[University Letter logo]

University Letter

February 27, 1998

Volume 35, No. 26



UNIVERSITY LETTER
University of North Dakota at Grand Forks
Vol. 35, Number 26, February 27, 1998

UNIVERSITY LETTER IS ALSO AVAILABLE ELECTRONICALLY in the Events and News
section of UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address
is: http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/our/uletter.htm

The University Relations Office maintains an index for the University Letter.

------------------------

          TABLE OF CONTENTS - PART 1

CAS II Will Be Renamed Bryce Streibel Hall
Students Can Still Pursue Teaching Degrees In Speech, Music, Physical
Education And Spanish
LeRoy Sondrol, Larry Zitzow Promoted
Wilson Appointed To National Advisory Panels
     EVENTS TO NOTE
Physics Sets Seminars
Anatomy Candidate Will Present Seminar
Biology Sets Seminar
Senate Library Committee Meets March 3
Librarians Will Discuss Full-Text E-Journals
University Senate Lists Agenda
WAC Meets March 5
Lecture Discusses Magellan Spacecraft
Ecosystems Geography Is Lecture Topic
Bioethics Conference Slated For March 8-13
UND Major Exploration Day Is May 9
     OF ACADEMIC INTEREST
Faculty Needed To Teach In Norway
ODIN Unavailable This Weekend
International Faculty Exchange Seminars Offered
Innovation Conference Slated
     GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS
Chen Awarded Department Of Defense EPSCoR Grant
Faculty Research Awards Listed
FRCAC Applications Due April 14
Resarch, Grant Opportunities Listed
     BILLBOARD
Margie Hansen Joins Nursing
Budget Management Is Focus Of Workshop
UNISYS Donates $15,000
Proposals Solicited From Student Technology Fees
PERC Lists Classes
Bookstore Offers Computer Service
     ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT
New North Dakota Quarterly Available
Theatre Arts Will Host Guest Artist
Traditional Music Concert Set
Band, Wind Ensemble Concert Set For March 3
Women's Center Lists Events
International Centre Lists Events
Art Program Features Medicine Stones
Reserve Space For Women's Day Celebration
Dakota P.G.A. Golf Seminar Set For March 14
Studio One Lists Guests
     EVENTS CALENDAR
------------------------

CAS II WILL BE RENAMED BRYCE STREIBEL HALL


The University of North Dakota's Center for Aerospace Sciences building long
known as CAS II will be renamed Bryce Streibel Hall. A request from UND to
rename the building was approved by the North Dakota State Board of Higher
Education at its regular meeting Friday, Feb. 20. At its January meeting, the
State Board of Higher Education approved renaming the building known as CAS I
after UND Aerospace Dean John Odegard, who founded UND's aviation program.

The former member of the North Dakota State Board of Higher Education and
long-time member of the North Dakota House of Representatives and then the
North Dakota Senate has made significant contributions, not only financially,
but also of his own time and talent to benefit UND.

In the early development of UND's aviation education program, Odegard called
on Streibel, a rural Fessenden, N.D., native, on many occasions for
assistance. Streibel made at least 10 trips to Washington, D.C., to seek
federal funds for the Aviation Department. He initiated the drive to procure
more than $2.5 million of federal funding to purchase a Citation II Cloud
Physics Platform, which placed UND as one of the leaders in national weather
modification research. Through his initiatives and with the support of North
Dakota's Congressional delegation, Streibel was appointed by Secretary of
Commerce Juanita Kreps to the National Weather Modification Advisory Board.

Streibel spent considerable time and his own money on lobbying efforts for
federal funding, not only for the Citation II research aircraft, but also for
the Center for Aerospace Sciences building and for other research projects
that have been very important to the growth and development of UND's aviation
education research programs.

Streibel has a long record of public service, serving for many years as a
member of the North Dakota House of Representatives and for many sessions as a
strong and effective House Majority Leader. After retiring from service in the
House of Representatives, he was later elected to the North Dakota Senate.
During the interim, from 1977 to 1981, he served as a member of the State
Board of Higher Education.

In 1973, Streibel was called on by President Tom Clifford for his counsel and
assistance with respect to a serious medical education problem. It was no
longer possible to transfer the UND School of Medicine's two-year graduates to
other medical schools around the nation to complete their four-year graduate
degrees. North Dakota was at a crossroads. Streibel at the time was both
Majority leader and chair of the 15-member Legislative Council Committee. He
used his leadership to appoint an interim committee to bring recommendations
to the next session of the Legislature. He appointed a fair-minded and
balanced bipartisan committee which, in working with UND and the medical
community, brought into the legislature a recommendation for the establishment
of a four-year medical education program. His leadership was crucial at this
time for medical education in the state. The importance of having a four-year
medical school has been confirmed: approximately 50 percent of the practicing
physicians in North Dakota have received some or all of their medical training
at UND.

In the years since 1974, Streibel has donated approximately $2 million to
benefit UND. In 1982, June and Bryce Streibel, with an irrevocable charitable
remainder unitrust, gifted their farm real estate to the UND Foundation. This
gift will provide substantial scholarship awards in the future to deserving
and needy students from North Dakota. The Streibels want a special emphasis
placed on scholarships for students from rural North Dakota communities who
are pursuing a medical education.

Streibel also contributed his magnificent stamp collection to the UND
Foundation. Presently on display in the UND Chester Fritz Library, the stamp
collection is conservatively valued at more than $400,000.

In 1976, Streibel was awarded the UND Alumni Association's highest honor, the
Sioux Award, in recognition of his outstanding public service accomplishments.
Streibel and his wife June are members of the UND Foundation William Budge
Society, the Foundation's highest level giving club. He is a founding fellow
of the Fellows of the University of North Dakota, Inc. He was the first
recipient of UND's Beta Gamma chapter of Theta Chi fraternity's "Outstanding
Alumnus Award." He is a charter member of the UND Athletic Department's Legacy
Club. Streibel is an annual contributor to UND, and over the years has
anonymously and quietly provided financial assistance to needy young people to
help them receive a quality education at UND. The Streibels have annually
funded other scholarships for aviation students.

-- Kendall Baker, President.
*******

STUDENTS CAN STILL PURSUE TEACHING DEGREES IN SPEECH, MUSIC, PHYSICAL
EDUCATION AND SPANISH

The North Dakota State Board of Higher Education on Feb. 20 approved a UND
request to terminate four Bachelor of Science in Education degrees: speech
education, music, physical education and Spanish. However students will still
be able to pursue teaching careers in these areas at UND.

There currently are two paths for pursuing teaching degrees in these four
areas, and that is sometimes confusing for students who are trying to decide
which path to take. What the Higher Education Board's action does is allow us
to eliminate duplication in degree programs. Elimination of the duplicate
education degree programs continues a process which began more 
than a year ago.

Students who want to prepare themselves to teach and obtain teacher
certification in speech, music, physical education or Spanish can still do so
at UND by pursuing baccalaureate degrees in each of those areas. There won't
be any problem for students and there won't be any change in their
opportunity. In many ways this change makes the choices and opportunities more
clear. Someone wanting to be a music teacher, for example, won't have to
decide between the two different majors.

The State Board of Higher Education also approved converting three minors in
technology into a single minor in Industrial Technology. Again, the
opportunities will remain the same for students, only the name of the minor
will change. -- Kendall Baker, President.
*******

LEROY SONDROL, LARRY ZITZOW PROMOTED

Effective March 1, 1998, LeRoy Sondrol, in addition to his duties as Director
of Plant Services, will become Assistant to the Vice President for Facilities
Planning. This appointment will utilize Sondrol's considerable talents in the
planning of the major projects that are currently under way or in development
for the University. This restructuring will relieve Sondrol of many of the
day-to-day Plant Services management responsibilities and will allow him to
focus on four key areas: flood restoration and recovery; major summer
projects, particularly steam line repair and storm sewer construction;
development of the Bronson property; and the planning of the new Animal
Quarters building at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

Also effective March 1, Larry Zitzow will be designated Interim Director of
Physical Plant. Zitzow will report to Sondrol.

"These changes recognize the talents and dedication of two outstanding Plant
Services employees, and will also help reduce my physical plant duties and
allow me to focus on my new duties in the area of Finance," said Hoffarth,
Vice President for Finance/Operations. Hoffarth, UND's Vice President for
Operations since 1983, became Vice President for the newly restructured
Division of Finance/Operations on Feb. 1.

-- Al Hoffarth, Vice President for Finance/Operations.
*******

WILSON APPOINTED TO NATIONAL ADVISORY PANELS

H. David Wilson, Dean of the School of Medicine and Health Sciences, has been
appointed to two national committees dealing with medical education.

He will serve a three-year term on the Advisory Panel on the Mission and
Organization of Medical Schools, sponsored by the Association of American
Medical Colleges (AAMC). Comprised of medical school deans, hospital
administrators, AAMC staff members, basic scientists, physician-educators and
others, the panel was named by Jordan Cohen, AAMC president.

The panel serves in an advisory capacity to the AAMC on issues including
professional ethics, research, professionalism, diversity, affirmative action
and other concerns in the realm of medical education. It has produced a
document concerning the organization and objectives of medical schools.

The group, chaired by Dartmouth Medical School Dean Andrew Wallace, is charged
to be "kind of a 'think tank' for the AAMC," Wilson said. Its two dozen
members will discuss matters of concern to the general public and seek input
from thoughtful and authoritative guests to clarify ethical and social
responsibilities of those in the practice of medicine.

Wilson also has been asked to serve on the Section on Medical Schools
Governing Council for the American Medical Association (AMA). The eight-member
committee is charged with making recommendations to the AMA Board of Trustees
about issues concerning medical schools and medical education. It consists
primarily of deans and senior administrators of medical schools.

"Working with this committee will provide me with insight into what's
happening on the national scene," Wilson said. "It allows the perspective of
the community-based medical school to be heard in deliberations on medical
education in this country."

Wilson's participation in such groups is a benefit to the UND School of
Medicine and Health Sciences, he said. These activities afford him an
important learning experience, as well as exposure to the most pressing issues
on the national scene.

All expenses incurred in connection with his attendance at these groups'
meetings will be covered by the AMA and the AAMC.

Wilson also has agreed to participate in a group, organized by the University
of Kentucky, which will study departments of family medicine in U.S. medical
schools. The group will conduct a study, funded by the federal Human Resources
and Services Administration, which is aimed at analyzing how these departments
are financed, their general health and well-being, and problems they currently
face.

His involvement will continue for about a year, he said.

-- Pamela Knudson, Public Affairs, School of Medicine and Health Sciences.
*******



EVENTS TO NOTE

PHYSICS SETS SEMINARS

The Physics Department has set three seminars Thursday and Friday, Feb. 26 and
27. Henn Soonpaa, Professor Emeritus of Physics, will present "Quantum
Turnstile," at 4 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 26, in 209 Witmer Hall. Coffee will be
served at 3:30 p.m. in Room 215. 

On Friday, Feb. 27, at 2:30 p.m. in 209 Witmer Hall, Alessandra Adrover,
Department of Chemical Engineering and Center for Fractal and Disordered
Systems in Chemical Engineering, University of Rome, will present "Geometry of
Mixing in 2D Time Periodic Flows: Asymptotic Directionality in Physically
Realizable Flows and Global Invariant Properties." 

A coffee break will be held from 3:30 to 4 p.m. in 215 Witmer Hall.

At 4 p.m. in 209 Witmer Hall, Massimiliano Giona, Department of Chemical
Engineering, University of Cagliari, Italy, and Center for Fractal and
Disordered Systems in Chemical Engineering, University of Rome, will present
"Statistical Properties in 2D Chaotic Flows and Hamiltonian Systems."

All interested persons are welcome. -- Sesh Rao, Chair, Physics.
*******

ANATOMY CANDIDATE WILL PRESENT SEMINAR

The Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology will hold a seminar, "Gravin, A
Novel PKA Binding Protein, Regulates Endothelial Wound Healing," presented by
Bryon Grove, Research Assistant Professor, Department of Molecular and
Cellular Physiology, Louisiana State University Medical Center, at 11 a.m.
Monday, March 2, in the Frank Low Conference Room, B710, Edwin C. James
Research Facility lower level.

Dr. Grove is a candidate for a faculty position in the Department of Anatomy
and Cell Biology, UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

-- Mark Olson, Chair, Anatomy Faculty Search Committee. 
*******

BIOLOGY SETS SEMINAR

Scott M. Lanyon, Director of the Natural History Museum, University of
Minnesota, will give a seminar in the Biology Department titled "Putting
History Back into Evolution: The Evolution of Cryptic Coloration in Orioles
and Their Relatives," at noon Friday, Feb. 27, in 141 Starcher Hall. Everyone
is welcome. -- Brenda Schill, Biology Department.
*******

SENATE LIBRARY COMMITTEE MEETS MARCH 3

The University Senate Library Committee will meet Tuesday, March 3, at 4 p.m.
in Room 217 at the Chester Fritz Library. The meeting is open to the public. -- Frank D'Andraia, Director of Libraries.
*******

LIBRARIANS WILL DISCUSS FULL-TEXT E-JOURNALS

Health Sciences Library staff will review the newest online journal titles
available through the Library at 1 p.m. Wednesday, March 4, in the Library.
This includes several research journals, such as Biochemical Journal, Journal
of Applied Physiology, Journal of Biological Chemistry, and Proceedings of the
National Academy of Sciences.

Learn how to access these journals through the library's
reconfigured E-Journal section of the home page. -- Judith Rieke,
Assistant Director and Collection Development Librarian, Library of the Health
Sciences.
*******

UNIVERSITY SENATE LISTS AGENDA

The March meeting of the University Senate will be held Thursday, March 5, at
4:05 p.m. in Room 7, Gamble Hall.

AGENDA

1)   Announcements.
 
2)   Minutes of the previous meeting and business arising from the minutes.
  
3)   Question Period.

CONSENT CALENDAR:

4)   Annual Report of the Academic Policies Committee. Alice Poehls,
Ex-officio. (Attachment No. 1)

5)   Annual Report of the Student Academic Standards Committee.  Alice
Poehls, Chair.  (Attachment No. 2)

6)   Annual Report of the Administrative Procedures Committee.   Alice
Poehls, Chair.  (Attachment No. 3)

7)   Annual Report of the Admissions Committee. Bette Olson,     Chair.
(Attachment No. 4)

BUSINESS CALENDAR:

8)   Report of Committee on Committees on Nominations for Senate Committees.
Charlotte Humphries, Chair.  (Attachment No. 5)

9)   Recommendation to renew by reintroduction the following motion rejected
by the Senate on November 6, 1997:

     Recommendation from the TFEMS that the UND Constitution (II.1.b.) be
     changed so that Clinical Instructors, Clinical Assistant Professors,
     Clinical Associate Professors and  Clinical Professors with full-time
     appointments, who are employed primarily on the Grand Forks campus, will
     be members of the Council.  

     John Ettling.

10)  Continued discussion of the tabled and revised recommendation from the
Task Force on Tenure and Promotion to synchronize the review processes for
promotion and tenure decisions in the same academic year by inclusion of the
following separate statements: "Promotion reviews (p.4)/tenure reviews (p. 9)
will take place in the Fall semester.  When a faculty member is being reviewed
for tenure and promotion during the same academic year, the faculty member may
submit the same supporting materials for both processes." [This statement
would appear both in the section on promotions and the section on tenure.] 
(See attachment to February 5, 1998 agenda.)  Al Fivizzani, Chair.

11)  Recommendation from the Task Force on Tenure and Promotion to establish
a procedure to extend the probationary period for tenure review in cases of:
a) childbirth or adoption, b) significant elder or dependent care obligations,
c) disability or chronic illness, d) circumstances beyond the control of the
faculty member that significantly impede progress toward tenure. (See
attachment to February 5, 1998 agenda.) Al Fivizzani, Chair.

     The wording of the new procedure reads: "Under certain circumstances a
     faculty member may request a one year extension to the probationary
     period.  Such a request is normally based upon one of the following: 1)
     responsibilities with respect to childbirth or adoption; 2) significant
     elder or dependent care obligations; 3) disability or chronic illness;
     4) circumstances beyond the control of the faculty member that
     significantly impede progress toward tenure.  A request for extension
     based upon childbirth or adoption is normally approved.  More than one
     request may be granted because of childbirth or adoption."
     
     A request for an extension of the probationary period will be submitted
     at any time but no later than the first month of the academic year in
     which the review for tenure is scheduled to occur.

     For requests for extension, the faculty member submits the request to
     the chair of the department who may consult with existing departmental
     governance bodies before approving or denying the request.  Requests
     approved by the department are further reviewed by the academic dean and
     the Vice President for Academic Affairs who grants or denies the
     request.  Ordinarily a request for extension other than those for
     childbirth or adoption is not granted for more than one year.

     In the personnel action review process for a faculty member granted an
     extension, the standards of the review will not differ from those
     applied following the normal probationary period."  Al Fivizzani, Chair.

12)  Recommendation from the Task Force on Tenure and Promotion that the
criteria for evaluation of early tenure and/or promotion should not be
different than those utilized for such reviews when conducted at the typical
time in grade of academic rank or probationary tenure status.  (See attachment
to February 5, 1998 agenda.) Al Fivizzani, Chair.

13)  Recommendation from the Student Policy Committee to add UND Student
Organization Travel Policy to the Code of Student Life.  Jan Zahrly, Chair. 
(See attachment to January Senate agenda.)

14)  Informal discussion of the Final Report of the Task Force on
Interdisciplinary Studies.  Janet Kelly Moen, For the Task Force.

15)  Recommendation from the Conflict of Interest Committee to establish the
Responsibilities of the Committee on Conflict of Interest/Scientific
Misconduct.  Richard Ludtke, Chair.  (See Attachment #6.)

-- Alice Poehls (Admissions and Records), Secretary, University Senate.
*******

WAC MEETS MARCH 5

The next meeting of the Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) Discussion Group
will be Thursday, March 5, from noon to 1 p.m. The topic for the meeting will
be "Research Writing and the Web: New Challenges for Students and Faculty."
For more information on the meeting, or to sign up to attend, call the WAC
office at 777-3600 or e-mail to hawthorn@badlands.nodak.edu. -- Joan
Hawthorne, WAC Coordinator.
*******

LECTURE DISCUSSES MAGELLAN SPACECRAFT

A LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary Sciences) Lecture will be
presented by Stephen B. Johnson (Space Studies) Friday, March 6, in the
Leonard Hall Lecture Bowl (Room 100). He will discuss at noon "Building and
Flying the Magellan Spacecraft."

The LEEPS Lecture Series is supported by the Department of Geology and
Geological Engineering, the Energy and Environmental Research Center and the
North Dakota EPSCoR Program. All interested persons are welcome to attend. For
additional information contact me. -- Will Gosnold, Professor of Geology and
Geological Engineering, 777-2631.
*******

ECOSYSTEMS GEOGRAPHY IS LECTURE TOPIC

The Geography Department will present its noon forum Friday, March 6, in 364
Clifford Hall. Dion Wiseman, Department of Geography at Brandon University,
Manitoba, Canada, will present "Ecosystems Geography: Alternative Methods of
Ecogeographic Analysis." Everyone is welcome. -- Mohammad Hemmasi, Professor
of Geography.
*******

BIOETHICS CONFERENCE SLATED FOR MARCH 8-13

A conference and public lectures will be held on the ethics of biomedical
research and medical practice. "Critical Issues in Bioethics" will be held
Sunday through Friday, March 8-13, at the University of Minnesota-Crookston,
Altru Hospital, and UND. Presenters will be Tom Beauchamp, Senior Research
Scholar, Kennedy Center for Bioethics, Georgetown University; Ann Cook,
Project Director, Exemplary Services, Rural Institute on Disabilities,
University of Montana; Ruth Faden, Philip Franklin Wagley Professor of
Bioethics, Johns Hopkins University; Jeffrey Kahn, Director, Center for
Bioethics, University of Minnesota; David Robinson, Director, Vascular
Research Program, NHLBI, National Institutes of Health; and James Thomasson,
Executive Director, The Woodside Center, and Associate Professor of
Philosophy, University of Minnesota-Crookston.

The schedule of events follows:

Sunday, March 8: Pre-Conference Workshop/Reception, The Woodside Center for
Interdisciplinary Studies, The Inn at Maple Crossing, Mentor, Minn., from 2 to
5:30 p.m.; "Where Does Life Begin, How Should It End, and What Does It
Matter?" presented by David Robinson and James Thomasson. Pre-conference
workshop/reception registration is $35, which includes workshop fee,
reception, and a copy of the Proceedings of "Critical Issues in Bioethics."

Tuesday, March 10: University of Minnesota, Crookston, Brown Dining Room. 3 to
4:30 p.m., Roundtable Discussion: "The Range of Ethical Issues Emerging from
Biomedical Research and medical Practice: A Conference Preview"; 4:30 to 5:45
p.m., UMC Reception for Conference Speakers; 6 to 7 p.m., private dinner; 7 to
8:30 p.m., Public Lecture in Bede Ballroom, "Between Hope and Exploitation:
Ethical Issues in Clinical Research" presented by Ruth Faden with responses by
Tom Beauchamp and David Robinson.

Wednesday, March 11: Altru Hospital/Altru Health Foundation, Meeting Room B.
12:15 to 1 p.m., Presentation to the Medical Staff, "Gene Therapy: Impact of
the Human Genome Project on Clinical Practice," presented by David Robinson;
1:30 to 3 p.m., Public Lecture, "Last Acts: Ethical Issues at the End of
Life," presented by Tom Beauchamp with response by James Thomasson; 3:15 to
4:45 p.m., Public Lectures, "Withholding and Withdrawing Treatment:
Implications for Organizational Management" presented by Jeffrey Kahn and
David Robinson.

Thursday, March 12: University of North Dakota Medical School, Reed T. Keller
Auditorium, noon to 1 p.m. Dean's Hour Presentation, "From Refusal of Care to
Assisted Suicide: The Ethics of Decisions at the End of Life," presented by
Tom Beauchamp with response by Allan Ingenito. Public lectures on "Human
Subjects Research" at the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.,
"From Protection to Access: Evolving Issues in the Ethics of Research in Human
Subjects" presented by Jeffrey Kahn and "We Can, But Should We? A Biologist's
View of the Ethics of Cloning" presented by David Robinson; Conference Dinner
at 7 p.m. at The Inn at Maple Crossing, Mentor, Minn., speakers with
principals from Altru Foundation and Altru Health Plan, UND Medical School and
School of Nursing, Riverview Healthcare Association, and UMC, "Withholding and
Withdrawing Treatment: Implications for Organizational Management: the
Conversation Extended."

Friday, March 13: John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences, UND Clifford
Hall Auditorium, noon to 1:30 p.m., Public Lectures: "Individual Rights and
the Public Good: Ethical Issues in Public Health," presented by Jeffrey Kahn
and Ann Cook; 1:45 to 3:15 p.m., Public Lectures, "Changing Paradigms in
Biomedical Research and Ethical Judgment" presented by David Robinson and
James Thomasson; 3:30 to 5 p.m., Public Forum, "Demystifying or Unraveling the
Universe: The Social Implications of the New Biology," presented by Ann Cook,
Allan Ingenito, Jeff Kahn, David Robinson, and James Thomasson.

Collaborative support for "Critical Issues in Bioethics" is provided by: Altru
Health Foundation, Riverview Healthcare Foundation, University of Minnesota,
Crookston, UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences, UND College of Nursing,
UND Office of Research and Program Development, and The Woodside Center for
Interdisciplinary Studies.

For further information/registration call (218) 637-6600 or e-mail conference
convener at jthomass@mail.crk.umn.edu. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, for James
Thomasson, Critical Issues in Bioethics.
*******

UND MAJOR EXPLORATION DAY IS MAY 9

The spring semester Major Exploration Day will be held Monday, March 9, from
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Memorial Union Ballroom. Approximately 135 students
attended the fall semester Major Exploration Day where they could explore what
39 academic departments and Career Counseling had to offer them. Academic
departments will again have faculty representatives available to answer
students' questions or concerns and to discuss the majors available.

The goal of Major Exploration Day is to provide accurate information, enabling
students to make informed academic decisions. There are a great number of UND
students that do not declare their major upon entrance to the University. Many
declared students are actually interested in a number of majors and need more
information to make their final decision. Also, many students change their
major during their academic years at the University.

Thank you to participants; the event would not be possible without the support
of academic departments and career counseling. For additional information
please contact Student Academic Services at 777-2117. -- Janelle Studney,
Academic Advisor, Student Academic Services.
*******


OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

FACULTY NEEDED TO TEACH IN NORWAY

A UND faculty member is needed to teach fall semester 1998 in Moss, Norway. If
interested, please contact Tom Rand, 777-4382, or Sharon Rezac Andersen, 777-3273. -- Tom Rand, Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences, and Sharon Rezac
Andersen, Director, International Centre.
*******

ODIN UNAVAILABLE THIS WEEKEND

The ODIN Library System will be unavailable from 6 p.m. Friday, Feb. 27, until
8 a.m. Monday, March 2. This will affect access to the Library catalog and
reference databases on ODIN. During this time the system software will be
updated to prepare ODIN for access with a Web browser.
Please call the Reference and Research Services Desk at 777-4629 with
questions about availability to other library databases. -- Randy Pederson,
Computer Services Librarian.
*******

INTERNATIONAL FACULTY EXCHANGE SEMINARS OFFERED

The Council on International Educational Exchange is offering Faculty
Development Exchange Seminars for seven to 12 days of intensive overseas
experiences. The exchange, available to both faculty and administrators, is
designed to stimulate campus initiatives toward internationalizing curricula
through the exploration of international issues and the exchange of views with
academic peers in other countries.

The application deadline is Wednesday, April 1. A series of 12 summer 1998
seminars will be held. They are:

"Brazil: The Emerging Giant," University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil, June
1-9; "Economic Reform, Free Trade and Democratization in Chile," Facultad
Latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales (FLASCO-Chile), Santiago, Chile, May 31
through June 8; "Sustaining the Masses: Environmental Protection and Economic
Development in China," Nanjing University and the Jiangsu Environmental
Protection Bureau, Nanjing, China, June 6-14; "Independent Croatia:
Reconstruction in Post-War Dubrovnik," The Inter-University Center, Dubrovnik,
Croatia, June 1-10; "Germany: Adapting to the Challenges of the 21st Century,"
Free University, Berlin, Germany, June 14-20; "Hungary and Central Europe: A
Region in Transition," Budapest University of Economic Sciences, Budapest,
Hungary, June 14-21; "Mexico: The Societal, Political, and Economic Impacts of
NAFTA," University of Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Mexico, May 31 through June 9;
"Human Rights in Russia: Five Years After the Russian Constitution of 1993,"
Russian-American Press and Information Center (RAPIC), St. Petersburg and
Moscow, Russia, June 7-14; "The Dynamics of the New South Africa," University
of the Western Cape, Cape Town, and the Human Rights Institute of South Africa
(HURISA), Pretoria, South Africa, June 7-17; "Understanding Islam: Impact on
Politics, Economy, and Education in Turkey," Middle East Technical University,
Ankara, Turkey, June 14-25; "The Arts in London: Theater, Art, and
Architecture," University of Westminster, London, United Kingdom, June 8-14;
"Contemporary Vietnam: Recovery, Renewal and Recognition," The Vietnam-USA
Society, Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, July 11-21.

Seminar fees range from $1,400 to $1,995 and include all costs except
transportation to and from the country. For additional information e-mail
IFDSRegistrar@ciee.org or visit the IFDS web site located at:
http://www.ciec.org or contact me. -- Sharon Rezac Andersen, Director, UND
International Centre, 777-3273.
*******

INNOVATION CONFERENCE SLATED

Register now for "An Invitation To Innovation," the 1998 National Conference
of the NCIIA, Friday through Sunday, March 13-15, in Washington, D.C. Join
your colleagues from around the country at the Sheraton Crystal City for the
second Annual Meeting of the National Collegiate Inventors and Innovators
Alliance, a conference with a new vision for higher education.
At this conference, you'll have the opportunity to choose from over 20
different hands-on workshops, presentations as well as panel discussions on
teaching innovation, creativity, and entrepreneurship.

"Invitation To Innovation" provides you with the opportunity to learn how you
and your students can benefit from the unique NCIIA grants program, and other
resources available to you through the NCIIA.
See the work of some of the best student innovators from around the country at
an exclusive exhibition and reception at the Smithsonian Institution's Museum
of American History.

Return home prepared to incorporate an experiential, dynamic approach into
your teaching.

Featured workshops and presentations include:

*    Grant resources for teaching innovation

*    Creating interdisciplinary models for independent learning

*    Unleashing creative potential

*    From idea to enterprise

*    Curriculum sessions featuring over 20 presentations and papers

*    NCIIA resource and grants workshops

*    Business planning and development skills

*    E-Team exposition and reception

*    Linking E-Teams with community resources

*    Patents, copyrights and protecting your intellectual property

For more information or to register online, visit the conference web site at
http:///hamp.hampshire.edu/nciia/conf98.html; send an e-mail with your name,
e-mail and street address to nciia@hampshire.edu and put "conference info" in
the subject heading; call (413) 582-5318 and ask for conference information;
fax to (413) 582-5834; or mail to NCIIA, Hampshire College LM, Amherst, MA
01002-5001. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, for ND EPSCoR.
*******


GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

CHEN AWARDED DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE EPSCoR GRANT

Tar-pin Chen (Physics), has successfully competed in the Department of Defense
EPSCoR (DEPSCoR) FY98 grants program.  Dr. Chen will study super conducting
materials (amount requested $280,000).

Award amounts are being negotiated by individual Defense program offices. The
average award will be approximately $250,000.  The Department of Defense
selected 34 academic institutions in 19 EPSCoR States including Puerto Rico to
receive $18 million in FY98 DEPSCoR awards. Previous DEPSCoR awards to North
Dakota since 1995 have totaled over $2 million. DEPSCoR operates on an annual
cycle and researchers are invited to participate.

The purpose of ND EPSCoR, a North Dakota University System program, is to make
North Dakota more competitive nationally in science, engineering, and
mathematics research and development.  Visit the ND EPSCoR homepage at
http://www.ndsu.nodak.edu/epscor to learn more or contact me. --  Philip
Boudjouk, ND EPSCoR Project Director, 258 Ladd-Dunbar Hall, NDSU, Fargo.
*******

FACULTY RESEARCH AWARDS LISTED

The Faculty Research and Creative Activity Committee, chaired by Harmon
Abrahamson (Chemistry) announces that 10 New Faculty Scholar Award
applications and 29 requests for research or travel funds were received in the
last round of applications.  The following awards were made at the Faculty
Research and Creative Activity Committee meetings of Jan. 28 and Feb. 5:

New Faculty Scholar Awards

Loretta Heuer (Nursing Professionalism and Practice), $5,000, "Prevalence of
Diabetes and Hypertension in Migrant Farmworkers and Their Family Members";
Weidong Zhu (Mechanical Engineering), $5,000, "Dynamic Stability of a
Traveling Medium with Varying Length."

Research Awards

Scott Dale (Languages), $2,500, "Beatriz Cienfuegos"; William  Gosnold,
(Geology and Geological Engineering), $927, "Ground Temperature Data on
Climate Change in North America"; Shihlung Huang (Criminal Justice Studies),
$2,000, "Punishment and Treatment for Drug Offenders: A Comparative Analysis
Between Criminal Sanctions and Medical Model in North Dakota, 1986-1995";
Robert Newman (Biology), $2,500, "Population Structure of Wood Frogs in a
Heterogeneous Environment"; Irina Smoliakova  (Chemistry), $2,500, "Chiral
Cyclopalladated Complexes of Oxazolines."

Travel Awards

Victoria Beard (Accounting and Business Law), $288; Daniel Biederman
(Economics), $304; Jacob Chacko (Marketing), $356; Joyce Coleman (English),
$321; James Faircloth (Marketing), $542; Henry Hexmoor (Computer Science),
$485; Shihlung Huang (Criminal Justice Studies), $379; Xiaozhao Huang
(English), $286; Pamela  Imperato (Political Science and Public
Administration), $566; Jeong Wan Lee (Finance), $420; Barbara Lewis (Music),
$439; Bruce Maxwell (Computer Science), $380; Michael Meyer
(Sociology/Criminal Justice Studies), $372; Brajendra Panda  (Computer
Science), $445; Jaesun Park (Management), $361; Dona Reese (Social Work),
$500; William Schwalm (Physics), $392;  Clifford Staples (Sociology), $283;
Kathleen Tiemann (Sociology),  $293; Elsa Valeroso (Computer Science), $539;
John A. Williams  (Anthropology), $405; and Candace Zierdt (Law), $392.

-- Harmon Abrahamson (Chemistry), Chair, Faculty Research and Creative
Activity Committee.
*******

FRCAC APPLICATIONS DUE APRIL 14

The third deadline for submission of applications to the Faculty Research and
Creative Activity Committee (FRCAC) is Tuesday, April 14. Travel applications
will be considered at that time only for travel that will occur between April
14 and Oct. 15. No research or publication applications will be considered at
that time.

The Committee reminds applicants to carefully prepare their proposals and be
specific and realistic in their budget requests.  Although the FRCAC
encourages submission of travel requests, the Committee takes into
consideration the recent FRCAC awards granted to each applicant. Priority will
be given to beginning faculty and first-time applicants.

Applications are available at the Office of Research and Program Development,
105 Twamley Hall, 777-4279. An original and seven copies of the application
must be submitted to ORPD prior to the deadline. Applications that are not
prepared in accordance with the directions on the forms will not be considered
by the Committee.

-- Harmon Abrahamson (Chemistry), Chair, Faculty Research and Creative
Activity Committee.
*******

RESEARCH, GRANT OPPORTUNITIES LISTED

Following are research and grant opportunities. For more information, contact
the Office of Research and Program Development at 777-4278.

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION

The Knowledge and Distributed Intelligence in the Information Age program is a
Foundation-wide effort designed to achieve the next generation of human
capability to generate, gather, model, and represent more complex and
cross-disciplinary scientific data from new sources and at enormously varying
scales; to transform this information into knowledge by combining,
classifying, and analyzing it in new ways; to deepen our understanding of the
cognitive, ethical, educational, legal, and social implications of  new types
of interactivity; and to collaborate in sharing this knowledge and working
together interactively. Pro-posals are solicited from individuals or groups
for research that is inher-ently multi-disciplinary or that, while lying
within a single discipline, has clear impact on at least one other discipline.
Knowledge Networking will focus on attaining new levels of knowledge
integration, information flow, and interactivity among people, organizations,
and communities.  Learning and Intelligent Systems will emphasize research
that advances basic understanding of learning and intelli-gence in natural 
and artificial systems and supports the development of  tools and environments
to test and apply this understanding in real situations. New Computational
Challenges will emphasize new computational approaches to frontier science and
engineering problems as well as problems involving data intensive computations
and simulations.  Deadlines: 4/1/98 (Letter of Intent); 5/8/98 (Full
Proposal).  Contact: http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/getpub?nsf9855.

The Division of Undergraduate Education has identified four special themes for
applicants to the following programs to consider as appropriate in developing
projects. These themes are:  teacher preparation, diversity, faculty
development, and integration of technology in education. 

The Course, Curriculum and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) program incorporates
most features of the former Course and Curriculum Development and
Instrumentation Laboratory Improvement pro-grams, including the option to
submit instrumentation- or equipment-only proposals. CCLI also gives increased
priority to adaptation and implementation of previously developed materials
and educational practices. The program seeks to improve the quality of
Science, Mathematics, Engineering, Technology (SMET) courses, curricula, and
laboratories. It encompasses SMET education for all students and targets
activities affecting learning environment, content, and educational practices.
The program has three major tracks:  Educational Materials Development (CCLI-EMD), Adaptation and Implemen-ta-tion (CCLI-A&I), and National Dissemination
(CCLI-ND).  Deadlines:  11/16/98, 6/7/99.

The NSF Collaboratives for Excellence in Teacher Preparation (CETP) program
has been reconfigured to support projects with an Institutional Focus (Track
I) or a System-wide Focus (Track II).  The purpose of this program is to
increase significantly the number of pre-kindergarten - grade 12 teachers well
prepared to teach science and mathematics. Projects are required to involve
substantial collaboration of faculty and administrators in the sciences,
mathematics, engineering, technology and their counterparts in education.
Projects should pay particular attention to the need to attract SMET majors
into the teaching profession and the need to provide a good science and
mathematics background to students majoring in other fields but intending to
become teachers, especially those from underrepresented groups.  Deadlines: 
CETP Track 1--5/1/98 (Preliminary Proposals), 9/1/98 (Formal Proposals);  CETP
Tracks 1 and 2--5/1/99 (Preliminary Proposals), 9/1/99 (Formal Proposals).

The Advanced Technological Educate (ATE) program promotes exemplary
improvement in technician education at national and regional levels through
support of curriculum development and program improvement in undergraduate and
secondary school SMET education. ATE solicits two types of proposals: ATE
Projects and National/Regional Centers of Excellence for Advanced
Technological Education.  Both focus on one or more aspects of curriculum
development and program improvement.  DUE also welcomes proposals for other
activities that lead to a better understanding of advanced technological
education and contribute to lifelong learning.  Deadline:  4/15/98
(Preliminary Proposals); 10/15/98 (Formal Proposals).

Contact: National Science Foundation, Division of Undergraduate Education;
703/306-1666; undergrad@nsf.gov; http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/start.htm.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE)

The Cellular Biology Research Program--Mechanisms of Cellular Responses to Low
Dose, Low Dose-Rate Exposures (Energy Research Financial Assistance Program
Notice 98-11) is a coordinated multidisciplinary research effort to develop
creative, innovative approaches to provide a better scientific basis for
understanding exposures and risks to humans associated with low level
exposures to radiation and chemicals. This research will provide information
that will be used to decrease the uncertainty of risk at low levels, help
determine the shape of dose-response relationships after low-level exposure,
and achieve acceptable levels of human health protection at the lowest
possible cost.  Applicants are encouraged to collaborate with researchers in
other institutions and to incorporate cost sharing and/or consortia where
feasible.  It is expected that most awards will range from $200,000-$400,000
for 1-3 years.  Deadlines: 3/26/98 (Preapplication); 5/7/98 (Formal
Application).  Contact: Complete announcement available at ORPD or contact Dr.
Susan Rose, 301/903-4731, or Dr. David Thomassen, 301/903-9817 at the DOE.

The Biological Research Program, Use of Model Organisms to Understand the
Human Genome (Energy Research Financial Assistance Program Notice 98-10) is a
coordinated multi-disciplinary research effort to develop creative, innovative
approaches, resources, and technologies that lead to a molecular understanding
of the human genome. This solicitation for peer reviewable applications is for
research that capitalizes on our understanding and the manipulability of the
genomes of model organisms, including yeast, nematode, fruitfly, Zebra fish,
and mouse, to speed under-standing of human genome organizations, regulation,
and function. Awards are expected to be for 1-3 years for $200,000-$400,000. 
Deadlines: 3/26/98 (Preapplica-tion); 5/7/98 (Formal Application).  Contact:
Complete announcement available at ORPD or contact Dr. Marvin Stodolsky,
301/903-4475, or Dr. David T. Thomassen, 301/903-9817 at the DOE.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

DOE, USDA, NSF

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and
National Science Foundation (NSF) have joined to continue the U.S. Arabidopsis
thaliana Genome Sequencing Project. To maximize use of available resources,
the project is being coordinated with other ongoing U.S. genome projects,
including the human genome research project supported by the National
Institutes of Health (NIH) and DOE, the microbial genome project supported by
DOE, and the plant genome project supported by USDA.  U.S. efforts to complete
the sequence of the Arabidopsis genome will continue to be coordinated on an
international level with other national and transnational programs.  Contact:
CSREES' National Research Initiative website at http://www.reeusda.gov/nri or
Ed Kaleikau, Division Director, National Research Initiative, CSREES,
202/401-1901; ekaleikau@reeusda.  Deadline: 4/15/98.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

COMMON CAUSE 

Internships are offered to college students each semester and during the
summer. Working closely with staff members and volunteers, interns coordinate
grassroots lobbying efforts, contribute to policy papers, draft
correspondence, monitor congressional committee meetings, function as press
office aides and serve as membership aides. Current priority issues include
campaign finance reform, ethics and accountability in government, civil and
equal rights for all citizens.  Contact: Volunteer Office, 202833-1200; fax
202/659-3716; grassroots@commoncause.org; http://www.commoncause.org/. 
Deadline: 4/1/98 (Summer); none (Fall/Spring).
- - - - - - - - - - - -

BOEHRINGER INGELHEIM FONDS

Postgraduate Fellowships are allocated for research projects on specific
subjects, focusing on biologists and molecular biology, not for vocational or
scientific training. Awards are available to scientists of any nationality,
and can be used in Germany or abroad. Pre-doctorate scientists should not be
older than 28; post-doctorate scientists should not be over 30 years at the
time of application. The Foundation supports only activities concerned with
basic research and aimed at acquiring new scientific knowledge.  Deadlines:
4/1/98, 8/1/98, 12/1/98.  Contact:  Stafflenbergstrasse 32, D-70184 Stuttgart
1, Germany; 711/247/397; fax 711/248/140.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH)

National Research Service Awards for Individual Postdoctoral Fellows are
offered for full-time research training in specified areas of biomedical and
behavioral research of interest to the NIH constituent institutes and centers.
Awards range from $19,608-$32,300/year for 3 years. Postdoctoral fellows
accepting an award covering their first 12 months of postdoctoral support must
sign an agreement to engage in health-related research training,
health-related research, or health-related teaching for a period equal to
their initial 12 months of support. Contact: For application materials contact
ORPD or the Office of Grants Information, 301/435-0714;
girg@drgpo.drg.nih.gov. For programmatic information, contact the appropriate
center or institute (telephone numbers available at ORPD). Deadlines: 4/5/98;
8/5/98; 12/5/98.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

The Evaluation of the Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State
Prisoners Program will provide 10 awards of up to $60,000 for up to 15 months
for local process evaluations of Residential Substance Abuse Treatment
programs in individual States. Funds are intended to encourage multiple,
non-redundant evaluations and build research capacity in this topic area. Five
awards of up to $100,000 for a 24 month period will be awarded for local
outcome evaluations to encourage multiple, non-redundant evaluations and build
research capacity in this topic area. It is expected that the outcome
evaluations will address the same programs included in the local process
evaluations, and will build upon the process evaluations.  Deadline(s):
4/14/98, 8/19/98, 2/16/99 (Outcome Evaluations); 5/5/98, 9/15/98 (Process
Evaluations).  Contact: National Institute of Justice, 800/851-3420;
askncjrs@ncjrs.org; http://www.ncjrs.org/fedgrant.htm#nij.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

ITTLESON FOUNDATION GRANTS PROGRAM

The sponsor provides seed money for start-up of innovative programs to improve
the social welfare of U.S. citizens.  Preference is given to pilot projects,
test and demonstration projects, and applied research which ideally should
inform public policy. Projects should be of national scope or significance
beyond the local area of implementation and should result in a product or
outcome of some consequence in the real world.  Dissemination projects are
also supported. Current areas of interest include AIDS, the environment, and
mental health.  Recent single-year grants have ranged from $5,000 to $400,000. 
Deadlines: 4/1/98; 9/1/98.  Contact: Anthony C. Wood, Executive Director,
212/794-2008; fax 212/794-0351.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES

The Head Start/University Partnerships: Translating Research into Practice
program provides support to conduct research on practices that enhance
children's cognitive or social-emotional development or support families to
maximize their children's development. Maximum Federal share is not to exceed
$75,000 for the first 12-month budget period, and approximately $150,000 for
each subsequent year of the 3-year project period. 

The Head Start Research Scholars Program provides support for doctoral
candidates to conduct research with Head Start populations which will
contribute to the knowledge base for improving services both for children and
families in Head Start.  Doctoral-level graduate students who are
representative of Head Start's diverse populations are particularly encouraged
to apply.  Maximum award is not to exceed $15,000 for the first 12-month
budget period or a maximum of $30,000 for a 2-year project period.  
Deadline: 5/5/98.  Contact: Head Start Research Support Center, 703/218-2480;
hsresearch@dakota-tech.com; http://www.acf.dhhs.gov/programs/hsb.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

CHARLES A. AND ANNE MORROW LINDBERGH FOUNDATION

The Foundation seeks to further the balance between nature and technology
through a wide variety of educational and research projects and programs.
Areas of interest are agriculture, aviation/aerospace, conservation of natural
resources (animal, plant, water, and conservation in general--land, air,
energy, etc.), education (humanities, the arts, and intercultural
communication), exploration, health (bio-medical research, health and
population sciences, adaptive technology), and waste minimization and
management. Approximately 9 grants of up to $10,580 each are made each year to
support innovative ideas at an early stage of development and establish pilot
projects which often receive more extensive funding later from other sources. 
Certificates of Merit are awarded to applicants whose projects are not funded
but are considered worthy of recognition.  Deadline: 6/16/98.  Contact:
612/338-1703; fax 612/338-6826; lindfdtn@mtn.org;
http://www.mtn.org/lindfdtn/.

-- Sally Eckert-Tilotta, Assistant to the Director of the Office of Research
and Program Development.
*******


BILLBOARD

MARGIE HANSEN JOINS NURSING

Margie Hansen joined the Family and Community Nursing Department quarter time
this fall to teach drug therapy to the Family Nursing Practitioner students.
This fall she will be with us half time and teach drug therapy Monday and
Wednesday afternoons and pathophysiology on Tuesday afternoons. Her new book,
"Pathophysiology: Foundations of Disease and Clinical Intervention," has been
published by Saunders. -- Liz Tyree, Chair, Family and Community Nursing.
*******

BUDGET MANAGEMENT IS FOCUS OF WORKSHOP

A "Managing the Departmental Budget," workshop will be held from 10 a.m. to
noon Thursday, March 5, in 305 Twamley Hall. Alice Brekke and other Budget and
Grants Administration staff members will conduct the workshop, which will
provide an overview of the tools and mechanics of administering a departmental
budget at UND. Strategies for dealing with changes that occur throughout the
year will also be discussed. A case study will be included.
Please contact me if you plan to attend or if you have any questions regarding
the information that will be covered in this workshop. -- Rosemary Thue,
Budget and Grants, 777-4151.
*******

UNISYS DONATES $15,000

Unisys Computer Systems Group, Minneapolis operations, and a number of their
employees who are alumni of the University of North Dakota, have joined
together to establish the Unisys Roughrider Scholarship Endowment within the
UND Foundation. This initial contribution, valued at $10,000, will help
further the development, growth and reputation of the University of North
Dakota, its faculty and students.

"This endowment reflects the importance of technology in business and the need
to support UND faculty in the development of high caliber students," said
Unisys representative Michael Wiest, '79. "This alliance of the University of
North Dakota, Unisys UND alumni and the Unisys corporation will provide the
drive to meet and exceed the expectations of students as they push to excel in
an academic setting."

UND alumni employed by Unisys have contributed significantly to the success of
the company. A number of the alumni were instrumental in the initiation of
this endowment. Sue Senger, '83, Ann Thureen, '77, and Michael Wiest serve as
Unisys representatives on the scholarship review board.

The shared service center in Bismarck, where the Unisys North American
disbursement center is located, has donated $5,000 toward flood recovery
expenses incurred by the University during the 1997 spring flood. Since its
inception in 1994, the Bismarck center has been heavily involved in the
support of higher education in North Dakota. Robert Black, '71, human
resources and public affairs manager for the Bismarck center, was primarily
responsible for the development of this grant.

Unisys, with $6 billion in sales, has over 50,000 clients in 100 countries
worldwide and is an industry leader in providing computer systems, services
and support capabilities needed to help clients manage information for
tangible business results. Unisys employs over 100 UND graduates worldwide. 
-- Heidi Amundson, Foundation News Coordinator.
*******

PROPOSALS SOLICITED FROM STUDENT TECHNOLOGY FEES

The Student Technology Fee Committee is soliciting proposals to be funded from
the fall student technology fee dollars.  Proposals were recently distributed
to Vice President and Provost Strathe, Vice President Henry, Vice President
Hoffarth, Dean Wilson, Academic Deans, Directors, and Department Chairpersons. 
For a copy of the request forms, please contact your appropriate
administrator. The application deadline to your division administrator is
Wednesday, March 18. Deans may have an earlier deadline to their office.
Please check with your college administrator. All proposals from division
administrators are due to the Office of the Vice President for Academic
Affairs on Friday, March 20, 1998.--Marlene Strathe, Vice President for
Academic Affairs and Student Technology Fee Committee Convener.
*******

PERC LISTS CLASSES

The Parent Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Road, will hold the
following classes at the Center unless otherwise noted. Call 795-2765 to
register or for more information.

Thursday, Feb. 26: "Teaching Our Children Character," presented by Leland
Lipp, Westward Ho Complex, Gateway Drive, 7 to 9 p.m.

Friday, Feb. 27: "Parents in a Pressure Cooker," a six-week series offered
Friday mornings from 9:30 to 11 a.m.; child care will be provided.

Tuesday, March 3: "Avoiding Bedtime Battles," a two-hour seminar presented by
Shaun Seymour from 7 to 9 p.m.

Wednesday, March 4: "Kids Are Worth It!" a five-week study group meeting
Wednesdays from 7 to 8:30 p.m.

Thursday, March 5: "How Diabetes Affects Different Generations," presented by
Gail Hand and Lynnette Dixon, a lunch box special from 12:10 to 12:50 p.m.;
child care is provided.

Monday, March 9: "Positive Parenting," three Monday mornings from 9:30 to 11
a.m. focusing on preschool children; child care will be provided.

Monday, March 9: "The Parent Magician: Balancing Home and Work," a three-week
series offered Monday evenings from 7 to 8:30 p.m.

Tuesday, March 10: "Parents, Teens and Boundaries: How to Draw the Line," a
five-week book study offered Tuesdays from 1 to 2:30 p.m.; child care will be
provided.

Tuesday, March 10: "Kids and Television," presented by Shaun Seymour, a two-hour seminar from 7 to 9 p.m.

Wednesday, March 11: "Parents Can . . . Help Their Children Do Better in
School," a four-week study group offered Wednesdays from 9:30 to 11 a.m.;
child care will be provided.

Wednesday, March 11: "Setting Limits," a five-week study group offered
Wednesdays from 1 to 2:30 p.m.; child care will be available.

Thursday, March 12: "Where Do You Turn When Your Child Needs Help in School?"
presented by Linda Jenkins, a lunch box special from 12:10 to 12:50 p.m.;
child care is provided.

Monday, March 16: "Sixth Grade Transition to Middle School," a one-hour
seminar from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. presented by Ron Gruwell; child care will be
provided.

Tuesday, March 17: "Raising a Daughter," presented by Cindy Peterson, this
seminar meets from 7 to 9 p.m.

Thursday, March 26: "Choosing Developmentally Appropriate Toys," presented by
Janie Holtan, a lunch box special from 12:10 to 12:50 p.m.; child care is
provided.

Saturday, March 28: "Kid Cooperation," presented by Elizabeth Pantley,
Westward Ho Complex, Gateway Drive, 8:30 a.m. to 2:45 p.m.

Monday, March 30: "Make and Take" for Parents of Preschoolers presented by
Holly Cronquist and Dawn Morken, a one-hour seminar from 9 to 10 a.m.; child
care will be available.

Monday, March 30: "A Quarter of a Century of Change in Education," presented
by Ginny Bollman, 1:30 to 2:30 p.m.; child care will be available.

-- Jan Orvik, Editor, for the Parent Education Resource Center.
*******

BOOKSTORE OFFERS COMPUTER SERVICE

The University Bookstore Computer Service Department is now open. Our new
technician, Dave Jorgenson, is ready to assist you with your computer service
and upgrade needs. For more information, please call the Computer Sales
Department at 777-2870. -- Kristi Bruno, University Bookstore.
*******


ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

NEW NORTH DAKOTA QUARTERLY AVAILABLE

The latest issue of North Dakota Quarterly is now available in the University
Bookstore, the North Dakota Museum of Art and the Urban Stampede. The single
issues is $8, and subscriptions for four attractive and absorbing issues
remain at $25 a year.

This issue features seven essays, seven poems, two stories, four book reviews,
and Dean Harvey Knull's annual list of theses and dissertations accepted by
the Graduate School of the University of North Dakota for 1997.

Featured in the current issue are stories by Susan Tekulve and Lucia Nevai,
poems by Brian Johnson, Robert Wrigley and Rick Mulkey, and essays by Mark
Phillips (a UND alum), D.E. Steward and Debra Marquart, as well as several
other essays and poems. Book reviews included in this issue are written by
Gregory Gagnon (Indian Studies), Susan Koprince (English), and Don McCaffrey
(English professor emeritus).

The cover is from a painting by Minot State University art professor Walter
Piehl. -- Robert Lewis (English), Editor, North Dakota Quarterly.
*******

THEATRE ARTS WILL HOST GUEST ARTIST

UND's Department of Theatre Arts will host a guest artist in residence, David
Boushey, Stunt Coordinator/Stuntman and Master Teacher, Friday, Feb. 27,
through Wednesday, March 4. Mr. Boushey has coordinated stunts for several
Academy and Emmy Award-winning film and television productions. He will teach
a one-week session on Restoration stage fighting to Theatre Arts performance
majors and serve as guest critic and workshop leader for the Theatre Arts
annual Drama Day/One-Act Play Festival Wednesday, March 4.

Boushey has worked in both stage and film media as a fight director and stunt
coordinator in over 45 feature and television films, including "Blue Velvet,"
"Drugstore Cowboy," "Twin Peaks," and "Northern Exposure." He has coordinated
stunts for actors including Tommy Lee Jones, Denzel Washington, Meg Ryan, Jon
Voight, and Marsha Mason. Boushey is the founder of the United Stuntmens
Association, the Society of American Fight Directors, his own firm, On Edge
Productions of Seattle, and he is a master teacher for the University of
Washington's Professional Actors' Training Program. As well as being one of
the 10 Fight Masters in North America, Boushey has taught in over 100
universities and master's programs across the country and boasts that he is
the only American to choreograph the entire Shakespearean canon. -- Mary
Cutler, Theatre Arts.
*******

TRADITIONAL MUSIC CONCERT SET

North Country Traditional Music and Dance will present On the Edge, with Bill
and Mariette Howatt, and Al and Loretta Thorliefson, from Manitou, Manitoba,
playing a mixture of traditional and recent folk, gospel, bluegrass, jazz, and
original music, at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 28, in the Josephine Campbell
Recital Hall, Hughes Fine Arts Center. Admission is $4 for adults, $1 for
children. A dance will follow the concert, with music by On the Edge and North
Country String Band. Folk and traditional dances will be taught. For
information call 773-3850. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, for Jeanne O'Neil, North
Country Traditional Music and Dance.
*******

BAND, WIND ENSEMBLE CONCERT SET FOR MARCH 3

The University Band and the UND Wind Ensemble Concert will be held Tuesday,
March 3, at 7:30 p.m. in the Memorial Union Ballroom.

The University Band will perform works by Jan Van der Roost (Belgian) and
Australians Percy Grainer and Ralph Hultgren. The Wind Ensemble will feature
Germany's Rolf Rudin and his dream piece for winds, "Der Traum des Oenghus,"
Mark Camphouse's, "Watchman, Tell Us of the Night" and a new theater work by
Eric Whitacre, "Godzilla Eats Las Vegas." -- Tami Swiers, Music.
*******

WOMEN'S CENTER LISTS EVENTS

The Women's Center Wednesday, March 4, program is, "Shirley Valentine," at 9
p.m. in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. Admission is free. 
On Thursday, March 5, "The Burning Times" will be shown from 12:15 to 1 p.m.
in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. Everyone is welcome. -- Donna Oltmanns,
Coordinator, Women's Center.
*******

INTERNATIONAL CENTRE LISTS EVENTS

The Thursday, March 5, 7 p.m. program at the International Centre, 2908
University Ave., is "Celebrating the Culture of Sri Lanka." International
students from Sri Lanka will present slides, artifacts, literature, food and
tea from their native country. Sri Lankan attire will also be featured. 
On Friday, March 6, "Celebrating International Women's Day" will be
facilitated by International women at UND. Women's stories, works and lives
will be celebrated along with an International meal. All are welcome. --
Sharon Rezac Andersen, Director, International Centre.
*******

ART PROGRAM FEATURES MEDICINE STONES

The public is invited to attend a free illustrated presentation Thursday,
March 5, at 8 p.m. by Linda Olson of the Minot State University Art
Department. Olson is a 1997-98 Humanities Council Larry Remele Memorial Fellow
who has been working on recording the rock art of Native Americans in
Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, and elsewhere in the Midwest since 1988. She holds
a Master of Arts from the University of Montana and a Master of Fine Arts from
UND. Olson has exhibited her art since 1979 throughout North Dakota, the
United States, and in a recent showing in Norway.

Olson's work on North Dakota rock art included a survey and recording of 15
sites. She studied the historical record, including the original journals of
Lewis and Clark, for example, to learn more about "Medicine Rocks," which
remains a place of spiritual significance to North Dakota Indians. Prof. Olson
is especially concerned about conserving the sites and leaving them in their
original location.

The slide talk will take place in the galleries of the North Dakota Museum of
Art which will be in the process of setting up a new exhibit titled, "Solo
Paintings: Voices in Contemporary Abstraction." Admission is free. 
-- Barb Crow, North Dakota Museum of Art.
*******

RESERVE SPACE FOR WOMEN'S DAY CELEBRATION

Make your reservations for the annual International Women's Day Celebration,
Friday, March 6, from noon to 1:30 p.m., at the International Centre, 2908
University Ave., by calling 777-4231. Free lunch will be provided. -- Sharon
Rezac Andersen, Director, UND International Centre.
*******

DAKOTA P.G.A. GOLF SEMINAR SET FOR MARCH 14

UND will host the 16th annual Dakota P.G.A. Golf Seminar Saturday, March 14,
in the Hyslop Sports Center. The seminar is designed for players, teachers and
coaches who want to improve their play or help others play better golf. Topics
will include basic swing fundamentals, short game techniques, iron play,
individual video tape session (bring your own VHS tape), rules of golf class,
equipment and course management class, and each student will go through a club
fitting program and be provided with club specification recommendations.

The teaching staff will consist of Dakota Chapter P.G.A. professionals.
Advanced registration is required. Please call 777-2155 or 772-3912. The
seminar will run from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The registration fee is $50 and all
proceeds will benefit the Fighting Sioux Golf Program. The seminar is being
presented in cooperation with the University of North Dakota and the Dakota
Chapter of the Professional Golfers Association of America. Participation is
limited to 120 persons. -- Rob Stiles and Leo Marchel, UND Golf Program.
*******

STUDIO ONE LISTS GUESTS

Linda Lamoureux, also known as the "Energizer Bunny," not only chases after
her six children every day but also runs marathons.  Linda has competed in six
marathons and is currently training for the Boston Marathon in April.  She
will talk about the physical and mental training that is necessary for such a
big endeavor and how she manages her two biggest priorities: family management
and marathon training. 

The sounds of a hockey game may go unrecognized without the help of one man
who helps bring those sounds to life on the radio. A feature story will
provide insight on radio sports broadcast technology with the help of a radio
sound engineer, Wayne Selly, as he helps unfold the mystery of radio sound
control. Selly has been working at sporting events for over 30 years. Watch
Studio One for more insight on the 'behind the scenes work' of Wayne Selly.    
   

"Studio One" is an award-winning one-hour weekly afternoon show featuring
news, weather, sports, and interviews produced at the University of North
Dakota Television Center. The program airs live on channel 3 at 5 p.m. on
Thursdays.  Rebroadcasts can be seen Fridays at noon and 7 p.m., Saturdays at
10 a.m. and noon, as well as Monday through Wednesday at 7 p.m.  "Studio One"
also airs in Fargo, Bismarck/Mandan, Minot, and Minneapolis.
-- Rich Gibbs, UND Studio One Marketing Team.
*******


EVENTS CALENDAR

FEBRUARY 1998

(Please contact Mavis at the Office of University Relations, Box 7144, or call
777-4304, if you wish to make changes or have an event included.)

---------------------
February -- BLACK HISTORY MONTH (EBTCC: Era Bell Thompson Cultural Center,
2800 University Ave.
     
     Thurs., Feb. 26: Workshop, "McNair Program," EBTCC, 1:30 to 3 p.m.
     
     Fri., Feb. 27: Col. (Ret.) Fitzroy Neusom, original member of the
Tuskegee Airmen, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, noon to 1 p.m., reception at
EBTCC, 2 p.m.; Def Comedy Jam, Chester Fritz Auditorium, 8 p.m.; Dance, 10:30
p.m. (cost is $8).

     Sat., Feb. 28: Black History Month Dinner, Grand Forks Air Force Base.
--------------------- 

Through Sat., Feb. 28 -- THEATRE, "The Grapes of Wrath," adapted by Frank
Galati, Burtness Theatre, 7:30 p.m.; cost is $5; call 777-2587 for tickets.

Through Sun., March 1 -- ART EXHIBIT, "Old Friends: New Art Part II," exhibit
features work of 20 artists including Ed Ruscha, Donald Anderson, Duane
Michals and Jim Dow, North Dakota Museum of Art.

Through Sun., March 1 -- ART STUDENT COLLECTIVE/STUDENT ART EXHIBIT OPENS,
North Dakota Museum of Art.

Through Thurs., March 5 -- GRAND FORKS, EAST GRAND FORKS AREA HIGH SCHOOL ART
EXHIBIT, Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center.

Through Sun., March 29 -- EXHIBITION OPENING, "New Work: New York," new
paintings from artists in New York City curated by Peter Ryan, North Dakota
Museum of Art.

Thurs., Feb. 26 -- UND FOUNDERS DAY BANQUET, Memorial Union Ballroom, 6:30
p.m.; tickets may be purchased in the Office of University Relations, 411
Twamley Hall.

Thurs., Feb. 26 -- ANATOMY CANDIDATE LECTURE, "Transcription Factor Gene MRF4
and the Hardwiring of Skeletal Muscle Development" presented by Timothy
Hinterberger, Assistant Professor, Biomedical Program and Department of
Biological Sciences, University of Alaska Anchorage, Frank Low Conference
Room, B710, School of Medicine, 11 a.m.

Thurs., Feb. 26 -- LUNCH BOX SPECIAL, "101 Ways To Tell Your Child 'I Love
You'," presented by Beth Randklev, principal at Ben Franklin Elementary
School, Parent Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Road, 12:10 to 12:50
p.m.; call 795-2765 to register; child care provided.

Thurs., Feb. 26 -- ENGLISH LECTURE SERIES, "An Object is an Object is an
Object is an Object: The Making of the Mother of Modernism," presented by a
member of both Neuroscience and English, Perry Benson, 116 Merrifield Hall, 4
p.m.; free and open to the public.

Thurs., Feb. 26 -- COMPUTER SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM, presented by the fall 1997
Advanced Computer Graphics course, 103 Odegard Hall (formerly CAS I), 3 p.m.;
watch flames ficker, trees grow, geese fly and lightning strike the plains of
Colorado when the class discusses their projects and shows animations and
stills that demonstrate state-of-the-art computer graphics techniques.

Thurs., Feb. 26 -- PHYSICS SEMINAR, "Quantum Turnstile," presented by Henn
Soonpaa, Professor Emeritus of Physics, 209 Witmer Hall, 4 p.m.; coffee will
be served at 3:30 p.m. in Room 215.

Thurs., Feb. 26 -- LECTURE, "The Similarities and Differences Between
Psychotherapy and Insight Meditation" by a visiting psychotherapist and
meditation teacher, Matthew Flickstein, Lotus Meditation Center, 2908
University Ave., 7:30 p.m.

Thurs., Feb. 26 -- FAREWELL RECEPTION for Leo Saucedo, Bookstore Manager of
the Health Science Bookstore, lower level of the atrium, just outside the
Health Science Bookstore, Medical School, 2:30 to 4 p.m.

Thurs., Feb. 26 -- WOMEN'S CENTER MOVIE, "The Goddess Remembered," Lecture
Bowl, Memorial Union, 12:15 to 1 p.m.

Thurs., Feb. 26 -- WORLD RELIGION FORUM, a panel discussion on world religions
will be facilitated by faculty of the UND Religion and Philosophy Department
faculty, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; everyone is
welcome to this free event; call 777-4231 for more information.

Thurs., Feb. 26 -- PARENT EDUCATION RESOURCE CENTER WINTER SERIES, "Teaching
Our Children Character," presented by Leland Lipp, Westward Ho Complex, 7 to 9
p.m.; call 795-2765 to register.

Thurs., Feb. 26 -- UNIVERSITY PROGRAM COUNCIL EVENT, "Conspiracy Theory,"
Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, 9 p.m.; free admission.

Fri., Feb. 27 -- UND FOUNDERS DAY.

Fri., Feb. 27 -- BIOLOGY SEMINAR, "Putting History Back Into Evolution: The
Evolution of Cryptic Coloration in Orioles and Their Relatives," presented by
Scott M. Lanyon, Director of the Natural History Museum, University of
Minnesota, 141 Starcher Hall, noon.

Fri., Feb. 27 -- PHYSICS SEMINAR, "Geometry of Mixing in 2D Time Periodic
Flows: Asymptotic Directionality in Physically Realizable Flows and Global
Invariant Properties" will be presented by Alessandra Adrover, Department of
Chemical Engineering and Center for Fractal and Disordered Systems in Chemical
Engineering, University of Rome, 209 Witmer Hall, 2:30 p.m.

Fri., Feb. 27 -- PHYSICS SEMINAR, "Statistical Properties of 2D Chaotic Flows
and Hamiltonian Systems" will be presented by Massimiliano Giona, Department
of Chemical Engineering, University of Cagliari, Italy, and Center for Fractal
and Disordered Systems in Chemical Engineering, University of Rome, 209 Witmer
Hall, 4 p.m.

Fri., Feb. 27 -- PARENT EDUCATION RESOURCE CENTER SIX-WEEK SERIES, "Parents in
a Pressure Cooker," offered Friday mornings from 9:30 to 11 a.m. at the Parent
Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Rd., call 795-2765 for more
information or to register; child care will be provided.

Fri., Feb. 27 -- BLACK HISTORY MONTH LECTURE, Retired Colonel Fitzroy "Buck"
Newsum, original member of the Tuskegee Airmen, will speak at the Memorial
Union Lecture Bowl from noon to 1 p.m.

Fri., Feb. 27 -- INTEGRATED STUDIES DISCUSSION, "Religion and Science,"
(chapter 6-10) by Bertrand Russell, 116 O'Kelly Hall, 10 a.m. to noon; call
Pat at 777-3015 or Carl at 777-3058 for details.

Fri., Feb. 27 -- DEF COMEDY JAM, Chester Fritz Auditorium, 8 p.m. (call the
Era Bell Thompson Cultural Center at 777-4119 for ticket information).

Fri., Feb. 27 -- BASKETBALL, WOMEN'S, UND at North Dakota State University,
Fargo, N.D., 6 p.m.

Fri. and Sat., Feb. 27-28 -- HOCKEY, UND at University of Minnesota-Duluth,
Duluth, Minn., 7:05 p.m.

Fri., Feb. 27, through Sun., March 1 -- INSIGHT MEDITATION RETREAT led by
visiting psychotherapist and meditation teacher Matthew Flickstein, Mount St.
Benedict, Crookston, Minn.; call 772-2161 or 777-4231 to register or for more
information.

Sat., Feb. 28 -- TEST, Foreign Service Officer Examination (FSO), 114 Witmer
Hall, 7:45 a.m.

Sat., Feb. 28 -- FIRST HIGHER EDUCATION FACULTY SUMMIT sponsored by the North
Dakota Public Employees Association, AFT, 4660, Doublewood Inn, Fargo, N.D., 8
a.m. to 5 p.m.; call 1-800-472-2698 to pre-register or for more information.

Sat., Feb. 28 -- RECITAL, DeAndra Jensen Saxophone Recital, Josephine Campbell
Recital Hall, Hughes Fine Arts Center, 4 p.m.

Sat., Feb. 28 -- UNIVERSITY PROGRAM COUNCIL EVENT, "The Meeting," a
conversation between Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr., Ballroom, Memorial
Union, 8 p.m.; free admission.

Sat., Feb. 28 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND at North Dakota State University,
Fargo, N.D., 7 p.m.

Sat., Feb. 28 -- SWIMMING & DIVING, FAST Last Chance Invitational, Hyslop
Sports Center.



MARCH 1998

(Please contact Mavis at the Office of University Relations, Box 7144, or call
777-4304, if you wish to make changes or have an event included.)

Sun. and Mon., March 1-2 -- SWIMMING & DIVING, Last Chance Invitational Hyslop
Sports Center.

Mon., March 2 -- ANATOMY CANDIDATE SEMINAR, "Gravin, A Novel PKA Binding
Protein, Regulates Endothelial Wound Healing," presented by Bryon Grove,
Research Assistant Professor, Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology,
Louisiana State University Medical Center, Frank Low Conference Room, B710,
Edwin C. James Research Facility, lower level, Medical Building, 11 a.m.

Mon., March 2 -- PSYCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM, "Roles for Psychologists in Business
and Industry," presented by Randall Cheloha, 202 Nursing, noon; everyone is
welcome.

Tues., March 3 -- MEETING, University Senate Library Committee, 217 Chester
Fritz Library, 4 p.m.; meeting is open to the public.

Tues., March 3 -- UNIVERSITY PROGRAM COUNCIL EVENT, "Good Girls Don't Eat
Dessert," lecture on the way women view their bodies and how society views
them, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, 7 p.m.; free admission.

Tues., March 3 -- PARENT EDUCATION RESOURCE CENTER CLASS, "Avoiding Bedtime
Battles," a two-hour seminar presented by Shaun Seymour from 7 to 9 p.m., PERC
Center, 500 Stanford Rd., call 795-2765 to register or for more information.

Tues., March 3 -- CONCERT, Wind Ensemble and University Band, Ballroom,
Memorial Union, 7:30 p.m.

Wed., March 4 -- "ON TEACHING" SESSION for department chairs and academic
program directors, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, noon; John Miller (Music)
will demonstrate a helpful student record-keeping computer application; to
reserve a complimentary box lunch, call 777-3325 by Tues., Feb. 24.

Wed., March 4 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for Karen Renee Danbom, a candidate for the
Ph.D. degree with a major in Teaching and Learning, 104 Education Building, 2
p.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Wed., March 4 -- NEWEST ONLINE JOURNAL TITLE DISCUSSION by Health Sciences
Library staff, Library of the Health Sciences, 1 p.m.

Wed., March 4 -- PARENT EDUCATION RESOURCE CENTER CLASS, "Kids Are Worth It!"
a five-week study group meeting Wednesdays from 7 to 8:30 p.m., PERC Center,
500 Stanford Rd., call 795-2765 to register or for more information.

Wed., March 4 -- THEATRE ARTS ANNUAL DRAMA DAY/ONE-ACT PLAY FESTIVAL, David
Boushey, Stunt Coordinator/Stuntman and Master Teacher serves as guest critic
and workshop leader for the festival, Burtness Theatre.

Wed., March 4 -- UNIVERSITY PROGRAM COUNCIL EVENT, "Shirley Valentine,"
Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, 9 p.m.; free admission.

Wed., March 4 -- FEAST AND FOCUS PROGRAM, "Honoring Our Mothers: A Ritual To
Honor Our Foremothers," Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon to 1 p.m.;
everyone is welcome.

Wed., March 4 -- WOMEN'S CENTER MOVIE, "Shirley Valentine," Lecture Bowl,
Memorial Union, 9 p.m.; admission is free.

Wed., March 4 -- BASEBALL, UND at St. Joseph's (Ind.), Metrodome, Minneapolis,
Minn., 11:45 a.m. 

Thurs., March 5 -- MEETING, University Senate, Room 7, Gamble Hall, 4:05 p.m.

Thurs., March 5 -- WORKSHOP, "Managing the Departmental Budget," 305 Twamley
Hall, 10 a.m. to noon; call Rosemary at 777-4151 if you plan to attend or for
more information.

Thurs., March 5 -- MEETING, Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) Discussion
Group, noon to 1 p.m.; call the WAC office at 777-3600 to sign up to attend or
for more information.

Thurs., March 5 -- ILLUSTRATED ART PRESENTATION, "Medicine Rocks," Linda Olson
of the Minot State University Art Department will present a slide talk, North
Dakota Museum of Art, 8 p.m.; admission is free.

Thurs., March 5 -- WOMEN'S CENTER MOVIE, "The Burning Times," Lecture Bowl,
Memorial Union, 12:15 to 1 p.m.; everyone is welcome.

Thurs., March 5 -- CELEBRATING THE CULTURE OF SRI LANKA -- international
students from the country of Sri Lanka will present slides, artifacts,
literature, food and tea from their native country; Sri Lankan attire will
also be featured; International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; everyone
is welcome to this free event; call 777-4231 for more information.

Thurs., March 5 -- PARENT EDUCATION RESOURCE CENTER CLASS, "How Diabetes
Affects Different Generations," a lunch box special presented by Gail Hand and
Lynnette Dixon from 12:10 to 12:50 p.m., PERC Center, 500 Stanford Rd., call
795-2765 to register or for more information.

Thurs., March 5 -- ALTRU HEALTH SYSTEM NIGHT JUST FOR WOMEN, Ramada Inn; call
the Women's Center at 777-4300 for more information.

Through Thurs., March 5 -- GRAND FORKS, EAST GRAND FORKS AREA HIGH SCHOOL ART
EXHIBIT, Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center.

Thurs. through Sat., March 5-7 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, North Central Athletic
Association Regionals.

Thurs. through Sat., March 5-7 -- BASKETBALL, WOMEN'S, North Central Athletic
Association Regionals.

Fri., March 6 -- UNSATISFACTORY PROGRESS REPORT FORMS DUE IN THE OFFICE OF
ADMISSIONS AND RECORDS BY NOON.

Fri., March 6 -- MEETING, Institutional Review Board, 305 Twamley Hall, 4 p.m.
to consider all research proposals submitted to the Office of Research and
Program development before Tuesday, Feb. 24.

Fri., March 6 -- GEOGRAPHY DEPARTMENT NOON FORUM, "Ecosystems Geography:
Alternative Methods of Ecogeographic Analysis," presented by Dion Wiseman,
Department of Geography at Brandon University, Manitoba, 364 Clifford Hall,
noon.

Fri., March 6 -- LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary Sciences) LECTURE,
"Building and Flying the Magellan Spacecraft" presented by Stephen B. Johnson
(Space Studies), Leonard Hall Lecture Bowl (Room 100), noon.

Fri., March 6 -- INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY CELEBRATION, International Centre,
2908 University Ave., noon to 1:30 p.m.; everyone is welcome; call 777-4231
for reservations; a free lunch will be provided.

Fri., March 6 -- CELEBRATING INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY facilitated by
international women at UND with women's stories, works and lives celebrated
along with an international meal, International Centre, 2908 University Ave, 7
p.m.; everyone is welcome to this free event; call 777-4231 for more
information.

Fri., March 6 -- SATELLITE BROADCAST, the Welfare Reform Academy has scheduled
a series of conferences on various topics of welfare reform on the first
Friday of each month, from February through June; the conferences will be
broadcast from the American Enterprise Institute in Washington, D.C., and will
be viewed in 130 Gamble Hall, noon to 2:50 p.m.; there is no fee to
participants; please register by contacting Mike Jacobsen (Social Work) at
777-3768 or mike_jacobsen@mail.und.nodak.edu.

Fri., March 6 -- GREATER GRAND FORKS SYMPHONY FAMILY CONCERT, "Peter and the
Wolf," Chester Fritz Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

Fri., March 6 -- GREEN AND WHITE DAY, President Baker has approved this day
for employees to wear UND colors and jeans to show support for our Sioux
athletes.

Fri. and Sat., March 6-7 -- HOCKEY, UND vs. University of Wisconsin, Engelstad
Arena, 7:35 p.m.
*******


UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and
distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is
also available electronically through UNDInfo, the University's menu
system on the Internet. The address is http://www.und.nodak.edu.
  
All articles submitted for publication should be labeled "University
Letter" and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic
submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu. Attachments to
University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number.
University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations,
Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.
  
UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.
*******


  





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