[University Letter logo]

University Letter

January 17, 1997

Volume 34 No. 20



UNIVERSITY LETTER
UNIVERSITY LETTER
University of North Dakota at Grand Forks
Vol. 34, Number 20, January 17, 1997

UNIVERSITY LETTER INDEX

University Senate Will Meet Feb. 6
Legislative Forum Set
President's Restructuring Decisions Announced
University of North Dakota Report to the Chancellor
     EVENTS TO NOTE
Talk Will Consider Native American Research
Women Studies "Salon" Begins
Join Writers Conference Reading Seminar
Dinosaurs Are Subject Of Lectures
Microbial Genetics Expert To Speak
OID Session Will Focus On Faculty Web Pages
Candidates To Present Anatomy Seminars
Psychology Will Hold Colloquium
Forums To Discuss Promotion, Tenure
Successful Writing Is Focus Of WAC Forum
MAC Will Present "Dr. King's Dream"
     OF ACADEMIC INTEREST
Research Listserv Available
Entrants Sought For Merrifield Competition
Six Faculty Named To Summer Professorships
Proposals For Summer Professorships Due Soon
GTA Training Session Set
     GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS
Applications Due To Faculty Research Committee
EPSCoR Offers Funding Opportunities
     BILLBOARD
Student Crisis Policies Listed
Ethernet Connections Recommended
Counseling Center Will Offer Educational Series
DSS Begins Informational Series
Students Should Use Form To Leave University
Chester Fritz Library Holiday Hours
Health Sciences Library Holiday Hours
Memorial Union Holiday Hours
Participants Sought For Nursing Program
U2 Hotline Announced
     MONEY MATTERS
Social Security Tax Rate Listed
Student Employees Should File New W-4 Form
     ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT
N.D. Quarterly Focuses On "Buffalo Commons"
Honor Band, Choir Students Will Visit Campus
International Centre Lists Events
Insight Meditation" Offered At International Centre
Women's Center Lists Events
     FYI
Jan. 17 Is "Green And White Day"
Sunday New York Times Available
Credit Union Offers Instant Cash And Check Card
Spring Semester Bowling Leagues Now Forming
Two Cross Country Ski Workshops Offered
     CALENDAR OF EVENTS
*******

ATTACHMENTS:
Bookstore Specials (included online)
International Centre Programs
Campus Bakery Specialty Breads:
     Feb. 12, Pesto Bread
     Feb. 19, Sunflower Bread
     Feb. 26, Onion Parmesan Bread
     March 5, 7-Grain Bread
     March 12, Apple Cinnamon Bread
     March 19, Dill Onion Rye Bread
     March 26, Bacon Cheese Bread
     April 2, Sun Dried Tomato Bread
     April 9, Savory Bread
     April 16, Pizza Bread
     April 23, Garden Veggie Bread
     April 30, Ciabatto Bread
*******

University Senate Will Meet Feb. 6

The University Senate will meet Thursday, Feb. 6, at 4:05 p.m. in Room 7,
Gamble Hall. Agenda items for this meeting are due in the Office of
Admissions and Records by 4 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 23. It is recommended that
some detail be included in the agenda items submitted. -- Alice Poehls
(Admissions and Records), Secretary, University Senate.
*******

Legislative Forum Set

The Governmental Affairs committee of the Grand Forks Chamber of Commerce
will host Saturday Morning Legislative Forums beginning Saturday, Jan. 18,
at 10 a.m. in the City Council Chambers, third floor in City Hall, 255
Fourth St. N. Moine Gates, Governmental Affairs chair, will moderate
discussions. "Economic Development" will be the kick-off topic.
These forums will continue every other Saturday. Future dates include Feb.
1 and 15, and March 1 and 15. Grand Forks legislators will be present to
discuss legislative topics of interest to the citizens. The forum is open
to the public. 

To contact your legislator at the State Capitol in Bismarck, dial 1-888-634-3447, toll-free. -- Jan
Orvik, Editor, University Letter.
*******

University of North Dakota
Report to the Chancellor
By President Kendall L. Baker
January 10, 1997

INTRODUCTION.  This report is submitted in response to Chancellor Larry
Isaak's request in his letter to President Baker of February 14, 1996, for
a progress report at the end of 1996 on UND's restructuring efforts. It
also is intended as a report to the campus community which can serve as a
guide for implementation of the decisions and recommendations.
The document consists of responses by President Baker to the report of the
University Senate Restructuring and Reallocation Committee, which was
considered by the University Senate on December 5 and 12 and transmitted to
President Baker. As documented in the attached minutes, the Senate also
provided input on four specific recommendations in the SRRC report.

As noted, the President recommends program closure in a number of
instances. It should be emphasized that although no new students will be
admitted to these programs, all currently enrolled students will be able to
complete their degrees. Hence, the official closing date for a program will
be when the last currently enrolled student finishes program requirements
or May 15, 2002, whichever occurs first.

Finally, it should be emphasized that the University Senate Restructuring
and Reallocation Committee, which focused on low-enrollment programs in the
fall semester, will continue its work in 1997, as will the University
Planning Council. Among other items on the agenda are a review of academic
programs that have experienced substantial change over the past ten years
in the number of majors served or the number of credit hours generated, and
an examination of the administrative structure of the University as
compared to national practice. The committee's work so far has been superb,
and its members deserve to be highly commended for the open consultative
process they designed, the thorough research they conducted, and the very
thoughtful recommendations they made. The committee's dedication and
seriousness of purpose have made an exceedingly difficult process a little
bit easier.

PRESIDENT BAKER'S RECOMMENDATIONS.  The following summary is organized in
the same order as the attached report from the Senate Restructuring and
Reallocation Committee.

1.   The B.S. programs in Classical Languages, French, German, Languages,
Latin, Biology, Chemistry, English, Geography, Mathematics, and Physics.

Recommendation:  Concur that the B.S. Ed. option in these programs be
discontinued. However, students will still be able to prepare to teach in
high school by earning degrees in their teaching fields along with
professional course work in Education. UND will continue to prepare
secondary teachers in all the fields currently available.

2.   The B.S. in Fisheries and Wildlife Biology.

Recommendation: Concur that this program be continued.

3.   The B.S. with a major in Natural Science.

Recommendation: Rather than using the Natural Science major, I believe UND
should, like many other institutions, have a clearly defined pre-med
curriculum for interested students. Hence, I intend to recommend
discontinuance of this program, and to ask Dr. Strathe to bring together
representatives of the medical and health disciplines on our campus to
develop a pre-med program. Dr. Marlene Strathe, Provost and Vice President
for Academic Affairs, is already working with a group to determine whether
we should develop a pre-health sciences program. Development of a pre-med
curriculum might be a natural extension of the work of this group, if it
were appropriately expanded.

4.   The B.S. in Athletic Training.

Recommendation: Concur that this program be continued.

5.   The B.A. majors in Advertising, Broadcasting, Journalism,
Communication Studies, and Public Relations.

Recommendation: Concur that these majors be discontinued with the
understanding that the B.A. with major in Communication is the restructured
replacement for the five programs.

6.   The Doctor of Philosophy in Physics.

Recommendation: Concur that the Ph.D. in Physics be continued. I want to
take this occasion to congratulate the Department of Physics on its
collaborative efforts with North Dakota State University, and I strongly
encourage the faculty to continue exploration of joint doctoral programming
with North Dakota State University. I would like to receive progress
reports on these efforts from the department in May and December, 1997 and
May 1998.

7.   The Doctor of Philosophy in Energy Engineering.

Recommendation: Concur that the Ph.D. be continued. However, I strongly
endorse the proposal of Dr. Don Richard, Dean of the School of Engineering
and Mines, to establish "a joint task force" of UND and NDSU faculty to
prepare, "with the leadership of the respective college deans," "an in-depth review, marketing
study, etc. to evaluate the possibility of a joint
Ph.D. program in engineering, with a report to be prepared by the end of
[the] spring semester." As the Task Force considers the options, it should
keep in mind that Chancellor Isaak has committed $50,000 from the North
Dakota University System contingency fund to enhance the voice, video and
data links between UND and NDSU.

Additionally, I will look forward to the results of the regular review of
this program Dr. Harvey Knull, Dean of the Graduate School, and the
Graduate Committee will conduct during the spring semester.

8.   The B.S.Ed. with composite major in Social Science.
Recommendation: Concur that this program be continued.

9.   The B.S.Ed. in Earth Science, in Physical Science and Biology, and in
Physical Science.

Recommendation: Recommend discontinuance of these programs and encourage
Dr. Mary Harris, Dean of the College of Education and Human Development,
and appropriate faculty to develop a new composite major in science.

10.  The minor in Greek.

Recommendation: Concur that this minor be discontinued and that regularly
scheduled courses in Greek be limited to the first two years of college
study.

11A and 11B.   The B.A. with major in Latin and the Proposed program in
Classical Studies.

Recommendation: 11A/B. Concur that the Latin major be continued, with the
following understanding:

-- That a Task Force in the College of Arts and Sciences consider and
prepare a report by May 15, 1997, on alternatives to the Latin major for
students and faculty interested in classical studies, with the
understanding that the University will not operate both a classical studies
and a Latin program.

-- That the College of Arts and Sciences, utilizing existing resources,
develop and implement a plan to build enrollments in the Latin major to an
agreed upon level, should a decision be made not to create a classical
studies program. If significant progress has not been achieved by December
31, 1998, the major will be discontinued, as recommended by the Senate
Restructuring and Reallocation Committee.

I want to emphasize that I both understand and deeply appreciate the
arguments of those who stress the importance of the Classics to a
university rooted in the arts and sciences. I also want to make it clear
that I honor and cherish UND's historical designation as the "liberal arts
university of North Dakota." Nevertheless, in this period when all elements
of our academic program are short of resources, it is not possible to
justify the commitment of faculty positions and other support to a program,
no matter how worthy it may be in the abstract, unless it can demonstrate
that it is meeting the needs of a critical mass of students. Moreover, the
University simply cannot afford to operate both a Classics and a Latin
program. My challenge to the faculty, therefore, is to reformulate UND's
offerings in this area in a way that will enhance its contribution to the
students of the 21st Century. [Note: The University Senate adopted a
position contrary to this recommendation, and it will be communicated to
the State Board of Higher Education as called for in the Board and
University's governance documents.]

12A and 12B.   The B.A. with major in Norwegian, and the proposal to
increase resources to the Norwegian program.

Recommendation: Because of the questions raised about the academic and
pedagogical integrity of a major taught by a single faculty member and
because student demand for this program has focused almost exclusively on
language instruction, I cannot support the recommendation (12A) of the
Senate Restructuring and Reallocation Committee and the University Senate
to maintain the Norwegian major. Moreover, since Dr. John Ettling, Dean of
the College of Arts and Sciences, has made it clear that he "will not
endorse an effort to reallocate resources from other A&S units to augment
Norwegian language instruction," I am unable to support recommendation 12B,
which suggests an infusion of new resources into the program. However,
because of the heritage of our region and UND's participation in two
important student exchange programs with universities in Norway, I will
recommend that we continue to provide Norwegian language instruction at the
100 and 200 levels. [Note: The University Senate adopted a position
contrary to this recommendation, and it will be communicated to the State
Board of Higher Education as called for in the Board and University's
governance documents.]

13.  The B.S. in Airway Science with a major in Electronic Systems and the
B.S. in Airway Science with a major in Aviation Maintenance Management.

Recommendation: Concur that these programs be discontinued.

14.  The Ph.D. Program in Geology.
Recommendation: Concur that this Ph.D. program be continued.

15.  The B.S. in Environmental Geology and Technology and the B.S. in
Geology.
Recommendation: Concur that these programs be examined to see if they can
be made less restrictive and that the Geology Department present a report
on this matter to the Senate Restructuring and Reallocation Committee by
February 1, 1997.

16.  The B.S. in Public Administration.

Recommendation: Concur that this program be continued. However, I will ask
the Department of Political Science to submit a viable and acceptable plan
to the Dean of the College of Business and Public Administration and the
Provost by May 15, 1997, to increase enrollment in this program to a
minimum of 15 majors. This program will be reviewed again in May 1999.

17.  The M.A. in Political Science.

Recommendation: I intend to recommend that admissions to this program be
suspended. Any student currently enrolled in the program will, of course,
be permitted to complete his or her degree. However, no new students will
be admitted to the program. I am not recommending elimination of this
degree program because I want to give a department that has a fine record
of creativity and responsiveness an opportunity to develop more attractive
Master's-level programming. Such discussions are already under way. Board
regulations provide that an inactivated program be revisited after three
years of suspension. Hence, the department should have ample time to
explore its options. [Note: The University Senate adopted a position
contrary to this recommendation, and it will be communicated to the State
Board of Higher Education as called for in the Board and University's
governance documents.]

18.  Proposal for a Center for Interdisciplinary Studies.

Recommendation: I recommend that the Senate ask the existing SRRC-established Task Force on
Interdisciplinary Studies to continue its work
and to submit a proposal to the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences by
May 15, 1997, that indicates how interdisciplinary education can best be
encouraged, supported and pursued at UND.

In its continuing work, I would ask that the Task Force pay particular
attention to item #5 on the last page of its initial report (see
attachment). I believe the Task Force should not only elaborate the "unique
instructional methods" that characterize participating programs, it should
also elaborate the unique perspectives and approaches to learning and
knowledge that characterize interdisciplinary education in general. Once it
has completed this discussion, it can begin to talk about item #3, namely
the curricular characteristics any particular interdisciplinary program
must have to meet the general criteria developed for interdisciplinary
education at UND. Actual interdisciplinary programming will and should
depend, to some extent, on the needs and wishes of students. In this
concept of interdisciplinary education, we would not have separate degree
programs, such as American Studies, Women Studies, Peace Studies, etc.
Rather, we would have a degree program in interdisciplinary studies which
students could pursue to meet their particular educational needs. A
student's diploma, for example, would read, "B.A. in Interdisciplinary
Studies: Peace Studies." Enrollment questions would focus on the number of
students in interdisciplinary education, not on the number of students in
any particular program within this area.

I have talked with Dean Ettling of the College of Arts and Sciences, and he
and I are prepared to provide financial support for a creative
interdisciplinary education initiative. I would encourage the Task Force,
therefore, to spend the spring semester developing such an initiative. He
and I would welcome the opportunity to share our ideas about
interdisciplinary education with the Task Force.

I want to emphasize that the expectation of this recommendation is that we
re-think interdisciplinary education at UND, and then provide our new model
with as much support as we reasonably can. I believe, therefore, that we
should suspend the admission of new majors into the existing
interdisciplinary programs of American Studies, Peace Studies, Humanities,
and Russian Studies, and the minors in Russian Studies, Scandinavian
Studies and Women Studies, pending the approval of the new general
interdisciplinary studies major. At that time, existing and new
interdisciplinary programs can be folded into the new, single major. [Note:
The University Senate adopted a position on this recommendation, and it
will be communicated to the State Board of Higher Education as called for
in the Board and University's governance documents.]

*******

EVENTS TO NOTE

Talk Will Consider Native American Research

The Counseling Department, Topics in Counseling and Counseling Psychology
Research and Practice will present "Native American Indian Research" with
Winona Simms (Counseling), at noon Thursday, Jan. 16, in 318 Montgomery
Hall. Everyone is invited, whether or not you are taking the seminar for
credit. -- Linda Winter, Coordinator, Topics in Counseling and Counseling
Psychology Research and Practice.
*******

Women Studies "Salon" Begins

The Women Studies Program will inaugurate a reading group in feminist
literature, beginning Thursday, Jan. 16, at 4 p.m. Faculty, staff, and
students are invited to participate.

The group, called "Salon" after 19th-century meetings of intellectuals in
patrons' parlors and salons, will meet once a month at the Women's Center,
305 Hamline St., to discuss selected readings by feminist writers.
The first selection is the introduction to "Listen Up: Voices from the Next
Feminist Generation," edited by Barbara Findlen. The reading is on reserve
at the Chester Fritz Library under "Salon." Additional copies are available
from the Women Studies Center at 314 Cambridge St. A reading list for the
spring semester will also be developed at the first meeting.

The group will meet on the third Thursday of every month, from 4 to 5 p.m.
at the Women's Center, 305 Hamline St. Anyone with an interest in feminist
writings is invited to attend. For more information, call Rebecca Moore, 7-2705, or the Women
Studies Center, 7-4115. -- Rebecca Moore (Philosophy and
Religion), for the Women Studies Program.
*******

Join Writers Conference Reading Seminar

Are you one of those who looks forward to the Writers Conference each year
but has trouble finding time to do the reading you'd like? Do you manage to
read a couple of the writers' books but wish you had a chance to talk about
them with others? If so, consider joining one of the new Writers Conference
Reading Seminars. Co-sponsored by the University Writing Program and the
English Department, the seminars will gather together six to 10 interested
University people who will meet weekly through the spring semester to read
and discuss selected works by this year's Writers Conference authors.
Featured authors for this year's conference, the theme of which is Writing
Nature/The Nature of Writing, were listed in an attachment to the Dec. 20
University Letter.

To accommodate different schedules, two options will be offered: Fridays
from noon to 1 p.m. (leader: John Ettling), and Wednesdays from 4 to 5 p.m.
(leader to be announced). Both seminars will begin the second week of
classes.

In addition to these seminars, interested readers may sign up for a special
Writers Conference e-mail discussion list, moderated by Michael Beard, on
leave in Jordan.

To inquire further, or to sign up for any of these seminars, call the
University Writing Program office (7-3600), or e-mail me at
rankin@badlands.nodak.edu. Be sure to indicate which session you're most
interested in. -- Libby Rankin, Professor of English.
*******

Dinosaurs Are Subject Of Lectures

LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary Sciences) Lectures will be
presented by Martin Lockley, Department of Geology, University of Colorado-Denver, on Friday,
Jan. 17. At noon in Leonard Hall Lecture Bowl, Room 100,
he will present, "Tracking Dinosaurs Around the World." At 3 p.m. in 109
Leonard Hall, he will consider "Dinosaurs of Colorado."

The LEEPS Lecture Series is supported by the Department of Geology and
Geological Engineering, the Energy and Environmental Research Center,
Office of Research and Program Development, Office of Instructional
Development and the Advancing Science Excellence in North Dakota (ASEND)
Program. All interested persons are welcome to attend. For additional
information contact me. -- Dexter Perkins, Professor of Geology and
Geological Engineering, 7-2991.
*******

Microbial Genetics Expert To Speak

The Department of Microbiology and Immunology will host a special guest
lecture on Friday, Jan. 17, titled: "Barriers to Recombination Between
Closely Related Species: Genetic Exchange Between Salmonella Typhimurium
and Salmonella Typhi." The lecture will be presented at noon in Room 5510
of the School of Medicine and Health Sciences by Stanley Maloy, Professor
of Microbiology at the University of Illinois, Urbana. All interested
persons are invited to attend. Dr. Maloy has published extensively,
including two textbooks on Microbial Genetics. His current work is directed
toward protein regulation of gene expression, protein and membrane
interaction, molecular mechanisms of membrane transport, and the role of
membrane proteins in determining host specificity. This lecture is co-sponsored by the Office of
Instructional Development. For more information
contact Scott Hoffman at 7-2625  or Ann Flower
at 7-6413. -- Ann Flower, Assistant Professor of Microbiology and
Immunology.
*******

OID Session Will Focus On Faculty Web Pages

"Development of a Home Page for Faculty" is the topic for the OID/CILT noon
session on Wednesday, Jan. 22, in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. Steve
Pottenger (Center for Instructional and Learning Technologies) will provide
a step-by-step guide to creating a simple World Wide Web page using Adobe
Pagemill. He will present an overview of the WWW, hardware and software
requirements, and give an online demonstration. Because food and drinks are
prohibited in the Lecture Bowl, the usual box lunches cannot be provided
for this session. While registration is not required, it would be helpful
if you phone the Office of Instructional Development (7-3325) if you plan
to attend. -- Dan Rice, Director of Instructional Development.
*******

Candidates To Present Anatomy Seminars

Two candidates for a faculty position in the Department of Anatomy and Cell
Biology will present seminars. "The Regulation of Gap Junction Assembly
Between Connexin43-Knockout Fibroblasts Rescued With Mutant or Wild Type
Connexin43" will be presented by Erica TenBroek, Research Associate,
Department of Genetics and Cell Biology at the University of Minnesota in
St. Paul, at noon Thursday, Jan. 23, in the Frank Low Conference Room,
B710, School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

"Multiple Roles for Myosin II in Dictyostelium Morphogenesis" will be
considered by James McNally, Assistant Professor of Biology in the
Department of Biology and Assistant Professor of Biomedical Computing in
the Institute of Biomedical Computing at Washington University, at noon
Thursday, Jan. 30, in the Frank Low Conference Room, B710, School of
Medicine and Health Sciences. -- Mark Olson, Chair, Histology Search
Committee.
*******

Psychology Will Hold Colloquium

The Psychology Department will hold a colloquium in which George Gaither
(Psychology) will present "Penile Plethysmography: An Examination of Its
Internal and External Validity." This will be held Monday, Jan. 27, in Room
102, Nursing Building, from noon to 1 p.m. Everyone is welcome to attend. -- Joan Peterson,
Psychology Department.
*******

Forums To Discuss Promotion, Tenure

All faculty members are invited to attend two forums on promotion and
tenure. The first forum will focus on the views of administrators; faculty
members who have recently been promoted or tenured will be the panelists
for the second forum. The first forum will be Wednesday, Jan. 29, from 3 to
4:30 p.m. in the Sioux Room of the Memorial Union. Panelists will be
Provost and Academic Vice President Marlene Strathe, Graduate School Dean
Harvey Knull, and College of Arts and Sciences Dean John Ettling.

The second forum will be Wednesday, Feb. 19, from 3 to 4:30 p.m. in the
Sioux Room of the Memorial Union. The forums are open to all persons in the
university community and are sponsored by the President's Advisory Council
on Women (PAC-W). For additional information contact me. -- Jan Zahrly,
Associate Professor of Management, 7-4697.
*******

Successful Writing Is Focus Of WAC Forum

"Writing Assignments That Work" is the subject of a half-day Writing Across
the Curriculum (WAC) forum Thursday, Jan. 30, from noon to 4 p.m. in the
Memorial Union Sioux Room. Lunch is provided.

Purpose of the forum is to give faculty in a variety of disciplines a
chance to share writing projects they have used in their classes --
projects that engage students in learning and promote critical and creative
thinking. All participants will be asked to contribute one assignment they
have used successfully (or perhaps not so successfully) in the past.
To register, call the University Writing Program at 7-3600 or e-mail Libby
Rankin at rankin@badlands.nodak.edu. Deadline for registration is Monday,
Jan. 27. -- Libby Rankin, Director, University Writing Program.
*******

MAC Will Present "Dr. King's Dream"

The Multicultural Awareness Committee, a division of Student Government,
will present "Dr. King's Dream" at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 11, in the South
Ballroom, Memorial Union. The performance will be given by the Mixed Blood
Theater Company of Minneapolis, and will focus on the famed civil rights
leader's trials and search for equality and justice. The performance is
expected to last for an hour, and a short discussion will follow the
program. Admission is free. -- Ben Subedi, Coordinator, Student
Organizations, and Advisor, Multicultural Awareness Committee.
*******

OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

Research Listserv Available

The Office of Research and Program Development announces a new electronic
mailing list, "RESEARCH-TALK," for communicating research news and views
across the UND campus. RESEARCH-TALK is available free by subscription to
all University personnel who wish to be informed about research
opportunities and discuss research issues important to UND.

To subscribe to RESEARCH-TALK send an e-mail message to:

listserv@listserv.nodak.edu with the message in the body of the mail
containing the command: sub RESEARCH-TALK your first name  your last name

For example: sub RESEARCH-TALK Carl Fox

Note: Groupwise users should use the following address:
internet:listserv@listserv.nodak.edu

Questions can be addressed by contacting me -- Carl Fox, Director, Office
of Research and Program Development, 7-4280 or carl_fox@mail.und.nodak.edu 
*******

Entrants Sought For Merrifield Competition

The Chester Fritz Library and the UND Alumni Association and Foundation
sponsor the Merrifield Competition for the most outstanding scholarly
research paper submitted by a UND student, undergraduate or graduate. A
grant from the Alumni Association and Foundation enables the Library to
recognize outstanding scholarly research utilizing primary source materials
held in the Elwyn B. Robinson Department of Special Collections. This
recognition is provided through an annual UND scholarship award of $1,500.

Papers will be juried by Sandy Slater (Special Collections), Albert Berger
(History), Joyce Coleman (English), Christina Dufner (Languages), and
Donald Miller (Visual Arts). Deadline for submission of papers is Friday,
April 25. Brochures which outline the competition and award guidelines are
available at the Chester Fritz Library Reference Desk, Administrative
Office, or the Elwyn B. Robinson Department of Special Collections. --
Sandy Slater, Head, Elwyn B. Robinson Department of Special Collections.
*******

Six Faculty Named To Summer Professorships

The following members of the Graduate Faculty have been appointed to Summer
Graduate Research Professorships for 1997: Morten Ender (Sociology), Tim
Koozin (Music), Marwan Kraidy (Communication), Jeff Lang (Biology), Michael
Anderegg (English), and Robert Newman (Biology). They will be pursuing
research activities and working closely with graduate advisees during the
1997 summer session. -- Harvey Knull, Dean, Graduate School.
*******

Proposals For Summer Professorships Due Soon

Faculty are reminded of the closing date of noon Thursday, Feb. 13, for
proposals for Summer Instructional Development Professorships for the
summer of 1997. Proposal guidelines are available from the Office of
Instructional Development, 7-3325. -- Dan Rice, Director, Office of
Instructional Development.
*******

GTA Training Session Set

A Graduate Teaching Assistant training session will be given by Hank
Slotnick (Neuroscience) on Wednesday, Feb. 5, from 3 to 4 p.m. in 16-18
Swanson Hall. This session will cover techniques that make students more
productive learners, such as ways to help students answer their own
questions in class, ways to get students involved in discussions, and, more
generally, ways to attract and maintain students' attention. This session
will be most useful to GTAs who want their students to become actively
involved in their learning. -- Harvey Knull, Dean, Graduate School.
*******

GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS 

Applications Due To Faculty Research Committee

Tuesday, Jan. 21, is the second deadline for submission of applications to
the Faculty Research and Creative Activity Committee (FRCAC). The committee
will consider requests from faculty members to support: (1) research,
creative activity or other types of scholarly endeavors; (2) requests to
support travel associated with research activities or the presentation of
scholarly papers; and (3) requests for funds to meet publication costs. 
Travel applications will be considered at that time only for travel that
will occur between Jan. 21, and April 15.  

The third deadline for submission of applications is April 15.  Travel
applications will be considered at that time only for travel that will
occur between April 15 and Oct. 15.  No research applications will be
considered at that time.

The committee reminds applicants to carefully prepare their proposals and
be specific and realistic in their budget requests.  Although the FRCAC
encourages submission of research/creative activity proposals and
travel/publication requests, the Committee takes into consideration the
most recent FRCAC award granted to each applicant.  Priority will be given
to beginning faculty and first-time applicants.  Requests for
research/creative activity awards may not exceed $2,500.  The Committee has
approximately $55,000 available to award during the 1996-97 academic year.

Application forms for research/creative activity, travel or publication
requests are available at ORPD, 105 Twamley Hall, 7-4279.  THESE FORMS HAVE
BEEN REVISED (9/96). IF YOU HAVE THE APPLICATIONS ON DISK, PLEASE STOP IN
FOR COPIES OF THE REVISED FORMS.  An original and seven copies of the
application must be submitted to ORPD prior to the deadline.  Applications
that are not prepared in accordance with the directions on the forms will
not be considered by the committee. -- Brian Paulsen, Chair, Faculty
Research and Creative Activity Committee.
*******

EPSCoR Offers Funding Opportunities

Funding opportunities are available through the ND Experimental Program to
Stimulate Competitive Research (ND EPSCoR).

Research addressing the Environmental Protection Agency  mission is being
solicited. It is expected that Principal Investigator budgets would be
approximately $25,000 per year for no more than two years. Preproposals are
due by 4 p.m. Monday, Jan. 20.

A National Science Foundation EPSCoR program is available for individual
tenure track faculty members who plan to initiate a research program in one
or more areas normally supported by the National Science Foundation. Awards
can be made for $10,000 to $30,000 (indirect costs are waived) for periods
of 12 to 24 months. ND EPSCoR anticipates making 15 to 30 awards.
Applications are due by 4 p.m. Monday, Feb. 24. Please note this
correction; this information supercedes the information published in the
last University Letter.

ND EPSCoR also invites proposals from department chairs soliciting support
for new faculty they plan to hire during 1997.  This program is the same as
the one carried out successfully last year and is expected to be repeated
at this time next year based on availability of funds. The major goal of
this program is to staff our research universities with new faculty who
will be very competitive for NSF CAREER awards. Proposals are due at noon
Friday, Jan. 31.

The Agency EPSCoR grants are reviewed and funded separately from the other
standard agency programs.

Copies of the RFPs can be obtained from the ND EPSCoR Office, 415 Twamley
Hall, 7-2492. NOTE UND EPSCoR LOCATION CHANGE. -- Cathy Lerud, ND EPSCoR.
*******

BILLBOARD

Student Crisis Policies Listed

The Student Affairs Office receives many calls regarding student
situations. Some of these concern routine matters; others involve emergency
situations for students and others. Below are some areas in which we can
assist with the emergency.

Crisis Calls: Students have life/death issues which face them periodically.
The Student Affairs Office staff will handle these calls from 8 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday at 7-2664. Night and weekend calls are
handled by telephoning the emergency operator at 7-3491. The operator will
contact a member of the Crisis Coordination Team from Student Affairs.

Hospitalizations: If a student is hospitalized, call the Student Affairs
Office at 7-2664. Contact with the student, the medical unit and the
faculty will be implemented.

Absence Notification: The Student Affairs Office will send out Absence
Notifications for students who have a death in the family/extended family,
have been hospitalized, or experience an uncontrollable emergency. All
other absences need to be handled directly by the student and faculty. Upon
returning to campus, the student has the responsibility of contacting the
faculty regarding missed assignments/tests and to arrange completion of
those assignments.

Crisis Cards: Billfold size cards with UND emergency telephone numbers and
Grand Forks Community Service telephone numbers are available from the
Student Affairs Office. Please telephone our office at 7-2664 to have a
departmental supply mailed to you. 

-- Lillian Elsinga, Associate Vice President for Student Affairs.
*******

Ethernet Connections Recommended

The Computer Center is adopting ethernet as the recommended network
connection to the UND backbone network.

Recognizing the increasing use of ethernet networking on campus, the UND
Computer Center is recommending movement from token ring networking to
ethernet.  Current token ring connections will not be moved now but we ask
that any time a new network interface card is purchased that it be
ethernet.  This will allow more efficient use of networking equipment.

While ATM and 100 MB are used for communication among enterprise systems
and servers on campus they are  not yet available for client workstations
because of the higher costs of both interface cards and communications
ports.   To help set future directions, as you define future uses for
higher speed networking to workstations in your area, please talk to Greg
Herndon, manager of Network Services for the Computer Center. -- Dorette
Kerian, Manager, User Services, Computer Center.
*******

Counseling Center Will Offer Educational Series

An Adult Children of Alcoholics educational seminar and therapy group will
assist adults coming from alcoholic homes to learn to love and focus on the
self. Sessions will be led by Karin Walton and Linda Hendrikson (both
Counseling Center). The educational series will be held Wednesdays, Jan. 29
and Feb. 5, from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. in 301 O'Kelly Hall. The eight-week
group process will be held from 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 12 through April
9. Those wishing to participate in a therapy group must attend the
educational series. Group size is limited; register by calling the
Counseling Center at 7-2127. -- Linda Hendrikson, Counseling Center.
*******

DSS Begins Informational Series

During the spring semester, Disability Support Services will publish a
series of short informational articles. Topics will include the law, DSS's
mission, accommodations, alternate format, confidentiality, services, and
responsibilities. You can access more information on each topic by visiting
the DSS Web Site at  http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/dss/sec504.htm or by
contacting our office at 7-3425.

Disability Topics:
Section 504 and ADA 
What is the law?

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 states that: "No otherwise
qualified handicapped individual in the United States...shall, solely by
reason of ...handicap, be excluded from participation in, be denied the
benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or
activity receiving federal financial assistance."

What is the impact of Section 504 on postsecondary education?

Colleges and universities receiving federal financial assistance must not
discriminate in the recruitment, admission, or treatment of students. 
Students with documented disabilities may request modifications,
accommodations, or auxiliary aids which will enable them to participate in
and benefit from all postsecondary educational programs and activities. 
Postsecondary institutions must make such changes to ensure that the
academic program is accessible to the greatest extent possible by all
students with disabilities.

What about the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)?

The ADA is the civil rights guarantee that upholds and extends the
standards for compliance in Section 504 to the private sector.  With the
passage of ADA, not only entities receiving federal money, such as grants
and student financial aid, but also private schools and businesses must
provide equal access to education, goods and services to people with
disabilities. -- Deb Glennen, Interim Director, Disability Support
Services.
*******

Students Should Use Form To Leave University

Students completely withdrawing from the 1997 Spring Semester must use the
UND "Withdrawal" form to complete the process. The withdrawal form is
available at the Office of Admissions and Records, 201 Twamley Hall.
Students are not to use the Registration Action Form for this process. --
Alice Poehls, Director, Office of Admissions and Records.
*******

Chester Fritz Library:

Chester Fritz Library hours for the Martin Luther King holiday are:
Saturday, Jan. 18, 1 to 5 p.m.; Sunday, Jan. 19, closed; Monday, Jan. 20
(Martin Luther King Day), 1 p.m. to midnight. -- Patricia Berntsen,
Assistant Director, Chester Fritz Library.
*******

Health Sciences Library:

The Martin Luther King holiday hours for the Library of the Health Sciences
are: Friday, Jan. 17, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, Jan. 18, 1 to 5 p.m.;
Sunday, Jan. 19, 1 to 11 p.m.; Monday, Jan. 20, 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. -- Judy
Rieke, Assistant Director, Library of the Health Sciences.
*******

Memorial Union Lists Hours for Martin Luther King Jr. Day Holiday:
                    
LIFETIME SPORTS CENTER: Fri., Jan. 17, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sat. and Sun.,
Jan. 18-19, noon to 5 p.m.; Mon., Jan. 20, noon to 6 p.m.(okay for leagues)
INFO CENTER: Fri., Jan. 17, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sat. through Mon., Jan. 18-20, noon to 5 p.m.
SERVICE CENTER: Fri., Jan. 17, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sat. through Mon., Jan.
18-20, noon to 5 p.m.
COPY STOP: Fri., Jan. 17, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sat. and Sun., Jan. 18-19,  Closed; Mon., Jan. 20,
noon to 5 p.m.
BURGER KING: Fri., Jan. 17, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sat., Jan. 18, 11 a.m. to 5
p.m.; Sun. and Mon., Jan. 19-20, noon to 5 p.m.
BOOKSTORE: Fri., Jan. 17, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sat. through Mon., Jan. 18-20, Closed
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE: Fri., Jan. 17, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Sat. through
Mon., Jan. 18-20, Closed
CRAFT CENTER/SIGN & DESIGN STUDIO: Fri., Jan. 17, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Sat.
through Mon., Jan. 18-20, Closed
DINING CENTER: Fri., Jan. 17, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Sat. through Mon., Jan. 18-20, Closed
BARBER SHOP: Fri., Jan. 17, 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Sat. and Sun., Jan. 18-19, Closed; Mon.,
Jan. 20, 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
CENTENNIAL ROOM: Fri., Jan. 17, 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.; Sat. through Mon.,
Jan. 18-20, Closed
ESPRESSO BAR: Fri., Jan. 17, 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.; Sat. through Mon., Jan.
18-20, Closed
CORNER DELI: Fri., Jan. 17, 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Sat. through Mon., Jan.
18-20, Closed
UNIVERSITY LEARNING CENTER: Fri., Jan. 17, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Sat.
through Mon., Jan. 18-20, Closed
UNION STATION: Fri., Jan. 17, 9 a.m. to 4:50 p.m.; Sat. through Mon., Jan.
18-20, Closed
PASSPORT IDs: Fri., Jan. 17, 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.; Sat. through Mon., Jan.
18-20, Closed
COMPUTER LEARNING LAB: Fri., Jan. 17, 8 a.m. to 5:45 p.m.; Sat., Jan. 18,    11 a.m. to
5:45 p.m.; Sun. Jan. 19,  noon to 5:45 p.m.; Mon., Jan. 20,
11 a.m. to 5:45 p.m.
BUILDING HOURS: Fri., Jan. 17, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Sat. through Mon., Jan.
18-20, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

-- MaryAnne Lustgraaf, Director, Memorial Union.
*******

Participants Sought For Nursing Program

The College of Nursing is seeking expectant mothers to participate in the
Expectant Family Program and children with chronic illness, developmental
disability or health risks to participate in the Child Health Program. The
programs are coordinated through the course, N387, The Family in the
Community.

The Expectant Family Program serves as a learning experience for UND
nursing students by providing the students with the opportunity to support
the expanding family. The nursing student's role focuses on the needs of
the family during the time of normal childbearing on a one-on-one basis. In
the Child Health Program, students visit the family and child about twice a
month. Students focus on child health, safety, development, nutrition and
family support.

The College of Nursing has been serving 150 to 200 families per year.
Nursing students are supervised by College of Nursing faculty throughout
the assignment period. There is no cost to participate. This is a community
service and an educational experience.

If you are interested in participating in the Expectant Family Program or
Child Health Program, please contact Liz Tyree, Coordinator, 7-4522, or the
secretary for the Nursing Center, 7-4147, for a brochure or more
information. -- Liz Tyree, Director, Nursing Center.
*******

U2 Hotline Announced

University within the University (U2)announces a Professional Development
Hotline.  You can dial 7-2000 to hear a complete listing of the
professional development opportunities currently scheduled on campus for
UND faculty, staff and students.  This hotline operates much like the
Career Mobility Line.  You simply dial the number and then press the
following numbers for the option you would like to listen to:

#1  Computer Center seminars
#2  Safety and Environmental Training Institute
#3  Supervisory and administrative seminars
#4  Conflict Resolution Center seminars
#5  Center for Instruction and Learning Technologies  seminars
#6  Miscellaneous events and opportunities
#0  to be connected with Jo Coutts at University within the University.

Have a pencil ready to note the seminar title, and person to contact for
registration.

This line will be kept current on a weekly basis.  If your department would
like to have an event listed on this hotline, please contact me at 7-4266.
Also, since this is a new venture, any suggestions or recommendations you
may have to make the Professional Development Hotline more useful to you
are welcome and encouraged.  Please call with your ideas and
recommendations. -- Jo Coutts, Program Coordinator, Continuing Education.
*******

MONEY MATTERS

Social Security Tax Rate Listed

The Social Security Tax rate for wages paid in calendar year 1997 will be
7.65 percent for both employee and employer for wages up to $65,400 and
1.45 percent for both employee and employer on wages above $65,400. This
compares with the 1995 rate of 7.65 percent for wages up to $62,700 and
1.45 percent for wages above $62,700. New federal withholding tax rates
were also effective Jan. 1 and will be reflected on Jan. 15 payroll checks.
-- Pat Hanson, Director of Payroll.
*******

Student Employees Should File New W-4 Form

The Jan. 15 and 31 payroll checks contain the following notation which
applies to student employees only: "Students only -- if you currently have
a W-4 tax exempt form filed, it expires after the January 31 paycheck. To
renew, contact Payroll."

Please note that employees (other than student employees filing a W-4 tax
exempt status) are not required to complete an IRS Form W-4 (Employee's
Withholding Allowance Certificate) for 1996 unless there is a change in
withholding status, such as a change in marital status or in number of
exemptions claimed. -- Pat Hanson, Director of Payroll.
*******

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

N.D. Quarterly Focuses On "Buffalo Commons"

The latest issue of North Dakota Quarterly is a special one on the "Buffalo
Commons" proposals of Frank and Deborah Popper. The Poppers, professors of
urban studies and geography, have advanced the idea of returning large
underpopulated areas of the Great Plains, including much of the Dakotas, to
a pre-settlement state in which large herds of bison and other native
animals would once again roam.

This issue contains a wide range of direct and indirect responses to the
idea, including the diary of a woman homesteader near Dickinson and a
memoir of an early Red River Valley farmer who stuck it out through hard
times to found a successful farm still in the family.

Among other writing the issue also contains a wonderfully comic short story
by Garrison Keillor ("My North Dakota Railroad Days"), essays by Kathleen
Norris and Linda Hasselstrom, a poem by Thomas McGrath ("The Buffalo
Coat"), and writing by UND graduates Diane Drake, Roland Flint, and Mike
Jacobs.

Dean of Arts and Sciences John Ettling guest-edited the issue, available by
subscription (four issues for $25) or at the Museum of Art, the Urban
Stampede, or the UND Bookstore for $12. -- Robert Lewis, Editor, North
Dakota Quarterly.
*******

Honor Band, Choir Students Will Visit Campus

On Friday, Jan. 17, 177 of North Dakota and Minnesota's most talented high
school musicians will arrive at the Hughes Fine Arts Center for the opening
of the 12th Annual Honor Band and Honor Choir Festival.

Students are selected for participation through live auditions conducted
throughout North Dakota by James Rodde (Choral Studies) and Gordon Brock
(Bands). This year, they heard over 700 auditions in Dickinson, Williston,
Minot, Langdon, Bismarck/Mandan, Fargo, Jamestown, and Grand Forks.
Students from as far as Brocket, Mont., were selected for participation.
The Honor Band and Honor Choir Concert will take place at 2:30 p.m. Sunday,
Jan. 19, at the Chester Fritz Auditorium. This event is free and open to
the public.
The full schedule follows: Friday, Jan. 17, 1 p.m., registration; 3:15
p.m., full rehearsal; 8 p.m., UND Ensembles Concert; 9:15 p.m., reception,
Chester Fritz Auditorium. Saturday, Jan. 18, 8:30 a.m., sectional
rehearsals; 9:45 a.m., full rehearsal; noon, lunch; 1:45 p.m., full
rehearsal; 3 p.m., break; 3:15 p.m., full rehearsal; 4:45 p.m., dinner;
7:15 to 9 p.m., full rehearsal. Sunday, Jan. 19, 11 a.m., Honor Band dress
rehearsal, Chester Fritz Auditorium; 11:45 a.m., Honor Band pictures; 12:30
p.m., Honor Choir pictures; 1 p.m., Honor Choir dress rehearsal, Chester
Fritz Auditorium; 2:30 p.m., Concert, Chester Fritz Auditorium. A reception
will follow the concert in the Chester Fritz Auditorium Lobby following the
concert. All in attendance are cordially invited to attend. -- James Rodde,
Director of Choral Studies, and Gordon Brock, Director of Bands.
*******

International Centre Lists Events

The Thursday, Jan. 23, program at 7 p.m. in the International Centre, 2908
University Ave., is "Reclaiming Our Heritage," with stories told by United
States citizens whose forebears immigrated to the U.S.A. Also, a video of
Ellis Island will be featured. Please join us. -- Sharon Rezac Andersen,
Director, International Centre, 7-4231.
*******

"Insight Meditation" Offered At International Centre

Insight Meditation (Vipassana), will be offered Wednesday evenings,
beginning Wednesday, Jan. 15, and continuing through the spring semester,
from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the International Centre, 2908 University Ave.
Instructions and complimentary discussions will be given. Insight mediation
is a practice of cultivating peacefulness in the mind and openness in the
heart. It is learning to live in the present moment, to ride more easily
with the ups and downs of our lives. It requires no specific belief
commitments and is compatible with any or no religious affiliation. --
Tamar Read, Professor Emeritus of Music.
*******

Women's Center Lists Events

The Wednesday, Jan. 22, Feast and Focus program at noon in the Women's
Center, 305 Hamline, is "So This Is Living!" Tammy Nelson Roy, former news
director of KFJM, parent of a young child, and leader of the Grand Forks
Multiple Sclerosis Support Group will share her personal experiences with
this chronic illness and discuss how she manages to cope in faith with
humor.

The Thursday, Jan. 23, For Women Only program is "The Winter Blues." Do you
notice a change in your energy level during the winter season? If you can't
get enough sleep, yet are sleeping more than usual, or seem to crave rich
foods, "the winter blues" may have a hold on you. Seasonal Affective
Disorder (SAD) affects nearly 30 percent of our North Dakota population and
the majority of those affected are women, yet we know so little about it.
Come and join this informative discussion and we'll "shed some light" on
how to effectively cope with the depressive symptoms of SAD. 
-- Donna Oltmanns, Coordinator, Women's Center.
*******

FYI

Jan. 17 Is "Green And White Day"

President Kendall Baker has approved Friday, Jan. 17, as a "Green and White
Day." Employees may wear UND colors and jeans. Both the men's and women's
basketball team will take on South Dakota State University on Friday, Jan.
17, and the hockey team will play the University of Wisconsin Friday and
Saturday, Jan. 17-18. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, University Letter. 
*******

Sunday New York Times Available

UND faculty, staff and students are invited to subscribe to the Sunday
edition of the New York Times for just $2 per copy, a 50 percent savings
off the cover price.

Newspapers will be available after 1 p.m. Sunday afternoon at the Memorial
Union Service Center. ID cards will be provided; you will not be able to
pick up newspapers without them. Newspapers not picked up by Wednesday will
be recycled. No credit will be given for unclaimed newspapers.

Spring term delivery begins Jan. 19, Jan. 26 or Feb. 2 and ends May 4.
There will be no delivery March 9 (Spring Break) and issues for March 17
and 30 will be available Mondays, March 18 and 31. For more information
please call the Service Center at 7-3927. -- Sharon Schimke, Memorial Union
Service Center.
*******

Credit Union Offers Instant Cash And Check Card

The University Federal Credit Union now offers an instant cash and check
card. The card gives members easy access to their checking account, and can
be presented as payment at more than 12 million merchants. The purchase
amount is automatically deducted from your share draft account just as if
you had written a paper check.

With the Instant Cash and Check card, you can take your checking account
with you wherever you go. The increased convenience offered by the card
will be an exciting new benefit for everyone, both around town and as you
travel. You will be able to use the card at automated teller machines
(ATMs) in the Instant Cash and Cirrus networks, in addition to the Visa
network of ATMs in over 160 countries around the world.

Other advantages of your credit union share draft/checking account are no
monthly fees, no per draft charges, no minimum balance required, no deposit
cost when using direct deposit, and easy record keeping with duplicate
checks. For more information, stop in or call the credit union at 7-2274.
The 59th Annual Meeting is set for Thursday, Jan. 30, in the Snack Bar at
Twamley Hall, with the social beginning at 3:30 p.m. and the business
meeting at 4 p.m. -- George Meister, Manager, University Federal Credit
Union.
*******

Spring Semester Bowling Leagues Now Forming

Spring Semester bowling leagues are now forming at the Lifetime Sports
Center in the Memorial Union. Beginners are welcome. We had a great time in
the fall semester league and have had requests to expand, and are now
offering two leagues to choose from for spring semester. Select Tuesday or
Wednesday for your bowling day, and sign up for yourself or your team of
three. Each league will bowl eight sessions, beginning Jan. 21 and 22 at 7
p.m. There will be no bowling during spring break. Copies of the league
rules are available from the Lifetime Sports Center.

Teams can be made up of any combination of men or women, with open
substitution. Having fun is the only requirement for joining these leagues.
Weekly fees are $5 per person, which covers bowling, prize fund and
secretary fee. Shoe rental is not included.

As of Jan. 7 there were only a couple spots open on the Wednesday league
and the Tuesday league is starting to fill, too. Hurry, space is limited. -- Mark Van Essen,
Coordinator, Lifetime Sports Center, 7-3981.
*******

Two Cross Country Ski Workshops Offered

Now is your chance to learn the basics of cross-country skiing in the
warmth of the River Valley Room in the Memorial Union. These workshops are
intended for those who have never been on cross country skis or would like
to take a refresher course on the basics.

Presenter Dale Anderson will discuss and demonstrate subjects like
selecting equipment, turning around, getting up after a fall, and he'll
even show you the best way to fall! Everyone will have skis on, so they can
follow along and participate. These workshops are offered Thursday, Jan.
23, or Thursday, Jan. 30 at 7 p.m. The fee for either workshop is $15 per
person. Ski equipment will be provided.

Follow-up outdoor sessions will be offered. Plans for these will be made
according to the weather and there will be no additional fee. To register,
call Dale Anderson at 7-2502 or Mark Van Essen at 7-3981. -- Mark Van
Essen, Coordinator, Lifetime Sports Center.
*******

CALENDAR OF EVENTS


JANUARY 1997

(Please contact Mavis at the Office of University Relations, Box 7144, or
call 777-4304, if you wish to make changes or have an event included.)

Through Sat., Jan. 18 -- SPRING TUITION/FEE PAYMENT and financial aid
distribution.

Thurs., Jan. 16 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for Traci Kelly, a candidate for the Ph.D.
degree with a major in English, Room 20, Montgomery Hall, 4 p.m.; members
of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Thurs., Jan. 16 -- WOMEN STUDIES SALON, the Women Studies Program will
inaugurate this reading group to discuss selected readings by feminist
writers; called "Salon" after 19th-century meetings of intellectuals in
patrons' parlors and salons, the group will meet once a month at the
Women's Center, 305 Hamline St. from 4 to 5 p.m.; call 777-4115 for more
information.

Thurs., Jan. 16 -- FREE DEFENSIVE DRIVING COURSE for UND employees and a
member of their family, 16 Swanson Hall, 12:30 to 4:30 p.m.; call the
Safety Office at 777-3341 by Tuesday, Jan. 14, to register.

Thurs., Jan. 16 -- COUNSELING SEMINAR, Topics in Counseling and Counseling
Psychology Research and Practice presents "Native American Indian Research"
with Winona Simms (Counseling), 318 Montgomery Hall, noon; everyone is
invited.

Thurs., Jan. 16 -- ASBESTOS CLASS, Environmental Training Institute
refresher course for inspector management planners (2911), Comfort Inn,
Highway 2 East, East Grand Forks, Minn.; cost is $80; call 777-3341 for
more information.

Thurs., Jan. 16 -- ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING FOR WOMEN IN SCIENCE, Sioux Room,
Memorial Union, noon to 1:15 p.m.; a group of faculty has been meeting
informally to discuss women and the sciences on campus; please join us for
this organizational meeting if you are interested; feel free to bring your
lunch; call Sandra Donaldson at 777-4115 for more information.

Thurs., Jan. 16 -- INTERNATIONAL STUDENT OPEN HOUSE, guests of President
Ken and Toby Baker, 1 Yale Drive, 7 p.m.; rides will be provided from the
International Centre, 2908 University Ave.; call 777-4231 for more
information.

Fri., Jan. 17 -- LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary Sciences)
LECTURE, Martin Lockley, Department of Geology, University of Colorado-Denver; at noon in
Leonard Hall Lecture Bowl, Room 100, he will present
"Tracking Dinosaurs Around the World"; at 3 p.m. in 109 Leonard Hall, he
will consider "Dinosaurs of Colorado"; all interested persons are welcome
to attend; call Dexter Perkins at 777-2991 for more information.

Fri., Jan. 17 -- Dr. Stanley Maloy, Professor at the University of
Illinois, will present a seminar "Barries to Recombination Between Closely
Related Species: Genetic Exchange Between Salmonella Typhimurium and
Salmonella Typhi," Room 5510, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, noon;
call 777-2625 for more information.

Fri., Jan. 17 -- ASBESTOS CLASS, Environmental Training Institute refresher
course for project design (2924), Comfort Inn, Highway 2 East, East Grand
Forks, Minn.; cost is $150; call 777-3341 for more information.

Fri., Jan. 17 -- GREEN AND WHITE DAY, President Baker has approved wearing
jeans and UND colors (hockey, University of Wisconsin; men's and women's
basketball, South Dakota State University).

Fri., Jan. 17 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND vs. South Dakota State University,
Hyslop Sports Center, 6:30 p.m.

Fri., Jan. 17 -- BASKETBALL, WOMEN'S, UND vs. South Dakota State
University, Hyslop Sports Center, 4:30 p.m.

Fri. and Sat., Jan. 17-18 -- HOCKEY, UND vs. University of Wisconsin, Ralph
Engelstad Arena, 8:05 p.m. 

Fri. and Sat., Jan. 17-18 -- SWIMMING AND DIVING, MEN'S, UND at University
of Alaska-Anchorage, Anchorage, Alaska.

Fri. and Sat., Jan. 17-18 -- SWIMMING AND DIVING, WOMEN'S, UND at
University of Northern Michigan Duals, Marquette, Mich.

Fri. through Sun., Jan. 17-19 -- 12TH ANNUAL HONOR BAND AND HONOR CHOIR
FESTIVAL, 177 of North Dakota and Minnesota's most talented high school
musicians, Chester Fritz Auditorium; concert is Sunday, Jan. 19, at 2:30
p.m.

Sat., Jan. 18 -- GRADUATE MANAGEMENT ADMISSION TEST (GMAT), Room 116,
Witmer Hall, 8 a.m.

Sat., Jan. 18 -- SATURDAY MORNING LEGISLATIVE FORUM, "Economic Development"
will be the kick-off topic, City Council Chambers, third floor, City Hall,
255 Fourth St. N., 10 a.m.; Moine Gates, Governmental Affairs chair, will
moderate discussions; forums continue every other Saturday (Feb. 1 and 15,
March 1 and 15); Grand Forks legislators will be present to discuss
legislative topics of interest to the citizens; forum is open to the
public.

Sat., Jan. 18 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND vs. Augustana College, Hyslop
Sports Center, 6:30 p.m.

Sat., Jan. 18 -- BASKETBALL, WOMEN'S, UND vs. Augustana College, Hyslop
Sports Center, 4:30 p.m.

Sat., Jan. 18 -- WRESTLING, UND at University of Nebraska-Omaha, Omaha,
Neb., 7 p.m.

Sun., Jan. 19 -- 12TH ANNUAL HONOR BAND AND HONOR CHOIR CONCERT, 177 of
North Dakota and Minnesota's most talented high school musicians, Chester
Fritz Auditorium, 2:30 p.m.

Mon., Jan. 20 -- HOLIDAY, MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. DAY.

Tues., Jan. 21 -- SECOND DEADLINE for submission of applications to the
Faculty Research and Creative Activity Committee; call the Office of
Research and Program Development at 777-4279 for more information.

Wed., Jan. 22 -- LAST DAY TO ADD A FULL-TERM COURSE FOR SPRING SEMESTER.

Wed., Jan. 22 -- OID/CILT NOON SESSION, "Development of a Home Page for
Faculty," Memorial Union Lecture Bowl; Steve Pottenger (Center for
Instructional and Learning Technologies) will provide a step-by-step guide
to creating a simple World Wide Web page using Adobe Pagemill; call the
Office of Instructional Development at 777-3325 if you plan to attend; box
lunches cannot be provided for this session.

Wed., Jan. 22 -- DOCTORAL GOWNS FOR FACULTY may be purchased at the
University Bookstore from now until the end of January at a special price;
a Jostens representative will be present Jan. 22 to help faculty with
questions or place an order; call 777-2746 for more information.

Wed., Jan. 22 -- WOMEN'S CENTER FEAST AND FOCUS PROGRAM, "So This Is
Living!" by Tammy Nelson Roy, former news director of KFJM, parent of a
young child, and leader of the Grand Forks Multiple Sclerosis Support
Group, Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

Wed., Jan. 22 -- GRAND FORKS OUTREACH for prospective UND students,
Memorial Union Ballroom, 7 p.m.; call 777-3304 for more information.

Thurs., Jan. 23 -- ANATOMY AND CELL BIOLOGY SEMINAR, faculty candidate
Erica TenBroek, Research Associate, Department of Genetics and Cell Biology
at the University of Minnesota in St. Paul, will present "The Regulation of
Gap Junction Assembly Between Connexin43-Knockout Fibroblasts Rescued With
Mutant or Wild Type Connexin43," Frank Low Conference Room, B710, School of
Medicine and Health Sciences, noon.

Thurs., Jan. 23 -- WOMEN'S CENTER FOR WOMEN ONLY PROGRAM, "The Winter
Blues," Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) affects nearly 30 percent of our
North Dakota population and the majority of those affected are women,
Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

Thurs., Jan. 23 -- "RECLAIMING OUR HERITAGE," with stories told by United
States citizens whose foreparents immigrated to the U.S.A.; also a video of
Ellis Island will be featured, International Centre, 2908 University Ave.,
7 p.m.; all are welcome; call 777-4231 for more information.

Thurs., Jan. 23 -- CROSS COUNTRY SKI WORKSHOP, Dale Anderson presents the
workshop for beginners or a refresher course on the basics, River Valley
Room, Memorial Union (also Thursday, Jan. 30); fee is $15 per person (ski
equipment will be provided);  call Dale Anderson at 777-2502 or Mark Van
Essen at 777-3981 to register.

Fri., Jan. 24 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND at University of Northern Colorado,
Greeley, Colo.

Fri., Jan. 24 -- BASKETBALL, WOMEN'S, UND at University of Northern
Colorado, Greeley, Colo.

Fri., Jan. 24 -- SWIMMING AND DIVING, UND at Gustavus Adolphus College, St.
Peter, Minn.

Fri., Jan. 24 -- WRESTLING, UND vs. South Dakota State University, Hyslop
Sports Center, 7 p.m.

Fri. and Sat., Jan. 24-25 -- HOCKEY, UND at Colorado College, Colorado
Springs, Colo.

Sat., Jan. 25 -- NATIONAL CERTIFICATION AGENCY EXAMINATION, River Valley
Room, Memorial Union, 8:30 a.m.
*******


REMINDER! The attachments referred to are not included in the electronic
form of the University Letter. However, you will find the attachments
with the paper copy.
  
UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and
distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is
also available electronically through UNDInfo, the University's menu
system on the Internet. The addresses are http://www.und.nodak.edu for
World-Wide Web and uninfo.und.nodak.edu for gopher.
  
All articles submitted for publication should be labeled "University
Letter" and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic
submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu. Attachments to
University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number.
University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations,
Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.
  
UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.
  
*******

UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE SPECIALS

The University Bookstore is located on the main floor of the Memorial
Union. We can be reached at . . .

(701) 777-2746, toll free 1-800-671-0948, or by fax at (701) 777-3410

If you are on-line, please check out our web site at . . .

http://bookstore.und.nodak.edu/bookstore/

or send us email . . . bookstor@operations.und.nodak.edu


- - - - - - - - U N I V E R S I T Y   B O O K S T O R E - - - - - - - -


THE FOLLOWING ARE SPECIALS AT THE UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE.

-   Memory Training / Question Session
-   Blizzard Special / Memory Blitz
-   Doctoral Gown On Sale
-   Free SmartFolio with Avery Purchase

(More information about each of these is listed below.)


- - - - - - - - U N I V E R S I T Y   B O O K S T O R E - - - - - - - -


ATTENTION:  System Managers, Network Managers, Technicians

The University Bookstore is sponsoring a Memory Training / Question session.  Representatives from
Viking will be on hand.

The Memory Training / Question session will be on January 28, 1997 in the
Memorial Union Lecture Bowl from 1 to 3 pm.  Refreshments will be served.

RSVP by January 24, 1997 to the University Bookstore Computer Service Dept.
(777-6224).

NOTE - This session will be highly technical.


- - - - - - - - U N I V E R S I T Y   B O O K S T O R E - - - - - - - -


BLIZZARD SPECIAL - - Memory Blitz


Attention:  Mac and PC Owners!!

We have a special on Non Parity and Parity Memory!

NON PARITY MEMORY (72 pin SIMM, 168 pin DIMM, and EDO)
8 Meg is only $ 49  -  16 Meg is only $ 94  -  32 Meg is only $ 189
           and
Parity Memory (72 pin SIMM)
8 Meg is only $ 59  -  16 Meg is only $ 104  -  32 Meg is only $ 199

Due to the Blizzard we've extended this offer until January 31, 1997!

Computer Service Department
777-6224  -  Swanson, Room 12

Limited Quantities . . .  offer good only while supplies last!
All Memory must be paid for and picked up by January 31, 1997.


 - - - - - - - - U N I V E R S I T Y   B O O K S T O R E - - - - - - - -


Attention Faculty Members -- Be part of Commencement this May!

Some faculty members who want to participate in graduation commencement exercises don't because
they lack academic dress.  From now until the end of January you  can purchase Jostens Premier
Sussex Doctoral Gown at a special promotional of $279.95 (normally $435).  We will have a Jostens
Representative here at the University Bookstore on January 22, to help faculty with questions or to
place an order.

The Jostens Representative will also be here to help with orders or questions regarding the new
University of North Dakota Official Class Ring.
You may charge on your Visa, Mastercard, Discover, or American Express.

Faculty who have received degrees from institutions other than UND and need a hood representing
their school are encouraged to place their orders at least 6 weeks before graduation.  The Bookstore
can also order deluxe, custom apparel from Jostens anytime.  Check with the University Bookstore
for prices and brochures.  Special orders take 8 - 10 weeks for delivery.

Call (777-2746) or stop in at the Bookstore and place your order now.


 - - - - - - - U N I V E R S I T Y   B O O K S T O R E - - - - - - - -


Free SmartFolio with Purchase of Selected Avery Products!


Buy one box of selected Avery Products . . .    and get a FREE Avery
SmartFolio
Secure, Expandable Project Carriers
- Secure -- papers won't fall out
- Expandable -- holds up to 300 letter size papers
- Portable -- carry projects from desk to briefcase to car
- Great for projects, proposals, meetings and mailings

Buy one box of . . .

Clear Laser Printer Labels (5660)
White Laser Labels (5160, 5161, 5163, 5165)
Fluorescent Laser Labels (5971, 5972)
Name Badge Labels (5095, 5395, 5895, 5384, 5883)
Video / Audio / Diskette Labels (5196, 5198, 5199)
Laser Tent Cards (5305, 5309)
Laser ID Cards (5361)

Offer redeemable by sender ONLY.  Expires January 23, 1997.


- - - - - - - - U N I V E R S I T Y   B O O K S T O R E - - - - - - - -


Have a nice day and please check out our web site!


  





Last Updated:Wednesday, January 16, 1997
Maintained by:Webmaster
Contact: Webmaster



Go To Top To Home Page