[University Letter logo]

University Letter

February 7, 1997

Volume 34 No. 23



UNIVERSITY LETTER


UNIVERSITY LETTER INDEX

Founders Day Tickets Are On Sale
Workshop Considers Higher Ed In Minnesota, North Dakota
Applications Sought For BPA Dean Position
     EVENTS TO NOTE
Counseling Lists Colloquiums
Biochemistry Candidate Will Give Lecture
Graduate Committee Will Meet Monday
Music, Women's Center To Present Lecture
Anatomy Faculty Candidate To Give Seminar
Child Welfare Issues Will Be Colloquium Topic
Television Is Subject Of Free Satellite Seminars
Guest Lecturer Will Discuss Art Marketing
Computer Science Will Hold Enrichment Series
History Announces Brown Bag Luncheon
Institutional Review Board Meeting Set For Feb. 14
Four Candidates Will Present Ecology Seminars
North Dakota's First Solar Car Will Be Unveiled
Promotion And Tenure Forum Set
Women Studies Salon Continues
Genetics Candidate Will Present Seminar
     OF ACADEMIC INTEREST
Students Should Apply For Scholarships Soon
Faculty Research And Creative Activity Committe Awards Listed
Doctoral Exam Set For James Warren Stenehjem
     GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS
NIH IDeA Center Q-Grants Available
ORPD Lists Funding Opportunities
     BILLBOARD
Medical Students To Host Elementary School Science Day
News From Disability Support Services
Participants Needed For Memory Experiments
Presidents Day Is Holiday
Chester Fritz Library/Health Sciences Library/Computer Center
List Holiday Hours
Memorial Union Lists Hours For Presidents Day Holiday
     ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT
Celebrate Chinese New Year
Music Will Host Visiting Lecturer
MAC Will Present "Dr. King's Dream"
Women's Center Lists Events
Theatre Arts Will Present "Remembrance"
Craft Center To Offer Pottery Workshop
     FYI
Report Icy Conditions To Plant Services
International Aerospace Camp Dates Set
Credit Union Holds Elections
Bookstore Journal Available
PGA Golf Seminar Set For March 7-8 In Hyslop Sports Center
Feb. 7 Is "Green And White" Day
Half-Price Tickets Available For Tracy Byrd
     CALENDAR OF EVENTS
*******

ATTACHMENTS:
BPA Dean Announcement (Included on e-mail)
Dining Services Special
Bookstore Specials (Included on e-mail)
*******

Founders Day Banquet Tickets Are On Sale At President's Office

Tickets for the annual Founders Day Banquet may be purchased in
the President's Office, third floor, Twamley Hall. This year's
event is set for 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 27. The program will
again feature the presentation of awards for teaching, research
and service, as well as the recognition of faculty and staff with
25 years of service and retired and retiring faculty and staff
with 15 or more years of service. Tickets are $5 each. -- Lorna
Jacobson, Administrative Officer, President's Office.
*******

Workshop Considers Higher Ed In Minnesota, North Dakota

The "First Workshop on Higher Education Issues in North Dakota
and Minnesota" is set for Saturday, Feb. 15, 1997, at North
Dakota State University in Fargo.  The workshop, which will run
from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., will focus on current issues and
bring together faculty and administration to help secure and
advance higher education in the two states.  It will consist of
several invited presentations, followed by a panel and open
discussion.  North Dakota University System Chancellor Larry
Isaak is expected to discuss "Legislation Today."  Other invited
speakers include John Hopper, ASC chair, "The Chapter Builder's
Ten Commandments and AAUP in Perspective"; Bob Bard, Committee A
chair, "Academic Freedom and Tenure Protection"; and members of
the Board of Higher Education.  Jon Lindgren of the NDSU faculty
will be the workshop chair.  The fee is $10.  UND faculty on the
working committee are Robert Kweit and John Williams; other
committee members are Lyle Prunty, NDSU; George Slanger, Minot
State University; Mitzi Brunsdale, Mayville State University;
Barbara Laman, Dickinson State University; and Bill Laskowski,
Jamestown College.  For more information, please contact Jayantha
Herath at herath@acc.jc.edu. -- Dorette Kerian, Computer Center,
for Jayantha Herath.
*******

Applications Sought For BPA Dean Position (See Attachment)

The position of Dean of the College of Business and Public
Administration at the University of North Dakota is open for
applications and nominations.

The next Dean of the UND College of Business and Public
Administration will work with its faculty and students,
businesses, and the University community as a whole to lead the
College into the 21st century. We are looking for someone with a
strong record of leadership, innovation, and creativity as well
as a passion for working with students and a history of
encouraging and rewarding excellence in teaching, research, and
service.

The complete position description for the position is attached to
this issue of the University Letter. Applications received by
Monday, Feb. 24, will receive full consideration.

-- Robert Boyd (Continuing Education), Chair, BPA Dean Search
Committee.
*******

EVENTS TO NOTE

Counseling Lists Colloquiums

The Department of Counseling Topics in Counseling and Counseling
Psychology Research and Practice Colloquium presents
"Introduction to Lesbian and Gay Positive Affirmative
Counseling," with Sally Kennedy (Counseling Center) Thursday,
Feb. 6, from noon to 1:30 p.m. in 318 Montgomery Hall.
"Reality Therapy: Choice in Counseling" will be presented by Judy
Comstock on Thursday, Feb. 13, from noon to 1:30 p.m. in 318
Montgomery Hall. 

Everyone is welcome, whether or not you are taking the seminar
for credit. -- Linda Winter, Coordinator, Topics in Counseling
and Counseling Psychology Research and Practice.
*******


Biochemistry Candidates Will Give Lecture

The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology will present
a special lectures by a candidate for a faculty position in the
Department. 

On Friday, Feb. 7, at 9 a.m. in 5510 Medical Science, Natalia Y.
Kedishvili, Assistant Scientist, Department of Biochemistry and
Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, will
present "Control of Retinol Oxidation by Alcohol Dehydrogenases."
Dr. Kedishvili received both her B.S. and Ph.D. in Biochemistry
from Moscow State University. Her dissertation advisor was
Professor Sergei Severin. She then spent two years as a Research
Assistant at the All-Union Cardiology Center in Moscow. From 1990
to 1994, she was a Postdoctoral Fellow with Robert Harris in the
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the Indiana
University School of Medicine. Since that time she has been an
Assistant Scientist there, and currently holds a Mentored
Research Career Development Award. 

Everyone is welcome to attend this lecture. -- Robert Nordlie,
Professor and Chair of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.
*******

Graduate Committee Will Meet Monday

The Graduate Committee will meet at 3:05 p.m. Monday, Feb. 10, in
305 Twamley Hall. The agenda will include:

1.   Consideration of a request by the Health and Physical
Education department to:

a.   Change the description for HPER 531, Sport Psychology.

b.   Add a new course, HPER 529, Exercise Psychology.

c.   Change the title and course number of HPER 532, Advanced
Exercise Physiology to HPER 535, Exercise Physiology I, change
the prerequisites and course description.

d.   Add new courses: HPER 536, Advanced Exercise Physiology II;
HPER 537, Theory and Practice of Exercise Testing; and HPER 538,
Exercise in Health and Disease.

e.   Change the title for HPER 501 to Introduction to Research in
Kinesiology, change the credits, and change the course
description.

f.   Change the title of Physical Education major to Kinesiology.

g.   Add course HPER 561, Critical Synthesis and Analysis in
Kinesiology.

h.   Change the course title for HPER 560 to Seminar in
Kinesiology, and change the course description.

i.   Change the program requirements for Physical Education
(Kinesiology) major.

2.   Consideration of a request by the Educational Foundations
and Research department to add a course, EFR 507, Gender and
Education.

3.   Consideration of a request by the College of Nursing to:

a.   Change the prerequisites for NURS 518, Parent-Child
Specialization:  Practicum & Seminar.

b.   Change the number of NURS 537, Drug Therapy II to NURS 539.

c.   Add a new course NURS 537, Graduate Co-op.

4.   Consideration of a request by the Chemistry Department to:

a.   Change the prerequisites for Chem 531, Chemical Dynamics.

b.   Add a course Chem 537, Chemistry Co-op Program.
*******

Music, Women's Center To Present Lecture

The Music Department and the Women's Center will present "Music
Knows No Cloister: Isabella Leonarda," a lecture with
accompanying music by Stewart Carter, Wake Forest University, at
7:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 10, in the Josephine Campbell Recital
Hall, Hughes Fine Arts Center.

Isabella Leonarda, an Italian nun, was the most productive woman
composer of the 17th century and the first to publish sonatas.
Dr. Carter, the foremost expert on her music, has brought many of
her works to light.

Admission is free and open to the public. -- Gary Towne,
Associate Professor of Music, and Donna Oltmanns, Coordinator,
Women's Center.
*******

Anatomy Faculty Candidate Will Give Seminar

A candidate for a faculty position in Anatomy and Cell Biology
will present "Evolutionary and Functional Aspects of Leaping in
Primates."  Carl J. Terranova, Postdoctoral Researcher/Instructor
in the Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Howard
University, will present on Monday, Feb. 10, at noon in Room
1360, Clifford Haugen Lecture Hall, Bio-Information Learning
Resources Center, Health Sciences Building. -- Edward Carlson,
Professor and Chair of Anatomy and Cell Biology, and Chair, OT/PT
Search Committee.
*******

Child Welfare Issues Will Be Colloquium Topic

The Psychology Department will hold a colloquium at noon Monday,
Feb. 10, in 102 Nursing Building. Tara Lea Muhlhauser, Director,
Children and Family Services Training Center, Department of
Social Work, will present: "Recent Child Welfare Issues."
Everyone is welcome to attend. -- Joan Peterson, Psychology
Department.
*******

Television Is Subject Of Free Satellite Seminars

The Northern Interscholastic Press Association at the School of
Communication is sponsoring a series of satellite seminars
focusing on "Television: The Creative Process" this spring. The
University Satellite Seminar Series originates from The Museum of
Television and Radio in New York and Los Angeles and is free and
open to the public.

The first seminar is "Creating Prime-Time Drama: Homicide: Life
on the Street," Monday, Feb. 10, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in the
Memorial Union South Ballroom. Members of the cast and creative
team of NBC's "Homicide: Life on the Street" will discuss the
process by which they create this program, which features a
gritty, stylized portrait of Baltimore police detectives solving
murder cases in an inner city where violence is random and
relentless. Shot entirely on location in Baltimore using hand-held cameras, "Homicide's" unusual look and feel set it apart
from other shows on U.S. television.

The second seminar is "Creating Prime-Time Drama: Steven Bochco,"
Wednesday, Feb. 19, from 7:30 to 9 p.m. in the Memorial Union
Lecture Bowl. This seminar looks at the career of writer/producer
Steven Bochco, who revitalized familiar genres with a series of
hit shows including "Hill Street Blues," "L.A. Law," "NYPD Blues"
and "Murder One."

A third seminar, "Creating a Prime-Time News Magazine: 60
Minutes," is scheduled for Tuesday, April 8, from 6:30 to 8 p.m.,
location to be announced. "60 Minutes" has been at the forefront
of television journalism since it first aired in 1968. The show
thrives on its eclectic mixture of stories ranging from world
events and trends in popular culture to small-town heroes and the
famous "60 Minutes" investigations. Executive producer Don
Hewitt, along with several of the "60 Minutes" on-air
personalities, will discuss what makes this Peabody Award-winning
show tick.

The final seminar, "Television and the Courts," will be held
Tuesday, April 15, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in the Memorial Union
South Ballroom. The presence of television cameras in the
courtroom was a revolutionary concept in 1977, when the Ronney
Zamora case in Florida made history by becoming the first
complete trial to be televised. Since then, the climate has
changed dramatically, as evidenced by Court TV, a cable channel
devoted to the coverage of trials. A panel of media and legal
professionals will discuss how a court case is transformed into
television programming and the differences between observing a
trial in the courtroom or on television. The panelists will also
address the legal and ethical issues raised by television's
coverage of the judicial process.

The University Satellite Seminar Series is made possible by
General Motors, and is sponsored in Grand Forks by the Northern
Interscholastic Press Association (NIPA), the high school
journalism program, at UND. NIPA is celebrating its 75th
anniversary. For more information, contact me. -- Peter Johnson,
NIPA director, at 7-4317 or peter_johnson@mail.und.nodak.edu.
*******

Guest Lecturer Will Discuss Art Marketing

Toni Sikes will present a talk, "Making the Connection: The
Philosophy Behind Marketing Your Art," at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb.
11, in the Paul Barr Room, 227 Hughes Fine Arts Center.

Toni Fountain Sikes is president of Kraus Sikes Inc., publishers
of "The Guild," the industry standard in artist sourcebooks. This
series of three books, published annually, links artists and
artisans doing commissioned work with design professionals in
North America. The books are sold internationally through design
bookstores and museum shops.

Sikes regularly jurors exhibits, consults with a number of
organizations, and lectures widely to design professionals and
artists. She is currently working with the Japan Traditional
Craft Center in Tokyo and the British Craft Council to help them
market the work of their artists in the United States. -- Katie
McCleery, Professor of Visual Arts.
*******

Computer Science Will Hold Enrichment Series

The Department of Computer Science invites interested students
and faculty to attend the second Enrichment Series in Computer
Science: Neural Networks and Genetic Algorithms. In this series
of three interactive lectures, we will explore the basic concepts
underlying neural networks and genetic algorithms, two successful
methods of subsymbolic computation and learning. The goal is to
present the fundamental concepts and give participants the
ability to continue to explore these ideas on their own.
There are no requirements for participation. If you are
interested in these topics and want to know more, please join us.

The presenter for the three sessions will be Bruce Maxwell
(Computer Science).

The second lecture, "All You Ever Wanted to Know About Genetic
Algorithms and Population-Based Learning," will be Thursday, Feb.
13, from 4 to 5:30 p.m., in 238 CAS II. In this second session,
we look at the development of genetic algorithms  and other
population-based techniques. These algorithms, inspired by the 
biological process of evolution, allow us to explore complex
spaces and  solve difficult problems more quickly than
traditional symbolic methods.

The third lecture, "Applications of Neural Networks in Speech,
Vision, and Robotics," will be held Thursday, Feb. 27, from 4 to
5:30 p.m., in 238 CAS II. In this final session, we'll examine
the application of artificial neural networks in real situations.
Artificial neural networks have found a wide variety of
applications in speech, vision, and robotics. We'll look at
examples of ANNs recognizing phonemes in speech, recognizing
faces in images, and even driving cars on the highway. 
Please direct any queries to me. -- Bruce Maxwell, Assistant
Professor of Computer Science, maxwell@cs.und.edu, 7-4982.
*******

History To Hold Brown Bag Lunch Session

The History Department and Phi Alpha Theta will hold a brown bag
lunch session at noon Wednesday, Feb. 12, in 217 Merrifield Hall.
Barbara Handy-Marchello (History) will present "Linda Slaughter:
An Intellectual Biography." Bring your lunch. There will be a
question and discussion period following Dr. Handy-Marchello's
presentation, which is open to all. This lecture is part of the
North Dakota Humanities Council Larry Remele Memorial Lecture
Series. For more information please contact me. -- David Rowley,
Associate Professor of History, 7-3380.
*******

Institutional Review Board Set To Meet Feb. 14

The Institutional Review Board will meet at 4 p.m. Friday, Feb.
14, in 305 Twamley Hall to consider all research proposals
submitted to the Office of Research and Program Development
before Tuesday, Feb. 4.  Proposals received later will be
considered only if a quorum has reviewed them and time permits.
Clinical medical projects must be reviewed by the Clinical
Medical Subcommittee before being brought to the full Board. 
Proposals for these projects were due in the Office of Research
and Program Development Jan. 28.

Notes from the meeting will be available in ORPD about one week
after the meeting. -- F.R. Ferraro (Psychology), Chair,
Institutional Review Board.
*******

Four Candidates will Present Ecology Seminars

The Department of Biology will present four seminars on various
aspects of Ecology as part of the interview process to hire a new
faculty member.

All talks will be at noon in 141 Starcher Hall; all interested
parties are encouraged to attend and see who may become a new
colleague. The schedule follows: 

On Friday, Feb. 14, Bryan Foster will present "Plant Competition
and Diversity in Relation to Productivity in Successional
Grassland."

On Friday, Feb. 21, Jim Cronin will present "Movement and the
Formation of Spatial Patterning in a Pine Beetle-Predator
System."

On Friday, Feb. 28, David Siemens will present a talk "Ecological
Consequences of Genetic Variation in Secondary Plant
Metabolites."

And on Monday, March 3, Andy McCollum will present "Predator-Induced Phenotypic Plasticity in Larval Amphibians." 

-- Colin Hughes, Assistant Professor of Biology.
*******

North Dakota's First Solar Car To Be Unveiled

Designing, building, and testing a solar-powered car in a state
that expects snow eight months of the year was an irresistible
challenge for a group of optimistic Engineering students.
Unfortunately, sunshine was not the only commodity in short
supply. Time and money were equally elusive. Nevertheless, in the
span of about a year, members of UND's Society for Energy
Alternatives raised the necessary funding, researched solar
design requirements, designed and built North Dakota's first
solar-powered car, the Subzero.

Subzero will be unveiled in a public ceremony this Valentine's
Day, Friday, Feb. 14, in the Memorial Union Ballroom, at 10:30
a.m. The keynote speaker, Byron Stafford, a project leader from
the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, will address the future
of renewable energy and the viability of solar-powered consumer
automobiles.

Subzero will be entered this summer in Sunrayce '97. Sponsored by
the U.S. Department of Energy, EDS, and General Motors, Sunrayce
'97 is a national collegiate competition challenging students to
design, build and race a road-worthy solar car. The race begins
in Indianapolis, Ind., on June 19, and ends when the first car
crosses a line 1,230 miles away in Colorado Springs, Colo. --
Barb Steadman, Media Relations, Society for Energy Alternatives.
*******

Promotion And Tenure Forum Set

All faculty are invited to attend the second Promotion and Tenure
Forum at 3 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 19, in the Sioux Room of the
Memorial Union. Panelists are Mary Cutler (Theatre Arts), Bruce
Dearden (Mathematics), and Jacob Wambsganss (Accounting and
Business Law). Panel members have recently completed the tenure
or promotion process. For additional information, contact me. --
Jan Zahrly, Associate Professor of Management, 7-4697. 
*******

Women Studies Salon Continues

On Thursday, Feb. 20, at 4 p.m. in the Women's Center, 305
Hamline St., the Women Studies Salon will meet to discuss
readings in feminist literature. The feature selection is by
Susan Griffin, from a book titled "Coming Into Our Fullness: On
Women Turning Forty," edited by C. Rountree. Griffin will take
part in the Writers Conference next month, so this is a chance to
read and discuss some of her work.

The Salon meets on the third Thursday of every month, from 4 to 5
p.m. at the Women's Center, 305 Hamline St. Copies of the reading
are on reserve at the Library under "Salon," and from the Women
Studies Center. For more information call Rebecca Moore, 7-2705
or the Women Studies Center, 7-4115. -- Rebecca Moore, Assistant
Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies.
*******

Genetics Candidate Will Present Seminar

The Department of Biology will present a seminar from a candidate
for the geneticist faculty position Friday, Feb. 21, at 3 p.m. in
141 Starcher Hall. Anne Gerber will present "Saltatorial
Genetics: Variation Above and Below the Species Level." Everyone
is welcome. -- Colin Hughes, Assistant Professor of Biology.
*******

OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

Students Should Apply For Scholarships Soon

Faculty are encouraged to remind their students that Saturday,
March 15, is the deadline for submitting applications to receive
top consideration for 1997-98 UND honor scholarships. 
Applications for scholarships must be made each academic year.
Honor scholarship application forms are available in the Student
Financial Aid Office, 216 Twamley Hall. -- Alice Hoffert,
Director, Student Financial Aid.
*******

Faculty Research and Creative Activity Committee Awards Listed

The Faculty Research and Creative Activity Committee (FRCAC) is
pleased to announce that Kay Abdullah, Ahmad Ghassemi, and Janis
Hulla are recipients of the 1996-97 New Faculty Scholar Award.
These awards provide support for research and creative activity
of tenure-track assistant professors who have completed less than
three years at UND. Criteria used to review applications included
external reviewers' comments, excellence of the application,
potential national prominence of the applicant, and potential for
future external funding, if applicable.

The recipients and titles of their respective projects follow:
Kay M. Abdullah (Surgery), "Role of Gap Junctional Proteins in
Diabetic Wound Healing"; Ahmad Ghassemi (Geology and Geological
Engineering), "Modeling Chemo-Mechanical Coupling and Borehold
Stability in Shale"; and Janis E. Hulla (Pharmacology and
Toxicology), "Development of Capability to Detect Genetic
Alteration at Mouse Microsatellite Loci." -- Brian Paulsen
(Visual Arts), Chair, Faculty Research and Creative Activity
Committee.
*******

Doctoral Exam Set For James Warren Stenehjem

The final examination for James Warren Stenehjem, a candidate for
the Ed.D. degree with a major in Educational Administration, is
set for 10 a.m. Friday, Feb. 14, in Room 208, Education Building.
The dissertation title is "The North Dakota BRIDGES Project:
Middle Level Education Reform Efforts in Six Schools." John
Backes (Educational Leadership) is the committee chair.

Members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend. -- Harvey
Knull, Dean, Graduate School.
*******

GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

NIH IDeA Center Q-Grants Available

The NIH IDeA Center will accept applications for quick grants (Q-grants) from researchers in health and behavioral sciences at
UND, NDSU, and local medical research facilities. The Center's
goal is to increase behavioral research grant proposals to the
National Institutes of Health. Q-grants are available, both as
small seed grants and consulting grants, to help investigators
prepare NIH proposals.

Three to four consulting grants will be awarded, up to $1,500
each, to help bring in an outside consultant, especially someone
with similar research interests and a successful NIH funding
record. Researchers receiving consulting grants will be asked to
submit an NIH proposal by February 1998. Review of consulting
grant applications will begin Friday, Feb. 7, 1997.

Four to five seed grants will be issued, up to $3,500 each, to
assist researchers with any type of preparation needed to submit
an NIH proposal, including such costs as student support, summer
salary for proposal writing, or equipment. Successful applicants
will be asked to submit an NIH proposal by October 1997. Review
of seed grant applications will begin Monday, Feb. 17.

Proposal reviews will be done locally, allowing for a quick turn-around on grant applications. Proposals will be accepted after
the listed deadlines if funds are still available. Instructions
for application submission and review criteria can be obtained by
contacting Mark McCourt at mccourt@plains.nodak.edu [(701)231-8625] or Kevin McCaul at mccaul@badlands.nodak.edu [(701)231-7072].

-- Bev Martinson, Psychology, North Dakota State University,
Fargo.
*******

ORPD Lists Funding Opportunities

Following are several research funding opportunities. For more
information on these grants, please call the Office of Research
and Program Development at 7-4278.

United States Army Summer Faculty Research and Engineering
Program
The Department of the Army, through the U.S. Army Research
Office, will offer research positions at Army facilities to
faculty employed by U.S. universities, colleges, or technical
institutions. Appointments will be for a work period of up to 12
weeks from May 1 to Sept. 15, 1997. DEADLINE: Feb. 27.

Department of Defense Strategic Environmental Research and
Development Program
The Department of Defense Strategic Environmental Research and
Development Program Office is interested in receiving proposals
for research focusing on the areas of Cleanup, Compliance,
Conservation and Population Prevention technologies. The Program
Announcement can be obtained by calling ORPD at 7-4278 or at
http://www.hgl.com/serdp. Preproposal DEADLINE: 4 p.m. EST, Feb.
25, 1997.

National Endowment for the Humanities Deadline Dates

Education Development and Demonstration, Humanities Focus Grants
-- April 18, 1997
Fellowships for University and College Teachers and Independent
Scholars -- May 1, 1997
Office of Challenge Grants -- May 1, 1997
Summer Stipends -- October 1, 1997

National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Call ORPD for further information on any of the following
programs:

Exploratory Grants in Chronic Renal Failure in Children. The
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
Division of Kidney, Urologic and Hematologic Diseases invites
exploratory/developmental grant applications to encourage and
facilitate studies designed to develop and/or apply new,
promising experimental tools to the understanding of the
pathophysiology and pathogenesis of events resulting in chronic
renal failure and its complications in children. DEADLINE: March
18, 1997 (Letter of Intent); April 18 (Application).

Helicobacter Pylori and Its Relationship to Digestive Diseases
and Cancer.  The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and
Kidney Diseases, the National Cancer Institute, the National
Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and the Office of
Research on Minority Health, in partnership with the American
Digestive Health Foundation, invite applications for basic and
clinical research focusing on the role of Helicobacter pylori
infection in peptic ulcer disease, nonulcer dyspepsia, and
gastric cancer, particularly in minority populations.  Studies on
the epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori in minority populations,
genetic susceptibility to and the acquisition of Helicobacter
infection, the role of Helicobacter in development and the
regulation of the inflammatory response are encouraged.   Support
will be through the NIH research project grant award, the FIRST
award, and the small grants award.  Deadline: March 21, 1997
(Letter of Intent); April 22, 1997 (Application Receipt).


Prevention and Cessation of Tobacco Use by Children and Youth in
the U.S.  The Division of Cancer Prevention and Control of the
National Cancer Institute, the National Institute of Child Health
and Human Development and the National Institute of Nursing
Research seek grant applications for innovative research that has
clear implications for the immediate and significant reduction of
tobacco use by children and youth in the United States.  Support
will be through the NIH individual research project grant. 
Deadline: March 15, 1997 (Letter of Intent); May 8, 1997
(Application Receipt).

Research on Musculoskeletal Fitness and Sports Medicine.  The
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin
Diseases (NIAMS) and the National Institute of Nursing (NIN)
invite investigator-initiated research grant applications to
study a broad range of basic and clinical topics related to
musculoskeletal fitness, exercise physiology and sports medicine. 
The National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research of the
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
(NCMRR/NICHD) encourage applications for both basic and clinical
studies of musculoskeletal fitness and exercise physiology of
persons with physical disabilities.  Under this announcement, the
NIAMS and the NICHD will support investigator-initiated research
project grants (RO1), First Independent Research Support and
Transition (FIRST) awards (R29), small grants ($03)[sic], program
projects (R01), career development grants (K01, K01, K08), and
Investigator-Initiated Interactive Research Project Grants
(IRPG).  The NINR will support individual research project grants
(R01, R29).

Small Grant Program for the National Institute of Arthritis and
Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease (NIAMS).  The NIAMS is seeking
small grant applications to stimulate and facilitate the entry of
promising new investigators into targeted, high priority areas of
NIAMS research.  This one-time solicitation will provide support
for pilot research that is likely to lead to an individual
research project grant or a First Independent Research Support
and Transition (FIRST) award application.  Deadline: March 18,
1997.   

-- Carl Fox, Director of Research and Program Development.    
*******

BILLBOARD

Medical Students To Host Elementary School Science Day

Members of the local American Medical Student Association (AMSA)
will host the Second Annual AMSA Elementary School Science Day
Saturday, Feb. 8, at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences.
The event, which stresses "hands-on" learning, is open at no
charge to students in grades five and six. Preregistration is
required. To accommodate as many children as possible, two
duplicate sessions will be offered. The morning session will run
from 8 a.m. to noon and the afternoon session from 1 to 5 p.m.
Participants should preregister for either one; each session is
limited to 150 participants. Registration will be conducted for
the first 45 minutes of each session.

In each session, six components are planned to stimulate
children's interest in and knowledge of science. They will focus
on topics such as human health and anatomy, computers in
medicine, the Gift of a Life (GOAL) project, tobacco awareness,
various science projects, and the STATS (Students Teaching AIDS
to Students) project.

Snacks will be served midway through each session. Adult
supervision will be provided by the more than 80 medical students
who are expected to take part in the event.

For more information or to obtain preregistration forms, please
contact the Office of Public Affairs at 7-4305. -- Pamela
Knudson, Public Affairs, School of Medicine and Health Sciences. 
*******

News From Disability Support Services

UND is federally mandated to provide access to the facilities and
programs we offer, both on campus and at remote sites.  Who is
responsible to ensure that access, and to provide accommodations
when requested?  

Our mission at Disability Support Services is to "assist the
University of North Dakota in carrying out its federally mandated
responsibility." We do not accept the full burden of ensuring
access but rather assist the institution.  Who is the
institution?  We all are.  

Some departments have specific responsibilities in this area.
Plant Services, for example, ensures that new construction and
retrofitted buildings meet ADA requirements. The Affirmative
Action Office handles access and accommodation issues for
employees, and DSS provides disability-related services in the
academic arena to eligible students with disabilities.

Even though each department on campus has a unique purpose, we
share one common mission -- to ensure that the programs and/or
services we offer are accessible to the entire student
population, including students with disabilities. When a student
asks that tests be produced in large print, the professor is
providing access in the testing situation. The student with a
disability then has the same opportunity to demonstrate what
she/he has learned as the other students in the class. If a deaf
student asks that an interpreter be present to translate for a
special event on campus, the sponsoring department's action of
hiring the interpreter is an accommodation.  When a student who
is blind asks the food service worker at Burger King to read the
menu aloud, that person is providing an accommodation.

All of us are responsible for ensuring access. Some
accommodations can be provided with the resources available in
your departments, and other requests require a coordinated effort
between departments. DSS is available to consult on how to
provide equal access for students; what is reasonable; who is in
the best position to provide the service; and what is fair and
equal treatment for students with disabilities. We would be happy
to discuss your questions and work with you to find solutions
that mutually benefit the students and the University. --
Disability Support Services, 7-3425.
*******

Participants Needed For Memory Experiments

Participants are needed for experiments dealing with memory and
language.  Volunteers must be 55 or more years of age.  The
experiments will require about an hour, and all participants will
receive a small honorarium (between $5 and $10) for
participating.  If you are interested or have questions, please
call me at 7-2414. -- Richard Ferraro, Assistant Professor of
Psychology.
*******

Presidents Day Is Holiday

In accordance with State Board of Higher Education directives,
Monday, Feb. 17, will be observed as Presidents Day by faculty
and staff members of the University. Only those employees
designated by their department heads will be required to work on
this holiday. -- Marlene Strathe, Vice President for Academic
Affairs and Provost, and Diane Nelson, Director, Personnel
Services.
*******

Chester Fritz Library:

Presidents Day holiday hours for the Chester Fritz Library are:
Saturday, Feb. 15, 1 to 5 p.m.; Sunday, Feb. 16, closed; Monday,
Feb. 17 (Presidents Day), 1 p.m. to midnight. -- Patricia
Berntsen, Assistant Director, Chester Fritz Library.
*******

Health Sciences Library:

The library of the Health Sciences hours for the Presidents Day
holiday are: Friday, Feb. 14, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, Feb.
15, 1 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, Feb. 16, 1 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Monday,
Feb. 17, 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. -- Judy Rieke, Assistant Director,
Library of the Health Sciences.
*******

Computer Center:

The Computer Center will close for the Presidents Day holiday at
midnight Sunday, Feb. 16, and will reopen at midnight Monday,
Feb. 17. -- Nadine Kotowicz, Operations Manager, Computer Center.
*******

Memorial Union Lists Hours For Presidents Day Holiday:
Fri., Feb. 14  Sat., Feb. 15  Sun., Feb. 16  Mon., Feb. 17
Lifetime Sports Center: Fri., Feb. 14, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sat. and 
Sun., Feb. 15-16, noon to 5 p.m.;  Mon., Feb. 17, noon to 6 p.m.
(okay for leagues).

Info Center: Fri., Feb. 14, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sat. through Mon.,
Feb. 15-17, noon to 5 p.m.

Service Center: Fri., Feb. 14, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sat. through
Mon., Feb. 15-17, noon to 5 p.m.

Copy Stop: Fri., Feb. 14, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sat. and Sun., Feb.
15-16, Closed; Mon., Feb. 17, noon to 5 p.m.

Burger King: Fri., Feb. 14, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sat., Feb. 15, 11
a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sun., Feb. 16, noon to 5 p.m.; Mon., Feb. 17, 11
a.m. to 5 p.m.

Bookstore: Fri., Feb. 14, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sat. through Mon.,
Feb. 15-17, Closed.

Administrative Office: Fri., Feb. 14, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Sat.
through Mon., Feb. 15-17, Closed.

Craft Center/Sign and Design Studio: Fri., Feb. 14, 9 a.m. to
4:30 p.m.; Sat. through Mon., Feb. 15-17, Closed.

Dining Center: Fri., Feb. 14, 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Sat. through
Mon., Feb. 15-17, Closed 

Barber Shop: Fri., Feb. 14, 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Sat. and Sun.
Feb. 15-16, Closed; Mon., Feb. 17, 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Centennial Room: Fri., Feb. 14, 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.; Sat.
through Mon., Feb. 15-17, Closed.

Espresso Bar: Fri., Feb. 14, 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.; Sat. through
Mon., Feb. 15-17, Closed.

Corner Deli: Fri., Feb. 14, 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Sat. through
Mon., Feb. 15-17, Closed.

Learning Services: Fri., Feb. 14, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Sat.
through Mon., Feb. 15-17, Closed.

Union Station: Fri., Feb. 14, 9 a.m. to 4:50 p.m.; Sat. through
Mon., Feb. 15-17, Closed.

Passport IDs: Fri., Feb. 14, 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.; Sat. through
Mon., Feb. 15-17, Closed.

Computer Learning Lab: Fri., Feb. 14, 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.; Sat.,
Feb. 15, 11 a.m. to 5:45 p.m.; Sun., Feb. 16, noon to 5:45 p.m.;
Mon., Feb. 17, 11 a.m. to 5:45 p.m.

Building Hours: Fri., Feb. 14, 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sat. through
Mon., Feb. 15-17, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

-- MaryAnne Lustgraaf, Director, Memorial Union.
*******

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

Celebrate Chinese New Year

The Chinese Student Association invites all to join us in a New
Year party to celebrate the Year of the Ox. The celebration
includes dinner, folk music, and a traditional lion dance, from 5
to 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 9, at the Grand Forks Civic Auditorium. 
Admission is $3 for students, and $4 for the general public.  
Tickets are available at the Memorial Union Lobby and the
International Centre. For more information please contact the
International Centre at 7-4231, or Shuguang Sun, president of the
Chinese Student Association, at 7-2496. -- Sharon Rezac Andersen,
Director, International Centre, and Sven Anderson, Visiting
Assistant Professor, Computer Science.
*******

Music Will Host Visiting Lecturer

On Monday, Feb. 10, the Department of Music and the UND Women's
Center will host a visiting lecturer, Dr. Stewart Carter, of Wake
Forest University. At 4 p.m., in 152 Hughes Fine Arts Center, Dr.
Carter will coach a Brass Ensemble Master Class for two
University brass quintets and the Collegium Musicum. Observers
are welcome.

At 7:30 p.m., in the Josephine Campbell Recital Hall, Dr. Carter
will deliver a lecture, "Music Knows No Cloister: Isabella
Leonarda."  The lecture will include a live performance of
Leonarda's Sonata 12, by Swantje Bossemeyer-Biernacki, violin. 
It is open to the public; admission is free.

Isabella Leonarda, an Italian nun, was the most productive female
composer of the baroque era, with over 200 works to her credit.  
Dr. Carter is Professor of Music at Wake Forest University in
Winston-Salem, N.C. A world-recognized sackbut performer and
scholar of 17th-century music, Dr. Carter has edited "Historical
Performance," "The Historic Brass Society Journal and two
important books in progress. His articles embrace performance
practice, women's music, and the history of the trombone, and he
has published the first editions of significant works by Isabella
Leonarda.  He has presented his scholarly work both nationally
and internationally and is a highly-respected professional
performer of early trombone.

Carter performs regularly with the Carolina Waits, an early brass
ensemble, and the Wake Forest Consort. He has taught early wind
instruments at workshops throughout the United States, most
notably at the Amherst Early Music Festival/Institute, where he
has been on the faculty since 1986. He has appeared in a
recording on the Amherst Festival label. Carter recently returned
from Poland, where he presented lectures on early wind
instruments in Wroclaw, Warsaw, and Legnica, and performed with
the Polish early music ensemble Collegio di Musica Sacra in
concerts in Wroclaw and Walbrzych.

-- Gary Towne, Associate Professor of Music.
*******

MAC Will Present "Dr. King's Dream"

The Multicultural Awareness Committee, a division of Student
Government, will present "Dr. King's Dream" at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday,
Feb. 11, in the South Ballroom, Memorial Union. The performance
will be given by the Mixed Blood Theater Company of Minneapolis,
and will focus on the famed civil rights leader's trials and
search for equality and justice. The performance is expected to
last for an hour, and a short discussion will follow the program.
Admission is free. -- Ben Subedi, Coordinator, Student
Organizations, and Advisor, Multicultural Awareness Committee.
*******

Women's Center Lists Events

The Wednesday, Feb. 12, Feast and Focus program at noon in the
Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., is "Close Encounter:
Experiencing Stereotypes." If we are going to ask each other to
work toward eliminating stereotypes, it is important to realize
that everyone is impacted by stereotyping. Each of us has been
stereotyped at one point or another in our lives. This discussion
will allow participants to recall their feelings when they were
unfairly judged by others and will encourage and recognize the
need to see each person as an individual. 

The Thursday, Feb. 13, For Women Only program will be "15 Ways to
Clean the Kitchen Floor." During this program we will examine
various approaches to situations in life that require change. We
will confront our natural tendency to avoid change, illustrate
the power of resistance, and attempt to understand some of the
reasons for our behavior.

-- Donna Oltmanns, Coordinator, Women's Center.
*******

Theatre Arts Will Present "Remembrance"

The Department of Theatre Arts is proud to present the drama,
"Remembrance," by Graham Reid. The play tells the story of a
Catholic woman and a Protestant man from Northern Ireland who
meet and fall in love while tending their sons' graves -- in
spite of the hatred that has dominated their community for so
long.

"Remembrance," the fourth production of the 1997-97 season, is
directed by Sandra Lindberg (Theatre Arts). The production also
features special appearances by Theatre Arts professors Gregory
Gillette and Mary Cutler. The show runs Tuesday through Saturday,
Feb. 18-22 and 25-28 at the Burtness Theatre; curtain rises at
7:30 p.m. Tickets are general admission and are available for $5
at the Burtness Theater Box Office or by calling 7-2587. -- Joel
Svendsen, Burtness Theatre Publicity Manager.
*******

Craft Center To Offer Pottery Workshop

The University Craft Center will offer a six-week pottery
workshop on Wednesday evenings, Feb. 12, 19, 26, March 5, 19 and
26 from 6 to 8:30 p.m. The workshop will teach techniques for
throwing on a potter's wheel and handbuilding with clay. Pieces
will be fired and glazed. The registration fee of $50 includes
materials. Registration is open to UND community and the public;
pre-registration by Sunday, Feb. 9, is required. Call the Craft
Center at 7-3979 for registration information. -- Bonnie Solberg,
Craft Center Coordinator.
*******

FYI

Report Icy Conditions To Plant Services

Winter weather causes icy conditions on our parking lots, roads,
and sidewalks.  We will salt and sand to reduce the slipperiness
as much as possible.  Please report any hazardous conditions to
Plant Services at 7-2591. There are some things you can do to
help reduce the risk of falling on ice.

1.  Wear boot or overshoes with gripper soles. Slick leather or
rubber soles on dress shoes are unsafe on ice.

2.  Don't walk with your hands in your pockets. This reduces your
balance if you slip on the ice.

3.  Take short to medium steps, or shuffle your feet in very icy
areas.

4.  Don't carry or swing heavy loads, such as large boxes or
cases, which could cause you to lose your balance when walking.

5.  When walking, curl your toes under and walk as flatfooted as
possible.

6.  Don't step on uneven surfaces. Step well over or avoid curbs
with ice on them.

7.  Place your full attention on walking. Don't allow your
attention to be divided by getting your keys out of your pocket,
digging in your pocketbook for items, etc., while walking on ice.

-- Paul Clark, Associate Director of Plant Services.
*******

International Aerospace Camp Dates Set

UND will sponsor the 14th Annual International Aerospace Camp
June 29 through July 9 and July 13 to the 23. This event brings
eighth, ninth and 10th graders (ages 14 to 16) from all over
North America together for a one-of-a-kind "camping" adventure.
The sky becomes their classroom when they fly with flight
instructors in three different aircraft -- helicopter, aerobatic
plane, and single engine trainer. They study aerodynamics, build
and fly model rockets, visit the U.S. Air Force Base and travel
to Winnipeg to experience the workings of a major international
airport, as well as much more.

Camp instructors are faculty at UND's Center for Aerospace
Sciences. For more information about the camp, contact Ken
Polovitz at 7-2791. To receive a 1997 camp brochure, call Monique
at 7-2663. -- Dawn Botsford, Program Coordinator, Division of
Continuing Education.
*******

Credit Union Holds Elections

At the annual meeting of the Credit Union on Jan. 30, one board
member and one credit committee member were elected. Frank Slater
(Chester Fritz Library, retired) was elected to a three-year term
on the Board of Directors. Elected to a three-year term on the
Credit Committee was Loretta Prather (Business Office). 

Copies of the Annual Report are available at the Credit Union
office. Please write or phone for a copy. A special thanks goes
to Cheryl Widman (Personnel Services) for three years of service
on the Credit Committee. -- George Meister, Manager, University
Federal Credit Union.
*******

Bookstore Journal Available

The newest edition of the "Bookstore Journal" will be sent to
departments this week. The "Bookstore Journal" is packed with
lots of information, specials and prizes. If you don't see one,
you can check our online version on our home page located at:
http:bookstore.und.nodak.edu/bookstore/ or call the Bookstore at
7-2746 to request a copy via intercampus mail. Please note that
the calendar section of the "Journal" incorrectly lists the
Senior Salute times. It should read "Feb. 19 and 20, Senior
Salute, Memorial Union Ballroom, Wednesday, Feb. 19, 8:30 a.m. to
7 p.m., and Thursday, Feb. 20, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. -- Don
Forbes, Manager, University Bookstore.
*******

PGA Golf Seminar Set For March 7-8 In Hyslop Sports Center

UND will host its 15th annual PGA Golf Seminar Friday and
Saturday, March 7 and 8 in the Hyslop Sports Center. The seminar
is designed for players, teachers and coaches who want to improve
their own play or help others play better golf. Topics will
include the general golf swing, short irons (chipping and
pitching), figuring handicaps, use of woods, putting, sand shots,
medium irons, long irons, videotape service (bring your own VHS
tape and take your swing home), rules and equipment. Instructors
who are tentatively scheduled for the seminar include Leo
Marchel, Rob Stiles, Steve Christian, Malcolm Rodacker, Jim
Leigh, Tom Donarski, and Dan Tannahill of Grand Forks; Scott
Buchholz of Devils Lake; Steve Murdock of Fargo; Cory Nelson of
Jamestown; Jeff Bass of Wahpeton, Greg McCullough, Mark Johnson,
Dean Mullerud and Matt Cook of Moorhead, Minn.; Greg Mireault of
Fosston, Minn.; Nick Anderson of Perham, Minn.; Dan Lehmann of
Detroit Lakes, Minn.; and Jack Backer of Wendover, Nev.

Advance registration is required; call 7-2155. Registration
starts at noon Friday and at 8 a.m. Saturday. The fee is $40 for
adults and $25 for college or high school students. The seminar
is being presented in cooperation with UND's Department of
Health, Physical Education and Recreation and the Professional
Golfers Association of America. Participation is limited to 120
persons. -- Rob Stiles, Golf Coach, Athletics Department.
*******

Feb. 7 Is "Green And White Day"

President Kendall Baker has approved Friday, Feb. 7, as a "Green
and White Day." Employees may wear UND colors and jeans. The men
and women's basketball teams will play Mankato State University
Friday, Feb. 7, and St. Cloud State University on Saturday, Feb.
8; the hockey team will host Michigan Technological University
both nights. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, University Letter.
*******

Half-Price Tickets Available For Tracy Byrd

Tracy Byrd tickets for Friday, Feb. 7, are half-priced for all
UND students, faculty and staff for remaining seats. Tickets are
available now and may be picked up only at the Box Office. -- Tom
Swangler, Chester Fritz Auditorium.
*******

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

FEBRUARY 1997

(Please contact Mavis at the Office of University Relations, Box 7144, or call
777-4304, if you wish to make changes or have an event included.)

Through Sun., Feb. 23 -- ART EXHIBITION, Piper Jaffray Collection, a regional
collection assembled in states where Piper Jaffray does business, North Dakota
Museum of Art.

Fri., Feb. 7 -- LAST DAY TO CHANGE TO/FROM S/U.

Fri., Feb. 7 -- LAST DAY TO CHANGE FROM CREDIT TO AUDIT.

Fri., Feb. 7 -- BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY FACULTY CANDIDATE LECTURE,
Natalia Y. Kedishvili, Assistant Scientist, Department of Biochemistry and
Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, will present
"Control of Retinol Oxidation by Alcohol Dehydrogenases," 5510 Medical
Science, 9 a.m.

Fri., Feb. 7 -- GREEN AND WHITE DAY, President Baker has approved wearing
jeans and UND colors (hockey, Michigan Tech; men's and women's basketball,
Mankato State University and St. Cloud State University).

Fri., Feb. 7 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND vs. Mankato State University, Hyslop
Sports Center, 6:30 p.m.

Fri., Feb. 7 -- BASKETBALL, WOMEN'S, UND vs. Mankato State University, Hyslop
Sports Center, 4:30 p.m.

Fri., Feb. 7 -- SWIMMING AND DIVING, MEN'S and WOMEN'S, UND at St. Cloud State
University Dual, St. Cloud, Minn.

Fri., Feb. 7 -- WRESTLING, UND at St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud,
Minn., 7 p.m.

Fri and Sat., Feb. 7-8 -- HOCKEY, UND vs. Michigan Technological University,
Ralph Engelstad Arena, 8:05 p.m.

Sat., Feb. 8 -- LAW SCHOOL ADMISSION TEST (LSAT), Room 7, Gamble Hall, 8:30
a.m.

Sat., Feb. 8 -- AMERICAN COLLEGE TEST (ACT), place to be announced, 8 a.m.

Sat., Feb. 8 -- TEST OF SPOKEN ENGLISH (TSE), place to be announced, 12:30
p.m.

Sat., Feb. 8 -- LAW SCHOOL ADMISSION TEST (LSAT), Room 7, Gamble Hall, 8:30
a.m.

Sat., Feb. 8 -- AMERICAN COLLEGE TEST (ACT), Ground floor, O'Kelly Hall, 8
a.m.

Sat., Feb. 8 -- TEST OF SPOKEN ENGLISH (TSE), Room 312, O'Kelly Hall, 12:30
p.m.

Sat., Feb. 8 -- SECOND ANNUAL AMSA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SCIENCE DAY, members of
the local American Medical Student Association (AMSA) will host the event,
which stresses "hands-on" learning, open at no charge to students in grades
five and six; preregistration is required; call 777-4305 for more information.

Sat., Feb. 8 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND vs. St. Cloud State University, Hyslop
Sports Center, 6:30 p.m.

Sat., Feb. 8 -- BASKETBALL, WOMEN'S, UND vs. St. Cloud State University,
Hyslop Sports Center, 4:30 p.m.

Sat., Feb. 8 -- SWIMMING AND DIVING, MEN'S and WOMEN'S, UND vs. University of
Manitoba and South Dakota State University Dual, Hyslop Sports Center.

Sat., Feb. 8 -- WRESTLING, UND at Mankato State University, Mankato, Minn., 7
p.m.

Sun., Feb. 9 -- ANNUAL CELEBRATION OF CHINESE NEW YEAR, the Year of the Ox,
the celebration includes dinner, folk music, and a traditional lion dance,
Grand Forks Civic Auditorium, 615 1st Ave. N., 5 to 7:30 p.m.; tickets are $4
for adults and $3 for students; date changed from Friday, Feb. 7; call 777-4231 for more information.

Sun., Feb. 9, through Sun., Feb. 23 -- 1997 ANNUAL JURIED STUDENT ART
EXHIBITION BEGINS, North Dakota Museum of Art; exhibition opens Feb. 9, with a
program including awards, music and food from 2 to 4 p.m.; contact Angie at
777-9964 for more information.

Mon., Feb. 10 -- MEETING, Graduate Committee, 305 Twamley Hall, 3:05 p.m.

Mon., Feb. 10 -- ANATOMY AND CELL BIOLOGY FACULTY CANDIDATE SEMINAR,
"Evolutionary and Functional Aspects of Leaping in Primates" will be presented
by Carl J. Terranova, Postdoctoral Reseracher/Instructor in the Department of
Anatomy, College of Medicine, Howard University, Room 1360, Clifford Haugen
Lecture Hall, Bio-Information Learning Resources Center, Health Sciences
Building, noon.

Mon., Feb. 10 -- LEADERSHIP SERIES, "A Trip to Self-Discovery," presented by
Cynthia Thompson, Coordinator of Leadership Development and Programming,
Leadership Inspiration Center, third floor, Memorial Union, 3 p.m.; non-credit
sessions are designed to help students explore leadership from a variety of
perspectives and develop an understanding of themselves; sessions are free and
open to the public.

Mon., Feb. 10 -- PYSCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM, "Recent Child Welfare Issues,"
presented by Tara Lea Muhlhauser, Director of Children and Family Services
Training Center, Department of Social Work, 102 Nursing Building, noon;
everyone is welcome to attend.

Mon., Feb. 10 -- LECTURE, "Music Knows No Cloister: Isabella Leonarda,"
presented by Stewart Carter of Wake Forest University, Josephine Campbell
Recital Hall, Hughes Fine Arts Center, 7:30 p.m.; lecture will include a live
performance of Leonarda's Sonata 12, by Swantje Bossemeyer-Biernacki, violin;
open to the public and admission is free; At 4 p.m., in 152 Hughes Fine Arts
Center, Dr. Carter will coach a Brass Ensemble Master Class for two University
brass quintets and the Collegium Musicum; observers are welcome.

Mon., Feb. 10 -- SATELLITE SEMINARS, "Television: The Creative Process"
sponsored by the Northern Interscholastic Press Association at the School of
Communication; the seminars originate from The Museum of Television and Radio
in New York and Los Angeles and are free and open to the public; the first
seminar, "Creating Prime-Time Drama: Homicide: Life on the Street," will be in
the Memorial Union South Ballroom from 6:30 to 8 p.m.; members of the cast and
creative team of NBC's "Homicide: Life on the Street" will discuss the process
by which they create this program; other seminars are Wednesday, Feb. 19,
Tuesday, April 8, and Tuesday, April 15.

Mon., Feb. 10 -- THEATRE SERIES, "Kiss of the Spider Woman," a musical that is
an unusual tale of friendship and love that portrays how the relationship
between two men gradually evolves from hostility and distrust to mutual
respect and understanding, Chester Fritz Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

Mon. and Tues., Feb. 10 and 11 -- LECTURE ON AIDS, presented by Don Boys,
former member of the Indiana House of Representatives, and author of 10 books,
Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, 7 p.m.; call 773-3166 for more information.

Mon. through Fri., Feb. 10-14 -- LEAD CLASS, Environmental Training Institute
inspector/risk assessor course (2975), Comfort Inn, Highway 2 East, East Grand
Forks, Minn.; cost is $450/700); call 777-3341 for more information.

Mon., Feb. 10, through Thurs., Feb. 20 -- EXHIBITION, paintings and drawings
of Walter Piehl, Professor at Minot State University and former Master of Fine
Arts student, Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center.

Tues., Feb. 11 -- PERFORMANCE, "Dr. King's Dream," by the Mixed Blood Theater
Company of Minneapolis, South Ballroom, Memorial Union, 6:30 p.m.; performance
is sponsored by the Multicultural Awareness Committee, a division of Student
Government. 

Tues., Feb. 11 -- LECTURE, "Making the Connection: The Philosophy Behind
Marketing Your Art," presented by Toni Fountain Sikes, president of Kraus
Sikes Inc., publishers of "The Guild," the industry standard in artist
sourcebooks, Paul Barr Room, 227 Hughes Fine Arts Center, 7:30 p.m.

Wed., Feb. 12 -- LAST DAY FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS TO REMOVE INCOMPLETES.

Wed., Feb. 12 -- HISTORY AND PHI ALPHA THETA BROWN BAG LUNCH SESSION, "Linda
Slaughter: An Intellectual Biography," will be presented by Barbara Handy-Marchello (History), 217 Merrifield Hall, noon; bring your lunch; a question
and answer period follows the presentation.

Wed., Feb. 12 -- FEAST AND FOCUS PROGRAM, "Close Encounter: Experiencing
Stereotypes," Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

Wed. through Sun., Feb. 12-16 -- SWIMMING AND DIVING, Phillips 66 National
Swimming Championships, Seattle, Wash.

Thurs., Feb. 13 -- COUNSELING COLLOQUIUM, "Reality Therapy: Choice in
Counseling," with Judy Comstock, 318 Montgomery Hall, noon to 1:30 p.m.;
presented by the Department of Counseling Topics in Counseling and Counseling
Psychology Research and Practice Colloquium; everyone is welcome, whether or
not you are taking the seminar for credit.

Thurs., Feb. 13 -- FOR WOMEN ONLY PROGRAM, "15 Ways to Clean the Kitchen
Floor," we will examine various approaches to situations in life that require
change, Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.


REMINDER! The attachments referred to are not included in the electronic
form of the University Letter. However, you will find the attachments
with the paper copy.
  
UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and
distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is
also available electronically through UNDInfo, the University's menu
system on the Internet. The addresses are http://www.und.nodak.edu for
World-Wide Web and uninfo.und.nodak.edu for gopher.
  
All articles submitted for publication should be labeled "University
Letter" and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic
submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu. Attachments to
University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number.
University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations,
Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.
  
UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.
  
*******

  





Last Updated:Wednesday, September 4, 1996
Maintained by:Webmaster
Contact: Webmaster



Go To Top To Home Page