For more information please contact me. -- David Rowley,
Associate Professor of History, 7-3380.
*******

Teaching With Writing Group Sets Meeting

The Teaching with Writing Discussion Group will meet Wednesday, Feb. 26, from
noon to 1 p.m. The topic for discussion will be "Forum on the State of Writing
at UND," and a small group of students has been invited to be part of the
discussion. To sign up for the group, please call the WAC office at 7-3600 or
respond by e-mail to . -- Joan Hawthorne,
WAC/Writing Center Coordinator, 7-6381.
*******

Dakota Conference On Rural And Public Health Set

The annual Dakota Conference on Rural and Public Health, set for Wednesday
through Friday, Feb. 26-28, in Bismarck, will center on the theme, "Putting
the Pieces Together: Celebrating Our Diversity."

The aim of the conference is to bring together people with a common interest
in the quality and availability of health care services in the rural regions
of the Dakotas and Minnesota. The conference attracts health care providers
form a wide range of disciplines including nursing, hospital and long-term
care administration, nutrition, environmental health care, social work, human
services, and professions devoted to the well-being of the elderly.

This is the fourth year that the event, formerly known as the Dakota
Conference on Rural Health, has been presented in an expanded format,
including the annual meeting of the North Dakota Public Health Association.
The conference has been presented annually since 1983.

Keynote speakers for this year's conference are: Phil Lane Jr., international
coordinator of the Four Worlds International Institute for Health and
Community Development, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada; Keith Mueller, president
of the National Rural Health Association, Omaha, Neb.; Ernie Mancini,
executive director of alumni relations and the C-400 Club at Concordia
College, Moorhead, Minn., and Richard Smith, director of the MEDEX Group and
professor of family practice and community health, John A. Burns School of
Medicine, Honolulu, Hawaii. Smith is a nationally renowned speaker and award-winning medical pioneer who helped to start the physician assistant/nurse
practitioner movement 28 years ago.

Two preconference workshops will be presented the morning of Feb. 26. Keynote
speaker will conduct a session on American Indian and holistic issues. A
second workshop will provide participants with background on accessing health
care information online through the Internet.

Another feature of this event is the national legislative update session which
presents staff members from the offices of U.S. Senators Kent Conrad and Byron
Dorgan (both D-N.D.) and Congressman Earl Pomeroy (D-N.D.). On Feb. 26, they
will update the audience regarding legislative matters affecting rural and
public health care, and respond to questions.
Another health policy session will be a roundtable discussion with state
legislators. Members of the House and Senate human services committees will be
available to discuss and answer questions related to state health policy.

For a second year, the conference will offer two-hour, intensive sessions
which offer attendees greater depth of understanding and explore subjects in
more detail. Four sessions will cover the following topics: "Managing and
Resolving Conflict in the Workplace"; "New Developments in the Treatment of
Diabetes"; "You Want ME to Write a Grant?" and a public health "smorgasbord"
on teen health including "Health Care and Education: Working Together to
Improve the Lives of North Dakota's Children," "Children and Teens in Weight
Crisis," "Tobacco Sales to Minors in North Dakota Communities: Results of
Statewide Surveys" and "Inhalant Abuse."

The conference also features a "foundation resource room," a display area
where foundation representatives are invited to discuss their funding
priorities and guidelines with attendees. Staff members of the Center for
Rural Health and the School of Medicine and Health Sciences, also will be
available to answer grant-related questions.

For a second year, the conference will offer "intensive sessions." These two-hour sessions are intended to offer attendees greater depth of understanding
and to explore subjects in more detail. Four, two-hour sessions will cover the
following subjects: conflict resolution, grantwriting, diabetes and a public
health "smorgasbord" on teen health.
For the fifth year, awards will be presented in recognition of the Outstanding
Rural Health Professional, Outstanding Rural Health Provider and Outstanding
Rural Health Program.

Conference sponsors are the North Dakota Academy of Physician Assistants;
North Dakota Public Health Association; North Dakota State University, College
of Pharmacy; School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Department of Family
Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rural Health, and Center for
Rural Health; UND Resource Center on Gerontology; UND College of Nursing; and
United Hospital of Grand Forks.

Continuing education hours will be available for nurses, social workers, long-term care facility administrators and pharmacists.

For more information or to pre-register, contact me. -- Dawn Botsford, Program
Coordinator, Division of Continuing Education.
*******

Curriculum Committee Sets Meeting

The University Curriculum Committee will meet Thursday, Feb. 27, at 3 p.m. in
303 Twamley Hall to review the request from the College of Education and Human
Development to terminate the B.S.Ed. with majors in Biology, Chemistry,
English, French, Geography, German, Mathematics, Music, Physical Education,
Physics, and Spanish; termination of the B.A. with a major in Natural Science;
suspension of the B.A. with a major in Humanities; and to terminate the minor
in Greek. Anyone interested in the proposal is invited to attend. -- Carl
Barrentine (Humanities and Integrated Studies), Chair, University Curriculum
Committee.
*******

Cooperative Learning Is LEEPS Lecture Topic

A LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary sciences) Lecture and workshop on
cooperative learning will be presented by Dean McManus, School of
Oceanography, University of Washington, Seattle, on Friday, Feb. 28.
At noon in 109 Leonard Hall, he will consider "Oceanographic Studies at the
University of Washington."

>From 2 to 4 p.m. in 215 Leonard Hall, he will conduct a workshop, "Changing a
Lecture Course to Cooperative Learning: Nuts and Bolts."
Those interested in participating in the workshop are asked to notify Gloria
Pederson at 7-2248.

Dr. McManus is a National Association of Geology Teachers Distinguished
Speaker and has been giving cooperative learning workshops at schools across
the country. He was originally scheduled to be at UND last fall, but his visit
was postponed.

The LEEPS Lecture Series is supported by the Department of Geology and
Geological Engineering, the Department of Space Studies, the Energy and
Environmental Research Center, the Office of Research and Program Development,
the Office of Instructional Development, and the Advancing Science Excellence
in North Dakota (ASEND) Program. All interested persons are welcome to attend.
For additional information, contact me. -- Dexter Perkins, Professor of
Geology and Geological Engineering, 7-2991.
*******

Psychology Sets Colloquium

The Psychology Department will hold a colloquium in which Tom Petros
(Psychology), will present "Executive Functioning in Reading Disabled and
Attention Deficit Children" at noon Monday, March 3, in Room 102, Nursing
Building. Everyone is welcome to attend. If you have any questions, please
contact Joan at 7-3451. -- Joan Peterson, Psychology Department.
*******

Faculty To Discuss Active Learning

"Increasing Active Learning" is the topic for the Office of Instructional
Development box lunch "On Teaching" series scheduled for Thursday, March 6, at
noon in the Memorial Room of the Memorial Union. Patti Alleva (Law), Tom Owens
(Chemical Engineering), and Jeff Stith (Atmospheric Sciences) will report on
what works for them as they strive to increase active learning for students.
To order a complimentary box lunch, phone the Office of Instructional
Development, 7-3325, no later than noon Thursday, Feb. 27. -- Dan Rice,
Director of Instructional Development.
*******

GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

Faculty Research/Creative Activity Travel Applications Due

The third deadline for submission of applications to the Faculty Research and
Creative Activity Committee (FRCAC) is TUESDAY, APRIL 15. Travel applications
will be considered at that time ONLY FOR TRAVEL THAT WILL OCCUR BETWEEN APRIL
15, 1997, AND OCT. 15, 1997. No research or publication applications will be
considered at that time.

The Committee reminds applicants to carefully prepare their proposals and be
specific and realistic in their budget requests. Although the FRCAC encourages
submission of travel requests, the Committee takes into consideration the most
recent FRCAC award granted to each applicant. Priority will be given to
beginning faculty and first-time applicants.

Applications are available at the Office of Research and Program Development,
105 Twamley Hall, 7-4279. THESE FORMS HAVE BEEN REVISED (9/96). IF YOU HAVE
THE APPLICATIONS ON DISK, PLEASE STOP IN FOR COPIES OF THE REVISED FORMS. An
original and seven copies of the application must be submitted to ORPD prior
to the deadline. Applications that are not prepared in accordance with the
directions on the forms will not be considered by the Committee.

-- Brian Paulsen (Visual Arts), Chair, Faculty Research and Creative Activity
Committee.
*******


ORPD Lists Funding Opportunities

Following are several grant and research opportunities. For more information,
contact the Office of Research and Program Development at 7-4278.

SMALL GRANT PROGRAM -NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DENTAL RESEARCH (NIDR)
Small grants provide limited research support for activities such as pilot
projects, testing of new techniques, and feasibility studies of innovative and
high risk research, which would provide the basis for more extended research. 
The primary goal of the NIDR Small Grant Program is to provide career
development opportunities for new and minority investigators that will enable
them to compete successfully for research support as independent
investigators.

DEADLINE: April 3, Aug. 3, Dec. 3

AVERAGE AWARD: $50,000

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION contact:
     Dr. Norman S. Braveman, Acting Program Director
     National Institute of Dental Research
     Natcher Building, Room 4AN24, MSC 6402
     45 Center Drive
     Bethesda, MD 20892-6402
     e-mail: bravemanN@de45.nidr.nih.gov


NATIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE AWARD (NRSA):
PREDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP FOR MINORITY STUDENTS AND STUDENTS
NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DENTAL RESEARCH (NIDR)

The National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) sponsors an
individual National Research Service Award Predoctoral Fellowship for Minority
Students and Students with Disabilities.  This fellowship provides up to five
years of support for research training in the biomedical/behavior sciences for
highly qualified students from under-represented minority groups and students
with disabilities.

DEADLINE: May 1, Nov. 15

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION contact:
     Dr. Norman James Lipton
     Special Assistant for Training and Career Development
     National Institute of Dental Research
     Natcher Building, Room 4AN24, MSC 6402
     45 Center Drive
     Bethesda, MD 20892-6402
     E-Mail: liptonJ@@de45.nidr.nih.gov


RESOURCE CENTERS FOR MINORITY AGING RESEARCH
NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING (NIA) AND
NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF NURSING RESEARCH (NINR)

The National Institute on Aging and the National Institute of Nursing Research
invite core center grant applications from qualified institutions for the
Creation of Resource Centers for Minority Aging Research (RCMARs).  The
long-range goal for the RCMARs is to decrease the minority/non-minority
differential in health and its social sequelae for older people by focusing
research upon health promotion, disease prevention, and disability prevention.

DEADLINE: March 7 for letter of intent; April 18 for application      

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION call the NIH Grant Line (data line 301/402-2221), the
NIH GOPHER (gopher.nih.gov), or the NIH Website (http://www.nih.gov).


EDUCATIONAL WORKSHOPS IN INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH/NOA - NIH

The Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR), the National
Center for Research Resources (NCRR), the National Institute of Nursing
Research (NINR), the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), and the National
Institute of Dental Research (NIDR) invite applications for educational
project grants to develop and conduct short-term (one-two weeks) educational
workshops in interdisciplinary research aimed at social, behavioral, and
biomedical researchers in the formative stages of their careers.

DEADLINE: March 14 for letter of intent; April 25 for application

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION the NIH Grant Line (data line 301/402-2221), the NIH
GOPHER (gopher.nih.gov), or the NIH Website (http://www.nih.gov).


PHS FORM 398 AVAILABLE ON THE WWW

The PHS Form 398 is available on the NIH Home Page, http://www.nih.gov, under
Grants and Contracts, Grants Page, then click on Funding Opportunities.  It is
the last item on the page.  The Guidelines for the Fellowship Application F32
can be found under Program Guidelines on the same page.  


FUND FOR RURAL AMERICA REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (USDA)

The Fund for Rural America RFP is a $33 million program supporting "Standard
Project Grants" and "Planning Grants for Centers."  The RFP details two
primary initiatives: (1) International agricultural competitiveness,
profitability, and efficiency; environmental stewardship; and rural community
enhancement; and (2) the Secretary's initiative to ensure a safe, competitive,
nutritional and accessible food system.

PLANNING GRANT DEADLINE: March 24

STANDARD GRANT DEADLINE: April 28

DEADLINE: March 7 for letter of intent; April 18 for application      

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION call Colleen in ORPD (7-4278).


RESEARCH INFORMATION SYSTEM ON THE WWW

The Office of Research and Program Development (ORPD) now subscribes to the
Illinois Research Information System (IRIS) on the World Wide Web.  Most, if
not all, faculty/students/staff on campus who have access to a computer
connected to the Internet should be able to use the IRIS database which
includes over 7400 funding opportunities.  Sponsors included in the database
are federal agencies, foundations, corporations, professional associations,
research centers and laboratories, universities, institutes, libraries and
museums.  The UND agreement with IRIS permits faculty, staff, and students to
search by any or all of the IRIS fields which include:  sponsor/agency,
program title, contact/address, state, keywords or phrases in the program
abstract, subjects/keywords, deadline dates, activities supported,
citizenship, academic qualifications, restrictions (women, minorities, etc.),
and/or sponsor/agency type.

The address for IRIS is: http://www.grainger.uiuc.edu/IRIS/.  Instructions are
available on the IRIS Homepage or in ORPD.

If you have problems using IRIS, please call ORPD for assistance.  If access
is denied, jot down the number and host name IRIS says it is not recognizing
and provide that information to ORPD so they can report the problem to IRIS
personnel.


LIST OF WORLD WIDE WEB SITES

ORPD now has a list of World Wide Web addresses you may find useful.  To
obtain a copy, call Colleen at 7-4278.  The list includes many federal
agencies as well as corporations, foundations, organizations and other
servers.


FEDIX OPPORTUNITY ALERT!!!

The Federal Information Exchange (FIE) offers a free e-mail service targeting
research and education funding opportunities within your area of interest. 
There are no registration or access fees; no user costs. To subscribe to the
service simply:

1. Register on FEDIX at http://www.fie.com/

2. Select the keywords that identify your area(s) of interest.

You will automatically begin receiving e-mail announcements on new federal
funding opportunities within your interest area.

This service is sponsored by the following federal agencies:  Department of
Energy, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Office of Naval
Research, Department of Transportation, National Institutes of Health,
Department of Air Force, Agency for International Development, Department of
Veterans Affairs, Environmental Protection Agency, Interagency Learning
Technology Office, Department of Agriculture, Defense Information Systems
Agency, Office of the Chief Information Officer Educational Institutions
Partnership Program.


SPECIAL RECRUITMENT FOR WORLDWIDE FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM

The Worldwide Women in Development Fellowship Program is requesting applica-
tions from mid-career professionals who are U.S. citizens and have
institutional support for their application to our program.  We are especially
interested in applicants who have qualifications appropriate for the following
possible field assignments.  PLEASE remember that there will also be
additional opportunities for placements, and that all negotiations with USAID
and USAID-funded programs on placements are made by the Worldwide Program
Staff.  What follows is a list of requests and possibilities to date.  PLEASE
NOTE THAT OUR NEXT APPLICATION DEADLINE IS MARCH 1.

BRAZIL: The are two possibilities in Brazil.   The first would require a
person with experience in the Amazon region in forestry, agroforestry, natural
resource management, and community participation.  The second would require a
person with expertise in a field associated with USAID's energy program in
Brazil. Portuguese required for both.

CAMBODIA: The are two possibilities in Cambodia.  A person with experience in
rural development and agriculture, with experience in Asia or rice production
a plus.  The second possibility in natural resource management with emphasis
on water resources.  French speaker preferred.

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC: Possible placement in community development and/or natural
resource management.  Spanish required.

EGYPT: Person with experience in formal and/or nonformal education to work on
girls' education objective.  Arabic speaker preferred.

EL SALVADOR: Person with skills and experience in the areas of legal rights,
human rights and women's political participation.  Spanish required.

HONDURAS: Person with skills and experience in natural resource management and
community development to work in promoting poor urban families' access to
waste treatment systems and environmental and health education.  Spanish
required.

INDIA: Placement request for a person with skills and experience related to at
least one of these areas: improving women's access to credit; girls education;
and violence against women.  Knowledge of India society and culture a plus.

MALI: A person with a social science degree and experience in health education
and/or knowledge of AIDS.  French desirable.

ROMANIA: Person with skills in communications, health, or related social
science field.  To develop a communications campaign around the issues of
women's reproductive rights.  Working knowledge of French desirable.  Fluency
in Romanian highly desirable.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
     Dr. Virginia Seitz, Worldwide
     Office of International Studies and Programs
     P.O. Box 113225
     University of Florida
     Gainesville, FL 32611
     Tel:  (352) 392-7074,  Fax:  (352) 392-8379
     E-mail:  wrldwid@nervm.nerdc.ufl.edu
     Or http://www.datexinc.com/worldwide

-- Carl Fox, Director of Research and Program Development.
*******

BILLBOARD

Workshops Target People Who Are Uncomfortable With Computers

The University Learning Center will present "Make Friends with the Computer,"
a four-session seminar designed for anyone who has minimal experience with or
a fear of using a computer. We will show them how to use the computer as a
word processor, teaching only the basics.
Each session will meet from 3 to 4:30 in 361 Upson II Hall. The dates are: 

     Session 1, Monday, Feb. 24; 
     Session 2, Wednesday, Feb. 26; 
     Session 3, Monday, March 3;   
     Session 4, Wednesday, March 5.

Encourage anyone interested in participating in this program to sign up early
as space is limited. To register, visit the University Learning Center, Room
201A, Memorial Union, or call 7-4406. This seminar is open to students,
faculty and staff. -- Jeanne Matson, University Learning Center, 7-4406.
*******

Disability Issues

If you use videos in your academic courses or UND programs you need to know
about closed captioning.

What is closed captioning?

Words are displayed on the video screen. It is an accommodation for a student
who cannot hear the information presented on the video. Although primarily
used to provide access for the deaf/hard of hearing person, research has shown
that using closed caption technology also benefits those who use English as a
second language, and all students when tape quality or acoustics are poor.

What do I need to provide closed captioning?

You need to have a video that is closed captioned. Since it is embedded, you
also need a decoder to allow you to display it. Look for the letters CC or a
"conversation bubble" image on the tape or tape case.

A quick check using a TV manufactured after 1993 will confirm whether the
video has closed captioning. Decoders are built in to all TVs manufactured
after 1993. If you will be using a TV made before 1993, you can check out a
stand-alone decoder from the Center for Instructional and Learning
Technologies (CILT).

What if the video does not have closed captioning?

UND does not have equipment for embedding closed captioning. There are
resources for this but the cost may be prohibitive. Check with your video
source to see if they have produced a CC version of the video. A catalog is
available at CILT or Disabled Student Services (DSS), titled "Captioned Films
for the Deaf."

When ordering videos, always ask if the videos are captioned. Video houses
need to hear that request coming from consumers.

The bottom line is that an accommodation must be provided. It may be an
alternative to closed captioning, but it must be an effective alternative. 
Each student has different requirements that affect the form of the
accommodations. We encourage you to talk with the student about an effective
accommodation and to consult with DSS. We are always happy to discuss
questions and work with you to find solutions that mutually benefit the
students and the University.

For more information call DSS at 7-3425 or visit our web site. -- Deb Glennen,
Interim Director, Disability Support Services.
*******

Submit Flexcomp Claims Soon

This reminder is for all employees who enrolled in the UND Flexcomp plan for
the short-year 1996 and still have funds remaining. All receipts for medical
and/or dependent care expenses incurred from July 1, 1996 to Dec. 31, 1996,
must be submitted to the Payroll Office by Friday, March 14. Any remaining
balances after that date will be forfeited. Reminders have been sent to
employees with balances over $10. If you have any questions or concerns,
please call Jean Daniel at 7-4423. -- Pat Hanson, Director of Payroll.
*******

Workshop Will Discuss Families

The Parent Education Resource Center (PERC) will hold a seminar and fair,
focusing on "Building Healthy and Resilient Families." Gary DuDell will
present the seminar Saturday, March 1, at Central High School, from 8:30 a.m.
to 2:30 p.m. The schedule is: registration, 8:30 to 9 a.m.; session, 9 to
11:30 a.m.; lunch (on your own), 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.; session, 12:30 to
2:30 p.m. It is sponsored by PERC, Family Educator Enhancement Team North
Dakota Transition Project in association with the UND Continuing Education
Parenting Series.

Gary DuDell is with the Mendez Foundation, Tampa, Fla. For over 20 years, he
has provided professional, individual, group, marital, and family counseling
while also designing and conducting a wide range of workshops for mental
health providers and educators. In his private practice and in his group
workshops, Dr. DuDell specializes in stress reduction, sexual trauma,
addiction and recovery, relationship enhancement and "fine-tuning" individual
lives for maximum balance and effectiveness. He is an Adjunct Professor at the
University of South Florida's Department of Rehabilitation Counseling.

There is no fee for the workshop; please register early by Wednesday, Feb. 26,
by calling 795-2765. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, for the Parent Education Resource
Center.
*******

Students Needed As Camp Counselors

Faculty are asked to inform students in the fields of Occupational Therapy,
Physical Therapy, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Education, Special
Education, Recreation Therapy and Health, Physical Education and Recreation
that camp counselor cooperative education positions are available at Camp
Buckskin in Ely, Minn. Camp Buckskin is a camp for young men and women ages 6
to 18 who are gifted/talented or who have special academic and social skill
needs (ADD and ADHD). Camp session begins in June and ends in August, lasting
four weeks.

For more information, students should contact the Cooperative Education Office
in 120 Hyslop Sports Center and/or stop by the main area of the Memorial Union
on Tuesday, Feb. 25, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and talk to the Camp Director. --
Terry Erickson, Cooperative Education.
*******

Free Defensive Driving Course Offered

A free Defensive Driving Course for UND employees and a family member will be
held in Room 16-18 of Swanson Hall Monday, Feb. 24. It will last four hours,
running from 10 a.m. to noon, and 1 to 3 p.m. with an hour lunch break. It is
open to all UND employees who are authorized to drive state fleet vehicles.
This course may reduce your North Dakota insurance premiums and could possibly
take away points from your driving record. Please call the Safety Office at 7-3341 to register. -- Norma Haley, Safety Office.
*******

Preschool Mothers Sought For Study

Mothers of preschool-aged children (aged 3-5) are needed for a study of
parents' thoughts and feelings about parenting. The study also focuses on
interactions between mothers and their preschoolers. Mothers who experiencing
feelings of depression and also mothers who are not experiencing feelings of
depression are invited to participate. Participants will be paid $15. If you
are interested in participating or have questions, please call me at 7-3017. -- Andrea Zevenbergen, Assistant Professor of Psychology.
*******

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

Theatre Arts To Host Conference

The Theatre Arts Department will host the annual Upper Midwest 
High School Theatre Conference. The conference is designed to give high school
students an opportunity to learn more about various aspects of theatre from
area professionals and educators.

On Friday and Saturday, Feb. 21 and 22, high school students from North Dakota
and Minnesota will participate in theatre workshops to enhance their skills as
theatre artisans. Local as well as statewide professionals in theatre will
conduct workshops on mask making, stage makeup and scenic painting, and more.
The conference will begin with registration on Friday at 6 p.m. The students
and their faculty will be entertained by UND's Suitcase Shakespeare Company
and their rendition of Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night." On Saturday, starting at
8:30 a.m., registration will continue, with workshops running from 9:30 a.m.
to 4 p.m. with breaks for Theatre Olympic events at 11 a.m. and lunch. 

Any questions concerning the conference can be directed to John Weninger,
conference director, at 7-3026. -- Joel Svendsen, Burtness Theatre Publicity
Manager.
*******

Canadian Dances Featured In Performance

North Country Traditional Music and Dance will present "Community Dance," with
special guest Ian Kirk, of L'Ensemble folklorique de la Riviere-Rouge, at 7:30
p.m. Saturday, Feb. 22, in the Josephine Campbell Recital Hall, Hughes Fine
Arts Center. Admission is $3 general, $1 for children. Kirk will teach French
Canadian dances and demonstrate French Canadian jig dancing, with music by the
North Country string band. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, for Jean O'Neil, North
Country Traditional Music and Dance, 773-3850.
*******

Celebrated Pianist To Perform At Museum Of Art

Acclaimed pianist Adam Neiman, winner of the 1996 Young Concert Artists
International Auditions, will perform in the galleries of the North Dakota
Museum of Art Sunday, Feb. 23, at 2 p.m.

Neiman has won awards for his performances across the United States and Europe
since playing his first piano concerto with an orchestra at the age of nine in
Royce Hall in Los Angeles. Since then he has given recitals at Ambassador
Auditorium in Pasadena, the Philip Lorenz Memorial Keyboard Concerts in
Fresno, San Francisco's Bay Area Pianists Series, the Sarasota Opera House,
and the Dame Myra Hess Memorial Concert Series in Chicago. His performances
abroad include a recital at the 1994 International Chopin Festival in Nohant,
France, which was broadcast on Polish National Radio and Television. Neiman's
1996-97 schedule includes performances at the New Hampshire Music Festival and
Florida's Museum of Fine Arts. He recently made his New York recital debut by
opening the 36th Young Concert Artists Series.

Neiman's performance is a part of the Museum's Concert Series, which each year
brings visiting musicians to Grand Forks. The performances are underwritten by
a major grant from the Myra Foundation, with special funding provided by the
city of Grand Forks. The Guild Trio will conclude the 1996-97 season March 23.

Admission for Neiman's performance is $12 general, $5 for students. Children
12 and under are admitted free. For more information contact the Museum of Art
at 7-4195. Currently on exhibition at the Museum of Art is the Piper Jaffray
Collection: Regional Expressions. -- Marsy Schroeder, North Dakota Museum of
Art.
*******

World Music Featured At Master Chorale Folk Concert

The Grand Forks Master Chorale, directed by James Rodde (Music), will present
a festival of folk songs, "Folk on the Red," on Sunday, Feb. 23, at 4 p.m. at
United Lutheran Church, 324 Chestnut St. The concert will be followed by a
reception featuring folk arts displays and food prepared by area cultural
heritage groups. The Grand Forks Sixth Grade Honor Chorus and the choirs of
Central and Red River High Schools will also participate in the program.

Guest artist at this year's concert is Nick Page, founder of Massachusetts'
Mystic Chorale. Page is a conductor, teacher, composer and multicultural music
specialist who refers to himself simply as "song leader." He is widely known
for his ability to involve the audience in a concert, based on his belief in
"the West African notion that there should be no separation between the
performers and the audience."

Eastern Europe, Scandinavia, and Africa provide the origins for many songs on
the program. There will be American songs and a performance of "A Prayer for
Africa (N'kosi Sikelel'i Afrika)," the Pan-African hymn made familiar by the
Graceland concert of Paul Simon and Ladysmith Black Mambazo. Several of Nick
Page's songs and arrangements are included in the program.
The Master Chorale's presentation of "Folk on the Red" is supported by the
North Valley Arts Council, Target Stores, American Federal Bank, and the East
Grand Forks Arts and Crafts Council, with promotional assistance from The
Grand Forks Herald and the Greater Grand Forks Convention and Visitors Bureau.
Tickets are $8 for general admission, $7 for seniors and $5 for students, and
will be available at the door. For more information, call 7-3376. -- Jan
Orvik, Editor, for Ruth Marshall, Master Chorale.
*******

Burtness Theatre Hosts Thesis Shows

The Burtness Theatre will host two graduate thesis shows, presented by the
Department of Theatre Arts in the College of Fine Arts and Communication.
"Ficky Stingers," by Eve Lewis, is the graduate work of Marcie Gallagher. It
is a rehearsal-oriented piece that deals with the various dynamics of the
victims and the power relations encompassing the issue of rape. Because of its
rehearsal nature, the production is free of charge and adult language is used. 

The production runs Sunday and Monday, Feb. 23 and 24, in the Chandler
Movement Studio located on the second floor of Chandler Hall. Curtain rises at
7:30 p.m. Discussions of the acting theory used in the process will follow
both performances.

"How to be Popular in Six Easy Steps and Other Lies They Told Us" is an
experimental theatre piece that looks at media images of women in the late 50s
and early 60s. The show runs Tuesday through Thursday, March 25-27 in the
Burtness Studio Theatre located in the basement of Burtness Theatre. Tickets
are $2 and can be purchased at the door. Curtain rises at 7:30 p.m. The
production is a collaborative effort between director Andrea Harris-Weir, and
the actors and designers, all of whom are women. 
Inspiration for the text is derived from women's magazines, movies and music
from the era. Fragmented and nonlinear, the piece hopes to link images of
womanhood that many look back on with amusement, fondness and sometimes
longing, to images that are still present in popular culture today. "How to be
Popular in Six Easy Steps and Other Lies They Told Us" hopes to make both
women and men begin to ponder these ideas of womanhood put forth by mass
culture.

-- Joel Svendsen, Publicity, Burtness Theatre.
*******

Fine Arts Lecture Series Features Alumni

The 1996-97 College of Fine Arts and Communication Lecture Series will offer
"A Celebration of Alumni Achievement."  All presentations will be given in the
Hughes Fine Arts Center, Room 227 (Barr Lecture Room).

Walter Piehl, who has received two master's degrees from UND, will contemplate
"Sweethearts and Roping Fools, or Why It's Difficult to Get There From Here." 
A former rodeo rider and announcer, the rodeo has been a principal source of
inspiration for his artwork for more than 20 years.  An opening reception for
an exhibition of his work is set for 7 to 9 p.m. Monday, Feb. 24, 1997, in the
Hughes Fine Arts Center Gallery; his lecture is set for 2 p.m. Tuesday, Feb.
25.  Apart from an overview of his work, Piehl will also use his lecture to
review the challenges facing artists who live in relatively remote, rural
areas.  Piehl has been a member of the Minot State University faculty since
1970.

The lecture is free, and all are invited. -- Dan Plato (Theatre Arts), Lecture
Series Coordinator, College of Fine Arts and Communication.
*******

Women's Center Lists Events

The Wednesday, Feb. 26, Feast and Focus program at noon in the Women's Center,
305 Hamline St., is "Stella Fritzell: A Daughter's Perspective on Being Raised
by a North Dakota Feminist." Sara Fritzell Hanhan (Education and Human
Development) will share some personal reflections on values that were passed
on to her by her mother. Stella Fritzell was noted publicly for her
environmental and feminist stances in the North Dakota State Senate, but she
was also a nutritionist, stockbroker, homemaker, artist, hunter, jazz
enthusiast, gourmet cook, and for much of her life, a single mother. 

The Thursday, Feb. 27, For Women Only program will be "Tune Into Your Body
Signals." Biofeedback is the process of tuning into your body and learning how
to interpret the signals it sends. It is based on the premise that when a
person is under stress, the body restricts blood flow to the extremities, such
as the hands and the feet, so they are colder than the rest of the body. But
if you warm your hands, blood flow increases, stress hormones diminish,
muscles relax, and you'll feel less tense. For this program, we will use
"biodots" to measure the effectiveness of a relaxation technique. They're a
great way to get people interested and involved in self-care.

-- Donna Oltmanns, Coordinator, Women's Center.
*******

International Centre Lists Events

The Thursday, Feb. 27, program at 7 p.m. in the International Centre, 2908
University Ave., is "A Panel Discussion on World Religions," facilitated by
Rebecca Moore (Philosophy and Religion). Individuals will discuss their faith
perspectives. The discussion will be followed by an interactive forum on world
religions. Please join us. -- Sharon Rezac Andersen, Director, International
Centre, 7-4231.
*******

Theatre Hosts Resident Performance Artists

The College of Fine Arts and Communication and the Department of Theatre Arts
announce the residency of performance artists/scholars Donna Marie Nudd (1981
M.A. in Theatre Arts, UND) and Terry Galloway.

On Monday, March 3, at 4:15 p.m., Galloway will perform her internationally-recognized performance pieces, "Out All Night" and "Lost My Shoes" at the
Burtness Studio Theatre. Galloway has written and performed her solo
performance pieces for stage and film in major U.S. theatre centers and
internationally.

On Tuesday, March 4, at 4 p.m., Dr. Nudd will present her lecture, "Feminist
Spectators as Invisible Dramaturges" in 227 Hughes Fine Arts Center, Barr
Lecture Room. Nudd's lecture is the final in a series of College of Fine Arts
and Communication's distinguished alumni lectures, commemorating the College's
25th anniversary. Dr. Nudd's lecture will examine the role of the audience in
the creation of Dinah LaFarge, a post modern heroine, tracing the process of
creation and noting the ways in which feminist theorizing helped/hindered the
creation of the character.
Nudd is an Associate Professor of Communication at Florida State University.
She teaches courses and publishes in the areas of Performance Studies,
Pedagogy, Women's Studies, and Rhetoric. Her publications have appeared in
"Text and Performance Quarterly," "Literature in Performance," "Communication
Education," and "North Dakota Quarterly." She has also received numerous
awards for teaching. She collaborates with Terry Galloway in their performance
art pieces and cabaret theatre.

Ten years ago, Nudd and Galloway co-founded the Mickee Faust Cabaret in
Tallahassee. Nudd directed and dramaturged Galloway's "Out All Night," "Lost
My Shoes," and "Lardo Weeping." These shows have toured nationally to
virtually every major alternative theatre venue in the United States, as well
as in Canada, Edinburgh, London, and Mexico.

Please encourage your colleagues, students, and any other interested parties
to attend these performances and scholarly events; all events are free of
charge. For further information, call Mary Cutler (Theatre Arts) at 7-2899. --
Joel Svendsen, Burtness Theatre Publicity Manager.
*******

Theatre To Host High School Play Festival

The Department of Theatre Arts will host the 1997 Drama Day and One-Act Play
Festival Wednesday, March 5, in Burtness Theatre. Outstanding high schools
have been selected to take part in the day's activities. Red River High School
will perform from North Dakota. Minnesota schools are East Grand Forks,
Hawley, Lancaster, Tri-County, Kittson Central, Stephen/Argyle, Oklee, and
Norman County West.

The first play will begin at approximately 9 a.m. Each group is limited to 40
minutes, which includes set-up, strike performance and critique.
Guest critic for this event is Donna Nudd, Associate Professor of
Communication at Florida State University. She teaches courses and publishes
in the areas of Performance Studies, Pedagogy, Women's Studies and Rhetoric.
She co-founded the Mickee Faust Cabaret in Tallahassee, Fla., and has directed
solo performances by Terry Galloway which have been produced in virtually
every major alternative theater venue in the United States, as well as Canada,
Edinburgh, London and Mexico City. Dr. Nudd will lead a workshop for Drama Day
participants, and UND Theatre Arts acting faculty will hold acting workshops
during the day as well. 

The public is invited to attend the festival. This is an opportunity to see
the area's finest young thespians. For more information, contact Mary Cutler
at 7-2899. -- Joel Svendsen, Burtness Publicity Manager, Burtness Theatre.
*******

FYI

Kids Invited To Skate With The Sioux

Faculty and staff are invited to bring children, kindergarten through sixth
grade, to the 10th annual "Skate with the Sioux" event. Here's your
opportunity to meet and skate with the Fighting Sioux hockey team, Head Coach
Dean Blais, and the UND Dance Team Sunday, Feb. 23, from 4 to 5:30 p.m. at the
Ralph Engelstad Arena. Bring your own skates; no sticks or pucks will be
allowed on the ice. "Skate with the Sioux" is free to the public and is
sponsored by telesis, UND's Student Alumni Association. -- Kirsten Carolin,
Special Events Coordinator, UND Alumni Association.
*******

COSE Will Hold Puzzle Drive

The UND representatives of the Council of State Employees are sponsoring a
puzzle drive for area retirement and life care homes and the Grand Forks
Senior Citizens Center.  Bring in slightly used (no pieces missing, please) or
new jigsaw puzzles to the drop boxes in the Memorial Union office area, the
Plant Services office area or to Mailing Services in Twamley Hall.  The
puzzles will be distributed to the Senior Center, Good Samaritan Center in
East Grand Forks, Almonte Living Center, Tufte Manor, and Parkwood Place. This
is our opportunity to brighten someone's long winter days. The drive will run
through the month of February. Thank you for your support with this project. -- Shelly Kain (Vice President for Finance Office), Council of State Employees.
*******

Newman Center Seeks Assistance

There was a major fire at the Newman Center a couple of weeks ago. The Newman
Center serves the Catholic students and some faculty and staff of UND. It is
not part of the University. Many staff and students have been helpful in
assisting the students that live (or did so) at the Center in relocating, in
the movement of offices, and providing meeting and liturgical space so that we
can begin the long process of rebuilding. We are very thankful for all your
help.

While the chapel is insured, the cost of the fire and smoke damage is
estimated to be several hundred thousand dollars. As you can imagine, students
are able to provide limited financial assistance but it is the 60 or so
permanent families who are largely responsible for keeping the doors open.
Anyone who would like to assist financially at this time may do so by writing
to the Newman Center, Box 7034. -- Jan Goodwin (Nursing), Newman Center.
*******

Bookstore Plans Textbook Information Fair

The Bookstore invites faculty and academic department staff to its first
Textbook Information Fair, Wednesday, March 3. Meet with publisher
representatives to order desk copies, and observe multimedia demonstrations.
The fair will be from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the textbook department. Come join
us for refreshments and prizes. -- Don Forbes, Manager, University Bookstore.
*******

Feb. 21 Is "Green And White Day"

President Kendall Baker has approved Friday, Feb. 21, as a "Green and White
Day." Employees may wear UND colors and jeans. The Swimming North Central
Conference Championships will take place over the weekend. -- Jan Orvik,
Editor, University Letter.
*******

CALENDAR OF EVENTS


FEBRUARY 1997

(Please contact Mavis at the Office of University Relations, Box 7144, or call
777-4304, if you wish to make changes or have an event included.)

Through Thurs., Feb. 20 -- EXHIBITION, paintings and drawings of Walter Piehl,
Professor at Minot State University and former Master of Fine Arts student,
Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center.

Through Sat., Feb. 22 -- THEATRE, "Remembrance" by Graham Reid, this warm
drama played against the hatred in Northern Ireland charts the love that
develops between a Protestant father and a Catholic mother who meet in the
cemetery where their sons are buried, both victims of violence, Burtness
Theatre, 7:30 p.m.; call 777-2587 for ticket information (also Feb. 25-28).

Through Sun., Feb. 23 -- ART EXHIBITION, Piper Jaffray Collection, a regional
collection assembled in states where Piper Jaffray does business, North Dakota
Museum of Art.

Through Sun., Feb. 23 -- 1997 ANNUAL JURIED STUDENT ART EXHIBITION BEGINS,
North Dakota Museum of Art; exhibition opens Feb. 9, with a program including
awards, music and food from 2 to 4 p.m.; contact Angie at 777-9964 for more
information.

Wed., Feb. 19 -- FACULTY PROMOTION/TENURE FORUM, Sioux Room, Memorial Union, 3
to 4:30 p.m.; all faculty members are invited to attend this forum, sponsored
by the President's Advisory Council on Women (PAC-W); panelists will be
faculty members who have recently been promoted or tenured; call Jan Zahrly at
777-4697 for more information.

Wed., Feb. 19 -- SATELLITE SEMINARS, "Television: The Creative Process"
sponsored by the Northern Interscholastic Press Association at the School of
Communication; the seminars originate from The Museum of Television and Radio
in New York and Los Angeles and are free and open to the public; the second
seminar, "Creating Prime-Time Drama: Steven Bochco," will be in the Memorial
Union Lecture Bowl from 7:30 to 9 p.m.; this seminar looks at the career of
writer/producer Steven Bochco, who revitalized familiar genres with a series
of hit shows including "Hill Street Blues," "L.A. Law," "NYPD Blues" and
"Murder One"; other seminars are Tuesday, April 8, and Tuesday, April 15.

Wed. through Sat., Feb. 19-22 -- SWIMMING AND DIVING, North Central Conference
Championships, Hyslop Sports Center.

Thurs., Feb. 20 -- COLLEGE-LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP), Room 312, O'Kelly
Hall, 8:30 a.m.

Thurs., Feb. 20 -- MARKETING TEAM PRESENTATION, student team from UND's
Marketing Department which participated in the Manitoba International
Marketing Competition (MIMC) will present their marketing strategy for Viper
Technologies, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, 3 p.m.; UND placed second for
their presentation, and third overall in their industry, in the competition
comprised of 25 to 30 teams from universities around the world.

Thurs., Feb. 20 -- COUNSELING TOPIC SEMINAR, "The Relationship of Health
Status and Social Support to Quality of Life in Female Systemic Lupus
Erythematosis Patients" presented by Seanne Tyson, 318 Montgomery Hall, noon.

Thurs., Feb. 20 -- COMPUTER SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM, "Trends in Education and
Educational Technology: Implementation Challenges for Software Designers,"
presented by Mark Grabe (Psychology), 106 CAS II, 4 p.m.

Thurs., Feb. 20 -- INFORMATIONAL SESSION ON THE CURRENT CONTENTS DATABASE, the
Harley E. French Library of the Health Sciences and the Chester Fritz Library
invite faculty, staff and students to this informational session in the
classroom in the Library of the Health Science from noon to 1 p.m.; the focus
will be on the sciences, including basic, life, physical, and biological
science as well as clinical medicine; also Tues., March 4; call Judy Rieke at
777-4129 or Cynthia Shabb at 777-4623 for more information.

Thurs., Feb. 20 -- NATIONAL TRIO DAY LUNCHEON, Richard Vari (Physiology), a
former Upward Bound student, will be the keynote speaker; the luncheon honors
and thanks people from UND and around the region who help the five TRIO
Programs at the University; contact Neil Reuter at 777-3427 for more
information.

Thurs., Feb. 20 -- BOOK FAIR, first floor, Merrifield Hall, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.;
the English/Composition Department is hosting the event; book representatives
will have a book display.

Thurs., Feb. 20 -- FOR WOMEN ONLY PROGRAM, "Get Real: Straight Talk About
Women's Health," Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon; first of two parts,
second will be presented April 10).

Thurs., Feb. 20 -- MEETING, Underrepresented Student Recruitment Committee,
305 Twamley Hall, 9 to 10 a.m.

Thurs., Feb. 20 -- WOMEN STUDIES SALON, the Women Studies Program will
inaugurate this reading group to discuss selected readings by feminist
writers; called "Salon" after 19th-century meetings of intellectuals in
patrons' parlors and salons, the group meets monthly at the Women's Center,
305 Hamline St. from 4 to 5 p.m.; call 777-4115 for more information.

Thurs., Feb. 20 -- "CELEBRATING NORWEGIAN CULTURE" featuring Norwegian attire,
music, literature, artifacts, historical perspectives, and food; experiences
at Moss will be facilitated by Norway's Director of the Moss program, Krista
Lauritzen, UND International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; all are
welcome; call 777-4231 for more information.

Thurs. and Fri., Feb. 20-21 -- MEETING, State Board of Higher Education,
Bismarck State College, Bismarck, N.D.

Fri., Feb. 21 -- ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING, Americans with Disabilities Act
(ADA), 305 Twamley Hall, 8:45 to 9:45 a.m.

Fri., Feb. 21 -- BIOLOGY CANDIDATE ECOLOGY SEMINAR, "Movement and the
Formation of Spatial Patterning in a Pine Beetle-Predator System," presented
by Jim Cronin, 141 Starcher Hall, noon; all interested parties are encouraged
to attend.

Fri., Feb. 21 -- GENETICS CANDIDATE SEMINAR, "Saltatorial Genetics: Variation
Above and Below the Species Level," presented by Anne Gerber, 141 Starcher
Hall, 3 p.m.; everyone is welcome.

Fri., Feb. 21 -- GREEN AND WHITE DAY, President Baker has approved wearing
jeans and UND colors (swimming, North Central Conference Championships).

Fri., Feb. 21 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND vs. University of Nebraska at Omaha,
Hyslop Sports Center, 6:30 p.m.

Fri., Feb. 21 -- BASKETBALL, WOMEN'S, UND vs. University of Nebraska at Omaha,
Hyslop Sports Center, 4:30 p.m.

Fri. and Sat., Feb. 21-22 -- ANNUAL UPPER MIDWEST HIGH SCHOOL THEATRE
CONFERENCE, designed to give high school students an opportunity to learn more
about various aspects of theatre from area professionals and educators; high
school students from North Dakota and Minnesota will participate in theatre
workshops; call John Weninger, conference director, at 777-3026 for more
information.

Fri. and Sat., Feb. 21-22 -- HOCKEY, UND vs. University of Alaska Anchorage,
Ralph Engelstad Arena, 8:05 p.m.

Sat., Feb. 22 -- SPECIAL EVENT, "Vienna Choir Boys," this choir combines the
naivete of childhood with artistic maturity; they have gained the title of the
world's most beloved choir, Chester Fritz Auditorium, 7:30 p.m. 

Sat., Feb. 22 -- "COMMUNITY DANCE," with special guest Ian Kirk, of L'Ensemble
folklorique de la Riviere-Rouge, Josephine Campbell Recital Hall, Hughes Fine
Arts Center, 7:30 p.m.; admission is $3 or $1 for children; presented by the
North Country Traditional Music and Dance; call Jean O'Neil at 773-3850 for
more information.

Sat., Feb. 22 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND vs. University of Northern Colorado,
Hyslop Sports Center, 6:30 p.m.

Sat., Feb. 22 -- BASKETBALL, WOMEN'S, UND vs. University of Northern Colorado,
Hyslop Sports Center, 4:30 p.m.

Sun., Feb. 23 -- MUSEUM CONCERT SERIES, Adam Neiman, piano, North Dakota
Museum of Art, UND campus, 2 p.m.; Neiman, winner of the 1996 Young Concert
Artists International Auditions, has won awards for his performances across
the United States and Europe since playing his first piano concerto with an
orchestra at the age of nine in Royce Hall in Los Angeles; call 777-4195 for
ticket or performer information.

Sun., Feb. 23 -- MASTER CHORALE FOLK CONCERT, "Folk on the Red," United
Lutheran Church, 324 Chestnut St., 4 p.m.; concert will be followed by a
reception featuring folk arts displays and food prepared by area cultural
heritage groups; Grand Forks Sixth Grade Honor Chorus and the choirs of
Central and Red River High Schools will also participate in the program; guest
artist is Nick Page, founder of Massachusetts' Mystic Chorale; tickets are $8
for general admission, $7 for seniors and $5 for students, and will be
available at the door; call 777-3376 for more information.

Sun., Feb. 23 -- 10TH ANNUAL "SKATE WITH THE SIOUX," faculty and staff are
invited to bring their children, kindergarten through sixth grade, to skate
with the Fighting Sioux hockey team, Head Coach Dean Blais, and the UND Dance
Team, Ralph Engelstad Arena, 4 to 5:30 p.m.; bring your own skates; free to
the public.

Sun. and Mon., Feb. 23-24 -- GRADUATE THESIS SHOW, "Ficky Stingers," by Eve
Lewis, is the graduate work of Marcie Gallagher; it is a rehearsal oriented
piece that deals with the various dynamics of the victims and the power
relations encompassing the issue of rape; Movement Studio, second floor,
Chandler Hall, 7:30 p.m.; production is free of charge and adult language is
used.

Mon., Feb. 24 -- MEETING, Graduate Committee, 305 Twamley Hall, 3:05 p.m.

Mon., Feb. 24 -- INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARD deadline for proposals requiring
full Board review.

Mon., Feb. 24 -- BIOLOGY SEMINAR, "Extracellular Matrix Changes During Scleral
Growth and Aging," presented by Jody Rada (Anatomy and Cell Biology), 141
Starcher Hall, noon; the program addresses the fundamental causes of
nearsightedness.

Mon., Feb. 24 -- FINE ARTS LECTURE SERIES, the 1996-97 College of Fine Arts
and Communication Lecture Series will offer "A Celebration of Alumni
Achievement." Walter Piehl, who has received two master's degrees from UND,
will contemplate "Sweethearts and Roping Fools." A former rodeo rider and
announcer, the rodeo has been a principal source of inspiration for his
artwork for more than 20 years; he has been a member of the Minot State
University faculty since 1970; the opening reception for an exhibition of his
work is set for 7 to 9 p.m. in the Hughes Fine Arts Center Gallery.

Mon., Feb. 24 -- LEADERSHIP SERIES, "Getting It All Done," presented by Tanya
Christman Kuntz, Merrill Lynch, Leadership Inspiration Center, third floor,
Memorial Union, 3 p.m.; non-credit sessions are designed to help students
explore leadership from a variety of perspectives and develop an understanding
of themselves; sessions are free and open to the public.

Mon., Feb. 24 -- FREE DEFENSIVE DRIVING COURSE for UND employees and a member
of their family is open to all UND employees who are authorized to drive state
fleet vehicles, Room 16-18 Swanson Hall, 10 a.m. to noon and 1 to 3 p.m.; call
the Safety Office to register at 777-3341.

Mon., Feb. 24 -- "MAKE FRIENDS WITH THE COMPUTER" SEMINAR BEGINS, four-session
seminar designed for anyone who has minimal experience with or a fear of using
a computer; 361 Upson II Hall, 3 to 4:30 p.m. (sessions continue on Wed., Feb.
26; Mon., March 3; and Wed., March 5); call the University Learning Center at
777-4406 to register; open to students, faculty and staff.

Mon., Feb. 24, through Thurs., March 6 -- ART EXHIBITION, Patrick Luber -
Installation, Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center.

Tues., Feb. 25 -- THEOLOGY FOR LUNCH, "Faith and Life: Our Story" series with
members of the University community sharing their faith and telling about the
role it has in their life and work; student representatives from the four
Campus Ministry Association Centers will speak, Christus Rex, 3012 University
Ave., noon.

Tues., Feb. 25 -- SWIMMING AND DIVING, FAST Last Chance Invitational, Hyslop
Sports Center.

Tues., Feb. 25, through Fri., Feb. 28 -- THEATRE, "Remembrance" by Graham
Reid, this warm drama played against the hatred in Northern Ireland charts the
love that develops between a Protestant father and a Catholic mother who meet
in the cemetery where their sons are buried, both victims of violence,
Burtness Theatre, 7:30 p.m.; call 777-2587 for ticket information.

Wed., Feb. 26 -- HISTORY AND PHI ALPHA THETA BROWN BAG LUNCH SESSION,
"Contemporary Trends in Post-Soviet Russian Historical Studies: Problems and
Perspectives," presented by Vadim Koukouchkine, 217 Merrifield Hall, noon;
bring your lunch; a question and answer period follows the presentation.

Wed., Feb. 26 -- FEAST AND FOCUS PROGRAM, "Stella Fritzell: A Daughter's
Perspective On Being Raised by a North Dakota Feminist," presented by Sara
Fritzell Hanhan, Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

Wed., Feb. 26 -- MEETING, Teaching with Writing Discussion Group, "Forum on
the State of Writing at UND," noon to 1 p.m.; to sign up for the group, please
call the WAC office at 7-3600 or respond by e-mail to
.

Wed., Feb. 26 -- QUARTERLY MEETING of the Grand Forks Business/Government
Alliance, "University-Community Partnerships," presented by a panel of
business and education representatives, Best Western Town House, 710 First
Ave. N., 7:30 to 9:30 a.m.; the meeting is designed to discuss contemporary
issues and opportunities facing the Grand Forks region and to meet with
community leadership representatives including the four local political
subdivisions, congressional representatives, and the media.

Wed. through Fri., Feb. 26-28 -- ANNUAL DAKOTA CONFERENCE ON RURAL AND PUBLIC
HEALTH, Bismarck, N.D., with the theme, "Putting the Pieces Together:
Celebrating Our Diversity"; aim of the conference is to bring together people
with a common interest in the quality and availability of health care services
in the rural regions of the Dakotas and Minnesota; keynote speakers are Phil
Lane Jr., international coordinator of the Four Worlds International Institute
for Health and Community Development, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada; Keith
Mueller, president of the National Rural Health Association, Omaha, Neb.;
Ernie Mancini, executive director of alumni relations and the C-400 Club at
Concordia College, Moorhead, Minn.; and Richard Smith, director of the MEDEX
Group and professor of family practice and community health, John A. Burns
School of Medicine, Honolulu, Hawaii (Smith is a nationally renowned speaker
and award-winning medical pioneer who helped to start the physician
assistant/nurse practitioner movement 28 years ago); contact Dawn Botsford,
program coordinator, Division of Continuing Education, phone 777-4260 for more
information.

Thurs., Feb. 27 -- OFFICIAL UND FOUNDERS DAY BANQUET AND OBSERVANCE, Ballroom,
Memorial Union, 6:30 p.m.
*******


REMINDER! The attachments referred to are not included in the electronic
form of the University Letter. However, you will find the attachments
with the paper copy.
  
UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and
distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is
also available electronically through UNDInfo, the University's menu
system on the Internet. The addresses are http://www.und.nodak.edu for
World-Wide Web and uninfo.und.nodak.edu for gopher.
  
All articles submitted for publication should be labeled "University
Letter" and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic
submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu. Attachments to
University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number.
University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations,
Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.
  
UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.
  
*******
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