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University Letter

June 26, 1998

Volume 35 No. 40

UNIVERSITY LETTER
University of North Dakota at Grand Forks
Vol. 35, Number 40, June 26, 1998

UNIVERSITY LETTER IS ALSO AVAILABLE ELECTRONICALLY in the Events and News section of UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address is: http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/our/uletter.htm

The University Relations Office maintains an index for the University Letter.

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CONTENTS

EVENTS TO NOTE

OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

BILLBOARD

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

EVENTS CALENDAR

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ETTLING NAMED INTERIM VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS, PROVOST

John Ettling has been named Interim Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost by President Baker.

The Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Ettling will officially start his duties July 1. One of Ettling's first acts will be to appoint an Interim Dean of Arts and Sciences. The current Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, Marlene Strathe, has been appointed to the same position at the University of Northern Colorado, and will begin her duties there after June.

Ettling's appointment is for one year. He will be eligible to become a candidate for the position on a permanent basis.

Since August 1, 1995, Ettling has been Dean of UND's largest and oldest college and a Professor of History. He came to UND from the University of Houston, where he had been with The Honors College and the Department of History since 1979. He was the Associate Dean of The Honors College from 1993 until 1995, when he came to UND. Ettling also taught at Northwestern University, Union College, SUNY-Albany, and Rice University. As a graduate student in the 1970s, he worked as a Teaching Fellow in the History and Literature Program at Harvard.

A Houston native, Ettling holds the B.A. (summa cum laude, 1966) from the University of Virginia and the M.A. (1972) and Ph.D. (1978) from Harvard. His area of expertise includes the history of philanthropic foundations, as they influenced the development of modern science, medicine and public health and as they foreshadowed federal sponsorship of research. He and Jenny Ettling have two daughters.

-- Ken Baker, President.

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PRESIDENTIAL BRIEFING SET FOR JULY 8

The next "9 o'clock" Presidential Briefing is Wednesday, July 8, at 9 a.m. in the Lecture Bowl of the Memorial Union. Coffee and breakfast pastries will be provided by Campus Catering. President Baker will also hold a briefing Wednesday, August 12, in the Lecture Bowl. All UND employees are welcome to attend.

-- Jan Orvik, Editor, University Letter.

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UNIVERSITY LETTER:

The summer schedule for University Letter follows. University Letter will be published on the following dates: June 26, July 10 and 24, Aug. 7, 21 and 28. The deadline for article submission remains at 1 p.m. the Tuesday before you wish the article published. Articles will be run only once due to space and budget considerations.

-- Jan Orvik, Editor, University Letter.

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NEW VICE PRESIDENTIAL DIVISION NAMED

When students return to the University this fall, they'll find a new name and structure for the division that represents them on the vice presidential level. The North Dakota State Board of Higher Education on Thursday, June 18, approved the name "Division of Student and Outreach Services" for the area that will be headed by Vice President Designate Robert Boyd.

Boyd, who has served as Dean of Outreach Programs since 1980, will oversee the newly reorganized division which merges student affairs with UND's Division of Continuing Education and four other departments -- the Offices of Admission, Enrollment Services and University Relations, and KUND, the campus radio station.

"This new name and new Division reinforce the University's commitment to students," said Boyd. "UND has a long and respected history of providing absolutely the best services for its students. The new Division will build on that tradition, but it will be new in that it will be committed to serving potential students -- including older individuals located in the state, region, nation and world -- as well as current students, and will help the University grow into the next century."

As part of the reorganization, Boyd announced some key personnel assignments:

* Lillian Elsinga will become Associate Vice President for Student Services and Dean of Students. Elsinga has been at UND since 1973, first as Associate Dean of Students, then Dean of Students from 1984 until 1996, Interim Vice President for Student Affairs in 1983, and as Associate Vice President of Student Affairs since 1996. She also is an adjunct assistant professor in the College of Education and Human Development.

* James Shaeffer will become Associate Vice President for Outreach Services and Dean of Outreach Programs. Shaeffer has been at UND since June of 1996 as Associate Dean of the Division of Continuing Education. He came to UND from the University of Wyoming, where he was director of the School of Extended Studies and Public Service and head of the Division of Extended Credit Programs.

* Karen Berthold will assume additional program responsibilities and serve in the role of Assistant Dean of Outreach Programs. She has been at the Division of Continuing Education since 1991 and most recently served as Director of Outreach Programs. Prior to 1991, she was at the Center for Rural Health at the UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

* Jill Novotny will become the administrative assistant in the Office of the Vice President for Student and Outreach Services. Novotny has been an administrative officer in UND's Student Affairs Office.

Departments in the new Division of Student and Outreach Services include the Student Affairs Office (to be renamed the Dean of Students Office), Career Services, Counseling Center, Memorial Union, Multicultural Student Services, Native American Programs, Student Financial Aid, Student Health Services and TRIO Programs. Elements of the Division of Continuing Education include Extension Classes, Extended Degree Programs, Learning After Hours Program, Credit and Credit-free Correspondence Study, Conference Services, the "University within the University" program (UND staff development), Work Force Development, UND Television Center, Summer Session, and the North Dakota Interactive Video Network. Other offices joining the new Division include the Offices of Enrollment Services and University Relations (which had reported to the President), and the Office of Admissions, Student Academic Services, and KUND Radio (which were in the Division of Academic Affairs).

President Baker said the new organizational structure will allow UND to expand its long-time commitment to student learning outside the traditional classroom. It will also make UND more responsive to the needs of the new types of students who are increasingly demanding services from higher education: namely, degree and non-degree students studying on and off the campus through a variety of delivery modes for purposes of professional and personal enhancement and development. "It is clear that UND must be more responsive to the increasingly diverse educational needs of its prospective students," Baker said. "For example, UND knows that more of its future students will be older, will be seeking particular kinds of education -- often related to their careers and will be dealing with personal situations preventing them from being traditional, full-time, residential students."

These trends are already evident, Baker said. Last year, for example, the Division of Continuing Education facilitated courses for more than 20,000 students not counted in UND's regular enrollment. The great majority of these students never set foot on the campus, but instead attended classes in which UND faculty traveled to other cities to teach, or provided instruction via the Interactive Video Network, correspondence study, the Internet, or short-term conferences, seminars and workshops.

Baker said the restructured division will also coordinate UND's student recruitment process, bringing together three units -- Enrollment Services, Admissions, and Student Financial Aid -- that have been under separate divisions.

In addition, Boyd will also become the President's senior advisor on public relationships, guiding UND's effort to generate public understanding and support and leading efforts to create and market mutually beneficial partnerships between UND and outside entities. Playing a role in that effort will be UND's Office of University Relations (UND's public information department), and KUND Radio, which joins the UND Television Center transferred last year to Boyd's supervision.

Baker stated that the changed organizational structure will enable UND to leverage its financial and human resources in new ways, an important factor, he said, at this point in the evolution of the institution and of the North Dakota University System.

"I am particularly pleased with the qualifications of the person who is heading up the restructured division," Baker said. "You could not write a better resume for the challenges that lie before us than the one Bob Boyd has compiled in nearly 20 years with UND. He has established himself as a bold and creative educator and administrator, on the cutting edge of virtually all of the trends and developments that are coming together as the University prepares for the 21st Century."

A native of Rocklake, N.D., Boyd holds a bachelors degree from Minot State University and master's and doctoral degrees from UND. He was a high school teacher and administrator before coming to UND, including service as principal of the Minot-Magic City Campus, the largest secondary school in North Dakota. He joined UND's Division of Continuing of Education in 1978 and was promoted to its dean the following year. The Division and Boyd have both won numerous regional and national awards over the years for creative and responsive approaches to extending the educational mission of the University.

During the flood emergency this spring, Boyd and his staff organized UND's successful telephone bank which fielded tens of thousands of phone calls from faculty, staff and students, as well as the "Virtual University" which operated electronically from the Rural Technology Center until the campus was able to reopen on May 8. He is chair of the Grand Forks Chamber of Commerce, writes and speaks on management topics, and is well known across the state as a skilled meeting and discussion facilitator.

-- Kendall Baker, President.

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BAKER ANNOUNCES INTERIM VICE PRESIDENT AT BRIEFING

President Baker named Arts and Sciences Dean John Ettling to the post of Interim Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost at his monthly June briefing. He replaces Marlene Strathe, who is leaving the University to take a similar post at the University of Northern Colorado at Greeley. See the story elsewhere in University Letter for more details. He also announced that retiring Computer Center Director Dale Vetter will be replaced by Dorette Kerian (User Services) as Interim Director, and Marv Hanson (Technical Services) as Higher Education Computing Network Liaison.

Other items discussed included:

-- Vice President designate Bob Boyd unveiled the new name of his division, Student and Outreach Services, effective July 1. The new division will be divided into two units, Student Services and Outreach. Unit heads were named; see the article elsewhere in this issue of University Letter for details.

-- Don Piper (Summer Sessions) reported that in an unofficial count, Summer Session enrollment is up 515 students over last year, and is running just 83 students fewer than the Summer 1996 total, a high in recent years. The official third-week count will be taken in about two weeks. Baker emphasized that the enrollment rise has meant a $300,000 increase in revenue over last year.

-- Cathy Buyarski (Student Academic Services) reported that the summer registration program is progressing well, and is ahead 200 student appointments from this time last year, mostly due to personal calls to every freshman who was accepted into the University. A volunteer calling program by faculty and staff resulted in calling 1,700 students in just four nights.

-- Donna Bruce (Admissions) reported that readmitted students who had left the University, then chosen to re-enroll, are up 17 percent from last year. The freshman enrollment is down slightly, but this could be because cancellations are coming in earlier this year. In short, it's too early to tell whether enrollment will be up or down in the fall.

-- Baker was prepared to make a presentation to the Grand Forks City Council requesting aid to develop infrastructure on the Bronson Property, which the University hopes to develop into University Village. He stressed that the development of the Village would aid with recruitment and make the University more attractive to students. In other building news, Baker announced that the UND Alumni Association has guaranteed the additional $1.2 million, if it cannot be raised through other forms (grants, federal aid, etc.), needed to build the Animal Research Facility adjacent to the Medical School. The Interim Legislative Budget Committee has voted to move forward with the project. The committee also approved a request to build a link connecting Abbott and McCannel Halls.

-- Baker also announced that the University will hold a large-scale open house Sunday, Sept. 20, patterned after Friends and Neighbors Day at the Grand Forks Air Force Base. He hopes to draw large numbers of people to campus with food, music and other events. The event is being chaired by Assistant to the President Dave Vorland; contact him if you have ideas for events.

-- Jan Orvik, Editor, University Letter.

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EVENTS TO NOTE

CITY, NEIGHBORHOOD DESIGNER WILL VISIT CAMPUS

One of the founders of the New Urbanism movement, Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, will give a slide lecture Thursday, June 25, at 8 p.m. at Clifford Hall. She will also speak about redeveloping existing neighborhoods and designing neighborhood concepts into new developments at a breakfast Friday at 7:30 a.m. at the North Dakota Museum of Art. Both the talk and breakfast are sponsored by the North Dakota Museum of Art, whose Design Forum series was funded by a $38,200 grant from the Otto Bremer Foundation. They are free and open to the public.

Plater-Zyberk is widely known for designing a new town in Seaside, Fla., following the principles of New Urbanism. Aimed at designing new developments which have an old-fashioned sense of neighborhood, New Urbanism stresses smaller lots, front porches, town squares, neighborhood parks, narrower streets, and mixed uses with small retail shops in residential neighborhoods. Plater-Zyberk was also active in promoting public participation in design forums to rebuild Dade County, Fla., after Hurricane Andrew.

Plater-Zyberk is a Trustee of Princeton University, and an elected member of the American Institute of Architects College of Fellows. She has been a Visiting Professor at Harvard School of Design, Prince of Wales Summer School in Rome, the University of Virginia, the University of Houston and the University of Maryland.

Since 1979 Plater-Zyberk has taught at the University of Miami School of Architecture, where in 1995 she was appointed Dean. Founding a master of architecture program in Suburb and Town Design in 1988, she continues to explore current issues in city growth and reconstruction with the students and faculty. At the University she has served as Director of the Center for Urban and Community Design, organizing and promoting numerous design exercises for the benefit of communities throughout South Florida. She was one of the coordinators of the New South Dade Charrette to inspire rebuilding after Hurricane Andrew.

Born and raised near Philadelphia, Plater-Zyberk has lived in South Florida since 1976. She received her undergraduate degree in architecture and urban design from Princeton University and her master's degree in architecture from Yale School of Architecture. A founding partner of Arquitectonica in the 1970s, she opened her own firm in partnership with Andres Duany. The architectural work of Duany and Plater-Zyberk includes housing, office, commercial, civic and religious building projects. In addition to receiving over 30 awards and honors from professional journals, government organizations, and universities, the firm has been recognized with 20 national, state and regional awards from the American Institute of Architects.

Since its founding in 1980, Plater-Zyberk's firm, DPZ, has designed nearly 200 new town and community revitalization projects for existing cities, towns and neighborhoods. The firm's work on Seaside was the first authentic new town to be built successfully in the United States in the last 45 years. In 1989 Time selected Seaside as one of the 10 "Best of the Decade" achievements in the field of design. The firm's method of integrating design with accompanying design codes and regulations is currently being applied in towns and cities in areas ranging from 14 to 10,000 acres throughout the United States and Canada.

-- Laurel Reuter, Director, North Dakota Museum of Art.

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RECEPTION WILL HONOR SANDY WIPER

A going away reception will be held for Sandy Wiper, Human Resource and Domestic Violence Program Coordinator, on Thursday, June 25, from 2 to 3:30 p.m., in the Riverdale Room of the Community Center. There will be refreshments.

-- Suzanne Gandrud, UND Police.

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NDPEA SETS MEETING

The North Dakota Public Employees Association, Grand Forks Chapter 49, will meet Thursday, June 25, at 5 p.m. in the North Dakota Public Employees Association office, 311 South Fourth St., Suite 202, in the Rivers Edge Building (formerly the Post Office Building downtown).

Topics of discussion will include Gov. Schafer's 95 percent budget cut, NDPEA's strategy, and a report on meetings with NDEA President Max Laird.

-- Eileen Nelson, Central Legal Research, 777-2841.

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RECEPTION WILL HONOR ELAINE DUNLAP

Please join us in wishing Elaine Dunlap, KFJM/KUND, farewell at a reception Friday, June 26, from 2 to 4 p.m. at 314 Cambridge St., second floor. Elaine will begin enjoying her retirement at the end of June after 28 years of service to the station. All are invited to attend.

-- Hilary Bertsch, KUND.

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MICROBIOLOGY PLANS SEMINAR

The Department of Microbiology and Immunology will hold a seminar, "In Vitro Growth and Detection of Cryptosporidium Parvum" presented by Liqun Wang (M.S. thesis defense), Monday, June 29, at 10 a.m. in 3001 Medicine and Health Sciences.

-- Microbiology and Immunology.

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LINGUISTICS INSTITUTE PLANS COLLOQUIUMS

The Summer Institute of Linguistics (SIL) will hold two colloquiums. On Tuesday, June 30, at 8 p.m. in Room 9, Gamble Hall, "Language Vitality Assessments," will be presented by Mark Karan, SIL and UND. On Tuesday, July 7, at 8 p.m. in Room 9, Gamble Hall, "Bora Classifiers: Their Use and Grammatical Status," will be presented by David Weber, SIL.

Call me at 777-5714 for more information.

-- Tim Pulju, Summer Institute of Linguistics.

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RECEPTION WILL HONOR LORNA JACOBSON

A farewell reception for Lorna Jacobson, President's Office, will be held Tuesday, June 30, from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Alumni Center. Lorna, who served the University for 25 years, will be enjoying retirement at the lake. The University community is invited.

-- Kendall Baker, President.

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LESSONS AT LUNCH SERIES OFFERED

The Lessons at Lunch series is again offered this summer by the Memorial Union. This series is a collection of fun and informative sessions of interest to staff, faculty, and students. All sessions are free and will run from noon to 1 p.m. Wednesdays in the Leadership Inspiration Center of the Memorial Union. Call 777-3926 to register for any or all of the sessions.

July 1, "Better Photography for Amateurs," presented by Lynda Kenney (Communication); July 8, "Finding Your Roots," presented by Sandy Slater (Chester Fritz Library); July 15, "You Work Hard for Your Money -- Does It Work Hard for You?" presented by Tanya Kuntz (Merrill Lynch); and July 22, "It's Never Too Late to Have a Happy Childhood," presented by Cynthia Thompson (Memorial Union).

Please feel free to bring your lunch.

-- Cynthia Thompson, Coordinator, Leadership Inspiration Center.

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CAMPUS WILL HOLD OPEN HOUSE SEPT. 20

President Ken Baker has announced that the University of North Dakota will hold an Open House from 1 to 7 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 20, modeled on the "Friends and Neighbors Day" held annually at the Grand Forks Air Force Base. A committee is being formed to plan the event, which will feature a number of family friendly events on campus as well as opportunities for the public to see various aspects of the University's academic and service operation. More details of the event will be announced over the summer. Dave Vorland, Executive Assistant to the President, telephone 777-2121, is chair of the planning committee, while Rita Galloway of the Office of University Relations, telephone 777-4194, is the open house coordinator.

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OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

JAMES HANLEY WILL CHAIR FARGO INTERNAL MEDICINE

James Hanley, associate professor of internal medicine and director of the Internal Medicine Residency Program at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences Fargo campus, has been named chair of the school's Department of Internal Medicine. The appointment was effective June 1. He replaces Charles Foulks, who resigned to accept a position with Scott and White Clinic in Temple, Texas.

Part of Hanley's new role is to oversee the internal medicine educational experience for medical students who learn from physicians serving as the school's faculty members in clinics and hospitals throughout the state. He joined the UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences faculty in the fall of 1996 after serving many years with the U.S. Army, both at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, and Fitzsimmons Army Medical Center in Denver. In 1997, he was selected to receive the Laureate Award from the American College of Physicians (ACP) for the Army Chapter. The award generally given to fellows and masters of the ACP who have demonstrated a commitment to excellence in medical care, education, research and service to their communities, regions and the ACP.

-- H. David Wilson, Dean, School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

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MEDICAL SCHOOL NAMES FARGO APPOINTMENTS

Four physicians and medical educators with the School of Medicine and Health Sciences have been appointed to leadership positions for the school's Southeast Campus, based in Fargo. Medical students and resident-physicians are trained at MeritCare Health System, Dakota Heartland Health System, the Veterans Administration Medical Center and Southeast Human Service Center.

They will assume duties of Richard Olafson, currently assistant dean for the Fargo campus and associate dean for veterans affairs. He is retiring June 30 after a career in medical education that spans more than three decades.

The practicing physicians, whose appointments are effective July 1, will serve part-time in their new roles with the school. They are:

Bruce Pitts (Internal Medicine), executive partner of system and clinical support services, MeritCare, associate dean for the Southeast Campus;

William Newman (Internal medicine), an internist with the Fargo Veterans Administration Medical Center, assistant dean for veterans affairs;

Steffen Christensen (Obstetrics and Gynecology), director of reproductive endocrinology at MeritCare, assistant dean for students on the Southeast Campus, and

Mark Tieszen (Internal Medicine) a critical care medicine physician with MeritCare, director of the Transitional Residency Program, a one-year program of training for physicians.

-- H. David Wilson, Dean, School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

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DOCTORAL EXAMS SET FOR THREE CANDIDATES

The final examination for Wendy C. Perryman, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Anatomy and Cell Biology, is set for 9 a.m. Tuesday, June 30, in Room B710, Edwin C. James Medical Research Facility. The dissertation title is "Temporally-Regulated Gene Expression in the Embryonic Rat Thoracic Spinal Cord." Kenneth Ruit (Anatomy and Cell Biology) is the committee chair.

The final examination for Barbara Wonder Olson, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Teaching and Learning, is set for 10 a.m. Tuesday, June 30, in Room 104E, Education Building. The dissertation title is "Understanding Coice as a Dimension of Literature Based Reading Instruction." Deanna Strackbein (Teaching and Learning) is the committee chair.

The final examination for Elizabeth A. Laverdure-McDougall, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Teaching and Learning, is set for 3 p.m. Thursday, July 9, in Room 104, Education Building. The dissertation title is "A Critical Study of Informal and Incidental learning Within an American Indian Community." Janet Ahler (Educational Foundations) is the committee chair.

Members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

-- Harvey Knull, Dean, Graduate School.

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GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

EPSCoR SEEKS DEFENSE PROPOSALS

The Department of Defense (DoD) has recently announced the DEPSCoR (Department of Defense Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research) Awards Program for the fiscal year 1999. Each of the 18 EPSCoR states is eligible to apply for up to $5,000,000 for three years. DoD requires that each state submit its proposal from the State EPSCoR Steering Committee. Each EPSCoR state proposal must consist of no more than 15 separate fundable proposals.

There are four DoD sponsors: U. S. Army Research Office, Office of Naval Research, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization. Research projects are open to all technical topics listed in the sponsors' research announcements.*

Some key points from the official announcement follow:

* DoD may select or reject an entire state proposal package or fund only sections of a state proposal.

* Multiple institution or multiple investigator research projects that are not fully integrated to address one focused issue are not normally funded and are discouraged.

* Given the intent of the DEPSCoR program to build infrastructure, DEPSCoR can provide more funding for critical research-infrastructure elements than traditional, single investigator awards.

Principal investigators must list the appropriate agency division/directorate and/or technical area on the cover sheet. This could be a critical factor in ensuring that the proposal is reviewed by the appropriate DoD sponsor. Principal investigators (PIs) should consult the agency web pages (addresses below) and their university research office (addresses below).

Primary evaluation criteria (of equal importance):

1. Scientific and technical merits of the proposed research.

2. The potential contributions of the proposed research to the defense missions of the participating agencies.

3. The likelihood of the proposed effort to develop new or enhance existing research capabilities and to broaden the university research base in support of national defense, and the potential to contribute to the education of future scientists and engineers in disciplines critical to the DoD mission.

Other evaluation criteria include (of lesser importance, but equal to each other):

4. The qualifications, capabilities, experience, and past research accomplishments of the proposed PI, team leader or key personnel who are critical to achieving the objectives of the proposal.

5. The proposed involvement and interaction with DoD or other federal laboratories, industry or other existing research centers of excellence.

6. The realism and reasonableness of cost, cost sharing, and availability of funds.

These awards are three-year, non-renewable grants expected to be in the 100K/yr range. North Dakota must provide a 50 percent match. This match may be comprised of 1. waiver of indirect costs; 2. graduate student tuition waiver; 3. up to two months of faculty time per academic year; and, 4. cash. Budgets must be approved by the PI's university administration and ND EPSCoR.

A synopsis, e.g., PI, tentative title and a paragraph or two about the proposed research (limit: one page), to be used only to aid in the selection of a review panel, is due by noon Tuesday, June 30 (fax is ok: (701)231-7947. This is not required for participation in the DEPSCoR program.

The complete formal principal investigator proposals (five copies) are due in one of the ND EPSCoR Offices by noon Monday, Aug. 3. Following an external peer review process, no more than 15 proposals will be chosen and returned to the PIs for a final update of the proposal. The deadline for submission of the final version (11 copies - original plus 10) of the selected proposals to one of the ND EPSCoR offices is noon Monday, Aug. 31. ND EPSCoR will coordinate the state's submission to DoD.

Format

Each separate DEPSCoR proposal must be prepared in accordance with guidelines* described in the Department of Defense Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (DEPSCoR) FY99. Please note that DoD requires that an appropriate Technical Point of Contact be given on the cover page.**

* The announcements and guidelines may be obtained at UND from the Office of Research and Development (105 Twamley Hall) and the ND EPSCoR Office (415 Twamley Hall). They are also available on the web at the following addresses:

http://www.aro.army.mil/research/dep99wp.htm (DEPSCoR Announcement), http://www.aro.ncren.net (Army Research Office), http://www.onr.navy.mil (Office of Naval Research), http://web.fie.com/fedix/afosr.html (Air Force Office of Scientific Research), and http://www.acq.osd.mil/bmdo/bmdolink/html/bmdolink.html (Ballistic Missile Defense Organization).

** Copies of the official cover sheet as well as blank budget sheets are available from the EPSCoR office.

-- Philip Boudjouk, Professor of Chemistry and Project Director, ND EPSCoR, NDSU, (701) 231-8601 or 8400, Fax (701)231-7947, http://quantum.chem.ndsu.nodak.edu/ndsuchem/faculty/boudjouk/boudjouk.html http://www.ndsu.nodak.edu/epscor/.

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ENERGY-RELATED INNOVATION GRANTS AVAILABLE

Independent researchers and small businesses which have promising energy-related inventions can receive an up to $100,000 grant from the Department of Energy's Inventions and Innovations Program. The program is meant to encourage the innovation and commercialization of energy-related inventions, specifically those which develop and promote cost-effective energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies within the building, industrial, transportation, and utility sectors.

The grants from the Department of Energy will be provided at two levels, up to $40,000 or up to $100,000, depending on the invention's stage of product development. The financial assistance is intended to support the research and technical development of the innovation. Those ideas that have significant potential energy impact and a future commercial market are given priority. DOE will also provide non-financial support to awardees in the form of assistance with business development and commercialization planning.

Research in the areas of nuclear power generation, remediation of sites, treatment or storage of nuclear or mixed wastes resulting from nuclear power generation or remediation of sites, weapons, games, toys and software are excluded from consideration for this grant program.

North Dakota innovators are encouraged to apply for the grants. The DOE program is a nationally competitive program, and therefore, it is recommended that time and effort be committed to the proposal. Grant applications must be received by the Department of Energy no later than Friday, July 31.

Applications for the Inventions and Innovation Program are available through the Center for Innovation in Grand Forks. If you would like an application or additional information on the DOE or SBIR grant program, contact the Center at (701) 777-3132.

-- Bruce Gjovig, Director, Center for Innovation.

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NSF ENCOURAGES MULTIDISCIPLINARY ACTIVITIES

In February 1995, the Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences (MPS) established the Office of Multidisciplinary Activities (OMA) and charged it with facilitating and supporting opportunities that cross traditional disciplinary boundaries. This office works with the five MPS divisions - Astronomical Sciences, Chemistry, Materials Research, Mathematical Sciences, and Physics - to respond to proposals from the community that, because of their subject, scope, or multi-investigator or multidisciplinary nature of the activity, do not readily fit the pre-existing MPS program structure.

OMA is open to creative ideas from all segments of the MPS community, ranging from individual investigators to centers. It especially encourages initiatives by multi-investigator, multidisciplinary teams pursuing problems on a scale that exceeds the capacity of individual investigators. OMA is particularly receptive to projects incorporating education and research training experiences that contribute to a diverse, quality workforce with technical and professional skills, career path flexibility, and appetite for lifelong learning appropriate to the dynamic, global science and technology enterprise of the 21st century.

In addition to encouraging creative proposals from the community, OMA can help divisions identify areas of research and education that are seen as particularly timely and promising. These areas are identified through interactions of the divisions with their communities via workshops and conferences; through interactive partnerships between MPS and other parts of NSF; and through interactions between MPS and other agencies.

Three areas which OMA expects to emphasize in FY 1999 for co-investment with MPS divisions are the following:

* The development of next-generation instrumentation to enable fundamental advances within disciplines and across disciplinary boundaries.

* Innovations in education, particularly at the graduate and undergraduate levels, that broaden the backgrounds and strengthen the technical, professional, and personal skills of graduates.

* Creative ideas that address important research problems at the interface between the MPS disciplines and biological sciences addressing significant research and instrumentation challenges in the bio- and biomedical related sciences and other appropriate venues.

The MPS divisions and OMA welcome the opportunity to discuss your ideas with you. Dr. Henry Blount heads the OMA and can be reached at 703-306-1946 or by e-mail at hblount@nsf.gov or contact any program director in the MPS Divisions.

-- Sally Eckert-Tilotta, Assistant to the Director, Office of Research and Program Development.

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RESEARCH, GRANT OPPORTUNITIES LISTED

Following are research and grant opportunities. For more information, contact the Office of Research and Program Development at 777-4278.

JAPAN SOCIETY FOR THE PROMOTION OF SCIENCE (JSPS)

Postdoctoral Fellowships for Foreign Researchers provide opportunities for young foreign researchers to conduct cooperative research with leading research groups in universities and other Japanese institutions, permitting them to advance their research while stimulating Japanese academic circles through close collaboration. Fellowships are awarded for 12-24 month periods. All fields within the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, engineering, and medicine are included when applications are from Japanese host researchers. Fields of research are specified or limited when applica- tions are through a Foreign Nominating Authority. Application may be made through the host or through various foreign nominating authorities. The NSF and NIH Fogarty International Center are the U.S. nominating authorities.

Invitation Fellowship Programs for Research in Japan: Short-Term Program allows Japanese scientists to invite researchers from other countries to Japan to participate in cooperative activities. The purpose is to invite senior scientists (including university professors) to participate in discussions, attend seminars, give lectures, or perform similar duties for 14-60 days. All fields of the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences are included. Applications must be submitted to JSPS by the Japanese scientist through the head of his/her institution. Foreign scientists are advised to establish contact with a Japanese researcher.

Contact: Head, Foreign Fellowship Division, +81-3-3263-1721; fax +81-3-3263-1854; http://www.jsps.go.jp/. Deadlines: 9/1/98, 5/1/99.

The Invitation Fellowship Programs for Research in Japan: Long-Term Program allows Japanese scientists to invite researchers from other countries to Japan to participate in cooperative research work for 6-10 months. All fields of the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences are included in this program. Applications must be submitted by the Japanese scientist through the head of his/her institution. Foreign scientists are advised to establish contact with a Japanese researcher. Contact: See above. Deadline: 9/1/98.

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COUNCIL FOR INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE OF SCHOLARS (CIES)

The Fulbright Program: Middle East/North Africa/South Asia Regional Research Program provides awards to college and university faculty, independent scholars, and established practitioners in professional fields for research in any academic or professional field in at least two of the following countries/areas: Bahrain, Bangladesh, Egypt, India, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Morocco, Nepal, Oman, Pakistan, Palestinian National Authority (Gaza or West Bank), Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sri Lanka, Syria, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, and Yemen. Fields for research include, but are not limited to, architecture; area studies of the Middle East, North Africa, or South Asia; biological sciences; environmental sciences; humanities; medical sciences; physical sciences; and social sciences. Projects may be comparative or regional in scope and may treat contemporary or historical topics. Preference is given to those who have not previously participated in the program and do not have substantial recent experience abroad. Award amounts vary from country to country. Duration is 3-9 months. Deadline: 8/1/98. Contact: Gary L. Garrison, 202/686-4019; mesa1@ciesnet.cies.org; or Homa Rafiq, 202/686-4018; mesa3@ciesnet.cies.org; http://www.cies.org.

The Fulbright Program: Latin America and the Caribbean provides awards to U.S. citizens for research and lectureships in various disciplines in the following countries of Latin America and the Caribbean: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Trinidad/Tobago, Uruguay, and Venezuela. Distinguished lecturing awards are targeted at those with outstanding reputations in their fields; a national standing is normally required. Junior lecturing awards are targeted at recent Ph.D. recipients and scholars at an early stage in their careers, or, in some cases, where the doctorate is not required. Duration ranges from 2-10 months. Deadline: 8/1/98. Contact: Ralph A. Blessing, 202/686-6236, la3@ciesnet.cies.org; Amelia Sauders, 202/686-6233, la6@ciesnet.cies.org; or cies1@ciesnet.cies.org; http://www.cies.org.

The Fulbright Program: Middle East and North Africa provides awards to U.S. citizens for research and lectureships in various disciplines in Bahrain, Egypt, Gaza, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, West Bank, and Yemen. Amounts and durations of awards vary from country to country. Serial grants allow scholars to conduct research and/or lecturing over 2-3 years with an annual short-term visit to the host country. Junior lecturing awards are targeted at recent Ph.D. recipients and scholars at an early stage in their careers, or, in some cases, where the doctorate is not required. Awards vary in duration from 2-12 months. Deadline: 8/1/98. Contact: 202/686-4000; cies1@ciesnet.cies.org; http://www.cies.org.

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SOCIETY OF FELLOWS IN THE HUMANITIES POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIPS

Fellowships of $30,000 each are provided to strengthen the intellectual and academic qualifications of fellows by enabling them to associate with teaching scholars in the University; involving them in teaching interdisciplinary programs of general education and innovative courses of their own design; and affording them time and resources to develop independent scholarship within a broadening educational and professional context. Eligible applicants are individuals who have received the Ph.D. in a subject in the humanities between January 1, 1993 and July 1, 1999. Mellon fellows are appointed at a rank equivalent to that of lecturer. Major cultures fellowships focus on teaching and research of the cultures and civilizations of Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. Appointments are for one year. Deadline: 10/15/98. Contact: Director, 212/854-4631; fax 212/662-7289.

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NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION (NASA)

NASA encourages submission of unique and innovative unsolicited proposals which will further the Agency's mission. Kennedy Space Center research interests include artificial intelligence/expert systems, atmospheric science, CELSS research, communications/fiber optics, computer-aided engineering, computer science, earth sciences advanced programs, engineering advanced programs, flight hardware evaluation, fluids, industrial/business management, industrial engineering, instrumentation and hazardous gas monitoring, life sciences, life sciences education, material science, remote monitoring and control, quality engineering, and systems safety. Contact: Industry Assistance and Acquisition Management Staff, 407/867-3494.

Headquarters supports research in the following areas: Office of Space Flight: space station, space shuttle; Office of Aeronautics: critical technologies, high performance aircraft and flight projects, high performance computing, high-speed research, subsonic transportation; Office of Space Science: astro- physics, information systems, solar system exploration, space physics; Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications: life and biomedical sciences and applications, microgravity sciences and applications; Office of Space Access and Technology, Office of Mission to Planet Earth: earth, atmospheric, oceanographic science and applications, and education. Contact: Attn: Code CMC.

Deadline: None, but funding availability is greater at the start of the government's fiscal year, which begins October 1. Contact: http://web.fie.com/htdoc/fed/nas/any/any/text/any/nastunso.htm.

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UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA

The Walker Cowen Memorial Prize is presented biennially to the author of a scholarly, booklength manuscript in Eighteenth Century Studies in history, literature, philosophy, or the arts. The author is awarded $3,000 and the manuscript is published by the University Press of Virginia. To be considered for the 1998 award, manuscripts should be submitted in triplicate no later than 9/1/98. Unrevised dissertations are not eligible. Manuscripts will not be returned. Contact: Cowen Award Judges, 804/924-3468; fax 804/982-2655; mmm5w@Virginia.edu; http://www.virginia.edu/. Deadline: 9/1/98.

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AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION

The Research Scholar-in-Residence award provides financial support, on a full-time basis, for an individual to conduct specific research activities on the higher education experience of women including topics of institutional culture, transitions to work, technology/distance learning, mentoring in nontraditional fields, persistence, and diversity. The Scholar will be expected to spend time in Washington, D.C. and to interact with staff and board members, but formal residence in Washington is not required. Up to $45,000 is provided for up to 12 months. Preference will be given to candi- dates with a demonstrated knowledge of and experience with women's issues in higher education and those with 3-5 years experience in research and/or information analysis. To be considered, submit a 5-page proposal; resume; salary requirement; and names, addresses, and telephone numbers of three professional references. Contact: 202/728-7602; fax 202/872-1425; foundation@mail.aauw.org; http://www.aauw.org/. Deadline: 9/15/98.

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NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES (NEH)

Materials Development Grants support development of materials for national dissemination that will have a significant impact on humanities instruction. Such products may be print or electronic, but may not ordinarily include textbooks. Curricular Development and Demonstration Grants support curriculum and materials development efforts; faculty study programs within and among educational institutions; and conferences and networks of institutions. Of special interest are projects that help teachers use the new electronic technologies to enhance students' understanding of humanities subjects. Dissemination and Diffusion Grants support projects to extend the reach and impact of promising and significant new developments in humanities education. Projects may include presentations, publications, workshops, conferences, visitor programs, and networks of collaborating institutions. Proposals should indicate the projects' national educational significance and should include plans to disseminate the results broadly to pertinent institutions and faculty throughout the country. Teaching with Technology projects are eligible in this category as well as projects that utilize electronic technology only in certain aspects of their work. Projects that seek to disseminate humanities learning through national seminars and institutes should apply to the Seminars and Institutes program. Projects may be designed for up to 3 years' duration. Contact: 202/606-8380; research@neh.fed.us; http://www.neh.fed.us/. Deadline: 10/15/98.

Education Development and Demonstration Grants, including "next semester" Humanities Focus Grants, support curriculum and materials development efforts, faculty study programs within and among educational institutions, and conferences and networks of institutions. NEH is interested in projects that help teachers use new electronic technologies to enhance students' understanding of humanities subjects. 'Humanities' includes, but is not limited to, the study of: language, both modern and classical; linguistics; literature; history; jurisprudence; philosophy; archaeology; comparative religion; ethics; the history, criticism and theory of the arts; those aspects of social sciences which have humanistic content and employ humanistic methods; and the study and application of the humanities to the human environment with particular attention to reflecting our diverse heritage, traditions, and history and to the relevance of the humanities to the current conditions of national life. Contact: 202/606-8380; education@neh.fed.us; http://www.neh.fed.us/. Deadlines: 10/15/98 (Education Development and Demonstration Grants); 4/15/99 (Humanities Focus Grants).

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NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS (NEA)

The purpose of Education & Access projects is to expand opportunities for educational experiences in the arts for Americans of all ages, and help make the arts available to all Americans. Projects can focus on access, education, or both. Access Projects seek to expose the widest public to excellence in the arts, while broadening understanding and appreciation of our heritage and culture. Participants are exposed to art forms, genres, or artistic processes, often heightening their appreciation and awareness, particularly among those whose opportunities to participate in the arts may have been limited by educational, geographic, ethnic, or economic constraints. Education Projects, regardless of the ages of the learners or the setting, involve the systematic engagement of participants to increase their knowledge of and/or skills in the arts. NEA regards the direct involvement of artists and, where appropriate, the use of original works of art, as crucial project elements. Projects may be interdisciplinary and/or multidisciplinary and involve partnerships with both arts and non-arts institutions or organizations. Applications which propose new approaches and have the potential to serve as model projects are encouraged. Grants range from $5,000-$200,000 and require a match of at least 1 to 1. Contact: Nancy Hanks Center, 202/682-5438; fax 202/682-5002 or 202/682-5612; http://arts.endow.gov/. Deadline: 8/03/98.

-- Sally Eckert-Tilotta, Assistant to the Director of Research and Program Development.

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BILLBOARD

JULY 3 IS HOLIDAY

In accordance with State Board of Higher Education directives, Friday, July 3, will be observed as Independence Day by faculty and staff members of the University. Only those employees designated by their department heads will be required to work on this holiday.

-- Marlene Strathe, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, and Diane Nelson, Director, Personnel Services.

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CHESTER FRITZ LIBRARY:

The Chester Fritz Library hours for the Independence Day holiday are: Thursday, July 2, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Friday, July 3, closed; Saturday, July 4, closed; Sunday, July 5, closed.

-- Karen Cloud, Chester Fritz Library.

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COMPUTER CENTER:

The Computer Center will close for the Independence Day holiday at midnight Thursday, July 2, and will reopen at midnight Friday, July 3.

-- Marv Hanson, Associate Director, Computer Center.

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MEMORIAL UNION:

All Memorial Union areas will be closed Friday through Sunday, July 3-5. The hours for Thursday, July 2, are: Lifetime Sports Center: 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Info Center: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Service Center: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Copy Stop: 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Union Food Court: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Bookstore: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Administrative Office: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Craft Center/Sign and Design Studio: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Dining Center Office: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Barber Shop: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Corner Deli: closed; University Learning Center: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Computer Learning: 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.; and Building Hours: 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

-- Marsha Nelson, Facilities Coordinator, Memorial Union.

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CREDIT UNION:

The Credit Union will be closed Friday, July 3, to observe Independence Day. The Twamley Hall location and the Service Center location on South Washington will both be closed. The Ducks are here. Adoption papers are available at the Credit Union for the sixth annual Great Red River Duck Race. Adopt your duck early.

-- George Meister, Manager, University Federal Credit Union.

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ADMISSIONS AND RECORDS OFFICE WILL CHANGE NAME

On July 1, the Office of Admissions and Records will become the Office of the Registrar. Alice Poehls will assume the title of University Registrar; Carmen Williams will be the Associate Registrar and Mary Bergstrom will be the Assistant Registrar.

-- Alice Poehls, Director, Admissions and Records.

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ODEGARD SCHOOL RECEIVES AWARD

The FAA has announced that the John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences will receive the agency's 1998 Excellence in Aviation award. FAA officials will travel to Grand Forks to present the award to the school in an official ceremony. Details of the presentation ceremony will be announced soon.

Aviation weather research conducted at the John D. Odegard School of Aerospace contributed to the development of the Terminal Doppler Weather Radar, which is used to detect wind shear near airports. The aerospace school, which has conducted aviation research, education and training programs for over 30 years, participates in a FAA-sponsored research project to chart wind conditions at the Juneau, Alaska, airport.

-- John Odegard, UND Aerospace.

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UND TO DROP WRESTLING PROGRAM

The University has dropped its wrestling program as a result of mandated budget cuts. The move was announced by President Baker following a recommendation by the UND Intercollegiate Athletic Committee.

Dropping wrestling is part of the Athletic Department's plan to lower its operating budget by $95,000. "Nobody likes to make these kinds of decisions," said Terry Wanless, Director of Athletics. "A lot of thought went into the decision, but ultimately it was a decision we felt we had to make." The student-athletes involved with the wrestling program can stay at UND and maintain their scholarships or transfer to another school and be immediately eligible. UND, following the move, sponsors eight men's sports and eight women's sports.

-- Terry Wanless, Director of Athletics.

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ATHLETIC TEAMS POST 3.02 GPA

The athletic teams at the University combined for a 3.02 grade-point average, according to grades released from the Registrar's Office.

A total of 271 student-athletes carried GPAs of 3.0 or better with 44 of those having perfect 4.0 marks. There are a total of 446 student-athletes at UND. The Fighting Sioux athletic teams have posted 3.0 or better GPAs in three of the last four semesters.

Women's golf posted the highest GPA as its nine members compiled a 3.67 GPA. Here is a sport-by-sport breakdown:

          Sport     3.0-3.99 -- 4.00 -- Team GPA
Baseball            21   3    2.98
Men's Basketball         6    1    2.96
Women's Basketball  9    1    3.37
Men's Cross Country 6    2    2.87
Football            52   7    3.01
Men's Golf               5    0    2.70
Women's Golf        6    3    3.67
Hockey              10   0    2.80
Softball            6    1    2.94
Men's Swimming      10   2    2.71
Women's Swimming         14   4    3.23
Tennis              4    1    3.03
Men's Track              20   4    2.98
Women's Track       21   6    3.51
Volleyball               8    0    2.95
Wrestling           7    1    2.48
Cheerleading        13   6    2.99
Total Department         227  44   3.02

-- Terry Wanless, Director of Athletics.

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DeMERS RECEIVES PORTRAIT AWARD FROM CLASS OF 2000

Judy DeMers, Associate Dean for Student Affairs and Admissions at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences, received the Portrait Award from sophomore medical students. The award is given annually by second-year medical students to a faculty or staff member who has demonstrated extraordinary concern and willingness to help them achieve their goals. As part of the award recognition, a portrait of DeMers will be hung in the medical school.

-- H. David Wilson, Dean, School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

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PATTY DORSHER NAMED MANAGER OF HEALTH SCIENCES BOOKSTORE

Patty Dorsher has been named manager of the Health Sciences Bookstore. She transferred to her new position from the main UND Bookstore where she was supervisor in the division of school and office supplies. The Climax, Minn., native earned a bachelor of science degree at UND and has been employed by the UND Bookstore since 1990.

-- School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

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BOOKSTORES WILL CLOSE FOR INVENTORY

The Health Science Bookstore will be closed Tuesday, June 30, and the University Bookstore and the Aviator's Corner will be closed Wednesday, July 1, for inventory. We apologize for any inconvenience caused. We encourage all departments to make year-end purchases as soon as possible to avoid the rush. The University Bookstore will not be receiving any UPS freight June 30 or July 1.

-- Don Forbes, Manager, University Bookstore.

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U2 LISTS STAFF DEVELOPMENT COURSES

Unless otherwise noted, the following classes are all held at the Computer Learning Lab in 361 Upson II. All of the computer classes are free.

Introduction to Windows 95 -- July 6-9, 3:30 to 5 p.m. each day; July 20-22, 10 a.m. to noon each day; August 4-6, 1 to 3 p.m. each day; August 25-27, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. each day.

Introduction to Word Perfect 8.0 -- July 7-9, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. each day; August 25-27, 3 to 5 p.m. each day.

E-Mail Using Eudora Light -- July 9, 2 to 3:30 p.m.

Introduction to Access 97 -- August 11-13, 10 a.m. to noon each day.

Introduction to Word 97 -- July 14-16, 3 to 5 p.m. each day; August 11-13, 1 to 3 p.m. each day.

Explore the Web Using Netscape -- July 16, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.

Introduction to GroupWise 5.2 -- July 17, 9 to 11 a.m. July 27, 9 to 11 a.m.

Introduction to Power Point 97 -- July 20-22, 1 to 3 p.m. each day; August 4-6, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. each day.

Introduction to Excel -- August 18-20, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. each day.

Basic Mediation Seminar -- July 13-17, 8 to 5 p.m. each day; located at the Memorial Union. Registration deadline, June 29. Contact the Conflict Resolution Center at 777-3664 or udcrc@ badlands.nodak.edu.

Family Mediation Seminar -- August 3-7, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day. Registration deadline: July 20. Located at the Memorial Union. Call the Conflict Resolution Center at 777-3664 or send e-mail to udcrc@badlands.nodak.edu.

For more information, please call me.

-- Kara Hyde, University Within the University, 777-2128 or kara_hyde@mail.und.nodak.edu.

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MEDICAL BENEFIT RAFFLE SET TO AID DENICE SCHAFER

Denice Schafer, a 19-year UND employee, has been receiving long-term cancer treatment, not covered by insurance, in California. She has worked at Biomedical Research and is currently employed at the Human Nutrition Research Center. She is also affiliated with the Conflict Resolution Center as a center member and serves on their governing board. Denice has returned to work part-time, but will continue to return to California for monthly treatments. To help Denice with the expenses incurred for these treatments, a benefit raffle, sponsored by the Greater Grand Forks Jaycees, will be held Wednesday, July 15. Local businesses have donated 30 prizes. These prizes include meals, entertainment, services and other items. Tickets are one dollar and are available by contacting Laura Idso (795-8375) or Kay Keehr (795-8491).

-- Kay Keehr and Laura Idso, Human Nutrition Research Center.

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CALL POLICE TO CLAIM LOST BICYCLES

To claim lost or abandoned bicycles, call UND Police at 777-3491 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday with a description. A form of identification is required.

-- Lee Sundby, Central Receiving.

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ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

NEW NORTH DAKOTA QUARTERLY AVAILABLE

The latest issue of North Dakota Quarterly is now available in the University Bookstore, the North Dakota Museum of Art, and the Urban Stampede. The single issue is $8, and subscriptions for four attractive and absorbing issues remain at $25 a year.

This issue features seven essays, five stories, nine poems, and 11 book reviews.

Featured in the current issue are stories by Patricia Hackbarth and Thomas Jenz, poems by Katherine Soniat, Robert DeMott, and Alane Rollings, and essays by Lou F. Caton, William Brevda, and Herman Asarnow, as well as several other essays, stories, and poems. Book reviews included in this issue are written by Scott Lowe (Philosophy and Religion), Jane Varley (English), Mary Ellen Caldwell (English), Robert Lewis (English), and alumna Jill Gidmark.

The cover is from a color etching by Linda Whitney, a University graduate in Visual Arts who now teaches at Valley City State University.

-- Robert Lewis, Editor, North Dakota Quarterly.

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NORTH DAKOTA MUSEUM OF ART OPEN JULY 4

The Museum of Art will remain open over the entire July 4 weekend to accommodate all those interested in seeing the "Under the Whelming Tide" exhibition. The Museum Coffee Bar will be open regular hours on Friday, July 3. This exhibit is co-curated by Director Laurel Reuter and Herald photographer Eric Hylden, and includes 161 photographs about the flood of 1997. Adam Kemp's "Flood Wall" fills the East Gallery and Barton Benes' "Ebb Tide" is in the West Gallery.

Hours are as usual, Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m. There is no admission charge; however, donations are welcome.

-- Marsy Schroeder, North Dakota Museum of Art.

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YOUNG ARTISTS FEATURED IN MUSIC SERIES

In the next program of Summer Music at the Museum, the spotlight will be on a group of talented young musicians. An Evening of Young Artists will take place Tuesday, June 30, at 7:30 p.m. at the North Dakota Museum of Art.

Pianist Kaley Budge of East Grand Forks will open the program. Budge was a finalist in the 1998 Young Artists Competition of the Greater Grand Forks Symphony Orchestra. The SPA Vocal Arts Ensemble, directed by Tom Young, will present a selection of English and Irish folk songs. Students from this year's Summer Performing Arts Company, a program of the Grand Forks Public Schools, will also preview songs from one of this summer's music theatre productions, "West Side Story."

Summer Music at the Museum is a series of informal recitals presenting a variety of artists from the region on Tuesday evenings through July 21. There is no admission charge, but contributions in support of the series are encouraged.

-- Marsy Schroeder, North Dakota Museum of Art.

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M.F.A. EXHIBITION BY FLEXHAUG OPENS JUNE 29

"Sculptural Furniture," a Master of Fine Arts exhibition by Curtis S. Flexhaug, will open with a reception Monday, June 29, from 7 to 9 p.m. in the Hughes Fine Arts Center Gallery. The show will run through Friday, July 10. Flexhaug has a website at www.und.nodak.edu/misc/cflexhau.

-- Jan Orvik, Editor, University Letter, for the Department of Visual Arts.

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CRAFT CENTER PLANS CHILDREN'S ACTIVITIES

KinderART, a multi media arts and crafts experience for children ages 5-7 years, will be held in four parts, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Monday and Tuesday, July 27 and 28, and 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Thursday and Friday, July 30 and 31, at the University Craft Center on third floor of the Memorial Union. Registration fee is $24 (or $18 for children of UND students with UND Student ID card). All supplies will be provided for a wide range of activities including drawing, painting, fiberarts, clay, sculpture and more. For a registration form or more information, call the Craft Center at 777-3979. Craft Center summer hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. Register early; enrollment is limited to 12 participants. Registrations will be accepted as space allows until 4 p.m. Friday, July 17.

-- Bonnie Solberg, Craft Center Coordinator.

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LAST WEDNESDAY OF MONTH IS DENIM DAY

Denim Day for July is Wednesday, July 29. Pay your dollar, wear your button, and enjoy "going casual" on a Wednesday. All proceeds go to charity, of course.

-- Patsy Nies (Student Affairs) for the Denim Day Committee.

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EVENTS CALENDAR

JUNE 1998 (Please contact Mavis at the Office of University Relations, Box 7144, or call 777-4304, if you wish to make changes or have an event included.)

Through Fri., July 17 -- GETTING STARTED 98 PROGRAM, an advisement and registration program for fall semester new freshmen, Gamble Hall, 8:25 a.m. to 3 p.m.; call 777-4706 for more information.

Through Fri., July 31 -- SUMMER INSTITUTE OF LINGUISTICS, UND campus; contact David Marshall (English) or Stephen Marlett (800) 292-1621 or e-mail steve.marlett@sil.org for more information.

Through Tues., July 28 -- 43RD ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL MUSIC CAMP AND MUSIC DIRECTOR'S WORKSHOPS, International Peace Garden; call Joseph Alme, Director, at (701) 838-8472 for more information.

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Wed., June 24 -- RECEPTION to honor Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Marlene Strathe, who is leaving the University June 30 to take a similar position at the University of Northern Colorado in Greeley, Alumni Center, 9:30 to 11 a.m.

Wed., June 24 -- RETIREMENT RECEPTION for Dale Vetter, Director of the Computer Center who retires after 32 years of service, Alumni Center, 2 to 4 p.m., with a short program at 2:30 p.m.

Wed., June 24 -- DENIM DAY, take advantage of this opportunity to "go casual" simply by wearing your button and paying your dollar; all proceeds go to charity.

Thurs., June 25 -- LAST DAY TO ADD A COURSE FOR SECOND SIX-WEEK SUMMER SESSION.

Thurs., June 25 -- SLIDE LECTURE, Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, one of the founders of the New Urbanism movement, will speak about redeveloping existing neighborhoods and designing neighborhood concepts into new developments, North Dakota Museum of Art, 7:30 a.m. breakfast; free and open to the public.

Thurs., June 25 -- UNIVERSITY WITHIN THE UNIVERSITY CLASS, "Introduction to HTML," 361 Upson Hall II, 9:30 a.m. to noon; call 777-2128 to register.

Thurs., June 25 -- GOING AWAY RECEPTION for Sandy Wiper, Human Resource and Domestic Violence Program Coordinator, Riverdale Room, Community Center, 2 to 3:30 p.m.

Thurs., June 25 -- MEETING, North Dakota Public Employees Association, Grand Forks Chapter 49, North Dakota Public Employees Association office, 311 S Fourth St., suite 202, Rivers Edge Building (formerly the Post Office Building downtown), 5 p.m.

Thurs. And Fri., June 25-26 -- MUSEUM DESIGN FORUM will feature Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, Dean of the School of Architecture at the University of Miami, who has embraced New Urbanism at its spiritual core, North Dakota Museum of Art; call 777-4195 for information.

Fri., June 26 -- RETIREMENT RECEPTION honoring Elaine Dunlap for 28 years of service to KFJM/KUND, 314 Cambridge St., second floor, 2 to 4 p.m.

Mon., June 29 -- MICROBIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY SEMINAR, "In Vitro Growth and Detection of Cryptosporidium Parvum" presented by Liqun Wang (M.S. Thesis Defense), 3001 Medicine and Health Sciences, 10 a.m.

Mon., June 29 -- OPENING RECEPTION for Master of Fine Arts exhibition, "Sculptural Furniture," by Curtis S. Flexhaug, Hughes Fine Arts Center Gallery, 7 to 9 p.m.; show will run through Friday, July 10.

Mon., June 29, through Fri., July 10 -- SUMMER ART CAMP FOR KIDS, Session 2 for grades 4-6 with cartoonist Aaron Brudvig from Dickinson and fiber artist Diane Paulson of Grand Forks; North Dakota Museum of Art, UND campus; fee is $75 for Museum members and $100 for Museum non-members per child, per session; call the Museum at 777-4195 to register; The Bremer Foundation is sponsoring scholarships for children impacted by the flood.

Tues., June 30 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for Wendy C. Perryman, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Anatomy and Cell Biology, Room B710, Edwin C. James Medical Research Facility, 9 a.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Tues., June 30 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for Barbara Wonder Olson, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Teaching and Learning, Room 104E, Education Building, 10 a.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Tues., June 30 -- SUMMER CONCERT SERIES, an evening of young artists, North Dakota Museum of Art, 7:30 p.m.; every Tuesday evening through July 21 the Museum will sponsor a light summer concert featuring musicians from Minnesota, Wisconsin, and North Dakota; no admission charge, however a $5 donation is encouraged for those over 12 years of age; call 777-4195 for information.

Tues., June 30 -- HEALTH SCIENCE BOOKSTORE will be closed for inventory.

Tues., June 30, through Thurs., July 2 -- UNIVERSITY WITHIN THE UNIVERSITY FREE CLASS, "Introduction to Power Point 97," 361 Upson Hall II, 10 a.m. to noon; call 777-2128 to register; also July 20-22 and aug. 4-6.

Tues., June 30 -- LINGUISTICS INSTITUTE COLLOQUIUM, "Language Vitality Assessments," presented by Mark Karan, SIL and UND, Room 9, Gamble Hall, 8 p.m.; call Tim Pulju at 777-5714 for more information.

Tues., June 30 -- SUMMER MUSIC AT THE MUSEUM SERIES, the evening features pianist Kaley Budge of East Grand Forks, finalist in the 1998 Young Artists Competition of the Greater Grand Forks Symphony Orchestra, the SPA Vocal Arts Ensemble and students from this year's Summer Performing Arts Company, North Dakota Museum of Art, 7:30 p.m.; there is no admission charge but contributions in support of the series are encouraged.

Tues., June 30 -- FAREWELL RECEPTION for Lorna Jacobson, President's Office, Alumni Center, 2 to 4 p.m.

JULY 1998

Through Fri., July 17 -- GETTING STARTED 98, advisement and registration for new freshmen, Gamble Hall.

Wed., July 1 -- MEETING, Institutional Review Board, 305 Twamley Hall, 4 p.m.; to consider all research proposals submitted to the Office of Research and Program Development before Monday, June 22.

Wed., July 1 -- NEW EMPLOYEE ORIENTATION for all new staff and faculty, 305 Twamley Hall, 1 p.m.; call Cheryl at 777-4361 or Pat at 777-4226 for more information.

Wed., July 1 -- UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE AND AVIATOR'S CORNER WILL BE CLOSED FOR INVENTORY.

Wed., July 1 -- LESSONS AT LUNCH SERIES, "Better Photography for Amateurs," presented by Lynda Kenney (Communication), Leadership Inspiration Center, memorial Union, noon to 1 p.m.; session is free; please feel free to bring your lunch.

Thurs., July 2 -- LAST DAY TO FILE PRELIMINARY APPROVAL OF THESIS OR DISSERTATION IN THE GRADUATE SCHOOL.

Fri., July 3 -- HOLIDAY, Independence Day.

Sun., July 5, through Wed., July 15 -- 15th INTERNATIONAL AEROSPACE CAMP for students ages 14-17 who have an interst or curiosity about the world of aerospace; contact Dawn Botsford at 777-2663 for more information (also July 19-29).

Mon. through Thurs., July 6-9 -- UNIVERSITY WITHIN THE UNIVERSITY FREE CLASS, "Introduction to Windows 95," 361 Upson Hall II, 3:30 to 5 p.m. each day; to register, contact Kara at 777-2128 or kara_hyde@mail.und.nodak.edu; also July 20-22, Aug. 4-6, and Aug. 25-27.

Mon., July 6, through Sun., July 12 -- FUTURE OF THE WATER PLANET EARTH CAMP, a week of activities for sixth to eighth grade students, teachers and parents; UND campus with field trips to Turtle River State Park and Canada; sponsored by Geology and Geological Engineering and the School of Engineering and Mines; call 777-6401 for information.

Tues., July 7 -- LINGUISTICS INSTITUTE COLLOQUIUM, "Bora Classifiers: Their Use and Grammatical Status," presented by David Weber, SIL, Room 9, Gamble Hall, 8 p.m.; call Tim Pulju at 777-5714 for more information.

Tues., July 7 -- SUMMER CONCERT SERIES, Lily Chia Brissman, pianist, North Dakota Museum of Art, 7:30 p.m.; every Tuesday evening through July 21 the Museum will sponsor a light summer concert featuring musicians from Minnesota, Wisconsin, and North Dakota; no admission charge, however, a $5 donation is encouraged for those over 12 years of age; call 777-4195 for information.

Tues. through Thurs., July 7-9 -- UNIVERSITY WITHIN THE UNIVERSITY FREE CLASS, "Introduction to Word Perfect 8.0," 361 Upson Hall II, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. each day; to register, contact Kara at 777-2128 or kara_hyde@mail.und.nodak.edu; also Aug. 25-27.

Wed., July 8 -- PRESIDENT BAKER'S 9 O'CLOCK BRIEFING, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, 9 a.m.

Wed., July 8 -- LESSONS AT LUNCH SERIES, "Finding Your Roots," presented by Sandy Slater (Chester Fritz Library), Leadership Inspiration Center, Memorial Union, noon to 1 p.m.; session is free; please feel free to bring your own lunch.

Thurs., July 9 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for Elizabeth A. Laverdure-McDougall, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Teaching and learning, Room 104, Education Building, 3 p.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Thurs., July 9 -- NEW EMPLOYEE ORIENTATION for all new staff and faculty, 303 Twamley Hall, 1 p.m.; call Cheryl at 777-4361 or Pat at 777-4226 for more information.

Thurs., July 9 -- UNIVERSITY WITHIN THE UNIVERSITY FREE CLASS, "E-Mail Using Eudora Light," 361 Upson Hall II, 2 to 3:30 p.m.; to register, contact Kara at 777-2128 or kara_hyde@mail.und.nodak.edu.

Fri., July 10 -- LAST DAY TO DROP A COURSE OR WITHDRAW FROM THE PROGRAM IN EIGHT-WEEK OR 12-WEEK SUMMER SESSION.

Fri., July 10 -- LAST DAY TO CHANGE TO/FROM S/U GRADING OR TO/FROM AUDIT GRADING FOR EIGHT- AND 12-WEEK SUMMER SESSION.

Mon. through Wed., July 13-15 -- UNIVERSITY WITHIN THE UNIVERSITY FREE CLASS, "Introduction to Access 97," 361 Upson Hall II, 10 a.m. to noon each day; to register, contact Kara at 777-2128 or kara_hyde@mail.und.nodak.edu; also Aug. 11-13.

Mon. through Fri., July 13-17 -- BASIC MEDIATION SEMINAR, Conflict Resolution Center seminar from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day, call 777-3664 to register or for more information; registration deadline is Friday, June 29.

Mon., July 13, through Fri., July 24 -- SUMMER ART CAMP FOR KIDS, Session 3 for grades 1-3 with painter Annette Rorvig from McVille and painter Dyan Rey from Grand Forks; North Dakota Museum of Art, UND campus; fee is $75 for Museum members and $100 for Museum non-members per child, per session; call the Museum at 777-4195 to register; the Bremer Foundation is sponsoring scholarships for children impacted by the flood.

Tues., July 14 -- SUMMER CONCERT SERIES, Maria Williams, soprano, North Dakota Museum of Art, 7:30 p.m.; every Tuesday evening through July 21 the Museum will sponsor a light summer concert featuring musicians from Minnesota, Wisconsin, and North Dakota; no admission charge, however, a $5 donation is encouraged for those over 12 years of age; call 777-4195 for information.

Tues. through Thurs., July 14-16 -- UNIVERSITY WITHIN THE UNIVERSITY FREE CLASS, "Introduction to Word 97," 361 Upson Hall II, 3 to 5 p.m. each day; to register, contact Kara at 777-2128 or kara_hyde@mail.und.nodak.edu; also Aug. 11-13.

Wed., July 15 -- LESSONS AT LUNCH SERIES, "You Work Hard For Your Money -- Does It Work Hard For You?" presented by Tanya Kuntz (Merrill Lynch), Leadership Inspiration Center, Memorial Union, noon to 1 p.m.; session is free; please feel free to bring your lunch.

Thurs., July 16 -- LAST DAY TO FILE FINAL COPY OF THESIS OR DISSERTATION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL.

Thurs., July 16 -- TEST, College-Level Examination Program (CLEP), Room 200, McCannel Hall, 8:30 a.m.

Thurs., July 16 -- UNIVERSITY WITHIN THE UNIVERSITY FREE CLASS, "Explore the Web Using Netscape," 361 Upson Hall II, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.; to register, contact Kara at 777-2128 or kara_hyde@mail.und.nodak.edu.

Fri., July 17 -- LAST DAY TO CHANGE TO/FROM S/U GRADING OR TO/FROM AUDIT GRADING FOR SECOND SIX-WEEK SUMMER SESSION.

Fri., July 17 -- LAST DAY TO DROP A COURSE OR WITHDRAW FROM THE PROGRAM FOR SECOND SIX-WEEK SUMMER SESSION.

Fri., July 17 -- UNIVERSITY WITHIN THE UNIVERSITY FREE CLASS, "Introduction to GroupWise 5.2," 361 Upson Hall II, 9 to 11 a.m.; to register, contact Kara at 777-2128 or kara_hyde@mail.und.nodak.edu; also July 27.

Sun., July 19, through Wed., July 29 -- 15th INTERNATIONAL AEROSPACE CAMP for students ages 14-17 who have an interst or curiosity about the world of aerospace; call Dawn Botsford at 777-2663 for more information.

Mon., July 20 -- INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARD deadline for clinical proposals that require subcommittee and full board review for Wednesday, Aug. 5, meeting.

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UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is also available electronically through UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address is http://www.und.nodak.edu.

All articles submitted for publication should be labeled "University Letter" and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu. Attachments to University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number. University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations, Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.

UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

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