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University Letter

March 14, 1997

Volume 34 No. 28



UNIVERSITY LETTER
UNIVERSITY LETTER IS ALSO AVAILABLE ELECTRONICALLY in the Events and News
section of UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address
is: http://www.und.nodak.edu

The University Relations Office maintains an index for the University Letter.

UNIVERSITY LETTER INDEX
Writers Conference Slated For March 18-22
Help Update Directory Of Scientists, Artists & Scholars
Sandbag Volunteers Sought
     EVENTS TO NOTE
Event Promotes In-State Medical Practice
Psychology Sets Colloquiums
Events Listed For Women's History Month
History Schedules Luncheon Lecture
Curriculum Committee Will Meet
Faith And Medicine Topic Of Dean's Hour Presentation
Women Studies Salon To Host Susan Griffin
International Centre Events Listed
Biology Sets Seminar
LEEPS Lectures Set
Graduate Committee Meets March 21
EERC Offers Tour Of Experimental Furnace
University Senate Will Meet April 3
IRB Sets Meeting For April 4
 OF ACADEMIC INTEREST
Honors Day Tickets On Sale Now
March 27 Is Last Day To Drop Course, Withdraw
Fall Class Schedules Available March 24
Student Evaluation Forms Available
Education Students Invited To Recruiting Fair
     UNIVERSITY SENATE
University Senate Report
     GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS
Applications Available For Technology Program
ORPD Lists Funding Opportunities
     BILLBOARD
Changes Made In Receiving Report Processing
Nominations Sought For Organization Award
Easter Holiday Hours Listed For Health Sciences Library, 
   Computer Center and Memorial Union
Tammy Obregon Joins Printing Center
Toastmasters Meets On Campus
NDPEA Set To Meet March 18
     ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT
"Wizard Of Oz" Rescheduled To March 15
M.F.A. Exhibition By Cuddington opens March 17
Guild Trio Closes Museum Concert Series
Second "Bunny Hut" Workshop Added
     FYI
March 21 Is "Green And White Day"
     CALENDAR OF EVENTS
*******

Writers Conference Slated For March 18-22

"Writing Nature/The Nature of Writing" is the theme of the 28th Annual UND
Writers Conference, Tuesday through Saturday, March 18-22, at the Memorial
Union. As the title implies, the conference will focus on writers whose work
is about or is influenced by nature.

The following is the schedule of events for the region's premiere cultural
event.

Tuesday, March 18: Noon, Panel: "Nature and the North American West," Garrett
Hongo, Annick Smith, and Meeka Walsh; 3 p.m., Reading, Annick Smith; 8 p.m.,
Reading, Garrett Hongo.

Wednesday, March 19: Noon, Panel: "The End of Nature Debate," Garrett Hongo,
Bill McKibben, Annick Smith, and Meeka Walsh; 3 p.m., Meeka Walsh; 8 p.m.,
Reading, Bill McKibben.

Thursday, March 20: Noon, Panel: "Writing Nature," Susan Griffin, Bill
McKibben, David Treuer; 3 p.m., Reading, David Treuer; 8 p.m., Linda Hogan.

Friday, March 21: Noon, Panel: "The Nature of Writing," Susan Griffin, Linda
Hogan, Bill Morrissey, and David Treuer; 3 p.m., Reading, Bill Morrissey; 8
p.m., Susan Griffin.

Saturday, March 22: 8 p.m., Bill Morrissey Concert.
All events except the Bill Morrissey Concert Saturday night are free.

Susan Griffin -- Known for her interweaving of history and autobiography,
ecology and gender, Susan Griffin is a writer, poet, essayist, lecturer,
teacher, and playwright. Her books include "Woman and Nature," "Pornography
and Silence," "The Eros of Everyday Life," and "A Chorus of Stones," which was
a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in Nonfiction. Her play "Voices" won an Emmy
in 1975, and she is the recipient of a MacArthur Grant for Peace and
International Cooperation. Recently named one of "100 visionaries" by the Utne
Reader, Susan Griffin lives in Berkeley, Calif.

Linda Hogan -- A Chickasaw poet, novelist, and essayist, Linda Hogan is
currently a professor at the University of Colorado where she teaches creative
writing, fiction, and Native American literature. Her novel, "Mean Spirit,"
was one of three finalists for the Pulitzer Prize in 1991, and "The Book of
Medicines" was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. "Solar
Storms," her most recent novel, is set among Minnesota and Canadian border
tribes.

Garrett Hongo -- A fourth-generation Japanese-American, Garrett Hongo was born
in Hawaii and raised in Los Angeles. His collection of poetry, "The River of
Heaven," received the Lamont Prize from the American Academy of Poets, and was
nominated for a Pulitzer Prize in Poetry for 1989. He has also published
another book of poetry, "Yellow Light," and a memoir, "Volcano," a lyrical
evocation of volcano and rain forest life which also explores his return to
Hawaii as an adult searching out family mysteries. Currently Hongo directs the
creative writing program at the University of Oregon.

Bill McKibben -- A writer and committed environmentalist, Bill McKibben is
perhaps best known for "The End of Nature," translated into 16 languages, an
account of global environmental problems. In 1992 he published "The Age of
Missing Information," and most recently "Hope, Human and Wild" (1995). He was
a staff writer for the New Yorker from 1982 to 1987, and has been published
widely including in The Atlantic, The New York Times, Audubon, and Rolling
Stone. His work has also been anthologized in The Oxford Book of Nature. Bill
McKibben lives in the Adirondack Mountains of New York with his wife Sue
Halpern, also a writer, and their daughter Sophie. An avid hiker, canoeist,
and cross-country skier, McKibben is the lay leader of a small Methodist
church.

Bill Morrissey -- Considered one of the best singer-songwriters working today,
Bill Morrissey's recordings include "You'll Never Get to Heaven" (1996) and
"Night Train" (1993). He is also the author of "Edson" (1996), a novel set in
a small mill town in New Hampshire. Music critics have long praised
Morrissey's songs for their literary qualities, noting his "Faulknerian eye
for detail." Morrissey lives in New Hampshire where he enjoys hunting and
fishing with friends.

Annick Smith -- Originally form Chicago, Annick Smith has been living on a
ranch outside Missoula, Mont., for over 30 years. As a writer, independent
film maker and producer, Smith states "my work is influenced and inspired by
the natural world, particularly the American West." Smith is the author of the
critically acclaimed "Homestead," and co-produced, with Robert Redford, the
film "A River Runs Through It." She co-edited, with William Kittredge, "The
Last Best Place: A Montana Anthology," and is the author of "Big Bluestem: A
Journey Into the Tallgrass" (1996). Her work appears in many anthologies,
including Best American Short Stories 1992.

David Treuer -- David Treuer, 25, and an Ojibwe from the Leech Lake
reservation, is the author of "Little," a novel set in a fictitious Minnesota
reservation town he calls Poverty. This first book weaves a series of first
person narratives "threading events and characters together by the pull of the
Mississippi River." Treuer, who grew up on a tree farm near Bemidji, is
completing a Ph.D. in anthropology at Michigan. He is currently a Fulbright
scholar in southern Ontario, collecting Ojibwe oral histories.

Meeka Walsh -- Meeka Walsh is a Winnipeg-based writer, critic, and editor
whose stories have appeared in numerous Canadian literary magazines, winning
two gold medals at the Western and National magazine Awards. A book of
journals, "Ordinary Magic: Intervals in a Life," was published by Turnstone
Press in 1989, and her first book of fiction, "The Garden of Earthly
Intimacies," appeared in 1996. She edits Border Crossings, an international
arts magazine. -- Jim McKenzie (English), Director, Writers Conference.
*******

Help Update Directory Of Scientists, Artists & Scholars

The Graduate School and the Office of University Relations are in the process
of updating the Directory of Scientists, Artists & Scholars. Faculty and
researchers should soon receive in the mail a form, a copy of an entry from
the last directory and a letter from Graduate School Dean Harvey Knull asking
them to participate in the project. Please fill out the form and return it to
Research Directory, Office of University Relations, Box 7144, by Friday, March
28. To help expedite the process, you may wish to use the form on the world
wide web. It can be found at http://www.und.nodak.edu/form. Thank you in
advance for your help on this important project. -- Peter Johnson, Assistant
Director, University Relations.
*******

Sandbag Volunteers Sought

Grand Forks County has issued an emergency flood declaration. The cities of
Grand Forks and East Grand Forks will begin the joint centralized sandbagging
effort at the Grand Forks Public Works Building (former Coca Cola plant), 724
N 47th St, Grand Forks, on the weekend of March 15-16. We need to stockpile a
large number of sandbags in anticipation of a record flood and volunteer
assistance is vital. There will be two four-hour shifts each day, 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. and 1 to 5 p.m. Food will be provided by the Red Cross and Salvation
Army. Volunteers can call Tom Mulhern at the United Way Volunteer Center, 775-0671, or fax
775-0672. If you get questions from students who want to help,
please refer them to the Student Government office at the Memorial Union, 7-4377. Student
Body President Tammy Schlinger has offered to help coordinate
student volunteers. Tom Mulhern, United Way, is coordinating the overall
volunteer effort. President Kendall Baker has pledged the help of UND in
helping the city prepare for what promises to be the largest flood in the past
century. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, for Tom Mulhern, United Way Volunteer Center.
*******

EVENTS TO NOTE

Event Promotes In-State Medical Practice

The School of Medicine and Health Sciences will host "Practice Opportunities
in North Dakota (POND)/Career Day," Friday and Saturday, March 14 and 15, at
the Holiday Inn in Minot. The event is hosted by the school's Northwest Campus
Assistant Dean Warren Keene, Minot.
The event brings together the school's third- and fourth-year medical students
and physician-residents, as well as their spouses, to meet representatives of
North Dakota health care facilities and UND medical residency training
programs.

It is a means to encourage medical students and physician-residents-in-training to explore in-state
opportunities in medical specialty training, such
as family medicine, surgery, internal medicine and psychiatry, and communities
where they may wish to establish their practices after completing training.
The school's residency program officials also present information regarding
medical specialty training they provide in the four major cities of the state.
-- Mary Amundson, Project Director, Center for Rural Health.
*******

Psychology Sets Colloquiums

The Psychology Department will hold a colloquium in which Helen Harton,
faculty candidate from Boca Raton, Fla., will present "The Dynamics of
Attitudes: Individual Beliefs to Cultural Norms" on Monday, March 17, in Room
108, Nursing Building, from 4 to 5 p.m. 

Joseph Plaud (Psychology) will present "Verbal Sexual Stimuli and the
Formation of Stimulus Equivalence Classes" at noon Monday, March 24, in Room
102, Nursing Building.

Sherry Ferguson, a faculty candidate from Jefferson, Ark., will present
"Developmental Cerebellar Stunting in Rats Results in Behavioral Alterations
Similar to Those in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder," on Monday,
March 24, Room 108, Nursing Building, from 4 to 5 p.m. 
Everyone is welcome. -- Joan Peterson, Psychology Department.
*******

Events Listed For Women's History Month

March is Women's History Month. Events from the Women's Center follow.
On Monday, March 17, "Salt of the Earth," a History Club Film and Discussion
will be held from 4 to 7 p.m. in 114 Merrifield Hall. "Women, Earth and
Spirit," a workshop on Mythology, Ecology and the Arts will be presented by
Alexis Rykken from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. at the Women's Center, 305 Hamline St.

On Tuesday, March 18, "Varina Howell (Mrs. Jefferson) Davis," will be
presented by Richard Beringer (History), at 7 p.m. in the Grand Forks Public
Library.

-- Donna Oltmanns, Coordinator, Women's Center.
*******

History Schedules Luncheon Lecture

The History Department and Phi Alpha Theta will hold a brown bag lunch session
Wednesday, March 19. Mary Jane Schneider (Indian Studies) will present "As By
Her Trading: Indian Women in the Great Lakes Fur Trade, 1760-1840," at noon in
217 Merrifield Hall. Bring your lunch. There will be a question and discussion
period following the presentation, which is open to all. This is the second in
a series honoring Women's History Month. For more information please contact
me. -- David Rowley, Associate Professor of History, 7-3380.
*******

Curriculum Committee Will Meet

The University Curriculum Committee will meet Thursday, March 20, at 3 p.m. in
303 Twamley Hall to review the request from the College of Arts and Sciences
to suspend the B.A. with major in American Studies. Anyone interested in the
proposal is invited to attend. -- Carl Barrentine, Co-Chair, University
Curriculum Committee.
*******

Faith And Medicine Topic Of Dean's Hour Presentation

"Faith and Medicine" will be the subject of the next Dean's Hour presentation
Thursday, March 20, at noon in the school's Keller Auditorium at the Wold
Center, School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

The address will be given by Dale Matthews, Associate Professor of Medicine at
Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, D.C.
Matthews practices and teaches general internal medicine and conducts research
on the doctor-patient relationship, patient satisfaction with medical care,
chronic fatigue syndrome, and psychological dimensions of medicine. He is the
author of a three-volume work, "The Faith Factor: An Annotated Bibliography of
Clinical Research on Spiritual Subjects" and a documentary, "Body, Mind and
Spirit," among other videotapes and many published works. He has appeared on
national television programs such as Larry King Live, Good Morning America and
the Oprah Winfrey Show.

The presentation is the fifth in the series of Dean's Hour Lecture
presentations for the 1996-97 academic year. Initiated in February 1995, it is
a forum for analyzing and discussing ideas and issues related to the practice
of medicine and health care. For more information, contact the Office of
Academic Affairs and Research, UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences, 7-2515. --
Thomas Norris, Executive Associate Dean, Academic Affairs and
Research, School of Medicine and Health Sciences.
*******

Women Studies Salon To Host Susan Griffin

Feminist writer Susan Griffin will join the next meeting of the Women Studies
Salon, set for 4 p.m. Thursday, March 20, in the Women's Center, 305 Hamline
St. Readings by Griffin are on reserve at the Chester Fritz Library under
"Salon"; copies are available at the Women's Center and outside the offices in
Merrifield Hall, Room 201. For more information, contact the Women Studies
Center at 7-4115 or me at 7-2705. -- Rebecca Moore, Assistant Professor of
Philosophy and Religion.
*******

International Centre Events Listed

The Thursday, March 20, program at 7 p.m. is the UND Writers Conference,
"Writing Nature/The Nature of Writing" in the Memorial Union Ballroom. A
reception follows at the UND International Centre, 2908 University Ave. All
are welcome to meet the authors at the reception. -- Sharon Rezac Andersen,
Director, International Centre, 7-4231.
*******

Biology Sets Seminar

The Biology Department will hold a seminar Friday, March 21, in which Steven
R. Beissinger, Professor, Ecosystem Sciences Division, ESPM, University of
California, Berkeley, will present a seminar titled: "Hatch Asynchrony in
Birds: Constraint or Adaptation?" The talk will be held at noon in 141
Starcher Hall.  All are welcome. -- Colin Hughes, Assistant Professor of
Biology.
*******

LEEPS Lectures Set

Two LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary Sciences) Lectures will be
presented by Erich Petersen, Department of Geology and Geophysics, University
of Utah, on Friday, March 21.

At noon, in Leonard Hall Lecture Bowl (Room 100), he will consider
"Tetrahedrite Compositions: Applications to Ore Genesis and Exploration in
Sedex, MSD, and Epithermal Au Deposits."

At 3 p.m., in 109 Leonard Hall, he will present "Hypogene and Supergene
Processes in the Genesis of Precious Metal Polymetallic Deposits on the
Bolivian Altiplano."

The LEEPS Lecture Series is supported by the Department of Geology and
Geological Engineering, the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Office
of Research and Program Development, Office of Instructional Development and
the Advancing Science Excellence in North Dakota (ASEND) Program. All
interested persons are welcome to attend. For additional information contact
me. -- Dexter Perkins, Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering, 7-2991.
********

Graduate Committee Meets March 21

The Graduate Committee will not meet March 17. The next scheduled meeting will
be Monday, March 24, at 3:05 p.m. in the Memorial Room of the 
Memorial Union.  The agenda will include:

1.  Consideration of a request by the Teaching and Learning department to give
graduate credit for T & L 421, Transition to Adult Life.

2. Review of the Rural Health Nursing Specialization offered via the
Interactive Video Network.

3. Review of the subcommittee's report on the graduate program in Educational
Leadership.

4. Review of the subcommittee's report on the graduate program in Clinical
Laboratory Science.

5. Matters arising.

Please note the change in the meeting location. -- Harvey Knull, Dean,
Graduate School.
*******

EERC Offers Tour Of Experimental Furnace

On Tuesday, March 25, at 10:30 a.m., the Energy and Environmental
Research Center (EERC) will conduct a tour of its Combustion 2000 pilot-scale
slagging furnace system (three million Btu/hr), which is currently under
construction. Combustion 2000 is a U.S. Department of Energy development
program aimed at commercializing a new generation of cleaner, more efficient
coal-fired power plants.  United Technologies
Research Center (UTRC), East Hartford, Conn., is the prime contractor for
Phase II of the project. As a member of UTRC's Combustion 2000 project team,
the EERC was awarded a subcontract of approximately $7 million over four-and-a-half years to
test key components of UTRC's high-temperature advanced
furnace (HITAF), an integral part of the high-performance power system design.

Tour participants will assemble in the reception area of the EERC
Administration Building, 15 North 23rd Street. Hard hats and safety glasses
are required for the tour (if you have your own, please bring them, as the
EERC's supply is limited), and participants should wear flat shoes (part of
the tour is in a grated-floor area). For more information, contact me. -- Rod
Stoa, EERC Research Specialist, 7-5066.
*******

University Senate Will Meet April 3

The University Senate will meet Thursday, April 3, at 4:05 p.m. in Room 7,
Gamble Hall. Agenda items for this meeting are due in the Office of Admissions
and Records by 4 p.m. Thursday, March 20. It is recommended that some detail
be included in the agenda items submitted. -- Alice Poehls (Admissions and
Records), Secretary, University Senate.
*******

IRB Sets Meeting For April 4

The UND's Institutional Review Board will meet at 4 p.m. Friday, April 4, in
305 Twamley Hall, to consider all research proposals submitted to the Office
of Research and Program Development before Tuesday, March 25. Proposals
received later will be considered only if a quorum has reviewed them and time
permits.  

Clinical medical projects must be reviewed by the Clinical Medical Subcom-
mittee before being brought to the full Board.  Proposals for these projects
are due in the Office of Research and Program Development Tuesday, March 18.

Notes from the meeting will be available in ORPD approximately one week after
the meeting.

-- F. R. Ferraro (Psychology), Chair, Institutional Review Board.
*******

OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

Honors Day Tickets On Sale Now
The Honors Day luncheon is set for noon Thursday, April 3, in the Memorial
Union Ballroom. The event recognizes presidents and advisors of honor
societies, seniors on the President's Roll of Honor, and outstanding students
recommended by departments that do not have honor societies. All faculty,
staff and students are invited to attend the luncheon; they may purchase
tickets ($5 each) in the Office of University Relations, 411 Twamley Hall. The
speaker will be Mary Muehlen Maring, North Dakota Supreme Court Justice. --
Rita Galloway, Special Projects Coordinator, University Relations.
*******

March 27 Is Last Day To Drop Course, Withdraw

The last day to drop a full-term course or withdraw from school for the 1997
Spring Semester is Thursday, March 27. Students completely withdrawing from
UND must use the UND "withdrawal" form which is available at the Office of
Admissions and Records, 201 Twamley Hall; students are not to use the
Registration Action Form for this process. -- Alice Poehls, Director of
Admissions and Records.
*******

Fall Class Schedules Available March 24

The "Time Schedule of Classes" for Summer and Fall 1997, to be used by
departments for advising purposes, will be available for pickup in the
reception area of the Office of Admissions and Records, second floor, Twamley
Hall, beginning at 9 a.m. Monday, March 24. If you have questions, please call
7-2711. -- Veriena Garver, Admissions and Records Officer, Office of
Admissions and Records.
*******

Student Evaluation Forms Available

All colleges have received UND Student Evaluation Forms, and departments have
been notified that they can ask for copies at their respective Deans' office.
Departments have received directions on how faculty are to administer the
forms and how students are to complete them. Faculty are reminded to inform
students to fill in the numbers for the course call number. If you are unsure
of the call number please check with your department. If you have questions
about any procedures related to the evaluation forms please feel free to
contact the Office of Institutional Analysis at 7-4358. -- Dean Schieve,
Director of Institutional Analysis.
*******

Education Students Invited To Recruiting Fair

Faculty and staff are asked to encourage Education students to participate in
the North Dakota Education Connection Recruiting Fair Wednesday, March 26, in
the Memorial Union Ballroom. This Fair is sponsored by all North Dakota
universities that prepare teachers and is an opportunity for candidates to
meet with representatives from many school districts in a one-day format.
Registration forms are available at Career Services, 120 Hyslop Sports Center.
-- Mark Thompson, Director, Career Services.
*******

UNIVERSITY SENATE

UNIVERSITY SENATE REPORT

University Senate conducted its regular monthly meeting March 6 with Chair
Sara Hanhan (Teaching and Learning) presiding. Fifty of the current 79 Senate
members attended. The March meeting was adjourned at 5:30 p.m. after a 4:11
p.m. call to order. Reports on proceedings follow.

Senate Questions Appropriateness Of
Appropriations Resolution, Votes No

University Senate defeated a resolution at its March 6 meeting that would have
put it on record against provisions in what has been termed the "lump sum"
higher education budget appropriation bill before the current session of the
North Dakota Legislature. Chief reasons for the resolution's 34-8 defeat (two
abstentions) avoiding appearances of unnecessary discord that the resolution
might suggest between faculty and the Legislature, and uncertainty about
details of the bill and what differences it represents from current funding
processes.

In proposing the resolution, Albert Berger (History and Peace Studies) said he
thought placing all funds for state colleges and universities under the State
Board of Higher Education (as opposed to direct appropriation to each school)
as called for in House Bill 1312, Section 6, would give the Board "arbitrary
power, with checks and balances written into the bill being all after the
fact." He said it would take up to two years until the next Legislative
session to bring in checks and balances, "and by that time, it would be all
over."

Several faculty expressed concern about terminology in Berger's resolution,
such as references to "bureaucrats instead of educators" holding "real power
over educational matters" and "power to retaliate with budget cuts" against
schools and individuals. Elizabeth Hampsten (English) said she was "troubled
by some of the language" which causes the argument to be somewhat spoiled by
the presence of what could be considered insults. Her reply to a suggestion to
alter the resolution was "trying to rewrite something in a body this large is
not going to work."

The degree of difference between current funding processes and the lump sum
approach was questioned. That and other concerns about details and scope of
that budgeting method seemed as responsible for hesitation by some senators to
get behind it as they were in causing reluctance to support the opposing
resolution, particularly in light of how they viewed the resolution's tone.

President Kendall Baker noted that the Board already has the capability of
reallocating funds, and pointed out that if senators are unclear on this
legislative bill, "we can get details on this issue and clarifications on what
its provisions are." In their relationships with the Legislature, he
encouraged UND faculty to continue the positive leadership roles they have
already exhibited at this session.

Berger's amendment to remove a paragraph with language that some senators said
could be thought of as offensive was approved, but the vote immediately after
on the main resolution was decidedly defeated moments before the regular
meeting adjournment time. A vote to extend the meeting to continue discussion
on the motion was defeated.


Announcements, Comments

President Kendall Baker commented on several current matters. He said he has
listened to discussion, reviewed documents, and visited with individuals to
gain as much information as he can on the matter of cutting back a Norwegian
languages major course of studies to offerings only through the 200 course
level. That has been his recommendation in contrast to the first Restructuring
and Reallocation Committee report calling for retention of the major, a
position on which University Senate has twice voted its support. While he
maintains his position of discontinuing the major in Norwegian, President
Baker said that relative to Norwegian language studies, he has been impressed
by a suggestion by International Programs Director David Marshall to establish
a Scandinavian Studies major through Interdisciplinary Studies. Vice President
for Academic Affairs and Provost Marlene Strathe and Arts and Sciences Dean
John Ettling will review that plan, the President said. . . President Baker,
along with Student Affairs Vice President Gordon Henry, commended Student Body
President Tammy Schlinger and Vice President Kari Gjovik, and other students,
for their performances at the State Legislature this session. Henry said "I
have never been more impressed in all my years on this campus" as he has been
with Schlinger and Gjovik in their student government leadership roles the
past year.
 
Other Senate Business

Other business at the March 6 University Senate meeting included the
following:

Senate approved resolutions from its Executive Committee to change functions
and responsibilities of the Student Academic Standards Committee and
membership, functions, and responsibilities of the Administrative Procedures
Committee as "clean-up" measures to bring those aspects of those groups in
line with present situations and practices, according to Admissions and
Records Director and Senate Secretary Alice Poehls. . .  Senate completed
voting on members for Senate committees as part of the annual report of its
Committee on Committees on nominations for those bodies. Ratification of that
voting will be on the next meeting's agenda. . . Annual reports from four of
its committees were approved by Senate for receiving and filing.

Senators present at the March 6 meeting were Jeanne Anderegg, James Antes,
Kendall Baker, Lyle Beiswenger, Albert Berger, Robert Boyd, Annie Claesson,
Richard Crawford,Frank D'Andraia, Rebecca Engwicht, John Ettling, Mary Lou
Fuller, Mike Grosz, Elizabeth Hampsten, Sara Hanhan, Mary Harris, Gordon
Henry, Al Hoffarth, Charlotte Humphries, Susan Hunter, Eric Jorgenson, Frank
Karner, Scott Knudsvig, Mary Kweit, David Lambeth, Gretchen Chesley Lang, Lynn
Lindholm, Stephen Markovich, E. John Miller, Janet Kelly Moen, Sheryl
O'Donnell, Glenn Olsen, David Perry, Thomas Petros, Monte Phillips, Alice
Poehls, Donald Poochigian, Ronald Pynn, Lana Rakow, Don Richard, Charles
Robertson, Tammy Schlinger, Larry Spain, Scot Stradley, Marlene Strathe, Wayne
Swisher, Beverly Uhlenberg, Andrew Varvel, Cecilia Volden, DuWayne Wacker.

Senators absent from the March 6 meeting were Mary Brant, Chris Carlson, W.
Jeremy Davis, Sally Dockter, George Frein, Betty Gard, Kari Gjovik, Thomasine
Heitkamp, Carla Wulff Hess, Bruce Jacobsen, Harvey Knull, W. Fred Lawrence,
Robert Lewis, Brian Lloyd, D. Scott Lowe, Chris Mickelson, Elizabeth Nichols,
Ben Nwoke, Marcia O'Kelly, John Odegard, Thomas Owens, Dexter Perkins, Heather
Phillips, Tina Richards, Daniel Sheridan, David Uherka, John A. Williams, H.
David Wilson. -- Jim Penwarden (University Relations).
*******

GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

Applications Available For Technology Program

The Faculty in Technology Transfer (FITT) program was established two years
ago to encourage technology transfer and interaction between business and
university faculty. Under the FITT program, faculty are eligible to work with
North Dakota companies for six to 10 weeks during the summer in technology-related areas,
including product development, solving production and
technology problems, and other areas. FITT seeks to help companies address
problems that require expertise in science, engineering and mathematics. A
business does not have to be a technology company to be eligible for
assistance, but the problem of research efforts must be based in science,
engineering or mathematics. All NDUS college and university faculty are
eligible to work with North Dakota companies for six to 10 weeks during the
summer. ND EPSCoR will share the cost of the salary, based on the faculty
member's current salary. The business provides a minimum of 1:1 match basis,
and can elect to increase its cost share. Businesses wishing to participate in
this program can obtain application forms through the Center for Innovation
located in the Rural Technology Center. To receive optimal consideration,
business applications should be received by Monday, March 31. Faculty will
then have an opportunity to review business applications and respond to the ND
EPSCoR stating their interest in participating. -- Bruce Gjovig, Director,
Center for Innovation, 7-3134.
*******

ORPD Lists Funding Opportunities

Following are several research opportunities. For more information, contact
the Office of Research and Program Development at 7-4278.

ASSISTANCE NEEDED FOR NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION GRANT PROPOSAL

Joe Kirtland (Mathematics Department at Marist College) and Steve Killion
(English Department at Marist College) are developing an interdisciplinary
approach to teaching Mathematics and English (composition). They are currently
in the process of writing an NSF grant to support this approach (develop
pedagogical methods and teaching materials) which links a low level (for non
Math/Science majors) Mathematics class and College Writing One into a "course
cluster." This course cluster has the same students, about 20 first semester
freshmen, enrolled in both courses where:  1) English (writing) is used to
teach Mathematics; 2) Mathematics is used as the content for the writing
course and used to help students improve their writing; 3) The
interdisciplinary aspects (applications) of Mathematics and writing are
investigated.

To strengthen this grant, they are interested in having some faculty at other
schools "sign on" to use the materials/methods developed.  Anyone interested
would be written into the grant and some form of financial support would be
extended for their efforts.

If you know of any schools/faculty who might be interested in participating in
such a project or if you want more information about the project, please
contact Joe Kirtland (914-575-3000 ext: 2602, e-mail:
joe.kirtland@marist.edu).
- - - - - - - - - - - -

ORIGINS OF SOLAR SYSTEMS SCIENTIFIC INVESTIGATIONS: NASA

Origins of Solar Systems -- Scientific Investigations Related to Understanding
the Formation and Early Evolution of Planetary Systems.  The National
Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Office of Space Science (OSS), is
releasing a NASA Research Announcement (NRA 97-OSS-06) that solicits basic and
applied research proposals for the Origins of Solar Systems Program (OSSP) to
conduct scientific investigations related to understanding the formation and
early evolution of planetary systems and to provide the fundamental research
and analysis necessary to detect and characterize other planetary systems. 
This announcement will be available on the OSS Homepage on March 21, at URL:
http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/oss/ research.htm.  (Commerce Business Daily,
March 5,1997, PSA#1795).

DEADLINE: June 20, 1997

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:  NRA 97-OSS-06 SOL NRA-97-OSS-06 POC
Joseph
Boyce, Scientist, NASA/Headquarters Acquisition Division, Code CW, 300E Street
SW, Washington, DC 20546, Phone (202) 358-0302, Fax (202) 358-3097, Email
joseph.boyce@hq.nasa.gov., or URL:http://web.fie.com/htdoc/fed/ nas/any/any/
proc/any/ 03059701.htm, or  http://procurement.nasa.gov/EPS/
HQ/date.html#NRA-97-OSS-06 or call ORPD at 7-4278. 

- - - - - - - - - - - -


The Office of Research and Program Development has established an electronic
mailing list,  RESEARCH-TALK , for communicating research news and views
across the UND campus.  RESEARCH-TALK is available free by subscription to all
University personnel who wish to be informed about and discuss research issues
important to UND.  RESEARCH-TALK is an open forum for faculty and staff to
present their views of research at UND. 

To subscribe to RESEARCH-TALK send an email message to:

LISTSERV@LISTSERV.NODAK.EDU with the message in the body of the mail
containing the command:   SUB RESEARCH-TALK    your first name   your last
name  

For example:      SUB RESEARCH-TALK Carl Fox

Questions can be addressed by contacting Dr. Carl Fox, Director, ORPD at 7-4280 or
carl_fox@mail.und.nodak.edu
- - - - - - - - - - - -

INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE PREVENTION RESEARCH

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention invites FY 97 applications for
intimate partner violence prevention research.  Non-profit and for-profit
organizations may apply.

DEADLINE: April 22, 1997.  Voluntary letters of intent should be postmarked by
March 20.

CONTACT: (404) 332-4561 and refer to announcement 723 or call ORPD at 7-4278.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY COMPETITIONS

The National Institute on Standards and Technology announces the availability
of funds for four focused Advanced Technology Program (ATP) competitions in FY
97:  97-04, digital data storage; 97-05, technologies for the integration of
manufacturing applications; 97-06, component-based software; and 97-07, tissue
engineering.

DEADLINES: Due dates will be published in the Commerce Business Daily.

CONTACT: ATP Hot Line, 800/287-3863, or http://www.atp.nist.gov, or call ORPD
at 7-4278.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

W. K. KELLOGG FOUNDATION

The International Journal of the W. K. Kellogg Foundation is now available on-line at
http://www.wkkf.org.  The primary purpose of this journal is to share
with readers the ideas, new approaches and successes realized through
privately funded philanthropic ventures.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Contact ORPD, 7-4278.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES (NEH)

The WWW address for NEH's home page is http://www.neh.fed.us.  Following are
e-mail addresses and deadline dates for several NEH divisions: 

Division of Preservation and Access, preservation@neh.fed.us, 7/1/97; George
F. Farr, Jr., Director, 202/606-8570;

Division of Public Programs, publicpgms@neh.fed.us, 12/6/97; Nancy Rogers,
Director, 202/606-8267;

Division of Research and Education, research@neh.fed.us, education@neh.fed.us;
James Herbert, Director, 202/606-8373;

    Fellowships for University & College Teachers and Independent Scholars,    
5/1/97;

    Summer Stipends, 10/1/97;

    Humanities Focus Grants, 4/18/97;

    Teaching with Technology/Other Development & Demonstration Projects,       
 10/1/97;

    Collaborative Research, 9/2/97;

    Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions, 10/1/97;

Office of Challenge Grants, challenge@neh.fed.us, 5/1/97;
Stephen M. Ross, Director, 202/606-8309;

Federal-State Partnership, fedstate@neh.fed.us; (Each state establishes its
own grant guidelines and deadlines.), Edythe R. Manza, Director, 202/606-8254.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Contact ORPD, 7-4278.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

NORTH DAKOTA COUNCIL ON THE ARTS DEADLINES

Following are program deadline dates (all are postmark dates) for Fiscal Year
1998 applications to the North Dakota Council on the Arts.

          Access, April 1, 1997
          Artist in Residence, October 1, 1997
          Special Projects, Ongoing
          Professional Development, Ongoing
          Traditional Arts Apprenticeship, April 1, 1997
          Teacher Incentive Grants, April 1, 1997, October 1, 1997
          Regional Outreach Grants, April 1, 1997, October 1, 1997
          Technology Grants, April 1, 1997

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: ORPD, 7-4278.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

COMMUNITY OF SCIENCE WEB SERVER

The Community of Science Database,
http://www.unisphere.com/uni/public/cos.html, is designed to help you identify
and locate researchers with interests and expertise similar to your own.  It
contains an on-line inventory of researchers, inventions, and facilities at
leading U.S. and Canadian universities as well as other R&D organizations. 
You can add yourself to the expert database and you may search for expertise
in specific states.

The site also includes databases providing information about research funded
by the Federal Government (NIH, NSF, USDA, SBIR, ATP), the Commerce Business
Daily, and connections to several databases at other sites which describe
research funding opportunities (e.g., NIH, NSF, FEDIX, Funding Opportunities
for Minorities).

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Call ORPD at 7-4278.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS (NEA): PROJECT GRANTS

The purpose of NEH Heritage and Preservation grants is to make visible artists
and forms of artistic expression that reflect cultural groups, to preserve
significant artistic accomplishments, and to conserve important works of art
for future generations. Deadline: 4/1/97.

Education and Access grants support projects that seek to expose the widest
public to excellence in the arts while broadening understanding and
appreciation of heritage and culture.   Deadline: 4/7/97.

Creation & Presentation grants nurture American culture and bring it to the
public. Projects may provide resources, time and space for artists to create a
specific work, or they may present art to audiences through a diverse range of
activities in formal or informal settings.  Deadline: 4/16/97.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: http://arts.endow.gov/ or call ORPD at 7-4278.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES (NEH)
FELLOWSHIPS FOR UNIVERSITY TEACHERS

NEH fellowships provide opportunities for individuals to pursue advanced work
that will enhance their capacities as interpreters of the humanities and
enable them to make significant contributions to thought and knowledge in the
humanities.  Projects may contribute to scholarly knowledge, the advancement
of teaching, or the general public's understanding of the humanities.

DEADLINE: May 1, 1997

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: http://www.neh.fed.us or call ORPD at 7-4278.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH), NATIONAL CENTER FOR RESEARCH
RESOURCES
BIOMEDICAL TECHNOLOGY EXPLORATORY GRANTS

The purpose of this program announcement is to encourage submission of new
developmental grant applications to explore new research paradigms in
engineering, instrumentation, physics, mathematics, or computer science as
applied to biomedical research.  The projects should provide the opportunity
to develop new technologies, methods, devices, and materials that provide
greater understanding of fundamental elements of biological phenomena.

DEADLINE: Feb. 1, June 1, Oct. 1

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: http://www.nih.gov or call ORPD at 7-4278.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH (ONR):  DUAL USE APPLICATIONS

The ONR seeks projects to create and develop new product or process
technologies with potential for navy and commercial applications.  Areas range
from remote sensing technologies to development of scalable information
infrastructures.

DEADLINE: April 15, 1997

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: http://www.onr.navy.mil or call ORPD at 7-4278.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

ITTLESON FOUNDATION: SEED MONEY FOR INNOVATIVE PROGRAMS

The Ittleson Foundation provides seed money for the start-up of innovative
programs concerned with the following:  

The AIDS program focuses on innovative prevention efforts.  The foundation is
interested in helping to organize networks of support and care for people with
AIDS, especially youths, as well as the mental health consequences of AIDS on
people with AIDS, their caregivers, families and friends.  

The Environment program supports pilot and model programs offering new
approaches to solving environmental problems.  Projects that link formal
competence with community-based efforts are a priority.

The Mental Health program supports projects that address the needs of
underserved populations, especially collaborative projects that link formal
professional competence to informal support networks to provide services.

DEADLINE: April 1, September 1

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Call ORPD, 7-4278.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION INVESTIGATOR AWARDS IN HEALTH
POLICY RESEARCH

This program challenges investigators from a variety of fields to tackle
critical health policy issues, think creatively about the most important
problems affecting the health care of Americans, and explore innovative ideas
and perspectives that may contribute to the theoretical underpinnings and
knowledge base of future health policy.

DEADLINE: April 1, for letters of intent.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: http://www.rwjf.org or call ORPD at 7-4278.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

LIGHTWORKS TECHNOLOGY FOUNDATION TECHNOLOGY RELATED
PHILANTHROPY

This foundation funds the following five major project areas:
1)   Computer-related technology programs in schools and universities,
particularly vocational, continuing and special education.
     
2) Internet and interactive communications access for schools, colleges, and
public libraries.
     
3) Information access programs in selected areas of need.
     
4) Selected initiatives that address  information poverty  challenges for
institutions and families.

5) Innovative cultural programs addressing cutting-edge technology
applications.

DEADLINE: June 30.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: http://www.lightworks.org or call ORPD at 7-4278.

-- Carl Fox, Director of Research and Program Development.
*******

BILLBOARD

Changes Made In Receiving Report Processing

Effective with the purchase orders/receiving reports created August 1, 1996,
and after, the following procedural changes were implemented:
     
Instructions on the Receiving Report advise departments to return the signed
Receiving Report with the quantity and date received for each item to Accounts
Payable, Box 8370.

If you have any questions about the receipt of merchandise ordered, contact
Central Receiving at 7-4359. If you have any questions about payment of an
open order, contact Accounts Payable at 7-2773. -- Allison Peyton, Accounts
Payable Manager.
*******

Nominations Sought for Organization Award

Each year student organizations are recognized for their work within the
University community. The awards highlight organizations' programming efforts,
community service, leadership development programs and overall accomplishments
throughout the year. The awards recognize the outside-the-classroom work of
students and student organizations.

Please stop by the Student Organization Center or call 7-3620 for an
application. Completed applications must be submitted by 4:30 p.m. Wednesday,
April 16, to the Student Organizations Center, Memorial Union. The awards will
be presented during the Memorial Union Leadership Program on April 25.

-- Ben Subedi, Coordinator of Student Organizations.
*******

Good Friday Is Holiday

In accordance with State Board of Higher Education directives, Friday, March
28, will be observed as Good Friday by faculty and staff members of the
University. Only those employees designated by their department heads will be
required to work on this holiday. -- Marlene Strathe, Vice President for
Academic Affairs and Provost, and Diane Nelson, Director, Personnel Services.
*******

Health Sciences Library:

Easter hours are: Thursday, March 27, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Friday, March 28,
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, March 29, 1 to 5 p.m.; Sunday, March 30, closed.
-- April Byars, Administrative Assistant, Library of the Health Sciences.
*******

Computer Center:

The Computer Center will close for the Good Friday holiday at midnight
Thursday, March 27, and will reopen at midnight Friday, March 28. -- Nadine
Kotowicz, Operations Manager, Computer Center.
*******

Memorial Union:

Easter Break hours for the Memorial Union follow.

All areas will be closed Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, March 28-30.
Hours for Thursday, March 27, are:

LIFETIME SPORTS CENTER, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; INFO CENTER, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.;
SERVICE CENTER, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; COPY STOP, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; BURGER KING,
7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; BOOKSTORE, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE, 8
a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; CRAFT CENTER/SIGN AND DESIGN STUDIO, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.;
DINING CENTER, 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.; BARBER SHOP, 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.;
CENTENNIAL ROOM, 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.; ESPRESSO BAR, 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.;
CORNER DELI, 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.; UNIVERSITY LEARNING CENTER, 8 a.m. to 4:30
p.m.; UNION STATION, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; PASSPORT IDs, 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.;
COMPUTER LEARNING LAB, 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.; BUILDING HOURS, 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.

-- Marsha Nelson, Facilities Coordinator, Memorial Union.
*******

Tammy Obregon Joins Printing Center

The Printing Center has employed Tammy Obregon as the Receptionist and Billing
Clerk. Tammy replaces Annette Viergutz who has moved to the Administrative
Clerk position vacated by Diane Hillebrand. Tammy comes to the Printing Center
from 97 KYCK FM. Please join us in welcoming her to the Printing Center Staff.
-- Richard Ganyo, Director of Printing.
*******

Toastmasters Meets On Campus

Toastmasters can help you to learn how to organize and present information,
gain self-confidence, think quickly on your feet, conquer your fear of
speaking to a group and much more.

Toastmasters is a fun and friendly positive organization that provides an
encouraging environment for you to practice speaking skills.  

The Prairie Winds Toastmasters meets on campus at lunch time so it's
convenient for you. Stop by Wednesdays, noon to 1 p.m., at  the Memorial Union
or call Dorette, 7-3880, for more information. -- Dorette Kerian, Manager,
User Services, Computer Center.
*******

NDPEA Set To Meet March 18

The North Dakota Public Employees Association (NDPEA), Grand Forks Chapter 49
will hold a business meeting Tuesday, March 18, at 7 p.m. in the Missouri Room
of the Memorial Union. Members and potential members are welcome. -- Eileen
Nelson (Law), Secretary, NDPEA, 7-2841.
*******

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

"Wizard Of Oz" Rescheduled To March 15

A canceled presentation of "The Wizard of Oz" has been rescheduled for
Saturday, March 15, at 2 p.m. in the Chester Fritz Auditorium. All tickets for
the canceled March 2 show will be honored on March 15. The March 2 performance
was canceled when the van carrying cast members, caught in a snow fog from a
snowplow, slid into the median on Interstate 29 south of Fargo. The most
serious injury among the seven cast members was a mild concussion. A
Crookston, Minn., performance for Monday, March 3, also was canceled. -- Peter
Johnson, Media Relations Coordinator, University Relations.
*******

M.F.A. Exhibition By Cuddington Opens March 17

"Common Threads," a Master of Fine Arts exhibition by Terry Cuddington, will
open with a reception Monday, March 17, from 7 to 9 p.m. in the Hughes Fine
Arts Center Gallery. The show will run through Thursday, March 27. About the
works Cuddington writes, "We are modelled from a host of disparate influences
which transform and shift over time. Consciously or unconsciously, common
threads emerge. My work exemplifies these threads: recurring themes . . .
'Common Threads' range from reusing an image to employing the same colour
combination or technique in fabrication. Although the subjects may appear to
be disparate, there is always a connection. An element from one provides the
basis or impetus for the next; each contributes to my artistic repertoire but
never completes it. Every image is another step toward an elusive goal." The
Hughes Fine Arts Center Gallery is open from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday
through Friday. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, University Letter, for the Department of
Visual Arts.
*******

Guild Trio Closes Museum Concert Series

New York's Guild Trio, one of contemporary America's most exciting chamber
music groups, will close the North Dakota Museum of Art's 1996-97 Concert
Series season with their performance Sunday, March 23, at 2 p.m.

Since pianist Patricia Tao, violinist Janet Orenstein and cellist Brooks
Whitehouse formed the trio in 1988 at the State University of New York at
Stony Brook, they have appeared throughout the United States, Canada, Europe
and Australia and have recorded works by Saint-Saens, Loeffler, Martinu and
Honneger while at the same time pursuing their own solo performance careers.
In 1990 the Tanglewood Music Center awarded the musicians the position of
trio-in-residence after the Guild Trio won the prestigious Artistic Ambassador
Competition. In 1991 they were one of four groups in the nation to receive a
matching grant from Chamber Music America for their unique new residency at
SUNY's Institute for Medicine in Contemporary Society.

For the past six years the Guild Trio has continued to perform at prestigious
chamber music series, colleges and universities across North America,
acquiring critical admiration as they travel. The Boston Globe writes "The
Guild Trio is irrefutably there, a beautiful new landmark just waiting for the
map-drawer."

Their performance at the museum will include pieces by Mozart, Schubert, and
"Four Movements for Piano Trio" by Bright Sheng, a composer who immigrated
from Shanghai to New York in 1982. The piece allows the Guild Trio to develop
Sheng's concept of "tonality" by unifying the traditions of Oriental classical
and folk music and western classical music, the two bases of Sheng's
composition.

Recordings by the Guild Trio will be on sale before and after the performance.
Surrounding the musicians will be the museum's current exhibition of paintings
by David Krueger, Back Water.
General admission to the concert is $12, $5 for students, and children 12 and
under are admitted free. The Museum Concert Series is sponsored by the Myra
Foundation and the City of Grand Forks. -- Andrea Dobberman, North Dakota
Museum of Art.
*******

Second "Bunny Hut" Workshop Added

The University Craft Center will sponsor a second "Bunny Hut" workshop Sunday,
March 23, from 2 to 4 p.m. in the Craft Center, third floor, Memorial Union.
The Saturday workshop is already full. This project will be a springtime
version of the popular "Gingerbread" workshop, using coconut for the grass,
jelly beans, frosting and graham cracker construction. Adults are invited to
bring a child and build a hut together. Advance registration and advance
payment are required. Enrollment is limited to 16 participants. The cost of $5
per hut includes all supplies. Call 7-3979 for more information. The Craft
Center will be closed over the spring break period, March 8-16, but
registrations may be sent to Box 8385. Please include your name, phone number,
payment for the number of "huts" you wish to make, and the total number of
people that will be coming. -- Bonnie Solberg, Coordinator, University Craft
Center.
*******

FYI

March 21 Is "Green And White Day"

President Kendall Baker has approved Friday, March 21, as a "Green and White
Day." Employees may wear UND colors and jeans. The men's and women's NCAA
Finals will take place over the weekend. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, University
Letter.
*******

CALENDAR OF EVENTS


MARCH 1997

(Please contact Mavis at the Office of University Relations, Box 7144, or call
777-4304, if you wish to make changes or have an event included.)

Through Fri., March 14 -- SPRING RECESS.

Through Sat., March 15 -- GOLF, WOMEN'S, UND in California (tentative).

Through Sat., March 15 -- SOFTBALL, UND at Fort Meyers, Fla.

Through Sun., April 20 -- ART EXHIBITION, Maryland artist, David Kreuger, who
creates paintings on the bizarre world of fishing as he knew it in his native
North Dakota; large painting from his Parallel Duck Hunting series owned by
the Metropolitan Museum in New York, North Dakota Museum of Art; opening
celebration is Sun., March 2 from 2 to 4 p.m. with the artist giving a gallery
tour of his works; paintings by Emily Lunde will be exhibited in the small
gallery located upstairs in the museum, also opening March 2.

Wed. and Thurs., March 12-13 -- ADVANCED MEDIATION TRAINING WORKSHOP:
BEYOND
THE BASICS SEMINAR offered by the UND Conflict Resolution Center, Memorial
Union, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days; designed for individuals with basic
mediation background to develop their knowledge and skills; call 777-3664 or
contact udcrc@badlands.nodak.edu for more information.

Wed. through Sat., March 12-15 -- SWIMMING AND DIVING, MEN'S and WOMEN'S,
National Collegiate Athletic Association Championships, San Antonio, Texas.

Thurs., March 13 -- COUNSELING TOPICS SEMINAR, "Neuropsychology: What
Counselors and Counseling Psychologists Need to Know," presented by Susan
Hunter, assistant professor of adult health nursing, 318 Montgomery Hall, noon
to 1:30 p.m.

Thurs., March 13 -- SPRING BREAK SOCIAL GATHERING featuring international
films and international snacks, UND International Centre, 2908 University
Ave., 7 p.m.; all are welcome; call 777-4231 for more information.

Thurs. and Fri., March 13-14 -- HOCKEY, Western Collegiate Hockey Association
Final Five, St. Paul, Minn.

Fri., March 14 -- MULTISTATE PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY EXAM (MPRE), Room
116, Witmer Hall, 12:30 p.m.

Fri., March 14 -- FLEXCOMP CLAIMS, all receipts for medical and/or dependent
care expenses incurred from July 1, 1996, to Dec. 31, 1996, must be submitted
to the Payroll Office; call Jean at 777-4423 for more information.

Fri. and Sat., March 14-15 -- "PRACTICE OPPORTUNITIES (POND)/CAREER DAY,"
hosted by the School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Holiday Inn, Minot;
event brings together the school's third- and fourth-year medical students and
physician-residents, as well as their spouses, to meet representatives of
North Dakota health care facilities and UND medical residency training
programs.

Fri. and Sat., March 14-15 -- WRESTLING, National Collegiate Athletic
Association Championships, Fargo, N.D.

Sat., March 15 -- GRADUATE MANAGEMENT ADMISSION TEST (GMAT), Room 116,
Witmer
Hall, 8 a.m.

Sat., March 15 -- DEADLINE for students to submit applications to receive top
consideration for 1997-98 UND honor scholarships; available in the Student
Financial Aid Office, 216 Twamley Hall.

Sat., March 15 -- MUSICAL, "Wizard of Oz," Chester Fritz Auditorium, 2 p.m.;
all tickets for the canceled March 2 show will be honored.

Sat., March 15 -- SATURDAY MORNING LEGISLATIVE FORUM, Moine Gates,
Governmental Affairs chair, will moderate discussions; Grand Forks legislators
will be present to discuss legislative topics of interest to the citizens;
forum is open to the public (held every other Saturday, also Feb. 15 and March
1 and 15); City Council Chambers, third floor, City Hall, 255 Fourth St. N.,
10 a.m.

Sat. and Sun., March 15-16 -- SANDBAG VOLUNTEERS NEEDED, Grand Forks Public
Works Building (former Cocoa Cola plant), 724 N 47th St., two four-hour shifts
each day, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 1 to 5 p.m.; food will be provided by the Red
Cross and Salvation Army; volunteers can call 775-0671; students call the
Student Government office at 777-4377.

Mon., March 17 -- PSYCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM, Helen Harton, faculty candidate from
Boca Raton, Fla., will present "The Dynamics of Attitudes: Individual Beliefs
to Cultural Norms," Room 108, Nursing Building, 4 to 5 p.m.; everyone is
welcome.

Mon., March 17 -- LEADERSHIP SERIES, "Leadership From the Swamp," presented by
Jan Zahrly, Associate Professor of Management, Leadership Inspiration Center,
third floor, Memorial Union, 3 p.m.; non-credit sessions are designed to help
students explore leadership from a variety of perspectives and develop an
understanding of themselves; sessions are free and open to the public.

Mon., March 17 -- WOMEN'S HISTORY MONTH, "Salt of the Earth," a History Club
film and discussion, 114 Merrifield Hall, 4 to 7 p.m.; "Women, Earth and
Spirit," a workshop on Mythology, Ecology and the Arts will be presented by
Alexis Rykken from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. at the Women's Center, 305 Hamline St.

Mon. through Fri., March 17-21 -- ASBESTOS CLASS, Environmental Training
Institute contractor/cupervisor initial course (2919), Comfort Inn, Highway 2
East, East Grand Forks, Minn.; cost is $400 (initial worker courses are
available at $350 per person upon demand); call 777-3341 for more information.

Mon., March 17, through Thurs., March 27 -- MFA EXHIBITION, "Common Threads,"
a Master of Fine Arts exhibition by Terry Cuddington, will open with a
reception Monday, March 17, from 7 to 9 p.m. in the Hughes Fine Arts Center
Gallery.

Tues., March 18 -- WOMEN'S HISTORY MONTH, "Varina Howell (Mrs. Jefferson)
Davis," will be presented by Richard Beringer (History), Grand Forks Public
Library, 2100 Library Circle, 7 p.m.

Tues. and Thurs., March 18 and 20 -- COMPUTER CENTER TRAINING SESSION,
"WordPerfect 6.1 Windows," will teach word processing skills to assist in
producing professional-looking documents (prerequisite is Windows
proficiency), Training Room 361, Upson II; register in advance by calling
Bonnie or Shelly at 777-3171.

Tues. through Sat., March 18-22 -- 28TH ANNUAL UND WRITERS CONFERENCE,
"Writing Nature/The Nature of Writing," UND Memorial Union; featuring Bill
McKibben, Susan Griffin, Linda Hogan, Garret Hongo, Bill Morrissey, Annick
Smith, David Treuer, and several others; following is the schedule of events:
     Tuesday, March 18: Noon, Panel: "Nature and the North American West,"
Garrett Hongo, Annick Smith, and Meeka Walsh; 3 p.m., Reading, Annick Smith; 8
p.m., Reading, Garrett Hongo.
     Wednesday, March 19: Noon, Panel: "The End of Nature Debate," Garrett
Hongo, Bill McKibben, Annick Smith, and Meeka Walsh; 3 p.m., Meeka Walsh; 8
p.m., Reading, Bill McKibben.
     Thursday, March 20: Noon, Panel: "Writing Nature," Susan Griffin, Bill
McKibben, David Treuer; 3 p.m., Reading, David Treuer; 8 p.m., Linda Hogan.
     Friday, March 21: Noon, Panel: "The Nature of Writing," Susan Griffin,
Linda Hogan, Bill Morrissey, and David Treuer; 3 p.m., Reading, Bill
Morrissey; 8 p.m., Susan Griffin.
     Saturday, March 22: 8 p.m., Bill Morrissey Concert.
     All events except the Bill Morrissey Concert Saturday night are free;
related events include an exhibit of new oils by David Krueger at the North
Dakota Museum of Art; contact James McKenzie at 777-2768 for more information.

Tues., through Sat., March 18-22 -- SWIMMING AND DIVING, Speedo Junior
Championships, College Station, Texas.

Tues., March 18 -- INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARD deadline for clinical proposals
(require Subcommittee and full Board review).

Tues., March 18 -- BUSINESS MEETING, North Dakota Public Employees Association
(NDPEA), Grand Forks Chapter 49, Missouri Room, Memorial Union, 7 p.m.;
members and potential members are welcome.

Wed., March 19 -- HISTORY AND PHI ALPHA THETA BROWN BAG LUNCH SESSION,
"As By
Her Trading: Indian Women in the Great Lakes Fur Trade, 1760-1840," presented
by Mary Jane Schneider (Indian Studies), 217 Merrifield Hall, noon; bring your
lunch; a question and discussion period follows the presentation; this is the
second in a series honoring Women's History Month.

Thurs., March 20 -- CONFERENCE CALL MEETING, State Board of Higher Education.

Thurs., March 20 -- COLLEGE-LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP), place to be
announced, 8:30 a.m. (location cannot be determined until the University
Counseling Center's move back to McCannel Hall is set).

Thurs., March 20 -- UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM COMMITTEE, 303 Twamley Hall, 3 p.m.

Thurs., March 20 -- MEETING, Underrepresented Student Recruitment Committee,
305 Twamley Hall, 9 to 10 a.m.

Thurs., March 20 -- MEDICAL SCHOOL DEAN'S HOUR PRESENTATION, "The Faith
Factor: Religious Commitment and Clinical Medicine," presented by Dale
Matthews, M.D., FACP, Reed T. Keller Auditorium, Room 1350, School of Medicine
and Health Sciences, noon.

Thurs., March 20 -- PARENTING SERIES, "Lifelong Learning" presented by Dave
Godfread, director of the Adult learning Center and Community High School,
Parent Education Resource Center (PERC), 500 Stanford Road, 12:10 to 12:50
p.m.; bring your lunch; child care will be provided.

Thurs., March. 20 -- WOMEN STUDIES SALON, the Women Studies Program will
inaugurate this reading group to discuss selected readings by feminist
writers; called "Salon" after 19th-century meetings of intellectuals in
patrons' parlors and salons, the group meets monthly at the Women's Center,
305 Hamline St. from 4 to 5 p.m.; feminist writer Susan Griffin will join this
meeting; call 777-4115 for more information.

Thurs., March 20 -- UND WRITERS CONFERENCE, "Writing Nature/The Nature of
Writing," UND Memorial Union Ballroom, with a reception following at the UND
International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; all are welcome to meet
the authors at the reception; call 777-4231 for more information.

Thurs. through Sun., March 20-23 -- HOCKEY, National Collegiate Athletic
Association Regionals.

Fri., March 21 -- LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary Sciences) LECTURE
by Erich Petersen, Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah;
at noon in Leonard Hall Lecture Bowl (Room 100), he will consider
"Tetrahedrite Compositions: Applications to Ore Genesis and Exploration in
Sedex, MSD, and Epithermal Au Deposits." At 3 p.m., in 109 Leonard Hall, he
will present "Hypogene and Supergene Processes in the Genesis of Precious
Metal Polymetallic Deposits on the Bolivian Altiplnano"; all interested
persons are welcome to attend; call 777-2991 for more information.

Fri., March 21 -- ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING, Americans with Disabilities Act
(ADA), 305 Twamley Hall, 8:45 to 9:45 a.m.

Fri., March 21 -- GREEN AND WHITE DAY, President Baker has approved wearing
jeans and UND colors (men's and women's basketball NCAA Finals).

Fri. and Sat., March 21-22 -- BASEBALL, UND at Dickinson State University
(NAIA).

Sat., March 22 -- PRAXIS SERIES (Specialty Areas), Room 114, Witmer Hall, 7:30
a.m.

Sat., March 22 -- PRAXIS SERIES (PPST), Room 116, Witmer Hall, 7:30 a.m.

Sat., March 22 -- UNIVERSITY CRAFT CENTER WORKSHOP, "Bunny Hut," third floor,
Memorial Union, 2 to 4 p.m.; adults are invited to bring a child to build
these together; pre-registration is required and enrollment is limited; cost
is $5 per hut; call 777-3979 for registration information.

Sun., March 23 -- MUSEUM CONCERT SERIES, Guild Trio, violin, North Dakota
Museum of Art, UND campus, 2 p.m.; contact Madelyn at 777-4195 for performer
or ticket information.

Sun., March 23 -- UNIVERSITY CRAFT CENTER SECOND "BUNNY HUT" WORKSHOP,
Craft
Center, third floor, Memorial Union, 2 to 4 p.m.; adults are invited to bring
a child and build a hut together; cost of $5 per hut includes all supplies;
call 777-3979 for more information or send registrations to Box 8385 with your
name, phone number, payment for the number of "huts" you wish to make, and the
total number of people that will be coming; the Craft Center will be closed
over spring break period, March 8-16.

Mon., March 24 -- GRADUATE COMMITTEE MEETING, Memorial Room, Memorial Union,
3:05 p.m. (note change in meeting location).

Mon., March 24 -- NATIONAL LEAGUE FOR NURSING PHARMACOLOGY EXAM (NLN),
place
to be announced, 10 a.m. (location cannot be determined until the University
Counseling Center's move back to McCannel Hall is set).

Mon., March 24 -- LEADERSHIP SERIES, "Presenting a Leadership Image,"
presented by Leadership Inspiration Center staff, Leadership Inspiration
Center, third floor, Memorial Union, 3 p.m.; non-credit sessions are designed
to help students explore leadership from a variety of perspectives and develop
an understanding of themselves; sessions are free and open to the public.
*******


UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and
distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is
also available electronically through UNDInfo, the University's menu
system on the Internet. The addresses are http://www.und.nodak.edu for
World-Wide Web and uninfo.und.nodak.edu for gopher.
  
All articles submitted for publication should be labeled "University
Letter" and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic
submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu. Attachments to
University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number.
University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations,
Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.
  
UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.
*******

Twamley Snack Bar Menu - March
  





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