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University Letter

February 28, 1997

Volume 34 No. 26



UNIVERSITY LETTER


UNIVERSITY LETTER IS ALSO AVAILABLE ELECTRONICALLY in the Events and News
section of UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address
is: http://www.und.nodak.edu

UNIVERSITY LETTER INDEX
U Senate Agenda Listed
     EVENTS TO NOTE
Cooperative Learning Is LEEPS Lecture Topic
Health, Law Are Symposium Topics
Graduate Committee Lists Agenda
Psychology Sets Colloquium
Events Listed For Women's History Month
IRB Slated To Meet March 5
History Schedules Brown Bag Lunch Session
Faculty To Discuss Active Learning
Writers Conference Slated For March 18-22
George McGovern To Speak At Conferences
     OF ACADEMIC INTEREST
General Education Requirements Changed
March 7 Is Deadline For "Unsatisfactory Progress Report" Forms
New Freshmen Advisement dates Set
Student Scholarships Available For Study Abroad
Tutors Sought For INMED
     GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS
ORPD Staff, Responsibilities Outlined
ORPD Lists Funding Opportunities
     BILLBOARD
Nominations Sought For Meritorious Awards
Linda Hendrikson Joins Conflict Resolution Center
Computer Center Offers WordPerfect Training
Spring Break Hours Listed for Chester Fritz Library, Health
   Sciences Library, Memorial Union
Education Students Invited To Recruiting Fair
Summer Camp Jobs Available
Merchandise Reports Must Be Sent To Central Receiving
Departments, Student Organizations Invited To Place Information Online
     ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT
Band Concert Set For March 2
Fish, Humor Subject Of New Exhibit
Women's Center Lists Events
Theatre To Host High School Play Festival
International Centre Lists Events
     FYI
Items Offered To Public On Bids
Craft Center Offers Activities
Bookstore Plans Textbook Information Fair
Workshop Will Discuss Families
     CALENDAR OF EVENTS
*******

U Senate Agenda Listed

The University Senate will meet at 4:05 p.m. Thursday, March 6, in Room 7,
Gamble Hall.

AGENDA
1. Announcements
2. Minutes of the previous meeting and business arising from the minutes.
3. Question period.

CONSENT CALENDAR:
4. Annual Report of the Academic Policies Committee. Jan Goodwin, Chair.
(Attachment No. 1)
5. Annual Report of the Student Academic Standards Committee. Alice Poehls,
Chair. (Attachment No. 2)
6. Annual Report of the Administrative Procedures Committee. Alice Poehls,
Chair. (Attachment No. 3)
7. Annual Report of the Admissions Committee. Fred Schneider, Chair.
(Attachment No. 4)

BUSINESS CALENDAR:
8. Report of Committee on Committees on Nominations for Senate Committees.
David Uherka, Chair. (Attachment No. 5)
9. Recommendation from the Senate Executive Committee to change the functions
and responsibilities of the Student Academic Standards Committee. (Attachment
No. 6)
10. Recommendation from the Senate Executive Committee to change the
membership, functions, and responsibilities of the Administrative Procedures
Committee. (Attachment No. 7)
11. Recommendation from Honorary Degrees Committee regarding awarding of
Honorary Degrees. Einar Einarson, Chair.
12. Resolution regarding HB1312. Al Berger (Attachment No. 8)
13. Resolution regarding HB1458. Andrew Varvel. (Attachment No. 9)
14. Resolution concerning higher education governance. Andrew Varvel
(Attachment No. 10)
15. Resolution concerning Higher Education Finance Reform. Andrew Varvel.
(Attachment No. 11)

-- Alice Poehls (Admissions and Records), Secretary, University Senate.
*******

EVENTS TO NOTE

Cooperative Learning Is LEEPS Lecture Topic

A LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary sciences) Lecture and workshop on
cooperative learning will be presented by Dean McManus, School of
Oceanography, University of Washington, Seattle, on FRIDAY, FEB. 28.
At noon in 109 Leonard Hall, he will consider "Oceanographic Studies at the
University of Washington."

>From 2 to 4 p.m. in 215 Leonard Hall, he will conduct a workshop, "Changing a
Lecture Course to Cooperative Learning: Nuts and Bolts."
Those interested in participating in the workshop are asked to notify Gloria
Pederson at 7-2248.

Dr. McManus is a National Association of Geology Teachers Distinguished
Speaker and has been giving cooperative learning workshops at schools across
the country. He was originally scheduled to be at UND last fall, but his visit
was postponed.

The LEEPS Lecture Series is supported by the Department of Geology and
Geological Engineering, the Department of Space Studies, the Energy and
Environmental Research Center, the Office of Research and Program Development,
the Office of Instructional Development, and the Advancing Science Excellence
in North Dakota (ASEND) Program. All interested persons are welcome to attend.
For additional information, contact me. -- Dexter Perkins, Professor of
Geology and Geological Engineering, 7-2991.
*******

Health, Law Are Symposium Topics

Nationally recognized telemedicine experts are joining North Dakota attorneys
and health care providers for an in-depth look at the future of modern rural
medicine.

The North Dakota Law Review is sponsoring the symposium, "Telemedicine: The
Intersection of Law, Medicine, and Technology." This conference features
panelists and presenters comprised of legal and medical practitioners,
educators, and government officials. Topics to be addressed include privacy
and confidentiality of patient records, reimbursement, licensure, medical
malpractice, and current legislation affecting this field. The conference also
includes a live demonstration of how telemedicine actually works.

The symposium will be held Friday through Sunday, FEB. 28 - MARCH 1, in the
Clifford Hall Auditorium. The conference fee is $225. For more information,
please contact me. -- Aaron Dorrheim, Case Comment Editor, North Dakota Law
Review at 7-2941.
*******

Graduate Committee Lists Agenda

The Graduate Committee will meet MONDAY, MARCH 3, at 3:05 p.m. in 305 Twamley
Hall.  The agenda will include:

1. Consideration of a request by the Department of Industrial Technology to:
     a. Change program requirements.
     b. Change the credits for IT 540, Supervision and Industrial Training
from two to three.
     c. Change the credits for IT 550, Industrial Technology Management from
two to three.
     d. Change the title for IT 560 to Quality Planning and Analysis, and
delete the prerequisites.
     e. Change the title for IT 593 to Technical Problems in Industrial
Technology, and change the course description.
     f. Delete IT 591, Technical Problems in Electronic/Control Systems.
     g. Delete IT 592, Technical Problems in Graphic Communication.
     h. Add a new course IT 565, Product Safety and Liability.
     i. Add a new course IT 537, Graduate Cooperative Education.

2. Consideration of a request by the College of Business and Public
Administration to:
     a. Change program requirements.
     b. Change the title for PSCI 591 to Readings in Political Science and
Public Administration.
     c. Change the title for PSCI 593 to Problems in Political Science and
Public Administration.
     d. Add a new course, PSCI 595, Professional Development in Public
Administration.
     e. Change the credits for MRKT 595, Graduate Readings in Marketing, from
one to three to one to three, repeatable to six.

3. Overview of proposed MPA/JD program. 

4. Consideration of a request by the Teaching and Learning Department to give
graduate credit for T&L 421, Transition to Adult Life.

5. Matters arising.

-- Harvey Knull, Dean, Graduate School.
*******

Psychology Sets Colloquium

The Psychology Department will hold a colloquium in which Tom Petros
(Psychology), will present "Executive Functioning in Reading Disabled and
Attention Deficit Children" at noon MONDAY, MARCH 3, in Room 102, Nursing
Building. Everyone is welcome to attend. If you have any questions, please
contact Joan at 7-3451. -- Joan Peterson, Psychology Department.
*******

Events Listed For Women's History Month

March is Women's History Month. Events from the Women's Center follow.
MONDAY, MARCH 3: Noon to 1 p.m., "Abby Aldrich (Mrs. John D.) Rockefeller"
presented by Albert Berger (History), Women's Center, 305 Hamline St.; 4 to 7
p.m., "Indians, Outlaws and Angie Debo," History Club film and discussion, 114
Merrifield Hall; 7 p.m., "It's a Female Thing: Sexism," presented by Women's
Center staff, Sioux Room, Memorial Union.

TUESDAY, MARCH 4: Noon to 1 p.m., "Land, Liquor and the Women of Hatton, N.D."
presented by Barbara Handy-Marchello (History), Women's Center, 305 Hamline
St.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5: Noon, "Beauty Pageants: Bright Lights and Big Business,"
film and discussion, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union; noon, "The Sexual Politics
of the Reign of Catherine the Great," 217 Merrifield Hall; repeated at 7 p.m.
in the Grand Forks Public Library.

THURSDAY, MARCH 6: Noon, For Women Only Program, "Women's Sexuality Throughout
History" presented by Sue Goebel, Valley Health, Women's Center, 305 Hamline
St.; noon to 1 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m., "International Women's Day Celebration
and Presentation of Women Studies Essay Contest Awards," International Centre,
2908 University Ave.

FRIDAY, MARCH 7: Noon to 1 p.m., "The Sexual Politics of the Reign of
Catherine the Great" presented by David Rowley (History), Women's Center, 305
Hamline St.

-- Donna Oltmanns, Coordinator, Women's Center.
*******

IRB Slated To Meet March 5

The Institutional Review Board will meet at 4 p.m. WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, in 305
Twamley Hall, to consider all research proposals submitted to the Office of
Research and Program Development before Monday, Feb. 24. Proposals received
later will be considered only if a quorum has reviewed them and time permits.  

Clinical medical projects must be reviewed by the Clinical Medical Subcom-
mittee before being brought to the full Board. Proposals for these projects
were due in the Office of Research and Program Development Feb. 17.

Notes from the meeting will be available in ORPD approximately one week after
the meeting. -- F.R. Ferraro (Psychology), Chair, Institutional Review Board.
*******

History Schedules Brown Bag Lunch Session

The History Department and Phi Alpha Theta will hold a brown bag lunch session
at noon WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, in 217 Merrifield Hall. David Rowley (History)
will present "The Sexual Politics of the Reign of Catherine the Great." Bring
your lunch. There will be a question and discussion period following the
presentation, which is open to all. This is the first in a series honoring
Women's History Month. For more information please contact me. -- David
Rowley, Associate Professor of History, 7-3380.
*******

Faculty To Discuss Active Learning

"Increasing Active Learning" is the topic for the Office of Instructional
Development box lunch "On Teaching" series scheduled for THURSDAY, MARCH 6, at
noon in the Memorial Room of the Memorial Union. Patti Alleva (Law), Tom Owens
(Chemical Engineering), and Jeff Stith (Atmospheric Sciences) will report on
what works for them as they strive to increase active learning for students.
To order a complimentary box lunch, phone the Office of Instructional
Development, 7-3325, no later than noon Thursday, Feb. 27. -- Dan Rice,
Director of Instructional Development.
*******

Writers Conference Slated For March 18-22

"Writing Nature/The Nature of Writing" is the theme of the 28th Annual UND
Writers Conference, TUESDAY THROUGH SATURDAY, MARCH 18-22, at the Memorial
Union. As the title implies, the conference will focus on writers whose work
is about or is influenced by nature.
The following is the schedule of events for the region's premiere cultural
event.

TUESDAY, MARCH 18: Noon, Panel: "Nature and the North American West," Garrett
Hongo, Annick Smith, and Meeka Walsh; 3 p.m., Reading, Annick Smith; 8 p.m.,
Reading, Garrett Hongo.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19: Noon, Panel: "The End of Nature Debate," Garrett Hongo,
Bill McKibben, Annick Smith, and Meeka Walsh; 3 p.m., Meeka Walsh; 8 p.m.,
Reading, Bill McKibben.

THURSDAY, MARCH 20: Noon, Panel: "Writing Nature," Susan Griffin, Bill
McKibben, David Treuer; 3 p.m., Reading, David Treuer; 8 p.m., Linda Hogan.

FRIDAY, MARCH 21: Noon, Panel: "The Nature of Writing," Susan Griffin, Linda
Hogan, Bill Morrissey, and David Treuer; 3 p.m., Reading, Bill Morrissey; 8
p.m., Susan Griffin.

SATURDAY, MARCH 22: 8 p.m., Bill Morrissey Concert.
All events except the Bill Morrissey Concert Saturday night are free.

SUSAN GRIFFIN -- Known for her interweaving of history and autobiography,
ecology and gender, Susan Griffin is a writer, poet, essayist, lecturer,
teacher, and playwright. Her books include "Woman and Nature," "Pornography
and Silence," "The Eros of Everyday Life," and "A Chorus of Stones," which was
a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in Nonfiction. Her play "Voices" won an Emmy
in 1975, and she is the recipient of a MacArthur Grant for Peace and
International Cooperation. Recently named one of "100 visionaries" by the Utne
Reader, Susan Griffin lives in Berkeley, Calif.

LINDA HOGAN -- A Chickasaw poet, novelist, and essayist, Linda Hogan is
currently a professor at the University of Colorado where she teaches creative
writing, fiction, and Native American literature. Her novel, "Mean Spirit,"
was one of three finalists for the Pulitzer Prize in 1991, and "The Book of
Medicines" was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. "Solar
Storms," her most recent novel, is set among Minnesota and Canadian border
tribes.

GARRETT HONGO -- A fourth-generation Japanese-American, Garrett Hongo was born
in Hawaii and raised in Los Angeles. His collection of poetry, "The River of
Heaven," received the Lamont Prize from the American Academy of Poets, and was
nominated for a Pulitzer Prize in Poetry for 1989. He has also published
another book of poetry, "Yellow Light," and a memoir, "Volcano," a lyrical
evocation of volcano and rain forest life which also explores his return to
Hawaii as an adult searching out family mysteries. Currently Hongo directs the
creative writing program at the University of Oregon.

BILL McKIBBEN -- A writer and committed environmentalist, Bill McKibben is
perhaps best known for "The End of Nature," translated into 16 languages, an
account of global environmental problems. In 1992 he published "The Age of
Missing Information," and most recently "Hope, Human and Wild" (1995). He was
a staff writer for the New Yorker from 1982 to 1987, and has been published
widely including in The Atlantic, The New York Times, Audubon, and Rolling
Stone. His work has also been anthologized in The Oxford Book of Nature. Bill
McKibben lives in the Adirondack Mountains of New York with his wife Sue
Halpern, also a writer, and their daughter Sophie. An avid hiker, canoeist,
and cross-country skier, McKibben is the lay leader of a small Methodist
church.

BILL MORRISSEY -- Considered one of the best singer-songwriters working today,
Bill Morrissey's recordings include "You'll Never Get to Heaven" (1996) and
"Night Train" (1993). He is also the author of "Edson" (1996), a novel set in
a small mill town in New Hampshire. Music critics have long praised
Morrissey's songs for their literary qualities, noting his "Faulknerian eye
for detail." Morrissey lives in New Hampshire where he enjoys hunting and
fishing with friends.

ANNICK SMITH -- Originally form Chicago, Annick Smith has been living on a
ranch outside Missoula, Mont., for over 30 years. As a writer, independent
film maker and producer, Smith states "my work is influenced and inspired by
the natural world, particularly the American West." Smith is the author of the
critically acclaimed "Homestead," and co-produced, with Robert Redford, the
film "A River Runs Through It." She co-edited, with William Kittredge, "The
Last Best Place: A Montana Anthology," and is the author of "Big Bluestem: A
Journey Into the Tallgrass" (1996). Her work appears in many anthologies,
including Best American Short Stories 1992.

DAVID TREUER -- David Treuer, 25, and an Ojibwe from the Leech Lake
reservation, is the author of "Little," a novel set in a fictitious Minnesota
reservation town he calls Poverty. This first book weaves a series of first
person narratives "threading events and characters together by the pull of the
Mississippi River." Treuer, who grew up on a tree farm near Bemidji, is
completing a Ph.D. in anthropology at Michigan. He is currently a Fulbright
scholar in southern Ontario, collecting Ojibwe oral histories.

MEEKA WALSH -- Meeka Walsh is a Winnipeg-based writer, critic, and editor
whose stories have appeared in numerous Canadian literary magazines, winning
two gold medals at the Western and National magazine Awards. A book of
journals, "Ordinary Magic: Intervals in a Life," was published by Turnstone
Press in 1989, and her first book of fiction, "The Garden of Earthly
Intimacies," appeared in 1996. She edits Border Crossings, an international
arts magazine. -- Jim McKenzie (English), Director, Writers Conference.
*******

George McGovern To Speak At Conferences

George McGovern, former U.S. Senator from South Dakota and the 1972 Democratic
Presidential nominee, will speak at the 23rd Annual National Association for
Rural Mental Health and the 22nd Annual National Institute on Social Work and
Human Services in Rural Areas on Sunday, Aug. 10. He will address a group of
200 professionals in the Memorial Union on the topic of chronic alcoholism.

McGovern's latest book, "Terry: My Daughter's Life-and-Death Struggle with
Alcoholism," is a chronicle of his third child's efforts to overcome her
addiction to alcohol. After her death from alcoholism in 1994, McGovern
established The McGovern Family Foundation to raise funds for alcohol
research. He now devotes his time to speaking about his daughter and
alcoholism, and to lobbying for federal funding for alcohol research.

The 23rd Annual Conference of the National Association for Rural Mental Health
is set for FRIDAY THROUGH SUNDAY, AUG. 8-10, at the Memorial Union. Topics
will include demographic changes in rural America, technology and rural mental
health practice, interdisciplinary rural mental health practice in small
communities, managed care, multicultural issues, and addictions.

The 22nd Annual National Institute on Social Work and Human Services in Rural
Areas is SATURDAY THROUGH MONDAY, AUG. 10-12, at the Memorial Union. Topics
may include areas such as economic, demographic and political change in rural
America; paradigm shifts in health and human services; rural technology
transfer programs; ethnic and cultural diversity; and practice and program
evaluation.

The conferences are sponsored by the UND Department of Social Work, the
National Association for Rural Mental Health, North Dakota Department of
Health Division of Alcohol and Drug Abuse, the Rural Social Work Caucus, and
coordinated by the UND Division of Continuing Education.

-- Dawn Botsford, Program Coordinator, Continuing Education.
*******

OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

General Education Requirements Changed

Prior to the fall of 1996, students needed 39 credits of General Education
Courses in order to graduate, as outlined below.
     6   Credits of English Composition
     12 Credits of Social Science
     12 Credits of Arts and Humanities
     12 Credits of Math, Science, & Technology

Starting in the fall 1996, students still need 39 credits of General Education
Courses, but that those credits are defined according to new criteria, as
outlined below.
     9   Credits of Communications
     9   Credits of Social Science*
     9   Credits of Arts and Humanities*
     12 Credits of Math, Science, & Technology
     *  3 of the Credits for Social Science or Arts and Humanities must be
designated as meeting the requirements for World Cultures Courses.

What courses meet the new Communications requirement?

What courses satisfy the requirement for three credits of World Cultures?

Does the new World Cultures requirement effectively mean that there are now 42
credits required, or are 39 credits still the minimum?

The Time Schedule of Classes is scheduled for release March 25. 
Preregistration begins April 7. Find answers to these questions before your
students begin calling for advising appointments by attending one of the
following three opportunities to discuss these issues:
     
     Tuesday, March 4, Memorial Union Lecture Bowl, 3 p.m.
     Thursday, March 6, Memorial Union Lecture Bowl, 9 a.m.
     Thursday, March 6, Memorial Union Lecture Bowl, 5 p.m. 

-- John Bridewell (Aviation), Chair, General Education Requirements Committee.
*******

March 7 Is Deadline For "Unsatisfactory Progress Report" Forms

"Unsatisfactory Progress Report" forms are due in the Office of Admissions and
Records by NOON FRIDAY, MARCH 7.  Please adhere to the following procedures to
ensure that accurate and adequate information is transmitted to students:
     
1. The departmental office picks up forms at 9 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 25, and
transmits them to teaching faculty through routine procedures.

2. Faculty complete a form for each class section.  NOTE:  Forms for ALL
sections are to be completed and returned.  If no students are deficient, the
blank sheet MUST be signed and returned.  This is considered verification that
the instructor considers no students to be deficient at this time.

3. If the form includes names of students who have never attended class, MARK
THEM AS FAILING.  This information should initiate action by the student to
correct any error in registration prior to the last day to drop (Thursday,
March 27).
     
4. If a student is attending a class and the name is not listed on the
deficiency form, this is an indication that the student's registration is in
error. The student should not be allowed to continue attending the class, but
should be directed to the Office of Admissions and Records to correct the
problem.

5. The "Unsatisfactory Progress Report" forms are to be completed by all
faculty members and returned to the Admissions and Records NO LATER THAN NOON
FRIDAY, MARCH 7. Adherence to this schedule is essential since computer
processing is done over the weekend. "Unsatisfactory progress reports" will be
mailed to students during the week beginning March 10.
     
6. DO NOT SEND THROUGH THE MAIL. Please return forms directly to the
Registrar's Office, 201 Twamley Hall.

Thank you for your cooperation.  If you have any questions, please call 7-2711. -- Alice Poehls, Director of Admissions and Records.
*******

New Freshmen Advisement Dates Set

The dates for "Getting Started '97" (advisement and registration for new
freshmen for the fall semester) have been set. The Freshman Presidential
Scholars will come to campus for advisement and registration on June 11 and
12. The Getting Started Program will run from June 16 through July 18,
including the Saturday of July 12. The program will not operate on July 4 and
7. Beginning in late April, new freshmen for fall semester 1997 and their
families will be invited to participate in the one-day program. Daily
activities include academic advisement, math and foreign language placement
testing, registration for the fall semester and activities to orient students
to campus.

Please assist us in keeping up-to-date by letting us know of any departmental,
program, curriculum or policy changes. Questions or comments can be addressed
to me. -- Tana Thorfinnson, Student Academic Services, 7-3914, or e-mail to
tana_thorfinnson@mail.und.nodak.edu.
*******

Student Scholarships Available For Study Abroad

The Rotary Foundation of Rotary International provides student scholarships
for study abroad for an academic year, for multiple years, and for shorter
three- and six-month periods. The financial awards vary for the different
scholarships, but are designed to cover round-trip transportation, tuition,
fees, and room and board. Applicants must have completed at least two years of
university or college course work or must have a secondary school education
and have been employed in a recognized vocation for at least two years when
the scholarship begins. Contact Mary Kweit for more information and
application forms. 
Applications must be returned to her by May 1. -- Mary Kweit, Professor of
Political Science and Public Administration, 7-3548.
*******

Tutors Sought For INMED

INMED is seeking instructors, who may be tutors, medical students or
physicians for the 1997 Med Prep program (June 9 to July 18) to teach the
following (or combination of) subjects:

MCAT Preparation (biological and/or physical sciences), eight hours per week
(separate sections and/or in conjunction with following subjects);
biochemistry, four hours per week; embryology, four hours per week;
physiology, five hours per week; study/test-taking skills, five hours per
week; focal problems, two hours per week. For more information contact me. --
Jill LaBatte, INMED, at 7-3072.
*******

GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

ORPD Staff, Responsibilities Outlined

We have had several inquiries about the responsibilities of the Office of
Research and Program Development. To assist you with your proposals, contact
the following personnel.

CARL FOX is the Director of ORPD.  As Director, he:

* reviews all grant proposals and contracts submitted to external agencies
and, if in keeping with University policies, signs the proposals on behalf of
the University.  In signing the proposals/contracts, the Director attests to
University compliance with a myriad of assurances required by the funding
agencies (e.g., assurances related to use of human subjects in research,
animal care and use, publication policies, patent and copyright policies, use
of radioactive materials or recombinant DNA in research, and/or compliance
with a drug-free workplace environment.

* participates in the negotiation of grants and contracts.

* interacts extensively with faculty, especially those involved in research
and the submission of grant proposals to external funding agencies.

* awards grants from the ORPD Research Fund.

* assists faculty in linking research interests across departmental lines and
organizational boundaries.

* gives presentations on the activities and services of ORPD.

* presents workshops, generally in conjunction with staff of Budget and Grants
Administration, concerning grantsmanship-related issues.

* serves on 16 University committees (Faculty Research, Institutional Animal
Care and Use, Institutional Biosafety, Institutional Review Board, EPSCoR
Steering Committee, Radiation Safety, etc.).

SHIRLEY GRIFFIN is secretary to Dr. Fox and three committees.  Call her at 7-4279 regarding:

* an appointment with the Director.

* Institutional Review Board (IRB) or the use of human subjects in research
(e.g., proposals, application forms, meetings, minutes, etc.).

* Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC) or the use of DNA or hazardous
materials in research (e.g., application forms, proposals).

* Faculty Research Committee (FRC) application forms, grant proposal
deadlines, etc.

* FRC or ORPD grant accounts (fund 1806 or 1813), approval of out-of-state
travel requests, etc.

* R&D News (mailing list, suggestions for articles, etc.).

* ORPD Annual Report (mailing list, suggestions, etc.).

Call COLLEEN PLUTOWSKI at 7-4278 if you have a question regarding, or would
like information on, any of the following:

* a grant proposal to an external funding agency.

* an IRIS search (e.g., search on database for potential funding sources based
on keywords).

* RAMS Faculty Personnel Profile System database (a program that links
individual faculty research interests with funding agency keywords).

* a particular funding agency or program.

* a particular program announcement, RFP, etc. Colleen may be able to find it
in our files, on the Internet, or on the IRIS database, or can watch for it as
she reviews information received daily.

-- Carl Fox, Director of Research and Program Development.
*******

ORPD Lists Funding Opportunities

Following are several research and funding opportunities. For more
information, please call the Office of Research and Program Development at 7-4278.


ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (EPA) FELLOWSHIPS 

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Network for Environmental
Management Studies (NNEMS) is now accepting applications for its Undergraduate
and Graduate Fellowship Program. NNEMS offers a range of fellowship activities
designed to help students refine their professional skills and enhance their
knowledge of environmental issues. Please note that this is NOT the same as
the graduate fellowship program administered by the Agency's Office of
Research and Development.
Students are invited to submit applications to EPA for specific projects. The
fellowships fall within the following categories:

Environmental Policy, Regulations, and Law
Environmental Management and Administration
Environmental Science
Public Relations and Communications 
Computer Programming and Development

Recipients of fellowships receive a stipend based on the level of education of
the student and the duration of the research project.

DEADLINE:   MARCH 25,1997.  

For further information or to receive a 1996-1997 program catalog that
contains a listing of all research project descriptions, information about
eligibility requirements for undergraduate and graduate students, and
specifics on the application process, write or call:

Sheri Jojokian
NNEMS National Program Manager
US EPA (1707)
401 M Street, SW
Washington, DC  20460
(202) 260-5283


COMMERCE BUSINESS DAILY ON THE WORLD WIDE WEB

The Commerce Business Daily (CBD) database is now available on the World Wide
Web at: http://cbdnet.access.gpo.gov.  The CBD lists notices of proposed
government procurement actions, contract awards, sales of government property,
and other procurement information.  Each notice appears in the print CBD only
once.  

Notices stay "active" in the CBD database online via GPO Access for 15 days
and are then moved to an "archived" database. Each notice is available as an
ASCII text file. The database is updated continuously.  
You can also connect to GPO Access via Superintendent of Documents' home page
at: http://www.access.gpo.gov/su_docs.  

For further assistance, contact the GPO Access User Support Team by e-mail at
cbd-support@gpo.gov, by phone at 1-888-293-6498 (toll free) or by fax at
202-512-1262.


GRANT OPPORTUNITIES ALERT SERVICE
The Office of Research and Program Development (ORPD) subscribes to the
Illinois Research Information System (IRIS) on the World Wide Web.  Most, if
not all, faculty/students/staff on campus who have access to a computer
connected to the Internet should be able to use the IRIS database which
includes over 7400 funding opportunities. Sponsors included in the database
are federal agencies, foundations, corporations, professional associations,
research centers and laboratories, universities, institutes, libraries and
museums. The UND agreement with IRIS permits faculty, staff, and students to
search by any or all of the IRIS fields which include: sponsor/agency, program
title, contact/address, state, keywords or phrases in the program abstract,
subjects/keywords, deadline dates, activities supported, citizenship, academic
qualifications, restrictions (women, minorities, etc.), and/or sponsor/agency
type.

The address for IRIS is: http://www.grainger.uiuc.edu/IRIS/.  Instructions are
available on the IRIS Homepage or in ORPD.

The IRIS ALERT SERVICE allows individuals to create a "search profile" by
selecting "keywords." The Alert Service will then automatically retrieve and
deliver IRIS records that 1) have been added or edited since the last time the
search profile was run, 2) have open deadlines or deadlines in the future, and
3) contain the user-selected IRIS keywords in the "Subjects/Keywords" field. 
Records are displayed first by overall subject category, then in chronological
order by deadline date, then in alphabetical order by sponsor name. You will
find the IRIS ALERT SERVICE at
http://carousel.lis.uiuc.edu/~IRIS/profiles/start.html.
Be sure to write down your login and password when you create your Alert
Service profile, and keep them handy.

Users who select the e-mail delivery option will receive their IRIS search
results by e-mail weekly (on Mondays), monthly (on the first of the month), or
every two months, depending on the search frequency chosen.  Users who opt to
have search results posted to the Web receive an e-mail message directing them
to the Web site where they can view the results.  At the Web site, they will
be prompted for their IRIS Alert Service login and password.

Your IRIS Alert Service profile may be modified at any time by going to:
http://carousel.lis.uiuc.edu/~IRIS/profiles/start.html and clicking on AReview
or Edit an Existing IRIS Alert Profile  The changes you make will take effect
the next time the profile is run.

If you have problems using IRIS or the Alert Service, please call ORPD for
assistance.  If access is denied, jot down the number and host name IRIS says
it is not recognizing and provide that information to ORPD so they can report
the problem to IRIS personnel.


DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

Energy Research Financial Assistance Program Notice 97-10
Microbial Genome Program

The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of the Office of Energy
Research, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), hereby announces its interest in
receiving applications for grants in support of the Microbial Genome Program
(MGP). The MGP focus is on developing and using high-throughput microbial
genome sequencing that will provide functional genomic sequence and mapping
information on microorganisms: with environmental or energy relevance; of
phylogenetic significance; and of potential commercial importance and applica-
tion. Bioinformatics tools relating to complete genomic sequences are also of
importance to the MGP.

DEADLINE: Preapplications referencing Program Notice 97-10 should be received
by March 24, 1997. Formal applications in response to this notice should be
received by 4:30 p.m., E.D.T., June 9, 1997, to be accepted for merit review
and funding in early FY 1998. 
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. Marvin E. Frazier, ER-72, Office of
Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research, U.S. Department
of Energy, 19901 Germantown Road, Germantown, MD 20874-1290, telephone: (301)
903-5468, e-mail: lana.ahalt@oer.doe.gov. 
(Federal Register: February 19, 1997, Volume 62, Number 33, 7443). 


THE EFFECTS OF TROPICAL FOREST CONVERSION: 
ECOLOGICAL RESEARCH IN THE LARGE-SCALE BIOSPHERE-ATMOSPHERE 
EXPERIMENT IN AMAZNIA (LBA)

NASA/HQ plans to issue a Request for Proposal for: The Effects of Tropical
Forest Conversion: Ecological Research in the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere
Experiment in Amaznia (LBA). The National Aeronautics and Space Administration
(NASA) announces the solicitation of proposals for scientific investigations
to participate in a multi-year field campaign to improve our understanding of
the effects of tropical forest conversion on ecosystem function and the
sustainability of land use in support of Mission to Planet Earth. The science
question that will focus this research is: How do tropical forest conversion,
re-growth, and selective logging, influence carbon storage, nutrient dynamics,
trace gas fluxes, and the prospect for sustainable land use in Amaznia. 
Proposals for research that address this question are solicited in the general
areas of carbon storage and exchange; nutrient dynamics; trace gas fluxes;
dynamics of surface water chemistry; and land cover and land use change.  
(Commerce Business Daily ISSUE OF FEBRUARY 25,1997 PSA#1789 NASA/Headquarters
Acquisition Division, Code CW, 300E Street SW, Washington, DC 20546.  SOL 97-MTPE-02 DUE 043097 POC.) 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:  Diane E. Wickland, Scientist, Phone
(202)358-0245, Fax (202) 358-2771, E-mail diane.wickland@hq.nasa.gov.  WEB:
Click here for the latest information about this notice,
http://procurement.nasa.gov/EPS/HQ/date.html#97-MTPE-02 .
URL : http://web.fie.com/htdoc/fed/nas/any/any/proc/any/02259713.htm  

PHS FORM 398 AVAILABLE ON THE WWW
The PHS Form 398 is available on the NIH Home Page, http://www.nih.gov, under
Grants and Contracts, Grants Page, Funding Opportunities.  It is the first
item on the page.  Other PHS applications are available on this same page.


NATIONAL CENTER FOR RESEARCH RESOURCES SHARED INSTRUMENTATION GRANT
The National Center for Research Resources (NCRR) Shared Instrumentation Grant
(SIG) Program is a competitive program co-sponsored by the National Institutes
of Health (NIH) and the National Science Foundation (NSF).  The objective of
the program is to make available to institutions with a high concentration of
NIH-supported biomedical investigators expensive research instruments which
can only be justified on a shared-use basis and for which meritorious research
projects are described.  

Shared Instrumentation Grants provide support for expensive state-of-the-art
instruments utilized in both basic and clinical research.  Applications are
limited to instruments that cost at least $100,000 per instrument or system. 
The maximum award is $400,000.

DEADLINE: March 26, 1997.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: call Colleen in ORPD at 7-4278.


THE KRESGE FOUNDATION

The Kresge Foundation awards challenge grants for capital projects, most often
for construction or renovation of buildings, but also for the purchase of
major equipment (at a cost of at least $300,000; may include computer software
expense), and real estate.  There are no geographic restrictions to the
Foundation's grantmaking.  Tax-exempt, charitable organizations operating in
the fields of higher education (awarding baccalaureate and/or graduate
degrees), health care and long-term care, human services, science and the
environment, arts and humanities, and public affairs may apply to the Kresge
Foundation.
The Kresge Foundation accepts proposals throughout the year, but only one per
institution in any twelve-month period.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: call Colleen in ORPD at 7-4278.
*******

BILLBOARD

Nominations Sought For Meritorious Awards

Nomination forms and instructions for the 1997 Meritorious Service Awards have
been distributed to each University employee. This spring, 10 awards for merit
of $1,000 each will be presented to UND staff employees.

These awards will be given to employees in each of the following five major
classification groups: Executive, Administrative, and Professional (three
awards); Technical, Paraprofessional (one award); Office Clerical (three
awards); Trades and Crafts (one award); and Service Employees (two awards).
Eligible employees are those employed on a regular basis who are not in a
probationary period. UND employees not eligible include teaching and research
faculty, vice presidents, deans, and the Personnel Director. Seven years must
pass before former Meritorious Award winners may again be considered for the
award. The deadline for nominations to be received in the Personnel Office is
April 11. Additional nomination forms are available in Personnel Services, 313
Twamley Hall, or by contacting Cheryl Osowski in the Personnel Office at 7-4367 or via e-mail at cheryl_osowski@mail.und.nodak.edu.

The Meritorious Service Award winners are announced annually at the UND
Recognition Ceremony for Staff Personnel. This year's ceremony will be held
Tuesday, May 13, in the Memorial Union Ballroom. -- Cheryl Osowski, Personnel
Services.
*******

Linda Hendrikson Joins Conflict Resolution Center

Linda Hendrikson has joined the staff of the Conflict Resolution Center as
part-time Coordinator of Conflict Resolution Services. Her primary
responsibility will be to arrange the delivery of mediation, group
facilitation, and training services conducted by Center members and staff.
Hendrikson holds a B.S. in Psychology from UND and is enrolled in the master's
program in the Counseling Department. She received basic mediation training
from the Conflict Resolution Center in 1994 and has been a member of the
Center since then. Hendrikson may be reached at 7-6390 on Tuesdays and
Thursdays, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and Wednesdays from 1 to 3 p.m. -- Jim Antes
(Psychology and Peace Studies), Interim Director, Conflict Resolution Center.
*******

Computer Center Offers WordPerfect Training

The following training session will be held in the Computer Center training
room in 361 Upson II. Please register in advance by calling Bonnie or Shelly
at the Computer Center, 7-3171. Requests for accommodation related to
disabilities need to be made when registering.
WordPerfect 6.1 Windows, TUESDAY AND THURSDAY, MARCH 18 and 20, 1:30 to 4:30
p.m., will teach word processing skills to assist in producing professional-looking documents. Prerequisite is Windows proficiency. -- Marlys Hanson, User
Services, Computer Center.
*******

SPRING BREAK HOURS LISTED:

Chester Fritz Library:

The hours for Spring Break at the Chester Fritz Library are: Saturday and
Sunday, March 8-9, closed; Monday through Friday, March 10-14, 8 a.m. to 4:30
p.m.; Saturday, March 15, closed; Sunday, March 16, 1 p.m. to midnight.
Regular hours will resume Monday, March 17. -- Patricia Berntsen, Assistant
Director, Chester Fritz Library.
***

Health Sciences Library:

Spring Break hours for the Library of the Health Sciences are: Friday, March
7, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, March 8, 1 to 5 p.m.; Sunday, March 9,
closed; Monday through Friday, March 10-14, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, March
15, 1 to 5 p.m.; Sunday, March 16, 1 to 11 p.m.

Easter hours are: Thursday, March 27, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Friday, March 28,
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, March 29, 1 to 5 p.m.; Sunday, March 30, closed.
-- April Byars, Administrative Assistant, Library of the Health Sciences.
***

Memorial Union Spring Break Schedule:

LIFETIME SPORTS CENTER: Friday, March 7, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Monday through
Friday, March 10-14, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, March 8-9 and
March 15-16, Closed

INFO CENTER: Friday, March 7, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Monday through Friday, March
10-14, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, March 8-9 and March 15-16,
Closed

SERVICE CENTER: Friday, March 7, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Monday through Friday,
March 10-14, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, March 8-9 and March 15-16,
Closed

COPY STOP: Friday, March 7, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, March 8, through
Sunday, March 16, Closed

BURGER KING: Friday, March 7, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Monday through Friday, March
10-14, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, March 8-9 and March 15-16,
Closed

BOOKSTORE: Friday, March 7, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Monday through Friday, March
10-14, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, March 8-9 and March 15-16,
Closed

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE: Friday, March 7, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Monday through
Friday, March 10-14, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, March 8-9 and
March 15-16, Closed

CRAFT CENTER/SIGN DESIGN STUDIO: Friday, March 7, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.;
Saturday, March 8, through Sunday, March 16, Closed

DINING CENTER: Friday, March 7, Closed; Monday through Friday, March 10-14, 7
a.m. to 4 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, March 8-9 and March 15-16, Closed

BARBER SHOP: Friday, March 7, 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Monday through Friday,
March 10-14, 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, March 8-9 and March
15-16, Closed

CENTENNIAL ROOM: Friday, March 7, 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.; Monday through Friday,
March 10-14, 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, March 8-9 and March
15-16, Closed

ESPRESSO BAR: Friday, March 7, Closed; Monday through Friday, March 10-14, 7
a.m. to 3:30 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, March 8-9 and March 15-16, Closed

CORNER DELI: Friday, March 7, through Sunday, March 16, Closed

UNIVERSITY LEARNING CENTER: Friday, March 7, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Monday
through Friday, March 10-14, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, March
8-9 and March 15-16, Closed

UNION STATION: Friday, March 7, 9 a.m. to 4:50 p.m.; Monday, March 7, through
Sunday, March 16, Closed

PASSPORT IDs: Friday, March 7, 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.; Monday through Friday,
March 10-14, Noon to 4 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, March 8-9 and March 15-16,
Closed

COMPUTER LEARNING LAB: Friday, March 7, 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.; Monday through
Friday, March 10-14, 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, March 8-9 and
March 15-16, Closed

BUILDING HOURS: 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Monday through Friday, March 10-14, 7
a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, March 8-9 and March 15-16, Closed

Regular building hours begin Monday, March 17.

-- MaryAnne Lustgraaf, Director, Memorial Union.
*******

Education Students Invited To Recruiting Fair

Faculty and staff are asked to encourage Education students to participate in
the North Dakota Education Connection Recruiting Fair Wednesday, March 26, in
the Memorial Union Ballroom. This Fair is sponsored by all North Dakota
universities that prepare teachers and is an opportunity for candidates to
meet with representatives from many school districts in a one-day format.
Registration forms are available at Career Services, 120 Hyslop Sports Center.
-- Mark Thompson, Director, Career Services.
*******

Summer Camp Jobs Available

Occupational Therapists, Nursing, Social Work, Recreation and Leisure Services
majors may find summer employment in their major, and defer student loans and
get college credit. The Director of Nursing at Camp Friendship, Annandale,
Minn., and Eden Wood, in Eden Prairie, Minn., will be in the main area of the
Memorial Union Thursday, March 6, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. to answer questions
and provide applications to those who are interested. -- Terry Erickson,
Cooperative Education.
*******

Merchandise Reports Must Be Sent To Central Receiving

If merchandise has been received and you do not have the Receiving Report,
contact Evelyn at Central Receiving, 7-4359. Sign it, indicate quantity and
date the merchandise was received, and return it to Accounts Payable, Box
8370. -- Evelyn Albrecht, Central Receiving.
*******

Departments, Student Organizations Invited To Place Information Online

Departments, offices, and student organizations are invited to place entries
on UNDInfo, the University's online menu system. It contains directories,
calendars, academic information, job openings, news and more, and we'd like to
add your information to the system, which is accessible worldwide. We'll train
you in placing information online; the only requirement is a computer hooked
to the Computer Center mainframe. There is no charge. Student organizations
are more than welcome to place information about their groups online; their
only additional requirement is an advisor's name so we have someone to contact
when school is not in session. If you're interested, please call me at 7-3621
for more information. -- Jan Orvik (University Relations), Co-Manager,
UNDInfo.
*******

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

Band Concert Set For March 2

At 4 p.m. SUNDAY, MARCH 2, the UND Band Department will present a concert at
the Performing Arts Center in East Grand Forks. Featured groups will include
the University Band and the Wind Ensemble.

The program will include literature from renowned European and American
composers. Our featured artist will be baritone soloist Krystoff Biernacki in
Norman Dello Joio's "Songs of Abelard." This three-movement work is a dramatic
and tragic musical expression of the Abelard and Heloise legend. The text for
the vocal solos is based on poetic material from a medieval period love story
which took place in Paris. This early twelfth-century romance between the
foremost scholar of his day and the niece of canon of the Notre Dame Cathedral
stunned the academic and clerical world at the time and is still recalled in
an inscription upon a small house on the Isle de La Cite:

     Heloise, Abelard, lived here.
     Sincere lovers. Precious models.
     The year 1118.

Under the leadership of Director of Bands Gordon Brock, the concert promises
to provide an exciting and varied program for everyone. Come and be a part of
over 100 years of band tradition at UND.
Admission is $4 for adults and $2 for students. -- Gordon Brock, Director of
Bands.
*******

Fish, Humor Subject Of New Exhibit

David Krueger's deeply imaginative paintings of fishermen and their prey will
be exhibited at the North Dakota Museum of Art SUNDAY, MARCH 2, THROUGH
SUNDAY, APRIL 20. The public is invited to attend an opening celebrating the
exhibition from 2 to 4 p.m. SUNDAY, MARCH 2. The artist, who teaches painting
at the Maryland Institute College of Art, will attend this opening and give a
gallery tour of his works.

Krueger's paintings have been described as the "Far Side" of hunting and
fishing. Fishermen battle giant fish and even birds, sometimes winning, and
sometimes losing to the Moby Dick-like trout, walleye, and bass inhabiting his
work. Using charcoal, oil and acrylic paint on large gorgeous surfaces,
Krueger creates a new world full of wit and wonder. That world is a bit
macabre, a bit humorous and always beautiful.
"ATLAS(T)" is about getting the big one, or catching the one that didn't get
away, according to Krueger, who writes that it's also about being the king of
one's domain. The shrouded fly fisherman, covered with huge, red mosquito
bites, flexes his rod as the great trout leaps.

A North Dakota native, Krueger was born in 1959 in Jamestown. He is a graduate
of UND and earned an M.F.A. in painting in 1984 from the University of
Maryland. Two years later he was offered his first New York exhibition, "The
Eccentric Drawing," at the Allan Frumkin gallery. Frumkin eventually became
his art dealer, and in 1988 the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York bought
a major painting from Krueger's solo show. It hung in the Twentieth Century
Galleries for several years. Today Krueger lives and works in Washington,
D.C., with his wife and child. Recently he won a National Endowment for the
Arts Individual Artist Grant given by the Mid-Atlantic Art Foundation. The
North Dakota Museum of Art show is sponsored in part by Philip Morris
Companies.
In addition to Krueger's works, paintings by Emily Lunde will be exhibited in
the small gallery located upstairs in the museum. Lunde's folk art, shaped by
her Scandinavian heritage, often includes images of life in Grand Forks.
Lunde's exhibit, sponsored in part by the Museum Gift Shop, also opens MARCH
2.

The North Dakota Museum of Art is located on Centennial Drive on the campus of
the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks. Hours are weekdays, 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. and weekends, 1 to 5 p.m. -- Andrea Dobberman, North Dakota Museum of
Art.
*******

Theatre Hosts Resident Performance Artists

The College of Fine Arts and Communication and the Department of Theatre Arts
announce the residency of performance artists/scholars Donna Marie Nudd (1981
M.A. in Theatre Arts, UND) and Terry Galloway.

On MONDAY, MARCH 3, at 4:15 p.m., Galloway will perform her internationally-recognized performance pieces, "Out All Night" and "Lost My Shoes" at the
Burtness Studio Theatre. Galloway has written and performed her solo
performance pieces for stage and film in major U.S. theatre centers and
internationally.

On TUESDAY, MARCH 4, at 4 p.m., Dr. Nudd will present her lecture, "Feminist
Spectators as Invisible Dramaturges" in 227 Hughes Fine Arts Center, Barr
Lecture Room. Nudd's lecture is the final in a series of College of Fine Arts
and Communication's distinguished alumni lectures, commemorating the College's
25th anniversary. Dr. Nudd's lecture will examine the role of the audience in
the creation of Dinah LaFarge, a post modern heroine, tracing the process of
creation and noting the ways in which feminist theorizing helped/hindered the
creation of the character.

Nudd is an Associate Professor of Communication at Florida State University.
She teaches courses and publishes in the areas of Performance Studies,
Pedagogy, Women's Studies, and Rhetoric. Her publications have appeared in
"Text and Performance Quarterly," "Literature in Performance," "Communication
Education," and "North Dakota Quarterly." She has also received numerous
awards for teaching. She collaborates with Terry Galloway in their performance
art pieces and cabaret theatre.

Ten years ago, Nudd and Galloway co-founded the Mickee Faust Cabaret in
Tallahassee. Nudd directed and dramaturged Galloway's "Out All Night," "Lost
My Shoes," and "Lardo Weeping." These shows have toured nationally to
virtually every major alternative theatre venue in the United States, as well
as in Canada, Edinburgh, London, and Mexico.

Please encourage your colleagues, students, and any other interested parties
to attend these performances and scholarly events; all events are free of
charge. For further information, call Mary Cutler (Theatre Arts) at 7-2899. --
Joel Svendsen, Burtness Theatre Publicity Manager.
*******

Women's Center Lists Events

In celebration of Women's History Month, the Women's Center will offer several
programs in addition to their weekly scheduled events. "It's A Female Thing!"
is a 27-minute video documentary about 21 girls and women ages 8 to 91 who
gathered together to create, perform and tour the "Growing Up Female" theater
piece about their personal and collective life stories.

The goal of "It's A Female Thing!" is to create an open and appreciate
learning environment where it is possible to explore and expand ideas about
what it means to be female in this society. The video presents a powerful
model of women and girls of many different backgrounds coming together to
share their experiences, find their unique voices and discover their own
common ground.

On MONDAY, MARCH 3, at 7 p.m. in the Memorial Union Sioux Room, the
presentation will be "It's A Female Thing: Sexism." Sexism is alive, well and
pervasive in our society. Times have changed. New and more opportunities are
open to women in the worlds of work, politics, family, and community life, but
the playing field is not level for males and females. Acknowledging the
reality of unfair and unequal treatment is a necessary starting point for
women and girls to be able to join with each other in standing up against
their common oppression.

The WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, Feast and Focus program at noon in the Memorial Union
Lecture Bowl is "Beauty Pageants: Bright Lights, Big Business." Since the
1920s, women have worn swimsuits and ball gowns, twirled batons, and pledged
to end world hunger in hopes of being crowned queen of the pageant. What was
once a collection of innocent sideshows is now a multi-billion dollar
international industry. From small towns to international competitions, the
evolution of the beauty pageant is a story involving nostalgia, big business
and changing social standards. Join us as we watch and discuss this
documentary film which mixes archival footage with contemporary interviews.

And the THURSDAY, MARCH 6, For Women Only program at noon will feature Sue
Goebel from Valley Health, who will lead us in a discussion of women's
sexuality issues. -- Donna Oltmanns, Coordinator, Women's Center.
*******

Theatre To Host High School Play Festival

The Department of Theatre Arts will host the 1997 Drama Day and One-Act Play
Festival Wednesday, March 5, in Burtness Theatre. Outstanding high schools
have been selected to take part in the day's activities. Red River High School
will perform from North Dakota. Minnesota schools are East Grand Forks,
Hawley, Lancaster, Tri-County, Kittson Central, Stephen/Argyle, Oklee, and
Norman County West.

The first play will begin at approximately 9 a.m. Each group is limited to 40
minutes, which includes set-up, strike performance and critique.

Guest critic for this event is Donna Nudd, Associate Professor of
Communication at Florida State University. She teaches courses and publishes
in the areas of Performance Studies, Pedagogy, Women's Studies and Rhetoric.
She co-founded the Mickee Faust Cabaret in Tallahassee, Fla., and has directed
solo performances by Terry Galloway which have been produced in virtually
every major alternative theater venue in the United States, as well as Canada,
Edinburgh, London and Mexico City. Dr. Nudd will lead a workshop for Drama Day
participants, and UND Theatre Arts acting faculty will hold acting workshops
during the day as well. 

The public is invited to attend the festival. This is an opportunity to see
the area's finest young thespians. For more information, contact Mary Cutler
at 7-2899. -- Joel Svendsen, Burtness Publicity Manager, Burtness Theatre.
*******

International Centre Lists Events

The THURSDAY, MARCH 6, program at 7 p.m. in the International Centre, 2908
University Ave., is "Celebrating International Women's Day," facilitated by
international women at UND. The video on the Beijing Women's Conference will
be featured, women's stories highlighted, women's works presented, and women's
lives celebrated. An international meal will be part of this event. Please
join us. -- Sharon Rezac Andersen, Director, International Centre, 7-4231.
*******

FYI

Items Offered To Public On Bids

The University is offering for sale to the public on a sealed, high-bid basis
the following items: older computer equipment, refrigerators, electric ranges,
commercial cooking equipment, electric pallet jack, electric powered car,
electric riding floor scrubber, and several miscellaneous items. These items
may be seen at the Central Receiving warehouse on the southwest corner of the
campus. Bids will be taken between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m. Monday through Thursday,
March 3-6. -- Jess Carl, Central Receiving.
*******

Craft Center Offers Activities

The University Craft Center will sponsor a "Bunny Hut" workshop SATURDAY,
MARCH 22, from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Craft Center, third floor, Memorial Union.
This project will be a springtime version of the ever- popular "Gingerbread"
workshop. Adults are invited to bring a child to build these together. Pre-registration is required and enrollment is limited to 16 participants. Cost is
$5 per hut. Call 7-3979 for registration information.

Many open studio activities are also available at the Craft Center. You may
make a frame, make a greeting card, or tie dye a T-shirt. These activities and
others are available on a drop-in basis for individuals or small groups of two
to three people, or can be scheduled for larger groups by calling 7-3979.
Craft Center hours are Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., Friday, 9
a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 1 to 4:30 p.m. Activities are open to
the public and the University community. March is National Craft Month. Come
celebrate by being creative at the Craft Center! -- Bonnie Solberg, Craft
Center Coordinator.
*******

Bookstore Plans Textbook Information Fair

The Bookstore invites faculty and academic department staff to its first
Textbook Information Fair, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 3. Meet with publisher
representatives to order desk copies, and observe multimedia demonstrations.
The fair will be from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the textbook department. Come join
us for refreshments and prizes. -- Don Forbes, Manager, University Bookstore.
*******

Workshop Will Discuss Families

The Parent Education Resource Center (PERC) will hold a seminar and fair,
focusing on "Building Healthy and Resilient Families." Gary DuDell will
present the seminar Saturday, March 1, at Central High School, from 8:30 a.m.
to 2:30 p.m. The schedule is: registration, 8:30 to 9 a.m.; session, 9 to
11:30 a.m.; lunch (on your own), 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.; session, 12:30 to
2:30 p.m. It is sponsored by PERC, Family Educator Enhancement Team North
Dakota Transition Project in association with the UND Continuing Education
Parenting Series.

Gary DuDell is with the Mendez Foundation, Tampa, Fla. For over 20 years, he
has provided professional, individual, group, marital, and family counseling
while also designing and conducting a wide range of workshops for mental
health providers and educators. In his private practice and in his group
workshops, Dr. DuDell specializes in stress reduction, sexual trauma,
addiction and recovery, relationship enhancement and "fine-tuning" individual
lives for maximum balance and effectiveness. He is an Adjunct Professor at the
University of South Florida's Department of Rehabilitation Counseling.

There is no fee for the workshop; please register early by Wednesday, Feb. 26,
by calling 795-2765. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, for the Parent Education Resource
Center.
*******

PERC Sponsors Luncheon Sessions

The Parent Education Resource Center (PERC), 500 Stanford Road, is sponsoring
a series on parenting from 12:10 to 12:50 p.m. You may bring your lunch; child
care will be provided.

"Raising Careful, Confident Kids in a Crazy World," a video presentation
featuring Paula Statman, will be held THURSDAY, MARCH 6. "Lifelong Learning"
presented by Dave Godfread, will be THURSDAY, MARCH 20. He is the Director of
the Adult Learning Center and Community High School. "How Do Adolescents
Think?" will be considered by Doug Knowlton THURSDAY, MARCH 27. Dr. Knowlton
is a clinical psychologist and professor in the Department of Teaching and
Learning. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, for Carol Helland, PERC Coordinator.
*******

CALENDAR OF EVENTS


FEBRUARY 1997

(Please contact Mavis at the Office of University Relations, Box 7144, or call
777-4304, if you wish to make changes or have an event included.)

Through Fri., Feb. 28 -- THEATRE, "Remembrance" by Graham Reid, this warm
drama played against the hatred in Northern Ireland charts the love that
develops between a Protestant father and a Catholic mother who meet in the
cemetery where their sons are buried, both victims of violence, Burtness
Theatre, 7:30 p.m.; call 777-2587 for ticket information.

Thurs., Feb. 27 -- OFFICIAL UND FOUNDERS DAY BANQUET AND OBSERVANCE, Ballroom,
Memorial Union, 6:30 p.m.

Thurs., Feb. 27 -- COUNSELING TOPIC SEMINAR, "Eating Disorders" presented by
Judy Haynes (Counseling Center), 318 Montgomery Hall, noon.

Thurs., Feb. 27 -- FOR WOMEN ONLY PROGRAM, "Tune Into Your Body Signals,"
biofeedback is the process of tuning into your body and learning how to
interpret the signals it's sending, Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

Thurs., Feb. 27 -- COMPUTER SCIENCE ENRICHMENT SERIES, "Computer Science:
Neural Networks and Genetic Algorithms," the last session, "Applications of
Neural Networks in Speech, Vision, and Robotics," will be presented by Bruce
Maxwell (Computer Science), 238 CAS II, 4 to 5:30 p.m.; contact Bruce Maxwell
at 777-4982 for more information.

Thurs., Feb. 27 -- MEETING, Curriculum Committee, 303 Twamley Hall, 3 p.m.

Thurs., Feb. 27 -- "PANEL DISCUSSION ON WORLD RELIGIONS," facilitated by
Rebecca Moore (Philosophy and Religion); individuals will discuss their faith
perspectives, followed by an interactive forum on world religions, UND
International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; all are welcome; call 777-4231 for more information.

Fri., Feb. 28- - BIOLOGY CANDIDATE ECOLOGY SEMINAR, "Ecological Consequences
of Genetic Variation in Secondary Plant Metabolites," presented by David
Siemens, 141 Starcher Hall, noon; all interested parties are encouraged to
attend.

Fri., Feb. 28 -- LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary Sciences) LECTURE,
Dean McManus, School of Oceanography, University of Washington, Seattle, at
noon in 109 Leonard Hall, he will consider "Oceanographic Studies at the
University of Washington"; from 2 to 4 p.m. in 215 Leonard Hall, he will
conduct a workshop, "Changing a Lecture Course to Cooperative Learning: Nuts
and Bolts"; those interested in participating in the workshop are asked to
notify Gloria at 777-2248; all interested persons are welcome to attend.

Fri., Feb. 28 -- BASKETBALL, WOMEN'S, UND vs. North Dakota State University,
Hyslop Sports Center, 7 p.m. (Televised).

Fri., Feb. 28, and Sat., March 1 -- HOCKEY, UND at University of Denver,
Denver, Colo.


MARCH 1997

Through Thurs., March 6 -- ART EXHIBITION, Patrick Luber - Installation,
Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center.

Sat., March 1 -- SATURDAY MORNING LEGISLATIVE FORUM, Moine Gates, Governmental
Affairs chair, will moderate discussions; Grand Forks legislators will be
present to discuss legislative topics of interest to the citizens; forum is
open to the public (held every other Saturday, also Feb. 15 and March 1 and
15); City Council Chambers, third floor, City Hall, 255 Fourth St. N., 10 a.m.

Sat., March 1 -- SEMINAR AND FAIR, Parent Education Resource Center (PERC)
will focus on "Building Health and Resilient Families," presented by Gary
DuDell, Central High School, 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Dr. DuDell is an Adjunct
Professor at the University of South Florida's Department of Rehabilitation
Counseling; there is no fee for the workshop; register early by Wed., Feb. 26,
by calling 795-2765.

Sat., March 1 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND vs. North Dakota State University,
Hyslop Sports Center, 2 p.m. (Televised).

Sat. and Sun., March 1-2 -- SWIMMING AND DIVING, Last Chance Invitational,
Hyslop Sports Center.

Sun., March 2 -- CHILDREN/FAMILY SERIES, "Wizard of Oz," a classic story of
Dorothy and her adventures in Oz brought to life on stage, Chester Fritz
Auditorium, 2 p.m.

Sun., March 2 -- BAND CONCERT, University Band and the Wind Ensemble will
perform literature from renowned European and American composers; featured
artist will be baritone soloist, Krystoff Biernacki, Performing Arts Center,
East Grand Forks, 4 p.m.; admission is $4 for adults and $2 for students.

Sun., March 2 -- WRESTLING, North Central Conference Championships, Hyslop
Sports Center.

Sun., March 2, through Sun., April 20 -- ART EXHIBITION, Maryland artist,
David Kreuger, who creates paintings on the bizarre world of fishing as he
knew it in his native North Dakota; large painting from his Parallel Duck
Hunting series owned by the Metropolitan Museum in New York, North Dakota
Museum of Art; opening celebration is Sun., March 2 from 2 to 4 p.m. with the
artist giving a gallery tour of his works; paintings by Emily Lunde will be
exhibited in the small gallery located upstairs in the museum, also opening
March 2.

Mon., March 3 -- NATIONAL LEAGUE FOR NURSING MOBILITY EXAMS (NLN), Room 312,
O'Kelly Hall, 8:30 a.m. and 1 p.m.

Mon., March 3 -- BIOLOGY CANDIDATE ECOLOGY SEMINAR, "Predator-Induced
Phenotypic Plasticity in Larval Amphibians," presented by Andy McCollum, 141
Starcher Hall, noon; all interested parties are encouraged to attend.

Mon., March 3 -- PSYCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM, "Executive Functioning in Reading
Disabled and Attention Deficit Children" presented by Tom Petros (Psychology),
Room 102, Nursing Building, noon; everyone is welcome to attend; call Joan at
777-3451 for more information.

Mon., March 3 -- LEADERSHIP SERIES, "Conflict Resolution: Reaching a Positive
Solution," presented by Conflict Resolution Center staff, Leadership
Inspiration Center, third floor, Memorial Union, 3 p.m.; non-credit sessions
are designed to help students explore leadership from a variety of
perspectives and develop an understanding of themselves; sessions are free and
open to the public.

Mon., March 3 -- TEXTBOOK INFORMATION FAIR, meet with publisher
representatives to order desk copies, and observe multimedia demonstrations,
textbook department, Bookstore, Memorial Union, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Mon., March 3 -- WOMEN'S HISTORY MONTH PROGRAM, "It's a Female Thing: Sexism,"
Sioux Room, Memorial Union, 7 p.m.; video documentary about 21 girls and women
ages 8 to 91 who speak to issues important to women's lives.

Mon., March 3 -- ASBESTOS CLASS, Environmental Training Institute worker
refresher course (2916), Comfort Inn, Highway 2 East, East Grand Forks, Minn.;
cost is $150; call 777-3341 for more information.

Mon. and Tues., March 3-4 -- RESIDENT PERFORMANCE ARTISTS, the College of Fine
Arts and Communication and the Department of Theatre Arts announce the
residency of performance artists/scholars Donna Marie Nudd (1981 M.A. in
Theatre Arts, UND) and Terry Galloway; Monday, March 3, at 4:15 p.m., Galloway
will perform her internationally-recognized performance pieces "Out All Night"
and "Lost My Shoes" at the Burtness Studio Theatre; on Tuesday, March 4, at 4
p.m., Dr. Nudd will present her lecture, "Feminist Spectators as Invisible
Dramaturges" in 227 Hughes Fine Arts Center, Barr Lecture Room; all events are
free of charge; call Mary Cutler at 777-2899 for more information.

Mon. through Fri., March 3-7 -- WOMEN'S HISTORY MONTH; Events from the Women's
Center are: Monday, March 3: Noon to 1 p.m., "Abby Aldrich (Mrs. John D.)
Rockefeller" presented by Albert Berger (History), Women's Center, 305 Hamline
St.; 4 to 7 p.m., "Indians, Outlaws and Angie Debo," History Club film and
discussion, 114 Merrifield Hall; 7 p.m., "It's a Female Thing: Sexism,"
presented by Women's Center staff, Sioux Room, Memorial Union.
     Tuesday, March 4: Noon to 1 p.m., "Land, Liquor and the Women of Hatton,
N.D." presented by Barbara Handy-Marchello (History), Women's Center, 305
Hamline St.
     Wednesday, March 5: Noon, "Beauty Pageants: Bright Lights and Big
Business," film and discussion, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union; noon, "The
Sexual Politics of the Reign of Catherine the Great," 217 Merrifield Hall;
repeated at 7 p.m. in the Grand Forks Public Library.
     Thursday, March 6: Noon, For Women Only Program, "Women's Sexuality
Throughout History" presented by Sue Goebel, Valley Health, Women's Center,
305 Hamline St.; noon to 1 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m., "International Women's Day
Celebration and Presentation of Women Studies Essay Contest Awards,"
International Centre, 2908 University Ave.
     Friday, March 7: Noon to 1 p.m., "The Sexual Politics of the Reign of
Catherine the Great" presented by David Rowley (History), Women's Center, 305
Hamline St.

Tues., March 4 -- NATIONAL LEAGUE FOR NURSING MOBILITY EXAMS (NLN), Room 312,
O'Kelly Hall, 8:30 a.m.

Tues., March 4 -- INFORMATIONAL SESSION ON THE CURRENT CONTENTS DATABASE, the
Harley E. French Library of the Health Sciences and the Chester Fritz Library
invite faculty, staff and students to this informational session in the
classroom in the Library of the Health Science from noon to 1 p.m.; the focus
will concentrate on the social sciences and humanities; Room 202, Chester
Fritz Library, noon to 1 p.m.; call Judy Rieke at 777-4129 or Cynthia Shabb at
777-4623 for more information.

Tues., March 4 -- FINE ARTS LECTURE SERIES, the 1996-97 College of Fine Arts
and Communication Lecture Series will offer "A Celebration of Alumni
Achievement." Donna Marie Nudd will discuss "Feminist Spectators as Invisible
Dramaturges," Room 227 (Barr Lecture Room), Hughes Fine Arts Center, 4 p.m.;
Nudd received her M.A. in Theatre Arts from UND in 1981; she currently is an
Associate Professor in the Department of Communication at Florida State
University.

Tues., March 4 -- GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS MEETING, Lecture Bowl,
Memorial Union, 3 p.m.; find answers to GER questions before students begin
calling for advising appointments.

Tues., March 4 -- ASBESTOS CLASS, Environmental Training Institute supervisor
refresher course (2917), Comfort Inn, Highway 2 East, East Grand Forks, Minn.;
cost is $150; call 777-3341 for more information.

Tues., March 4 -- LEAD REFRESHER CLASS, Environmental Training Institute
inspector course (2978), Comfort Inn, Highway 2 East, East Grand Forks, Minn.;
cost is $150; call 777-3341 for more information.

Tues., March 4 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, National Collegiate Athletic Association
Play-Ins.

Wed., March 5 -- HISTORY AND PHI ALPHA THETA BROWN BAG LUNCH SESSION, "The
Sexual Politics of the Reign of Catherine the Great," presented by David
Rowley, 217 Merrifield Hall, noon; bring your lunch; a question and answer
period follows the presentation; this is the first in a series honoring
Women's History Month.

Wed., March 5 -- FEAST AND FOCUS PROGRAM, "Beauty Pageants: Bright Lights, Big
Business," Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, noon.

Wed., March 5 -- MEETING, Institutional Review Board, 305 Twamley Hall, 4
p.m.; to consider all research proposals submitted to the Office of Research
and Program Development before Monday, Feb. 24.

Wed., March 5 -- DRAMA DAY AND ONE-ACT PLAY FESTIVAL, outstanding high schools
have been selected to take part in the day's activities from North Dakota and
Minnesota schools, Burtness Theatre; public is invited to attend the festival;
call Mary Cutler at 777-2899 for more information.

Wed., March 5 -- ASBESTOS CLASS, Environmental Training Institute inspector
management planner refresher course (2915), Comfort Inn, Highway 2 East, East
Grand Forks, Minn.; cost is $80; call 777-3341 for more information.

Thurs., March 6 -- MEETING, University Senate, Room 7, Gamble Hall, 4:05 p.m.

Thurs., March 6 -- GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS MEETING, Lecture Bowl,
Memorial Union, 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.; find answers to GER questions before
students begin calling for advising appointments.

Thurs., March 6 -- "ON TEACHING" SERIES, "Increasing Active Learning" is the
topic for the Office of Instructional Development box lunch series in the
Memorial Room of the Memorial Union at noon; Patti Alleva (Law), Tom Owens
(Chemical Engineering), and Jeff Stith (Atmospheric Sciences) will report on
what works for them as they strive to increase active learning for students;
to order a complimentary box lunch, call 777-3325 before Thursday, Feb. 27.

Thurs., March 6 -- PARENTING SERIES, "Raising Careful, Confident Kids in a
Crazy World" a video presentation featuring Paula Statman, Parent Education
Resource Center (PERC), 500 Stanford Road, 12:10 to 12:50 p.m.; bring your
lunch; child care will be provided.

Thurs., March 6 -- SUMMER EMPLOYMENT for Occupational Therapists, Nursing,
Social Work, Recreation and Leisure Services majors may find employment and
defer their student loans and get college credit too; Director of Nursing at
"Camp Friendship," Annandale, Minn., and "Eden Wood," in Eden Prairie, Minn.,
will be in the main area of the Memorial Union from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. to
answer questions and provide applications to those who are interested.

Thurs., March 6 -- "CELEBRATING INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY," facilitated by
international women at UND; video on the Beijing Women's Conference will be
featured, women's stories highlighted, women's works presented, and women's
lives celebrated; an international meal will be part of this event; UND
International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; all are welcome; call 777-4231 for more information.

Thurs., March 6 -- FOR WOMEN ONLY PROGRAM, Sue Goebel from Valley Health will
lead us in a discussion of women's sexuality issues, Women's Center, 305
Hamline St., noon.

Thurs., March 6 -- ASBESTOS CLASS, Environmental Training Institute project
design refresher course (2918), Comfort Inn, Highway 2 East, East Grand Forks,
Minn.; cost is $150; call 777-3341 for more information.

Fri., March 7 -- REPORT ON UNSATISFACTORY PROGRESS (DEFICIENCIES) due in the
Office of Admissions and Records by noon.

Fri., March 7 -- FAMILY CONCERT, Greater Grand Forks Symphony Orchestra
featuring the winner of the Annual Young Artist Competition, Chester Fritz
Auditorium, 10 a.m., 1 and 7:30 p.m.

Fri. and Sat., March 7-8 --15TH ANNUAL PGA GOLF SEMINAR, Hyslop Sports Center;
designed for players, teachers and coaches who want to improve their own play
or help others play better golf; call 777-2155 for registration details.

Fri. and Sat., March 7-8 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, National Collegiate Athletic
Association Regionals.

Fri. and Sat., March 7-8 -- HOCKEY, Western Collegiate Hockey Association
First Round.
*******


UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and
distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is
also available electronically through UNDInfo, the University's menu
system on the Internet. The address is http://www.und.nodak.edu for
World-Wide Web.

All articles submitted for publication should be labeled "University
Letter" and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic
submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu. Attachments to
University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number.
University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations,
Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.
  
UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.
  
*******

  





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