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University Letter

January 23, 1998

Volume 35, No. 30

UNIVERSITY LETTER
University of North Dakota at Grand Forks
Vol. 35, Number 30, January 23, 1998

UNIVERSITY LETTER IS ALSO AVAILABLE ELECTRONICALLY in the Events and News section of UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address is: http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/our/uletter.htm

The University Relations Office maintains an index for the University Letter.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

EVENTS TO NOTE

OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

BILLBOARD

MONEY MATTERS

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

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SENATE MOTION SUPPORTS PRESIDENCY

At its regular monthly meeting Jan. 15, University Senate passed a resolution supporting the UND presidency in the light of recent matters and discussion about a UND budget audit. The motion, by Stephen Markovich (Political Science), stated, "The UND University Senate, representing the faculty, staff, and students of the University, hereby strongly reaffirms its commitment to and support of the presidency of Dr. Kendall Baker." Sixty-four of the current 79 Senate members attended the January meeting.

Details on proceedings of the January meeting, as well as other Senate matters such as agendas, minutes of other meetings, and announcements, can be accessed under the UND Internet home page, Academics -- Senate (http://www.und.nodak.edu).

-- Jim Penwarden, University Relations.

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FACULTY INVITED TO MEET WITH SBHE FACULTY REPRESENTATIVE

Faculty members are invited to meet with Kay Fulp, of the State College of Science, who is the faculty representative to the North Dakota State Board of Higher Education, from noon to 1:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 27, in the Edna Twamley Room, Twamley Hall. Fulp also will fill the position as state coordinator for common course numbering, working from Wahpeton and retaining her faculty status there. UND faculty interested in talking with her about either common course numbering or other higher ed issues are invited to go through the lunch line (on your own) and talk with Kay Fulp informally. Anyone wishing to see her at another time, please contact me.

-- Elizabeth Hampsten, English and Council of College Faculties representative, 777-3987.

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TED AUYONG, PHARMACOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY EMERITUS, DIES

Theodore (Ted) Auyong, Associate Professor Emeritus of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Grand Forks, passed away Jan. 16 at Altru Hospital in Grand Forks after a brief illness.

Dr. Auyong was born in 1925 in Honolulu. He served in the U.S. Army from 1945 to 1946 and in the Army Reserve from 1946 until 1951. During those years, he attended the University of Hawaii and the University of Dayton. At the University of Missouri-Kansas City, he was awarded a bachelor's degree in pharmacy in 1954 and master's degree in 1955. He earned the doctorate in pharmacology at the University of Missouri in Columbia in 1962.

In 1963 Dr. Auyong joined the faculty of the UND School of Medicine as an Assistant Professor and was promoted to Associate Professor in 1972. In 1976, he received the prestigious Golden Apple Award for outstanding teaching from the local chapter of the American Medical Student Association. The trained pharmacist was not only active in teaching and research, but also served as a consultant to the chief pharmacist at the Rehabilitation Hospital in Grand Forks.

Dr. Auyong served as acting chairman of Pharmacology and Toxicology at the UND School of Medicine from 1986 to 1987, paving the way for the development of the department into one of the flagship research units on campus.

"It is difficult to comprehensively chronicle or even fully appreciate the many important contributions Ted Auyong made to UND and the citizens of North Dakota," said Rick Samson, Chairman and Professor of Physiology and Interim Chairman of Pharmacology and Toxicology. "He will be remembered as a kind and compassionate gentleman who valued his profession and practiced the highest ideals of scholarship."

He is survived by his wife, Ellen Auyong, Professor of Visual Arts.

-- H. David Wilson, Dean, School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

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EVENTS TO NOTE

FACULTY PANEL TO DISCUSS STUDENT WRITING

"What Makes Student Writing Good" is the topic of a faculty panel and discussion scheduled for 3:30 to 5 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 22, in the Sioux Room of the Memorial Union. Featured speakers will be David Rowley (History), Pat Sanborn (Integrated Studies), Steve Sternberg (Chemical Engineering), and Jan Zahrly (Management). All four panel members will comment briefly on specific examples of good student writing produced in their classes. A general discussion will follow.

Faculty from all disciplines are invited to attend and take part in what promises to be a lively conversation. (For a preview, see the January issue of the WAC newsletter.) We encourage those who have good student papers on hand to bring one or two along and to be thinking about the implicit definition of "good writing" that applies to those papers.

For further information, phone the University Writing Program at 777-3600 or e-mail Libby Rankin at rankin@badlands.nodak.edu.

-- Libby Rankin, University Writing Program.

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IVN MEETING ON TUITION CHANGES SET FOR JAN. 25

A meeting with students regarding the per credit tuition model has been rescheduled to be a meeting over the Interactive Video Network. Chancellor Larry Isaak and Vice Chancellor for Administrative Affairs Laura Glatt will be present to field questions. There will also be some State Board of Higher Education Members present at the meeting as well as other Tuition Study Committee members.

The meeting will be held from 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 25, in 120 Gamble Hall.

-- Jonathan Sickler, Student Representative.

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BIOLOGY CANDIDATE WILL LECTURE

Kurt Borg will present a seminar, "Prostate Cell Biology: Progression from Normal Function to Hormone-Independent Cancer" on Monday, Jan. 26, at noon in 141 Starcher Hall. Dr. Borg is a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology School of Medicine and Health Sciences. He received his Ph.D. in Physiology from North Carolina State University. Dr. Borg is a candidate for the Cell Biology position in the Biology Department.

-- Al Fivizzani, Biology.

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ROBINSON LECTURE WILL HONOR FACULTY

The librarians and staff of the Chester Fritz Library cordially invite all members of the UND community to attend this year's Robinson Lecture. Professor Robinson, whose career spanned 35 years at UND, was a distinguished member of the History Department faculty. This special lecture series was begun six years ago on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of the publication of his book, "A History of North Dakota," and is designed to recognize the scholarly accomplishments of the UND faculty. The ceremonies will be held in the East Asian Room of the Library (fourth floor) at 3 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 27. The ceremonies will last approximately one hour, with a reception to follow. Mary M. Case, Director, Office of Scholarly Communication, Association of Research Libraries, Washington, D.C., will deliver the keynote address.

-- Karen Cloud, Chester Fritz Library.

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HISTORY FOR LUNCH BEGINS JAN. 28

On Wednesday, Jan. 28, the History Department will sponsor a talk by Joyce Coleman (English) on the topic, "Politics in Frontispieces: Ideological Responses to the Prologue of Raoul de Presles' 'City of God.'" There will be a question and discussion period following Dr. Coleman's presentation. Bring your lunch, if you like. History for Lunch runs from noon to 12:50 p.m. in 217 Merrifield Hall, and is open to all. For more information, please contact me.

-- David Rowley, Associate Professor of History, 777-3380.

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RUSSIAN FULBRIGHT SCHOLAR TO SPEAK IN ENGLISH LECTURE SERIES

Russian Fulbright Scholar Natalia Orlova will speak on "Higher Education in Russia and the Syllabus of the English Department," in 116 Merrifield Hall on Thursday, Jan. 29, at 4 p.m.

Natasha will speak on the striking differences in education between Russia and the United States. She will also describe the English Language Department in a Russian University. Sponsored by the English Lecture series, the lecture is free and open to the public. Please come and welcome our distinguished visiting international scholar.

-- Martha Meek, Coordinator, English Lecture Series.

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BLACK HISTORY MONTH EVENTS LISTED

The University of North Dakota, in collaboration with the Era Bell Thompson Cultural Center (EBTCC) and Multicultural Student Services, will present a number of lectures and workshops during the month of February to recognize Black History Month. Activities are as follows:

-- M.C. Diop, Assistant to the Vice President for Student Affairs and Director of Multicultural Student Services.

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THREE ALUMS FEATURED ON 11TH ANNUAL HULTBERG LECTURESHIP

"Business Through the Years" is the theme of the 11th annual Hultberg Lectureship panel that will be held Tuesday, Feb. 3, at 7:30 p.m. in the Fred Orth Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union.

The panel features three successful women graduates of UND: Denise Flanagan, a Bachelor of Public Administration graduate, is currently the Executive Assistant to the Deputy Assistant of the Navy (Civilian Personnel/Equal Employment Opportunity) in Washington, D.C.; Leah Manning Stetzner, a Bachelor in Honors and a Master of German graduate is currently the Vice President, General Counsel, and Corporate Secretary of the Illinois Power Company; Linda Nelson Butts, a Bachelor of Accountancy graduate, currently owns and is the President of the Prairie Inn Restaurant and Bakery in Carrington, N.D.

The panel will be moderated by UND First Lady Toby Baker.

Denise Flanagan, Arlington, Va.

Flanagan, originally from Fargo, received a bachelor of science in Public Administration from UND in 1990 and a Master's in Public Administration from Syracuse University in 1991. She is presently the Executive Assistant to the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Civilian Personnel/Equal Employment Opportunity) in Washington, D.C. In this capacity, Flanagan's responsibilities have included a review of the Office of Civilian Personnel Management's information technology program for the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Civilian Personnel/EEO) where she developed an action plan to address problems, and monitor the transition to a new information technology organizational structure. In addition, in 1993, Flanagan was part of the Reinventing Human Resources Management Team for the National Performance Review in the Office of the Vice President. In this capacity, she prepared recommendations on the subject of family-friendly workplaces for the "Report of the National Performance Review." Earlier in her career, Flanagan was a Presidential Management Intern with the United States Office of Personnel Management.

Leah Manning Stetzner, Decatur, Ill.

Stetzner, originally from Hettinger, N.D., is a 1970 Bachelor of Arts in Honors concentration on History and Philosophy graduate as well as a 1973 Master's of German graduate from UND. She went on to receive her law degree from the University of Minnesota School of Law in 1977. She is presently the Vice President, General Council, and Corporate Secretary of the Illinois Power Company, an electric and gas utility. She is also the General Counsel and Corporate Secretary of Illinova Generating Company, a holding company of Illinois Power Company. Stetzner holds the position of Corporate Secretary at Illinova Generating Corporation, an unregulated energy services company, and at Illinova Power Marketing, an unregulated marketer of electricity, natural gas, and other related energy services. Prior to joining the Illinois Power Company in 1989, she worked for Burlington Northern railroad for 12 years as an in-house attorney. She is a member of the American Bar Association, Federal Energy Bar Association, American Society of Corporate Secretaries, and the American Corporate Counsel Association. She is also currently a member of the UND Foundation and the UND Alumni Association Board of Directors.

Linda Nelson Butts, Carrington, N.D.

Butts, originally from Carrington, N.D., is a 1988 Bachelor of Business Administration in Accountancy graduate from UND and also received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Mathematics with a minor in Communications from North Dakota State University in 1969. Since 1976, Butts has been the President and Owner of the Prairie Inn Restaurant and Bakery located in Carrington, N.D. In 1997, she was a nominee for the North Dakota Department of Economic Development and Finance Award for Outstanding Woman Owned Businesses. In 1994, she was named one of the top 16 women-owned businesses in North Dakota by the Small Business Association, North Dakota Department of Economic Development, "Going Places" magazine and Women's Business Institute. Butts has recently been appointed to the Agricultural Product Utilization Commission by Governor Schafer. Butts served as Co-Chair for the North Dakota delegation to the White House Conference in Small Business in 1994 in Washington, D.C. She also serves on the Boards of Carrington Development Corporation and the Greater North Dakota Association.

The Hans and Susanna Hultberg Lectureship was established by their daughter, Clara Anderson, through the University of North Dakota Foundation. Clara graduated from the UND College of Business and Public Administration in 1928.

-- Pamela Imperato, Political Science and Public Administration.

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STUDENT ACADEMIC SERVICES PLANS OPEN HOUSE

Student Academic Services will host a new office open house Thursday, Feb. 5, from 2 to 4 p.m. in Room 2, O'Kelly Hall. Please join us for refreshments, a tour of the office and great conversation!

-- Cathy Buyarski, Director, Student Academic Services.

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IRB WILL MEET FEB. 6

The Institutional Review Board will meet at 4 p.m. Friday, Feb. 6, in 305 Twamley Hall, to consider all research proposals submitted to the Office of Research and Program Development before Tuesday, Jan. 27. Proposals received later will be considered only if a quorum has reviewed them and time permits.

Clinical medical projects must be reviewed by the Clinical Medical Subcommittee before being brought to the full Board. Proposals for these projects are due in the Office of Research and Program Development Tuesday, Jan. 20.

Notes from the meeting will be available in ORPD approximately one week after the meeting.

-- F. R. Ferraro, Chair, Institutional Review Board.

SATELLITE BROADCASTS WILL DISCUSS WELFARE REFORM

The Welfare Reform Academy has scheduled a series of conferences on various topics of welfare reform to be satellite broadcast to sites across the country on the first Friday of each month, from February through June 1998. The conferences will be broadcast from the American Enterprise Institute in Washington, D.C., and will be viewed in 130 Gamble Hall. They are scheduled for: Feb. 6, noon to 3 p.m.; March 6, noon to 2:50 p.m.; April 3, noon to 3 p.m.

While program agendas have not been finalized, the conferences will address such topics as: Evaluating Welfare Reform, Family Caps in Welfare: What Research Says about their Impact, Implementing the 'Illegitimacy' and Teen Parent Provisions of Welfare Reform, Preventing Second Births to Teenage Mothers: Demonstration Findings, Program Design for the New TANF, Welfare Reform and Child Care.

There is no fee to participants. Conference participants are to register for the conferences so that conference attendance can be monitored and so that they may receive conference agendas, speaker biographies, background papers, etc.

Please register by contacting me.

-- Mike Jacobsen (Social Work) at 777-3768 or mike_jacobsen@mail.und.nodak.edu.

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OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

POLITICAL SCIENCE AND LAW TO OFFER JOINT J.D./M.P.A. DEGREE

The Department of Political Science and Public Administration and the School of Law at UND will offer a joint J.D./M.P.A. degree. This program enables students to receive two professional degrees in only four years.

The collaboration between the two departments provides students with a broader range of legal and administrative experience than they would typically acquire in only one program. Graduates will have a wider range of expertise to offer potential employers after completing the joint program. Assistant Dean of the School of Law, Julie Erjavec, said that "the joint program is especially beneficial to those planning careers in the public service or the nonprofit sector where there is a need for greater understanding of legal and legislative processes."

Students can be accepted to both programs after graduating from college. They must apply and be admitted to each program separately. Their first year will be completed in law school, with the last two years of law school devoted to public administration courses. The final year of study will concentrate on public administration offerings.

Those seeking information on the joint degree program should contact me.

-- Robert Kweit, Graduate Director, Political Science and Public Administration, 777-3831, or e-mail rkweit@badlands.nodak.edu.

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FINAL APPROVAL RECEIVED FOR HEALTH ADMINISTRATION CONCENTRATION IN MPA PROGRAM

The Department of Political Science and Public Administration has received final approval to offer a Health Administration Concentration in the Master of Public Administration (MPA) Program. This program is designed to help those already in or wishing to enter the health care industry to gain expertise in the fast changing health care environment. The program also provides administrative grounding for those in or seeking management positions.

Health care is one of the fastest growing industries in North Dakota, with eight of the top 13 private sector employers from the health care industry.

According to Randy Eken, Associate Dean for Administration and Finance at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences, "Health care services will account for almost one-fifth of all job growth from 1994-2005." In North Dakota, a 15 percent growth in health services jobs is projected.

The MPA program is offered with or without the Health Administration concentration in Grand Forks and at Bismarck State College through the Interactive Video Network (IVN). To accommodate students with full-time jobs, classes meet in late afternoons, evenings, and on weekends.

Those seeking further information on the program should contact me.

-- Robert Kweit, Graduate Director, Department of Political Science and Public Administration, 777-3831, or e-mail at rkweit@badlands.nodak.edu.

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FACULTY ENCOURAGED TO SERVE ON COMMITTEES

All faculty have been sent a University Committee Preferences form, to permit them to express their interest in serving on the various University committees next year. We encourage all faculty who might be interested to return these forms by Friday, Jan. 30. Descriptions of the committees are found in Section I-6 of the Faculty Handbook.

-- Charlotte Humphries (HPER), Committee on Committees Chair.

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NOT JUST FOR ADVISORS: FORMAL APPLICATION OF GRADUATION

Candidates for degrees must make written application to the Registrar or to the Dean of the college granting the degree within the first four weeks of the semester in which the student expects to receive the degree. Blank application forms may be obtained from the Registrar. Students applying for two or more degrees to be awarded simultaneously must receive approval from each College granting the degrees.

The deadline to apply for a degree for this semester is Wednesday, Feb. 4.

-- Student Academic Services.

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STUDIES WITH RECOMBINANT DNA NEED PRIOR APPROVAL

The Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC) requires that any research, teaching, or other activities which utilize recombinant DNA or involve the use of biohazardous research material be subject to a University Review Process and that these activities must be approved by the IBC prior to their initiation. The IBC is the only authorized University committee which can give approval to projects and activities involving recombinant DNA and biohazardous research material. The IBC will follow the NIH guidelines for recombinant DNA and biohazardous material research in determining the suitability of projects and activities and will provide an explanation of any decision not to approve a project or activity. Any project or activity not approved can be revised and resubmitted to the IBC for consideration.

All faculty or staff who plan on using recombinant DNA or biohazardous materials for research, teaching, or other activities must submit an original and 12 copies of the completed signed application form to the IBC. The IBC will then consider the application at its earliest convenience.

For grant applications submitted to more than one funding agency, it will only be necessary to submit one application to the IBC prior to submission to the granting agencies. One copy of all submitted grant applications utilizing recombinant DNA or biohazardous materials must be submitted to the IBC.

Any changes to an approved project with respect to recombinant DNA or biohazardous materials must receive IBC approval prior to their use. Anyone considering the use of recombinant DNA or biohazardous materials should contact the Office of Research and Program Development (ORPD), 105 Twamley Hall, Extension 777-4279, for a copy of the NIH Guidelines, the Recombinant DNA Review Form and other pertinent information. Forms are also available on ORPD's home page at http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/orpd.

-- Barry Milavetz (Biochemistry and Molecular Biology), Chair, Institutional Biosafety Committee.

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ENTRIES SOUGHT FOR MERRIFIELD COMPETITION

The Chester Fritz Library and the UND Alumni Association and Foundation annually sponsor the Merrifield Competition for the most outstanding scholarly research paper submitted by a UND undergraduate or graduate student. A grant from the UND Alumni Association and Foundation enables the Library to recognize outstanding scholarly research utilizing primary source materials held in the Elwyn B. Robinson Department of Special Collections. This recognition is provided through an annual UND scholarship award of $1,500.

Papers will be juried by Sandy Slater (Elwyn B. Robinson Department of Special Collections), Richard Beringer (History), Jay Meek (English), Rebecca Moore (Philosophy and Religion), and Richard Wilsnack (Neuroscience). Brochures which outline the competition and award guidelines are available at the Chester Fritz Library Reference Desk, Administrative Office, or the Elwyn B. Robinson Department of Special Collections.

-- Sandy Slater, Head, Elwyn B. Robinson Department of Special Collections.

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GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

NOVEMBER GRANT RECIPIENTS LISTED

The Office of Research and Program Development would like to congratulate the following UND faculty and staff who were listed as principal or co-principal investigators on awards received during the month of November 1997:

Jean Altepeter, Human Nutrition Research Center; Steven Benson, Energy and Environmental Research Center; Larry Burd, Neuroscience; Thomas Erickson, Energy and Environmental Research Center; Kevin Galbreath, Energy and Environmental Research Center; Tim Gerlach, Energy and Environmental Research Center; Brian Gibbons, KUND Radio; Janis Hulla, Pharmacology and Toxicology; G. Michael Jacobsen, Social Work; Wally Kearns, Small Business Development Center; Jeffrey Lang, Biology; Sanku Mallik, Chemistry; Donald McCollor, Energy and Environmental Research Center; William Newman, Internal Medicine; Erin O'Leary, Energy and Environmental Research Center; David Pierce, Chemistry; Dan Rice, Instructional Development; Joyce Riske, Energy and Environmental Research Center; Jonathan Spanier, Microbiology and Immunology; Wayne Swisher, Communication Sciences and Disorders; Donald Toman, Energy and Environmental Research Center; Dennis Toom, Anthropology; H. David Wilson, School of Medicine and Health Sciences; Charles Wood, Space Studies; Christopher Zygarlicke, Energy and Environmental Research Center.

-- Sally Eckert-Tilotta, Assistant to the Director of the Office of Research and Program Development.

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NSF ESTABLISHES SCHOLAR-IN-RESIDENCE PROGRAM

The National Science Foundation (NSF), through its Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences and Directorate for Engineering, and the National Institutes of Health (NIH), are establishing the NSF Scholar-In-Residence at NIH. It will be a partnership to enable investigators in the mathematical and physical sciences and engineering to develop research collaborations within the intramural research environment at the NIH. Emphasis is on those efforts in which the expertise of mathematical and physical scientists and engineers can be used to develop innovative applications of science and engineering in addressing significant research questions in the medical and biological sciences.

The activity is open to mathematical and physical scientists and engineers who are interested in making connections between their research and current and future problems in the medical and biological sciences. Applicants must hold tenured, tenure-track, or senior research faculty positions at U.S. academic institutions, and have had no funding from the NIH. Participants are expected to spend a minimum of six months to a maximum of one year, either consecutively or staggered within an 18-month time frame, working within the NIH intramural research program.

Investigators may apply for support as a supplement to an existing NSF grant or through a new proposal, depending on the preference of the participating NSF program. Submissions should be made to the disciplinary program in the participating Directorate in which the Principal Investigator would normally have his/her research supported. NSF funds will support summer salary, travel, and per diem costs for the visiting NSF Scholar while on the NIH campus, as well as travel costs associated with short-term visits to the NIH campus by students working with the Scholar at his/her home institution.

General questions about the NSF Scholar-in-Residence at NIH activity can be addressed to the Directorate coordinators at NSF: Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Dr. Denise Caldwell, dcaldwel@nsf.gov; Engineering, Dr. Rajinder Khosla, rkhosla@nsf.gov; or to the coordinator at NIH: Dr. Robert Bonner, bonner@helix.nih.gov. Additional information is available on the NSF website at http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/1998/nsf9848/nsf9848.htm.

-- Sally Eckert-Tilotta, Assistant to the Director of the Office of Research and Program Development.

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PROPOSALS SOUGHT FOR SUMMER INSTRUCTIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROFESSORSHIPS

In an effort to support significant instructional development activities, the Faculty Instructional Development Committee seeks proposals for Summer Instructional Development Professorships. The purpose of these professorships is to provide faculty with an opportunity to work full time on instructional development for four weeks during the summer. Recipients must spend full time on their projects, typically on campus. The focus will be on the development of innovative instructional material, methods, or approaches to new or existing courses that would be offered in the following academic year. Professorships are being offered at a stipend of $2,700 for a four-week project.

The FIDC is presently seeking applications; interested faculty members should submit a proposal in this format:

Faculty members interested in the opportunity of a Summer Instructional Development Professorship are encouraged to discuss their ideas and draft proposals with Dan Rice (Instructional Development) prior to submitting a final proposal.

Proposals (10 copies) are due by noon Thursday, Feb. 12, in the Office of Instructional Development, 407 Twamley Hall.

-- Dan Rice, Director of Instructional Development.

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RESEARCH, GRANT OPPORTUNITIES LISTED

Following are research and grant opportunities. For more information, contact the Office of Research and Program Development at 777-4278.

NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES

Humanities Focus Grants enable groups of teachers, faculty members, and other educators who work together in the same or related institutions to explore important humanities topics and develop plans of action for their institutions. They provide support for joint study, outside experts, workshops on scholarly issues and related curricular questions, and planning. With a simplified application process and an expedited review cycle, these small ($10,000-$25,000), "next semester" grants make it possible for colleagues to consider substantive questions and chart institutional directions in a timely way.

Humanities Focus Grants may be used to support Teaching with Technology projects, a special three-year opportunity which supports projects to strengthen education in the humanities by developing and using information technologies. Electronic technologies -- including digital audio, video and imaging, hypertext and hypermedia, video-conferencing, speech processing, the Internet, and World Wide Web sites -- can enable teachers to draw on newly accessible resources and engage their students in active learning and higher-level thinking. The program seeks to support projects of national significance that will extend these benefits to a broad range of those studying the humanities disciplines. In particular it seeks proposals: 1) to increase the number and usefulness of technological resources with rich, high-quality humanities content, particularly for schools and colleges; 2) to improve the effectiveness of such resources by shaping them around sophisticated, creative, and engaging approaches to learning and by testing them in classrooms; 3) to increase significantly the number of teachers who can integrate such humanities materials into their daily teaching. Deadline: 4/17/98. Contact: 202/606-8380; education@neh.fed.us.

Special Initiative for Public Libraries. The NEH announces a Challenge Grants Special Initiative to assist public libraries in creating endowments that support the humanities. Any public library that has not previously held an NEH Challenge Grant is eligible to apply. Special consid-era-tion will be given to applicants from libraries without humanities endowments and to libraries whose plans show promise of outreach to new and diverse audiences. Smaller libraries are especially encouraged to apply. Under this initiative, applicants may request a maximum of $150,000; federal funds must be matched by two times the amount in non-federal donations. Deadline: 5/1/98. Contact: 202/606-8309; challenge@neh.fed.us.

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NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION

The Instructional Materials Development Program provides support to institutions with educational interests for a wide range of projects designed to provide new and improved materials and strategies that can help to increase the quality of, and continuously renew, the nation's educational resources in mathematics, science, and technology. FY97 awards ranged from $10,000 to $2.79 million for one-to four-year projects. Contact: Directorate for Education and Human Resources, 703/06-1614, fax: 703/306-0412. Deadline(s): 5/1/98 (Preliminary Proposal), 8/15/98 (Full Proposal).

The Evaluation Program provides funding for evaluations and impact studies of science education initiatives, and the development of innovative techniques, approaches, and methodologies for the general improvement of the field. Eligible to apply are public and private colleges and universities and other educational associations. Contact: Directorate for Education and Human Resources, 703/306-1653; fax 703/306-0434. Deadline: None.

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RADIOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF NORTH AMERICA

The Research & Education Fund provides seed grants of up to $25,000 three times a year to assist full-time faculty members to foster research in radiology by underwriting the preliminary studies that are frequently necessary before seeking major funding for a project. Data from these projects will indicate feasibility and appropriateness of the research when funding from other agencies is sought. They are not intended as a supplement to major funding already secured. Contact: Ms. Jennifer Boylan, Managing Director, 630/571-7868; fax 630/571-7837. Deadline(s): 5/15/98, 9/15/98.

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SOCIETY FOR THE PSYCHOLOGICAL STUDY OF SOCIAL ISSUES

Sponsored Nationally-Based Theme Conference. The sponsor will provide support for conferences which bring theory and practice into focus on human problems of the group, the community, and the nation, as well as the increasingly important problems that have no national boundaries. The national-level award will provide up to $10,000; the workshop award will provide $2,000-$4,000. Contact: 313/662-9130; fax 313/662-5607, spssi@umich.edu. Deadline: 6/1/98.

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DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

Energy Research Financial Assistance Program. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the Office of Energy Research (ER), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) invites preapplications from potential applicants for research funding in the Energy Biosciences program area. The preapplication should consist of a two-to three-page concept paper on the research contemplated for an application to the Energy Biosciences program. The concept paper should focus on the scientific objectives and significance of the planned research, include an outline of the approaches planned, and any other information relating to the planned research. No budget information or biographical data need be included; an institutional endorsement is not necessary. Deadline: 2/27/98 (Preapplications); 6/17/98 (Formal Applications). Address: Preapplications referencing Program Notice 98-09 should be forwarded to: U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, ER-17, Division of Energy Biosciences, 19901.

-- Sally Eckert-Tilotta, Assistant to the Director of the Office of Research and Program Development.

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BILLBOARD

REGULATED WASTE POLICY ARTICULATED

To ensure that "regulated waste" is disposed of properly, the Institutional Biosafety Committee requires that all members of the University community who generate "regulated waste" have in place a disposal plan which conforms with federal regulations. "Regulated waste" as defined by the federal government includes but is not limited to human body fluids and tissues and items contaminated with human body fluids or tissues such as needles, syringes, and scalpels, whether generated during medical procedures, research or teaching. Anyone who is generating "regulated waste" within the University and does not have a disposal plan in place or is unsure of whether "regulated waste" is being generated by their activities or is being disposed of properly must contact the Safety Office.

-- Barry Milavetz (Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Chair, Institutional Biosafety Committee.

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INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS SEARCH EXTENDED

The search for a director of International Programs has been extended through the spring semester. Sharon Rezac Andersen will serve as Interim Director of International Programs and Coordinator of the International Centre. She has served as the Center Coordinator since 1990 and recently was selected as the Region IV representative for the National Association of International Educators and Scholars. We appreciate Sharon's willingness to assume these responsibilities for the coming months.

-- Marlene Strathe, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost.

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AWARDS HONOR DIVERSITY EFFORTS

The Era Bell Thompson Cultural Center recognized the efforts to promote cultural diversity Jan. 15 by presenting five individuals and one group with the first Martin Luther King Jr. Awards on the civil rights leader's birthday.

Winners in six categories were based on nominations collected over the past month and were chosen for displaying the values and philosophy of King. The categories are based on different aspects of King's message, Diop said.

The awards and the winners include:

Service to UND: Chaminda Prelis, an international student at UND, who serves on a statewide diversity committee and is involved with student government as the Senate liaison to the Multi-Cultural Awareness Committee. Through these roles, he has been active in issues of diversity and cultural understanding both at the University and throughout the education community in North Dakota.

Service to the Spiritual Life of UND: Lisa Clark, an active member of the Pi Beta Phi sorority, who has served as vice president of moral advancement for the UND chapter of her sorority. Her volunteer efforts include teaching a third and fourth grade religious education class at the Newman Center, teaching ninth grade confirmation, and co-chairing the Newman Center Bike Race committee.

Service to Diversity at UND (Era Bell Thompson Memorial Award): Gordon Henry, UND Vice President for Student Affairs, was instrumental in the development of the Era Bell Thompson Cultural Center, and has been a strong advocate for multi-cultural educational opportunities on campus.

Service to the Spiritual Life in the Greater Grand Forks Community: Mike Stromberg, UND swimming coach, who originated and ran a shelter for flood volunteers this past summer, and is also involved in national and international events to help build the physical and spiritual life of many people.

Service to the Greater Grand Forks Community: Stacey Ricard, an active member of Pi Beta Phi, who has actively pursued volunteer efforts in the Grand Forks community since 1994. Altru Hospital, the Adopt-A-School program, and the LISTEN Center are some of the local organizations she has worked with. Ricard also spent many hours sandbagging last spring, and worked with flood victims in Bemidji over the summer.

Service to Humanity: BRIDGES (Building Roads Into Diverse Groups Empowering Students) is a UND group which has sponsored a number of open forums on understanding and respecting the Native American culture. This group has been instrumental in bringing the issue of the University's use of the Sioux as a mascot to the attention of the community.

Father William Sherman, pastor of St. Michael's Church in Grand Forks, was the main speaker. He is the author of a number of ethnic books, including "Plains Folk" and "African Americans in North Dakota," and holds a master's degree in Sociology from UND.

-- M.C. Diop, Director of Multicultural Student Services.

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MAILBOX LISTING INCORRECT

Two campus mailboxes are incorrect on the University Extension Numbers sheet that was printed in September 1997.

-- Lois MacGregor, Telecommunications.

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MONEY MATTERS

BUDGET PREPARATION WORKSHOP SET

A Budget Preparation Workshop will be held Friday, Jan. 30, from 10 a.m. to noon in 305 Twamley Hall.

Budget and Grants Administration staff members will conduct the workshop, which will discuss the basics of budgeting and budget worksheet preparations. The following topics will be addressed: requesting and maintaining position numbers; funding sources and their limitations; overview of single and pooled positions; budget worksheets and description of fields; working with computer formatted worksheets; submittal of worksheets by computer. Individuals who prepare the personnel and operating budgets for departments are encouraged to attend.

Please contact me if you have any questions and/or you plan to attend.

-- Rosemary Thue, Budget and Grants Administration, 777-4151.

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CREDIT UNION ANNUAL MEETING SET

The 60th annual meeting of the University Federal Credit Union will be Wednesday, Jan. 28, in the Snack Bar of the fourth floor of Twamley Hall. The social will be held at 3:30 p.m., and the business meeting will begin at 4 p.m. Please note the correct day.

One of the privileges of owning your Credit Union is sharing in democratic decision making. Each member has one vote and the same rights as any other member to decide the Credit Union's future.

Your participation is welcome as we begin a new and better year of serving you, the member. Join us and become a part of the Credit Union voice.

-- George Meister, Manager, University Federal Credit Union.

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ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

NATIVE AMERICAN STORY-TELLERS FEATURED AT MUSEUM

North Dakota residents Merry Ketterling, William Ambrose Littleghost, and Dorreen Yellow Bird will share stories from their heritage Sunday, Jan. 25, at 2 p.m. at the North Dakota Museum of Art.

"Fireside Stories," a celebration of the oral tradition of story-telling in Native American culture, will be the third event in the Museum's Readers' Series this season. The Series was instituted in 1991 and continued through 1993. It began again this year with "The Ghost of Lake Agassiz," flood-related essays and poems by local writers, and "Old Poems, New Work," readings by three nationally known poets from the region.

Admission to "Fireside Stories" is free and open to the public. For further information, call 777-4195.

-- Barbara Crow, North Dakota Museum of Art.

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CHILDREN INVITED TO "SHOOT WITH THE SIOUX"

Attention faculty and staff with kids in grades K through six! Here's an opportunity for your children to meet and "Shoot with the Sioux" men's and women's basketball teams on Sunday, Feb. 1, from 12:30 to 2 p.m. at the Hyslop Multi-Purpose Gym. They will also have the opportunity to learn UND fight songs from the UND Cheer Team. Have your children bring their own basketballs with their names on them. "Shoot with the Sioux" is free to the public and is sponsored by Telesis, UND Student Alumni Association. For more information, contact me.

-- Kirsten Carolin, Special Events Coordinator, Alumni Association.

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WOMEN'S CENTER LISTS EVENTS

Programs at the Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., include Feast and Focus at noon, Wednesday, Jan. 28, "I Wonder ..." and Soup for the Soul at 12:15 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 29. Everyone is welcome.

-- Donna Oltmanns, Coordinator, Women's Center.

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INTERNATIONAL CENTRE LISTS EVENTS

The Thursday, Jan. 29, 7 p.m. program at the International Centre, 2908 University Ave., is "Celebrating the Culture of Croatia." International students from Croatia will provide an evening with a video, food, artifacts and stories of their homeland. Please join us.

-- Sharon Rezac Andersen, Director, International Centre.

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THESIS PRODUCTION EXPLORES DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

The Department of Theatre Arts will present a Graduate Thesis production, "Floating Rhoda and the Glueman," by Eve Ensler. Under the direction of graduate student Laurie Hinn, the production will run Thursday through Saturday, Feb. 5 to 7, at 7:30 p.m. in the Burtness Studio Theatre. Tickets are $2 per person and may be purchased at the door.

A twisted tale of romance and love, "Floating Rhoda and the Glueman" examines the issues of physical and sexual abuse, incest, rape and their effects and consequences on character relationships. Ensler goes one step further to show us how these forms of violence create the people we are and the people we will eventually become. Audience members are introduced to Rhoda (played by Stacie Erickson) who has been through it all: an incestuous relationship with her father, a husband who beat her, and now a manipulative boyfriend whose primitive sexual tactics seem equivalent to rape. Then she meets Barn (Travis Maruska), a caring man that truly loves her. But due to emotional distress, Rhoda is unable to let Barn anywhere close enough to love her. "Floating Rhoda and the Glueman" provides us with an opportunity to view one woman's struggle to find herself and the love of another.

Other cast members include Laura Henry, Tim Delcavo, Ben Olesen, Jennifer Churchill, Nicole Quam, and Ryan Lee. If you have questions, please feel free to call me.

-- Laurie Hinn, Theatre Arts, 777-4075.

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS

JANUARY 1998

(Please contact Mavis at the Office of University Relations, Box 7144, or call 777-4304, if you wish to make changes or have an event included.)

Through Thurs., Jan. 29 -- ART EXHIBITION, Harold O'Connor, Metals, Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center.

Through Sun., March 1 -- ART EXHIBIT OPENS: "Old Friends: New Art Part II," exhibit features work of 20 artists including Ed Ruscha, Donald Anderson, Duane Michals and Jim Dow, North Dakota Museum of Art.

Thurs., Jan. 22 -- 9 O'CLOCK BRIEFING by President Baker, Memorial Union Fred Orth Lecture Bowl, 9 a.m.

Thurs., Jan. 22 -- FACULTY PANEL AND DISCUSSION, "What Makes Student Writing Good," with panel members David Rowley (History), Pat Sanborn (Integrated Studies), Steve Sternberg (Chemical Engineering), and Jan Zahrly (Management), Sioux Room, Memorial Union, 3:30 to 5 p.m.; call or e-mail in advance if you plan to attend, 777-3600 or e-mail to rankin@badlands.nodak.edu.

Thurs., Jan. 22 -- UNIVERSITY PROGRAM COUNCIL EVENT, "Fools Rush In," Lecture Bowl, 9 p.m.; free admission.

Thurs., Jan. 22 -- VIDEO PRESENTATION, "Ten Ways To Be a Better Parent," Parent Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Rd., 12:10 to 12:50 p.m.; call 795-2765 to register.

Fri., Jan. 23 -- BIOLOGY CANDIDATE SEMINAR, "Acan125: A Link Between Myosin-I and Cellular Membranes" presented by Henry Zot, Assistant Professor in the Department of Physiology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 141 Starcher Hall, noon.

Fri., Jan. 23 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND vs. University of Northern Colorado, Hyslop Sports Center, 8 p.m.

Fri., Jan. 23 -- BASKETBALL, WOMEN'S, UND vs. University of Northern Colorado, Hyslop Sports Center, 6 p.m.

Fri., Jan. 23 -- SWIMMING & DIVING, UND at Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, Minn., 4 p.m.

Fri. and Sat., Jan. 23-24 -- HOCKEY, UND at St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, Minn., 7:05 p.m.

Fri. through Sun., Jan. 23-25 -- FIREHALL THEATRE PRODUCTION, "Best Little Whorehouse in Texas," Chester Fritz Auditorium, 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 25.

Sat., Jan. 24 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND vs. University of Nebraska at Omaha, Hyslop Sports Center, 8 p.m.

Sat., Jan. 24 -- BASKETBALL, WOMEN'S, UND vs. University of Nebraska at Omaha, Hyslop Sports Center, 6 p.m.

Sat., Jan. 24 -- SWIMMING & DIVING (men's and women's), UND at Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, 1 p.m.

Sun., Jan. 25 -- IVN MEETING ON TUITION CHANGES, Chancellor Larry Isaak and Vice Chancellor for Administrative Affairs Laura Glatt will be present to field questions, 120 Gamble Hall, 2 to 4 p.m.

Sun., Jan. 25 -- MUSEUM READER'S SERIES: Fireside Stories, with North Dakota residents Merry Ketterling, William Ambrose Littleghost, and Dorreen Yellow Bird, North Dakota Museum of Art, 2 p.m.; admission is free and open to the public; call 777-4195 for more information.

Sun., Jan. 25 -- UNIVERSITY PROGRAM COUNCIL EVENT, "Hamlet," Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, 2 p.m. matinee, free admission.

Mon., Jan. 26 -- MEETING, UND General Education Committee, 303 Twamley Hall, 3 p.m.

Mon., Jan. 26 -- BIOLOGY CANDIDATE SEMINAR, "Prostate Cell Biology: Progression from Normal Function to Hormone-Independent Cancer," presented by Kurt Borg, Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology School of Medicine and Health Sciences, 141 Starcher Hall, noon.

Mon., Jan. 26, through Mon., Feb. 23 -- STUDY GROUP, "Active Parenting of Teens," Parent Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Rd., 7 to 9 p.m.; call 795-2765 to register.

Tues., Jan. 27 -- INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARD deadline for proposals requiring full board review for Fri., Feb. 6, meeting.

Tues., Jan. 27 -- ROBINSON LECTURE, keynote address by Mary M. Case, Director, Office of Scholarly Communication, Association of Research Libraries, Washington, D.C., East Asian Room (fourth floor), Chester Fritz Library, 3 p.m.; this lecture series recognizes the late Professor Elwyn Robinson, a distinguished member of the History Department whose career spanned 35 years at UND.

Tues., Jan. 27 -- MEETING, faculty members are invited to meet with Kay Fulp, of the State College of Science, who is the faculty representative to the North Dakota State Board of Higher Education, Edna Twamley Room, fourth floor, Twamley Hall, noon to 1:30 p.m.; anyone wishing to see her at another time, contact Elizabeth Hampsten (English) at 777-3987.

Tues., Jan. 27 -- SEMINAR, "Raising a Daughter," Parent Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Rd., 7 to 9 p.m.; call 795-2765 to register.

Tues., Jan. 27 -- UNIVERSITY PROGRAM COUNCIL EVENT, "Tony Jarvis," Afro-Cuban, gospel and funky acoustic guitar, Coffeehouse performer, Ballroom, Memorial Union, 8 p.m.; free admission.

Wed., Jan. 28 -- ANNUAL MEETING, University Federal Credit Union, Snack Bar, fourth floor, Twamley Hall, social begins at 3:30 p.m. and meeting at 4 p.m.

Wed., Jan. 28 -- HISTORY FOR LUNCH, "Politics in Frontispieces: Ideological Responses to the Prologue of Raoul de Presles' 'City of God,'" presented by Joyce Coleman (English), 217 Merrifield Hall, noon to 12:50 p.m.; bring your lunch; open to all.

Wed., Jan. 28 -- FEAST AND FOCUS PROGRAM, "I Wonder ...," Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

Wed., Jan. 28 -- VIDEO PRESENTATION, "1-2-3- Magic," Parent Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Rd., 1 to 2:30 p.m.; call 795-2765 to register.

Wed., Jan. 28 -- UNIVERSITY PROGRAM COUNCIL EVENT, "Air-Force One," Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, 9 p.m.; free admission.

Wed., Jan. 28, and Wed., Feb. 4 -- STUDY GROUP, "Positive Discipline," Parent Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Rd., 9:30 to 11 a.m.; call 795-2765 to register.

Thurs., Jan. 29 -- ENGLISH LECTURE SERIES, Russian Fulbright Scholar Natalia Orlova will speak on "Higher Education in Russia and the Syllabus of the English Department," 116 Merrifield Hall, 4 p.m.

Thurs., Jan. 29 -- SOUP FOR THE SOUP, Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., 12:15 p.m.; everyone is welcome.

Thurs., Jan. 29 -- CELEBRATING THE CULTURE OF CROATIA, international students from Croatia will provide an evening with a video, food, artifacts and stories of their homeland, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; all are welcome; call 777-4231 for information.

Thurs., Jan. 29 -- VIDEO PRESENTATION, "Raising Careful and Confident Kids in a Crazy World: Personal Safety Skills," Parent Education Resource Center, 500 Stanford Rd., 12:10 to 12:50 p.m.; call 795-2765 to register.

Thurs. through Sat., Jan. 29-31 -- COOPERATIVE LEARNING WORKSHOPS, presented by Karl A. Smith, nationally recognized leader in cooperative learning methods and Associate Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering, Associate Director for Education at the Center for Interfacial Engineering, and Co-Coordinator for the Bush Faculty Development Program for Excellence and Diversity in Teaching at the University of Minnesota; to register for the workshops or for more information, call Dave Morstad at 777-2458.

Fri., Jan. 30 -- BUDGET PREPARATION WORKSHOP, Budget and Grants Administration staff members will conduct the workshop, which will discuss the basics of budgeting and budget worksheet preparations, 305 Twamley Hall, 10 a.m. to noon; call Rosemary at 777-4151 if you plan to attend or have questions.

Fri., Jan. 30 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND vs. Morningside College, Hyslop Sports Center, 8 p.m.

Fri., Jan. 30 -- BASKETBALL, WOMEN'S, UND vs. Morningside College, Hyslop Sports Center, 6 p.m.

Fri. and Sat., Jan. 30-31 -- SWIMMING & DIVING (women's), UND vs. University of Northern Michigan Duals, Hyslop Sports Center, 7 p.m. Jan. 30 and 11 a.m. Jan. 31.

Sat., Jan. 31 -- TEST, Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT), River Valley Room, Memorial Union, 8 a.m.

Sat., Jan. 31 -- TEST, National Certification Agency examinations, 114 Witmer Hall, 8:30 a.m.

Sat., Jan. 31 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND vs. University of South Dakota, Hyslop Sports Center, 8 p.m.

Sat., Jan. 31 -- BASKETBALL, WOMEN'S, UND vs. University of South Dakota, Hyslop Sports Center, 6 p.m.

Sat. and Sun., Jan. 31-Feb. 1

-- HOCKEY, UND vs. Mankato State University, Engelstad Arena, 2:05 p.m.

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UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is also available electronically through UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address is http://www.und.nodak.edu.

All articles submitted for publication should be labeled "University Letter" and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu. Attachments to University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number. University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations, Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.

UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

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