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University Letter

March 21, 1997

Volume 34 No. 29



UNIVERSITY LETTER

UNIVERSITY LETTER IS ALSO AVAILABLE ELECTRONICALLY in the Events and News
section of UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address
is: http://www.und.nodak.edu

The University Relations Office maintains an index for the University Letter.

UNIVERSITY LETTER TABLE OF CONTENTS
Planning Council Sponsors Video Conference Forums
Protect Equipment From Flood Threat
Phi Beta Kappa Lecture Set
Honors Day Tickets On Sale Now
     EVENTS TO NOTE
LEEPS Lecture Canceled
Combustion 2000 Tour Postponed
Biology Sets Seminar
Two English Grads To Be Honored With Maxwell Anderson Award
Events Listed For Women's History Month
Graduate Committee Meets March 24
"Mahatma" Gandhi Grandson To Speak At UND
Great Teachers Is Colloquium Topic
History Schedules Luncheon Lecture
Counseling Topics Seminar Listed
Technology In Classrooms Will Be Seminar Topic
Psychology Announces Colloquium
Native Media Caucus Schedule Listed
Down Syndrome Symposium Scheduled
Faculty May Apply For WAC Workshop
     OF ACADEMIC INTEREST
Fall Class Schedules Available March 24
March 27 Is Last Day To Drop Course, Withdraw
Help Update Directory Of Scientists, Artists & Scholars
Human Subject Research Must Be Approved
Doctoral Exam Set For Norton And Goeb
     GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS
Applications Available For STTAR Program
Research Funding Opportunities Listed
     BILLBOARD
Changes Made In Receiving Report Processing
Meritorious Service Nominations Due April 11
State Fleet Vehicles Available
Majors Fair Set For March 24
Education Students Invited To Recruiting Fair
April 7-11 Is Student Employment Week
Nominations Sought For Organization Award
Good Friday Is Holiday
Easter Holiday Hours Listed For Chester Fritz Library, Health
   Sciences Library, Computer Center and Memorial Union
Disability Support Services News
CILT Plans Open House
     ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT
Guild Trio Closes Museum Concert Series
Folk Dance Society Meets Saturdays
International Centre Lists Events
     FYI
Bookstore Introduces New Staff Members
March 21 Is "Green And White Day"
Wednesday, March 26, Is Denim Day
     IN THE NEWS
     CALENDAR OF EVENTS
*******

Planning Council Sponsors Video Conference Forums

The University of North Dakota Planning Council is sponsoring UND's
participation in a national live video conference on Thursday, April 10 on the
subject of "The New Public University: How Do We Compete in a Changing
Environment?"  The session, from noon to 2 p.m., will take place in 1370 Bio-LRC, Medical Science North, and is free and open to the public.

In the days following the video conference, the Council will host two forums
to solicit input on the Planning Document that has guided much of UND's
Restructuring and Reallocation effort and which is in the process of being
revised. The first forum will be held at noon Friday, April 11, North
Ballroom, Memorial Union, and the second at 7 p.m. Monday, April 14, in the
Loft at the Engelstad Arena. Copies of the planning document are available
from the President's Office (777-2121) or by accessing the University's Web
Site (http://www.und.edu.)

Produced by the Public Broadcasting Service, the video conference will feature
a panel made up of Constantine Curtis, President of Clemson University and a
member of the Kellogg Commission to explore the public university mission; Gil
Whitaker, Professor of Business Administration and former Provost of the
University of Michigan; Judith Eaton, Chancellor of the Minnesota Sate College
and Universities; and Colorado Governor Roy Romer, Chair of the National
Education Goals Panel. The panel will address the question, "If you could
design the ideal public university for today's world, what choices would you
make?" Among topics to be considered are expected to be the need to
restructure and re-order the public university; successful institutional
models that meet community and corporate needs; involving and motivating
faculty, students and community to change; competition outside the academy;
new delivery systems; ensuring diversity; and using alternative learning
assessments. -- Dave Vorland, Assistant to the President and Recording
Secretary to the Planning Council, 3-16-97.
*******

Protect Equipment From Flood Threat

State Fire and Tornado provides the insurance coverage for all state-owned
facilities and equipment. Flood damage is a covered loss, but only at a
minimal level ($10,000 per occurrence). The University has obtained additional
flood insurance for three high-risk facilities on campus: Hughes Fine Arts
Center, Wilkerson and Smith Hall. This additional insurance is on the
structure only. Therefore, ALL departments are strongly encouraged to take the
necessary action to protect their equipment and supplies. Appropriate action
may include moving equipment from basement areas and/or raising equipment off
the floor. If you have any questions, please call. -- Pat Hanson, Director of
Payroll, 7-4228, or Leroy Sondrol, Director of Physical Plant, 7-2592.
*******

Phi Beta Kappa Lecture Set

This year's Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar is Dennis O'Brien, President
Emeritus of the University of Rochester, and previously Professor of
Philosophy at Rochester and Bucknell Universities. He will present a lecture
Thursday, April 10, at 8 p.m. in 101 Abbott Hall on "The Logic of Cursing."
The lecture will address the nature of primary religious discourse from the
perspective of its converse, cursing. He is also the speaker in the "Theology
for Lunch" series, Thursday, April 10. The noon discussion, at Christus Rex,
is on "The Anger World and Theology." Both events are free and open to the
public. Dr. O'Brien's visit is sponsored by the UND chapter of Phi Beta Kappa,
the Department of Philosophy and Religion, Christus Rex, the Newman Center,
the College of Arts and Sciences, and the Office of the President. -- Patricia
Kelley (Geology and Geological Engineering), Vice President, Phi Beta Kappa.
*******

Honors Day Tickets On Sale Now

The Honors Day luncheon is set for noon Thursday, April 3, in the Memorial
Union Ballroom. The event recognizes presidents and advisors of honor
societies, seniors on the President's Roll of Honor, and outstanding students
recommended by departments that do not have honor societies. All faculty,
staff and students are invited to attend the luncheon; they may purchase
tickets ($5 each) in the Office of University Relations, 411 Twamley Hall. The
speaker will be Mary Muehlen Maring, North Dakota Supreme Court Justice. --
Rita Galloway, Special Projects Coordinator, University Relations.
*******

EVENTS TO NOTE

LEEPS Lecture Canceled
The LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary Sciences) Lecture by Erich
Petersen, Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, on Friday,
March 21, has been canceled due to illness. -- Dexter Perkins, Professor of
Geology and Geological Engineering.
*******

Combustion 2000 Tour Postponed

The tour of the Combustion 2000 pilot-scale slagging furnace system previously
scheduled for Tuesday, March 25, at the Energy and Environmental Research
Center (EERC) has been postponed to a later date. Details regarding
rescheduling will be announced in a future edition of the University letter. -- Joyce Riske, Energy and Environmental Research Center.
*******

Biology Sets Seminar

The Biology Department will hold a seminar Friday, March 21, in which Steven
R. Beissinger, Professor, Ecosystem Sciences Division, ESPM, University of
California, Berkeley, will present a seminar titled: "Hatch Asynchrony in
Birds: Constraint or Adaptation?" The talk will be held at noon in 141
Starcher Hall.  All are welcome. -- Colin Hughes, Assistant Professor of
Biology.
*******

Two English Grads To Be Honored With Maxwell Anderson Award

A publications editor with the State Historical Society of North Dakota and
the founder of the Writers Conference in Children's Literature at UND will be
presented Friday, March 21, with the UND English Department's Maxwell Anderson
Award.

Janet Daley Lysengen (B.A. 1971, M.A. 1986), who has been with the State
Historical Society since 1993, will receive the undergraduate Maxie award, and
Emily Rhoads Johnson (M.A. 1981), author of "A House Full of Strangers"
(Cobblehill Books, 1992) and "Spring and the Shadow Man" (Dodd, Mead Inc.,
1985), will receive the graduate Maxie award.

Both will take part in a panel, "Is There Life After the English Major?"
Friday, March 21, at 10:30 a.m. in the Alumni Room, Memorial Union. Other
panel members include Peter Johnson (B.A. 1981, B.S.Ed. 1982), (University
Relations), 1997 North Dakota Teacher of the Year Sam Johnson (B.A. 1973, B.S.
1990, M.Ed. 1993), Director of Media Services and Special Projects
Coordinator, Devils Lake Public School District; and Alice Poehls (M.A. 1978,
Ph.D. 1989), (Admissions and Records).

The Department of English Literary Homecoming coincides with the annual UND
Writers Conference. -- John Little, Associate Professor of English.
*******

Events Listed For Women's History Month

March is Women's History Month. Events from the Women's Center follows.
On Monday, March 24, "Rosa Luxembourg: Woman as Revolutionary," will be
presented by Jim Mochoruk (History) from noon to 1 p.m. at the Women's Center,
305 Hamline St. "It's A Female Thing: Gender Roles," will be presented by
Donna Oltmanns (Women's Center) at 7 p.m. in the Memorial Union Sioux Room.

On Tuesday, March 25, "Should a Lady Ride a Bicycle: The History of Women in
Sports," will be presented by Kathy McCann (Athletics), from noon to      1
p.m. at the Women's Center. "It's a Female Thing: Women's Wisdom" will be
presented by Donna Oltmanns at 7 p.m. in the Memorial Union River Valley Room.

The Wednesday, March 26, schedule begins with "Earth Quilt: Putting the Pieces
Together for Earth Care," presented by Glinda Crawford (Sociology), from noon
to 1 p.m. at the Women's Center. "Daughters of Africa," a Mixed Blood theater
production, will be at 6 p.m. in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl.

The Thursday, March 27, For Women Only program will be "Fill Your Mind with
Empty," at noon in the Women's Center. "Female Composers: A Look at Their
Lives and Works in the History of Music," will be presented by Diane Lee
(Music) at 7:30 p.m. in the East Grand Forks Public Library.
-- Donna Oltmanns, Coordinator, Women's Center.
*******

Graduate Committee Meets March 24

The Graduate Committee will meet Monday, March 24, at 3:05 p.m. in the
Memorial Room of the Memorial Union.  The agenda will include:

1.  Consideration of a request by the Teaching and Learning department to give
graduate credit for T & L 421, Transition to Adult Life.

2. Review of the Rural Health Nursing Specialization offered via the
Interactive Video Network.

3. Review of the subcommittee's report on the graduate program in Educational
Leadership.

4. Review of the subcommittee's report on the graduate program in Clinical
Laboratory Science.

5. Matters arising.

Please note the change in the meeting location. -- Harvey Knull, Dean,
Graduate School.
*******

"Mahatma" Gandhi Grandson To Speak At UND

Arun Gandhi, grandson of India's late spiritual leader, Mohandas K. "Mahatma"
Gandhi, will speak on "Understanding Race, Overcoming Prejudice" Tuesday,
March 25, in the Chester Fritz Auditorium. The program, free and open to the
public, will begin at 6:30 p.m. and will include discussions on issues related
to non-violence. Born in 1934 in Durban, South Africa, Arun Gandhi was
profoundly impacted by the experience of growing up under the apartheid
government. At the age of 12, he was sent to live with his grandfather,
India's legendary spiritual and social leader, and would spend an hour each
day with Arun, sharing stories and answering questions. A journalist, scholar
and author, Arun has just finished his fifth book, "A Testament of truth," a
collection of The Mahatma's writings set in a contemporary context. The
program is sponsored by the UND Multicultural Awareness Committee, a standing
committee of Student Government. -- Ben Subedi, Advisor, Multicultural
Awareness Committee.
*******

Great Teachers Is Colloquium Topic

The Department of English invites faculty, staff, and students to attend a
colloquium on teaching Tuesday, March 25, at 4 p.m. in 116 Merrifield Hall.
The discussion will be led by a panel of faculty: Colin Hughes, Biology;
Melinda Leach, Anthropology; and Ron Pynn, Political Science; and moderated by
Dan Rice, Instructional Development. Elizabeth Hampsten (English) is the host.
The discussion will focus on an article, "Great Teachers and Teaching," copies
of which may be requested or picked up in advance at the English Department
Office or the Office of Instructional Development, 407 Twamley Hall, 7-3325. -- Elizabeth Hampsten, Professor of English.
*******

History Schedules Luncheon Lecture

The History Department and Phi Alpha Theta will hold a brown bag lunch session
at noon in 217 Merrifield Hall Wednesday, March 26. Kimberly Porter (History)
will present "Women of the People's Party." Bring your lunch. There will be a
question and discussion period following the presentation, which is open to
all. This is the third in a series honoring Women's History month. For more
information please contact me. -- David Rowley, Associate Professor of
History, 7-3380.
*******

Counseling Topics Seminar Listed        

The Department of Counseling 565N Topics Seminar will present 
"Counseling Research, Determinism & Positivism: Postmodern, Critical 
Person-Centered Musings," will be by J. Wade Hannon, Thursday, March 27, from
noon to 1:30 p.m. in 318 Montgomery Hall. -- Linda Winter, Coordinator,
Counseling 565N Topics Seminar.
*******

Technology In Classrooms Will Be Seminar Topic

"The Uses of Instructional Technologies in the Classroom," Wednesday, March
26, is the next session in the "On Teaching" noon lunch series co-sponsored by
the Office of Instructional Development and the Center for Instructional and
Learning Technologies. Paula Cooke (CAS) will host the session in Room 128 in
the ARTC Building, the CAS facility on the west side of 42nd Street. The
session will feature a demonstration of the instructional capabilities
presently being used in CAS. Faculty and staff who wish to reserve a
complimentary box lunch should call OID, 7-3325, by noon Monday, March 24.

The "On Teaching" session scheduled for April 3, featuring Dean John Ettling
reporting for the General Education Task Force, has been postponed to avoid a
conflict with the Honors Day luncheon on the same day. A new date will be
announced.

The final session of the semester, "Demonstration of Classroom Applications,"
April 23, will feature Bette Olson (Nursing) and colleagues and will be held
at noon in Room 201, College of Nursing Building. Complimentary box lunches
must be reserved for that session by noon, Wednesday, April 16. -- Dan Rice,
Director of Instructional Development.
*******

Psychology Announces Colloquium

The Psychology Department will hold a colloquium at which Mark Grabe
(Psychology) will present "Consequences of Personal Philosophies of Learning:
Educator Beliefs Determining Student Opportunities," Monday, April 7, in Room
102, Nursing Building, from noon to 1 p.m. Everyone is welcome. -- Joan
Peterson, Psychology Department.
*******

Native Media Caucus Schedule Listed

The Native Media Caucus: Keeping Traditions Alive Through Communication, will
be held Wednesday through Friday, April 9-11. Journalism workshops will be
held for tribal college students and Native media professionals. Students from
each of the state's tribal colleges are invited to attend. The Native Media
Center will provide attendance scholarships for selected students from each
tribal college. This scholarship will include the workshops, campus housing
for April 10 and 11, meals (including the banquet) and mileage for one vehicle
from each tribal college site in North Dakota.

Journalism and media skills are necessary to address the barriers and
challenges facing Native people. We hope this workshop will facilitate the
growth and development of Native media and introduce students to the skills
necessary to begin their own college newspapers.

Participants will also have the opportunity to visit with the new executive
director of the Native American Journalists Association.

For Native media professionals, workshops in story development, writing
photography and design will give those people already working in the media the
opportunity to hone their journalism skills. Journalism professionals from the
Grand Forks Herald and the School of Communication will instruct the
workshops.

Northern Plains Media Consortium meetings will also be held. The Consortium
was formed in 1983 to encourage, inspire, enhance and empower Native
communications in the northern plains region. Membership and informational
meetings will be held during the Caucus.

The keynote speaker is Harley Straus Visiting Photographer Mary Annette
Pember. Pember, Red Cliff Ojibwe, is currently the Picture Editor at the
Lexington Herald-Leader, a daily newspaper in Lexington, Ky. She has won
numerous awards for her photography, and was one of 12 journalists of color to
cover the UN World Conference on Women in Beijing, China. She has been staff
photographer for the Oregonian, the Arizona Republic and the Cincinnati
Enquirer. Her work has also been published in Ms magazine and the book, "A
Circle of Nations, Voices and Visions of American Indians."

Harley Straus taught photojournalism at UND from 1980 until his death in 1989.
Shortly before his death, he and his wife, Zena Beth McGlashan, also a School
of Communication journalism professor, established the Harley Straus Visiting
Photographer Fund to bring outstanding photographers to UND to inspire
photography students. The Fund continues to support this endeavor in his
memory.

The Environmental Racism and the Media panel discussion will cover issues
including environmental policy-making, targeting of minority communities for
toxic waste facilities, presence of poisons and pollutants in our communities
and leadership of the environmental movement.


The conference schedules follows:

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9: 1 to 3 p.m., Conference registration, Native Media Center,
321 O'Kelly Hall; 3 to 5 p.m., Native Media Center Open House, 321 O'Kelly
Hall; 6:30 to 8 p.m., Gathering of Communicators and Prayer Ceremony, River
Valley Room, Memorial Union.

THURSDAY, APRIL 10: 8 to 9 a.m., Opening Prayer and Continental Breakfast,
Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, with welcome by Mike Saunders, Director of
Native Media Center; 9 to 11 a.m., Journalism Workshops, Native Media Center,
on Story Development" and "Interviewing Techniques"; 11 a.m. to noon, Panel on
Radio Production; 1 to 4 p.m., Journalism Workshops on "Writing the News" and
"Leads and Headlines"; 4:15 to 5 p.m., Northern Plains Media Consortium
Business Meeting, River Valley Room, Memorial Union; 7 to 9 p.m., Panel,
"Native Women and the Media," with Cheryl Red Eagle, Columnist, and Mary
Annette Pember, Photojournalist, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union.

FRIDAY, APRIL 11: 8 to 9 a.m., Opening Prayer and Continental Breakfast,
Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, with welcome by Harold Iron Shield, Northern
Plains Media Consortium; 9 to 11 a.m., Journalism Workshops, Native Media
Center, on "Visual Storytelling: Tips on Photography and Design"; 11 a.m. to
12:30 p.m., Panel on "Environmental Racism and the Media," Lecture Bowl,
Memorial Union; 1 to 5 p.m., Journalism Workshops, Native Media Center, on
"Writing Feature Stories," and "Newspaper Production"; 3 to 4 p.m., Northern
Plains Media Consortium Membership Meeting, River Valley Room, Memorial Union;
4 to 5 p.m., Native Media Press Conference, River Valley Room, Memorial Union;
5:30 to 7 p.m., Banquet (provided for paid participants), River Valley Room,
Memorial Union, speaker will be Loren Omoto, Executive Director of Native
American Journalists Association; 7 to 9 p.m., Presentation by Mary Annette
Pember, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union.

The conference is sponsored by the Native Media Center, School of
Communication; the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation; and the Northern
Plains Media Consortium, Moorhead, Minn. 

For more information, contact the Native Media Center, Mike Saunders at 777-2478, or Lucy Ganje at 777-2670, Box 7169, Grand Forks, ND 58202. -- Kim Lee,
Native Directions.
*******

Down Syndrome Symposium Scheduled

The Down Syndrome Support Group is sponsoring "Caring for Down Right Beautiful
People," a symposium on current issues concerning people with Down Syndrome.
Topics to be discussed include Family Stress Management, Inclusion, and
Medical Issues Across the Life Span. Keynote speakers include Allan Crocker,
Program Director of the Institute for Community Inclusion at Children's
Hospital in Boston, and Robert Venniga from the University of Minnesota. The
cost of the day and a half symposium is $20 for an individual or $25 per
family. It will be held at the Grand Forks Holiday Inn Friday and Saturday,
April 25 and 26, and is sponsored by the Arc. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, for Rick
Blair at The Arc, Upper Valley, 772-6191.
*******

Faculty May Apply For WAC Workshop

Faculty who plan to develop a writing component for a course, or to reconsider
and restructure writing activities currently being used, are invited to apply
to participate in a seven-session May Extended Writing Across the Curriculum
Workshop. The workshop is scheduled for seven mornings (May 12-13, 15-16, and
19-21), from 8:30 a.m. until noon each day. Group members will work together
during those sessions to address teaching with writing issues as they relate
to their own course projects. Stipends of $600 will be awarded to
participants.

Faculty who are interested in participating in this workshop should apply by
April 1, since participation is limited. For more information on the workshop,
contact me. -- Joan Hawthorne, WAC Coordinator, 7-6381 or
hawthorn@badlands.nodak.edu.
*******

OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

Fall Class Schedules Available March 24
The "Time Schedule of Classes" for Summer and Fall 1997, to be used by
departments for advising purposes, will be available for pickup in the
reception area of the Office of Admissions and Records, second floor, Twamley
Hall, beginning at 9 a.m. Monday, March 24. If you have questions, please call
7-2711. -- Veriena Garver, Admissions and Records Officer, Office of
Admissions and Records.
*******

March 27 Is Last Day To Drop Course, Withdraw

The last day to drop a full-term course or withdraw from school for the 1997
Spring Semester is Thursday, March 27. Students completely withdrawing from
UND must use the UND "withdrawal" form which is available at the Office of
Admissions and Records, 201 Twamley Hall; students are not to use the
Registration Action Form for this process. -- Alice Poehls, Director of
Admissions and Records.
*******

Help Update Directory Of Scientists, Artists & Scholars

The Graduate School and the Office of University Relations are in the process
of updating the Directory of Scientists, Artists & Scholars. Faculty and
researchers should soon receive in the mail a form, a copy of an entry from
the last directory and a letter from Graduate School Dean Harvey Knull asking
them to participate in the project. Please fill out the form and return it to
Research Directory, Office of University Relations, Box 7144, by Friday, March
28. To help expedite the process, you may wish to use the form on the world
wide web. It can be found at http://www.und.nodak.edu/form. Thank you in
advance for your help on this important project. -- Peter Johnson, Assistant
Director, University Relations.
*******

Human Subject Research Must Be Approved

The UND Institutional Review Board (IRB) was established in 1980 to protect
the rights and welfare of humans who are the subjects of research activities
conducted under the auspices of the University of North Dakota. All persons
affiliated with the University who wish to conduct research involving human
subjects on or off campus must first receive approval of the IRB. This process
is initiated by submitting a research protocol to the IRB. Forms are available
in the Office of Research and Program Development (ORPD) in 105 Twamley Hall.

There are three categories used in the review of research protocols: "Exempt";
"Expedited"; and "Full Board" review. Descriptions of the various categories
of review are included with the IRB forms. Approval of "Exempt" and
"Expedited" protocols may be provided by an individual member of the Board and
generally do not require a Full Board review. Approximately 14 days are
required for the review if it is determined that an "Exempt" or "Expedited"
review is appropriate. However, the individual reviewer may request additional
information or refer the protocol to the Full Board. In either case, the
review may take longer. The Full Board meets on a monthly basis. The schedule
for the coming year (1997-98) is attached.

If a Full Board review is required and the protocol involves clinical
subjects, the Clinical Medical Subcommittee must also review the protocol and
provide a recommendation to the IRB. This typically requires one additional
week for the review process.

IRB members are available to make presentations to faculty, students, and
staff regarding IRB policies, procedures, etc. Also, ORPD has several videos
and books which may be checked out by faculty members. Contact Shirley Griffin
at 7-4279 or shirley_griffin@mail.und.nodak.edu if you are interested in
either of these options.

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARD
MEETING AND DEADLINE DATES: APRIL 1997-MAY 1998

Meeting Date       Deadline: Proposals       Deadline: Clinical Proposals
(Meetings Held     Requiring                 (Require Subcommittee and
at 4:00 p.m.)      Full Board Review         Full Board Review)  
 
Fri., April 4      Tues., March 25           Tues., March 18
Fri., May 2        Tues., April 22           Tues., April 15
Wed., June 4       Tues., May 27             Tues., May 20
Wed., July 2       Mon., June 23             Mon., June 16
Wed., August 6     Mon., July 28             Mon., July 21
Fri., Sept. 5      Tues., August 26          Tues., August 19
Fri., Oct. 3       Tues., Sept. 23           Tues., Sept. 16
Fri, Nov. 7        Tues., Oct. 28            Tues., Oct. 21
Fri., Dec. 5       Tues., Nov. 25            Tues., Nov. 18
Fri., Jan. 9       Tues., Dec. 30            Tues., Dec. 23
Fri., Feb. 6       Tues., Jan. 27            Tues., Jan. 20
Fri., March 6      Tues., Feb. 24            Tues., Feb. 17
Fri., April 3      Tues., March 24           Tues., March 17
Fri., May 1        Tues., April 21           Tues., April 14

NOTE:  All meetings will be held at 4:00 p.m. in Room 305 Twamley.  Alterations
in location, date, or time will be announced in the University Letter prior to
the meeting.

-- F.R. Ferraro (Psychology), Chair, Institutional Review Board.
*******

Doctoral Exam Set For Norton And Goeb

The final examination for Marge R. Norton, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree
with a major in Clinical Psychology, is set for 9 a.m. Tuesday, April 1, in
210 Corwin-Larimore Hall. The dissertation title is "The Effects of Attraction
to Sexual Aggression, a History of Self-Reported Sexually Aggressive Behavior,
and Social Disinhibition on the Expression of Sexually Agressive Behavior in
the Laboratory." Jeffrey Holm (Psychology) is the committee chair.

The final examination for Richard Allan Goeb, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree
with a major in Educational Administration, is set for 2 p.m. Wednesday, April
2, in 208 Education Building. The dissertation title is "A Comparison of Moral
Reasoning Among Selected NCAA Division II Intercollegiate Coaches and
Athletes." John Backes (Educational Leadership) is the committee chair.

Members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend. -- Harvey Knull, Dean,
Graduate School.
*******

GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

Applications Available For STTAR Program

Interaction between academic researchers and industry improves academic and
learning opportunities, and benefits businesses and the state's economy. In
response to the recognized need for improved technology transfer, North Dakota
EPSCoR (Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research) supports an
innovative program, Students in Technology Transfer and Research (STTAR).
Since the summer of 1994, the program has received an enthusiastic response,
and funding is available for up to 30 student positions for the summer of
1997.

The STTAR program encourages business/academic partnerships in technology by
hiring students in science and technology areas (engineering, industrial
technology, computer science, biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, etc.).
A business enterprise does not have to be a technology company to be eligible
for assistance. However, the problem or research effort must be based in
science, engineering or mathematics.

EPSCoR-approved business applications are forwarded to North Dakota University
System (NDUS) Cooperative Education offices. Students interested in STTAR
should register with their Cooperative Education offices and follow the
student application process. Cooperative Education offices then send student
applications to participating businesses for review.
The STTAR program is administered through the combined efforts of ND EPSCoR;
the Cooperative Education offices at UND, North Dakota State University,
Mayville State University, Valley City State University, the Center for
Innovation; the Institute for Business and Industrial Development (NDSU); and
the North Dakota Small Business Development Centers (UND).

All NDUS and North Dakota resident students (upper-division) are eligible to
work with North Dakota companies for seven to 12 weeks during the summer. The
STTAR program will cost-share the student's salary. The business provides a
minimum of a one-to-one match for the student's salary. Student applications
are available in the Cooperative Education Office, 120 Hyslop Sports Center;
the application deadline is Tuesday, April 15. Business applications are
available through the Center for Innovation at the new Rural Technology Center
on the west edge of campus. Top consideration is given to business
applications received by March 31. -- Darlene Van Tour, Director of
Cooperative Education, 7-4104, and Bruce Gjovig, Director of the Center for
Innovation, 7-3134.
*******

Research Funding Opportunities Listed

Following are several items on research and grant opportunities. For more
information, please contact the Office of Research and Program Development at
7-4278.

THE CHARLES A. & ANNE MORROW LINDBERGH FOUNDATION

Lindbergh Grants (up to $10,580 each) are made in the following categories:
aviation/aerospace, agriculture, arts and humanities, biomedical research and
adaptive technology, conservation of natural resources (animals, plants,
water), general conservation education, exploration, health (biomedical
research, population sciences, adaptive technology), intercultural
communication, oceanography, waste minimization and management, water resource
management, and wildlife preservation.  The grants often provide seed money
and credibility for pilot projects that subsequently receive larger sums from
other sources.

DEADLINE: Second Tuesday in June in the year preceding the awarding of funds

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: The Charles A. & Anne Morrow Lindbergh
Foundation, 708 South 3rd Street, Suite 110, Minneapolis, MN 55415-1141; or
the website at http://www.mtn.lindfdtn; or call ORPD at 7-4278.
- - - - - - - - - - - -


RESEARCH CORPORATION

The Research Corporation supports scientific research and experimentation in
the core physical sciences, chemistry, physics and astronomy. 

Cottrell College Science Awards encourage research with undergraduates. 
Cottrell Scholars Awards ($50,000) are made to beginning faculty wishing to
excel at teaching and research.  The Partners in Science program provides
awards to colleges and universities to support collaborative summer research
between a high school chemistry, physics or biology teacher and a faculty
mentor.  Research Opportunity Awards are for mid-career tenured science
faculty who wish to reestablish vigorous research programs.  The Corporation
occasionally funds novel research projects that are unlikely to receive
support from more traditional sources.

DEADLINES: Contact the Foundation for Target Dates for the various programs.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Research Corporation, Science Advancement
Program, 101 N. Wilmot Rd., Ste. 250, Tucson, AZ 85711-3332; Telephone
(602)471-1111; Fax (602) 571-1119; or http://rctech.com; or call ORPD at 7-4278.
- - - - - - - - - - - -


INTERNATIONAL LIFE SCIENCES INSTITUTE (ILSI) REQUEST FOR PREPROPOSALS
NEW INVESTIGATOR AWARD AND FOOD ALLERGY AWARD 
FOR FOOD SCIENTISTS

The ILSI is currently accepting preproposals for the 1998 New Investigator
Award.  These awards provide $50,000 per year for three years for basic and/or
limited clinical research in food allergy and immunology.  The awards are used
primarily for the investigator's salary.

Preproposals are also being accepted for Food Allergy Awards for Food
Scientists.  These awards provide $25,000 per year for three years in support
for research in the underlying mechanisms of food allergy, the development of
immunotoxicological testing procedures that show potential to predict allergic
potential of food borne substances, the identification and characterization of
food allergens, the detection of residues of food allergens or allergenic
foods contaminating other foods, and the effect of processing on allergenicity
of foods including the developing of novel hypoallergenic processing methods.

DEADLINE: June 16, 1997

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Catherine Nnoka, Manager, ILSI Allergy
and Immunology Institute, 1126 Sixteenth Street, NW, Washington, DC, 20036-4810; Telephone 202/659-0074; Fax 202/659-3859; e-mail aii@dc.ilsi.org; or
call ORPD at 7-4278.
- - - - - - - - - - - -


AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY (ACS)
PROGRAMS OF THE PETROLEUM RESEARCH FUND (PRF)

Type AC grants from the Petroleum Research Fund usually provide $50,000 over
two years for stipends for graduate students, undergraduates, or postdoctoral
fellows, summer faculty salary, research supplies, travel costs, and a $500
annual departmental allocation.

Type B grants provide $25,000 over two years to departments which DO NOT award
the Ph.D and must include participation by undergraduate students.

Type G  Starter  grants are awarded to new faculty in the first three years of
a tenure-track appointment who do not have extensive postdoctoral research
experience.  They provide $20,000 over two years for student stipends, summer
faculty salary, supplies, equipment, travel.

Summer Research Fellowships are awarded as supplements to active ACS-PRF
grants and provide $5,000 to support faculty guest researchers from non-doctoral institutions.

Scientific Education Grants usually provide partial funding for foreign
speakers at major symposia in the U.S. or Canada.

DEADLINE: None.  Proposals reviewed in February, May and November. Proposals
should reach ACS four months in advance of meeting at which you wish
consideration.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. Joseph E. Rogers, Jr., Program
Administrator, The Petroleum Research Fund, American Chemical Society, 1155
Sixteenth St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036; telephone (202)872-6091; email
prfinfo@acs.org; http://www.acs.org; or call ORPD at 7-4278.
- - - - - - - - - - - -


NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE
CHEMOPREVENTION IN GENETICALLY-IDENTIFIED HIGH-RISK GROUPS

The purpose of this initiative is to establish integrated, multidisciplinary
research programs that define and evaluate chemopreventive strategies in
asymptomatic subjects at high risk for cancer. This Request for Applications
seeks programs with administrative core functions supporting at least three
independent but integrated research projects that share a common focus
directed at designing and evaluating chemopreventive strategies in high-risk
cohorts. This includes groups with on-going administrative clinical trials
core functions and laboratory support such as cooperative groups, CCOP
Research Bases and NCI designated cancer centers. At least two of the
individual projects must involve Phase I/II or Phase II clinical
chemoprevention trials or translational research needed for chemoprevention
applications.  (NIH Guide, Vol. 26, No. 7, 3/7/97, RFA Available: CA-97-005.)

DEADLINE: Letter of Intent Receipt Date: April 3, 1997
  Application Receipt Date: May 22, 1997

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:  URL:
http://web.fie.com/htdoc/fed/nih/gen/any/ proc/any/03079707.htm; or call ORPD
at 7-4278.
- - - - - - - - - - - -


NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE (NCI)
PIVOTAL CLINICAL TRIALS FOR CHEMOPREVENTION AGENT DEVELOPMENT 

The Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC), of the NCI invites
applications to further drug development efforts of the Chemoprevention Branch
by carrying out intermediate-sized Phase II/III efficacy trials of promising
chemopreventive agents in major cancer target organs, particularly prostate,
breast, lung, colon, and bladder.  Approximately $3 million in total costs for
the first year of support for the program will be committed to fund three to
four cooperative agreement applications submitted in response to this RFA. 
(NIH Guide, Volume 26, Number 7, March 7, 1997, RFA available: CA-97-014.)

DEADLINE: Letter of Intent Receipt Date: April 3, 1997
Application Receipt Date: May 22, 1997

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION:  URL:
http://web.fie.com/htdoc/fed/nih/gen/any/proc/any/ 03079709.htm; or call ORPD
at 7-4278.
- - - - - - - - - - - -


NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING (NIA)
PILOT RESEARCH GRANT PROGRAM IN NEUROSCIENCE AND BIOLOGY

The NIA is seeking small grant (R03) applications to: (1) stimulate and
facilitate the entry of promising new investigators into the neuroscience and
biology of aging and (2) encourage established investigators to enter new
targeted, high priority areas in these research fields.  This Small Grant
(R03) Program provides support for pilot research that is likely to lead to a
subsequent individual research project grant (R01) or a FIRST (R29) award
application and/or a significant advancement of aging research.  (NIH Guide,
Volume 26, Number 7, March 7, 1997; PA Available: PAR-97-040).

DEADLINES: July 17, November 17

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: URL:
http://web.fie.com/htdoc/fed/nih/gen/any/proc/any/ 03079711.htm; or call ORPD
at 7-4278.
- - - - - - - - - - - -


NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING (NIA): PILOT GRANTS IN GERIATRICS

The Geriatrics Program of the NIA is seeking small grant (R03) applications to
stimulate and facilitate research in underdeveloped topics in specific areas
of aging research. This Small Grant (R03) Program provides support for pilot
research that is likely to lead to a subsequent individual research project
grant (R01) or a FIRST (R29) award application and/or a significant
advancement of aging research. These R03 projects include, but are not limited
to, research that is innovative and/or high risk.  (NIH Guide, Volume 26,
Number 7, March 7, 1997, PA Available: PAR-97-041.)

DEADLINES: July 17, November 17

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: URL :
http://web.fie.com/htdoc/fed/nih/gen/any/proc/any/ 03079713.htm; or call ORPD
at 7-4278.
- - - - - - - - - - - -


NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES (NIAID)
INNOVATION GRANT PROGRAM FOR APPROACHES IN HIV VACCINE RESEARCH

The NIAID seeks to implement a new program aimed at rapidly exploiting new
scientific opportunities to broaden the base of scientific inquiry in areas
related to vaccine discovery and development. The NIAID invites applications,
including those from researchers previously outside the field of AIDS
research, for research projects that involve a high degree of innovation, risk
and novelty--as well as a clear promise of helping to improve vaccine design
or evaluation--in three categories.  (NIH Guide, Volume 26, Number 7, March 7,
1997, PA Available: PAR-97-042.)

DEADLINE: Application Receipt Date: May 23, 1997

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: URL:
http://web.fie.com/htdoc/fed/nih/gen/any/proc/any/ 03079715.htm; or call ORPD
at 7-4278.

-- Carl A. Fox, Director of Research and Program Development.
*******

BILLBOARD

Changes Made In Receiving Report Processing

Effective with the purchase orders/receiving reports created August 1, 1996,
and after, the following procedural changes were implemented:

  Instructions on the Receiving Report advise departments 
  to return the signed Receiving Report with the quantity 
  and date received for each item to Accounts Payable, Box 8370.

If you have any questions about the receipt of merchandise ordered, contact
Central Receiving at 7-4359. If you have any questions about payment of an
open order, contact Accounts Payable at 7-2773. -- Allison Peyton, Accounts
Payable Manager.
*******

Meritorious Service Nominations Due April 11

This is a reminder to all faculty, staff and others associated with UND that
the deadline for nominations for Meritorious Service Awards for staff
employees is Friday, April 11.  The completed nomination form must be
forwarded to Personnel Services, 313 Twamley Hall, Box 8010, by that date. 
Any questions regarding this award program should be directed to Personnel
Services at 7-4361. -- Cheryl Osowski, Personnel Services.
*******

State Fleet Vehicles Available

The North Dakota State Fleet has been updating and adding to the selection of
vehicles available for University and state agency use. Pool sedans now
consist of Dodge Neons, Plymouth Breezes, and Dodge Intrepids. New to the
fleet is a cargo van, two mini-cargo vans, and a Chevy S-10 pickup with
extended cab. Please post the following rates in your department. To make
reservations, contact the Transportation Office at 7-4122 from 8 a.m. to 4:30
p.m. Monday through Friday.

  Vehicle Type          Rate Per Mile*
  Sedans, Compact           0.189
  Sedans, Midsize           0.237
  Minivan                   0.298
  Van, 8 passenger          0.354
  Van, 12 passenger         0.354
  Van, 15 passenger         0.354
  Suburban, 6 passenger     0.319
  Chevy S-10 Pickup         0.327
  Cargo Van                 0.438
  Mini Cargo Van            0.327
  Hi-Cube Cargo Van         0.327
  Trailer                  $6.00/day

*Note: Rates may be adjusted periodically.
Drivers for vans available upon request.

-- Mary Metcalf, Office Manager, UND Transportation.
*******

Majors Fair Set For March 24

The spring semester Majors Fair will be held Monday, March 24, from 11 a.m. to
2 p.m in the Memorial Union Ballroom. Approximately 150 students attended the
fall semester Majors Fair where they could explore the offerings from 39
academic departments and Career Counseling. Academic departments will again
have faculty representatives available to answer students' questions or
concerns and to discuss the majors available. The fair will be conducted in a
casual atmosphere.

The goal of the Majors Fair is to provide accurate information which enables
students to make informed academic decisions. There are a great number of UND
students who do not declare their major upon entrance to the University. Many
declared students are actually interested in a number of majors and need more
information to make their final decision. Also, many students change their
major during their academic years at the University.

Thank you to the participants. The fair would not be possible without the
support of those academic departments and Career Counseling. For additional
information please contact Student Academic Services at 7-2117. -- Janice
Mostofi, Academic Advisor, Student Academic Services.
*******

Education Students Invited To Recruiting Fair

Faculty and staff are asked to encourage Education students to participate in
the North Dakota Education Connection Recruiting Fair Wednesday, March 26, in
the Memorial Union Ballroom. This Fair is sponsored by all North Dakota
universities that prepare teachers and is an opportunity for candidates to
meet with representatives from many school districts in a one-day format.
Registration forms are available at Career Services, 120 Hyslop Sports Center.
-- Mark Thompson, Director, Career Services.
*******

April 7-11 Is Student Employment Week

The week of April 7-11 has been designated as Student Employment Week. The
observance of this week provides us an opportunity as employers and educators
to recognize the contributions student employees make to our campus, and to
emphasize the benefits of the student employment programs to our students.
Please remember to say "Thank You" to your student employees. A special treat
or lunch is nice. -- Alice Hoffert, Director, Student Financial Aid.
*******

Nominations Sought for Organization Award

Each year student organizations are recognized for their work within the
University community. The awards highlight organizations' programming efforts,
community service, leadership development programs and overall accomplishments
throughout the year. The awards recognize the outside-the-classroom work of
students and student organizations.

Please stop by the Student Organization Center or call 7-3620 for an
application.  Completed applications must be submitted by 4:30 p.m. Wednesday,
April 16, to the Student Organizations Center, Memorial Union. The awards will
be presented during the Memorial Union Leadership Program on April 25.

-- Ben Subedi, Coordinator of Student Organizations.
*******
Good Friday Is Holiday

In accordance with State Board of Higher Education directives, Friday, March
28, will be observed as Good Friday by faculty and staff members of the
University. Only those employees designated by their department heads will be
required to work on this holiday. -- Marlene Strathe, Vice President for
Academic Affairs and Provost, and Diane Nelson, Director, Personnel Services.
*******

Chester Fritz Library:

The Easter Weekend hours at the Chester Fritz Library are: Thursday, March 27,
8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Friday, March 28, closed; Saturday, March 29, 1 to 5
p.m.; Sunday, March 30, closed. Regular hours will resume Monday, March 31. --
Patricia Berntsen, Assistant Director, Chester Fritz Library.
*******

Health Sciences Library:

Easter hours are: Thursday, March 27, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Friday, March 28,
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, March 29, 1 to 5 p.m.; Sunday, March 30, closed.
-- April Byars, Administrative Assistant, Library of the Health Sciences.
*******

Computer Center:

The Computer Center will close for the Good Friday holiday at midnight
Thursday, March 27, and will reopen at midnight Friday, March 28. -- Nadine
Kotowicz, Operations Manager, Computer Center.
*******

Memorial Union:

Easter Break hours for the Memorial Union follow.
All areas will be closed Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, March 28-30.

Hours for Thursday, March 27, are:

LIFETIME SPORTS CENTER, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; INFO CENTER, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.;
SERVICE CENTER, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; COPY STOP, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; BURGER KING,
7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; BOOKSTORE, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE, 8
a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; CRAFT CENTER/SIGN AND DESIGN STUDIO, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.;
DINING CENTER, 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.; BARBER SHOP, 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.;
CENTENNIAL ROOM, 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.; ESPRESSO BAR, 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.;
CORNER DELI, 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.; UNIVERSITY LEARNING CENTER, 8 a.m. to 4:30
p.m.; UNION STATION, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; PASSPORT IDs, 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.;
COMPUTER LEARNING LAB, 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.; BUILDING HOURS, 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.

-- Marsha Nelson, Facilities Coordinator, Memorial Union.
*******

Disability Support Services News

What is an accommodation?

An accommodation is an action or service that is used to get around the
functional limitations of a disabling condition so that a student with a
disability has similar access to materials and services that students without
disabilities have. In other words, accommodations level the playing field;
they do not provide special treatment or an advantage. For example, if someone
cannot use printed materials (most often because of a visual impairment,
blindness or some types of learning disabilities), UND is responsible for
providing printed materials, such as course textbooks, tests, time schedule of
classes, etc. in an alternate format, i.e. audio tape, disk copy, or large
print.

How do I know that the requested accommodation is appropriate?

Somtimes, the person being asked to make an accommodation may not be sure that
the accommodation is necessary. This happens most often when the person
requesting has an invisible disability, and therefore the reason for the
request is not obvious. For example, if a student cannot move her/his arms
requests a notetaker and test writer, no one would question whether the
accommodations were intended to level the playing field or would give the
student an undue advantage. However, if the person has a learning disability
which adversely affects his/her ability to write, those same requests could be
viewed as a special privilege.  

In order to avoid both the inappropriate use or withholding of accommodations,
DSS provides the verification needed to make reasonable and appropriate
accommodations. In order to do that, we require that the student supply DSS
with a written statement from a licensed or certified professional in a
position to either diagnose or verify the student's disability. Such
professionals include medical doctors, psychologists, audiologists,
rehabilitation counselors and learning disabilities specialists.  At UND, DSS
is responsible for housing these confidential records, thereby relieving other
departments of the burden of setting up specific policy statements and
procedures to maintain the security and confidentiality of these records.  

Usually, the student requesting a classroom accommodation will have a form or
letter from DSS, which provides the verification needed that the request is
legitimate. When the request is not for a class, such as asking for the UND
catalog on disk, the student may not have such a document. However, if you
want verification, ask the student to contact DSS, rather than personally
calling and asking for disability related information about the student.
Because of confidentiality rules, DSS cannot disclose that a student is
registered with our office nor can we say anything about the student's
disability without the student's express permission. Therefore, the best way
to handle this situation is to ask the student to contact DSS and make
arrangements to provide the verification you need.  

We will continue this discussion on accommodations in the next article. For
more information, call DSS at 7-3425 or visit our web site:
http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/dss/dss.htm -- Disability Support Services.
*******

CILT Plans Open House

The Center for Instructional and learning Technologies (CILT), in conjunction
with its advisory board will host an open house on Tuesday, March 25, from 11
a.m. to 1 p.m. to introduce the New Media Studio for faculty. The studio
provides a working and meeting environment for design, consultation and
development of instructional materials.

As a division of Academic Affairs, our mission is to provide leadership and
support for the enhancement of teaching and learning through the appropriate
integration of technology. CILT is located in 108 Sayre Hall at 370 Oxford
Street. 

Please join us. -- Kathy Smart, Director, Center for Instructional and
Learning Technologies.
*******

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

Guild Trio Closes Museum Concert Series

New York's Guild Trio, one of contemporary America's most exciting chamber
music groups, will close the North Dakota Museum of Art's 1996-97 Concert
Series season with their performance Sunday, March 23, at 2 p.m.

Since pianist Patricia Tao, violinist Janet Orenstein and cellist Brooks
Whitehouse formed the trio in 1988 at the State University of New York at
Stony Brook, they have appeared throughout the United States, Canada, Europe
and Australia and have recorded works by Saint-Saens, Loeffler, Martinu and
Honneger while at the same time pursuing their own solo performance careers.
In 1990 the Tanglewood Music Center awarded the musicians the position of
trio-in-residence after the Guild Trio won the prestigious Artistic Ambassador
Competition. In 1991 they were one of four groups in the nation to receive a
matching grant from Chamber Music America for their unique new residency at
SUNY's Institute for Medicine in Contemporary Society.

For the past six years the Guild Trio has continued to perform at prestigious
chamber music series, colleges and universities across North America,
acquiring critical admiration as they travel. The Boston Globe writes "The
Guild Trio is irrefutably there, a beautiful new landmark just waiting for the
map-drawer."

Their performance at the museum will include pieces by Mozart, Schubert, and
"Four Movements for Piano Trio" by Bright Sheng, a composer who immigrated
from Shanghai to New York in 1982. The piece allows the Guild Trio to develop
Sheng's concept of "tonality" by unifying the traditions of Oriental classical
and folk music and western classical music, the two bases of Sheng's
composition.

Recordings by the Guild Trio will be on sale before and after the performance.
Surrounding the musicians will be the museum's current exhibition of paintings
by David Krueger, Back Water.

General admission to the concert is $12, $5 for students, and children 12 and
under are admitted free. The Museum Concert Series is sponsored by the Myra
Foundation and the City of Grand Forks. -- Andrea Dobberman, North Dakota
Museum of Art.
*******

Folk Dance Society Meets Saturdays

You're invited to Folk Dance contradances, squares, and reels with the North
Country Traditional Dance Society, most Saturday mornings at 10 a.m. in the
Hughes Fine Arts Center. -- Jan Orvik, Editor; for Jeanne O'Neil, North
Country Traditional Dance Society.
*******

International Centre Lists Events

The Thursday, March 27, program at 7 p.m. in the International Centre, 2908
University Ave., is "International Egg Dyeing," featuring arts from the
various cultures used for dyeing of eggs. International students will present
their artistic work and all participants will have an opportunity to create
their own international egg art piece. Please join us. -- Sharon Rezac
Andersen, International Centre, 7-4231.
*******

FYI

Bookstore Introduces New Staff members

The University Bookstore Computer Sales Department has had two recent
additions to its staff, Kristi Bruno and Mark Argall. Kristi is the new
Computer Sales Supervisor. She's spent the last two years at Gaffaney's as
their Senior Computer Consultant, and previously was with TTI, Inc. in Denver,
Colo. Mark Argall, Storekeeper II, has been with UND for eight years. He's
worked with inventory and supplies at CAS, Plant Services and Transportation.
-- Don Forbes, Manager, University Bookstore.
*******

March 21 Is "Green And White Day"

President Kendall Baker has approved Friday, March 21, as a "Green and White
Day." Employees may wear UND colors and jeans. The men's and women's NCAA
Finals will take place over the weekend. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, University
Letter.
*******

Wednesday, March 26, Is Denim Day

Wednesday, March 26, is Denim Day! Dig out that Denim Day button, wear it
proudly, and know that your $1 all goes to charity. March weather being as
variable as it is around here, "going casual" probably will be an excellent
idea. Can't find your button? Your building coordinator can sell you a
replacement for 50 cents. -- Patsy Nies, Office of the Vice President for
Student Affairs.
*******

IN THE NEWS

Center for Aerospace Sciences

The UND Aerospace home page on the World Wide Web has been named a Netguide
Platinum site.  The Platinum Award recognizes Web sites that meet stringent
criteria for overall excellence.  Of 100,000 URLs screened, only 5,000 receive
the Platinum award.  The page may be found at http://www.aero.und.edu, or you
can link to it from UNDInfo, http://www.und.edu.

College of Arts and Sciences
An undergraduate student project directed by Mark Henriksen (Physics) was co-winner of the first prize at the Undergraduate Research Conference and
Competition in Minot.  The paper was titled "An X-Ray and Optical Study of
Galaxies in Pairs," and was a continuation of a summer research project began
as part of the Research Experience for Undergraduates Program at UND. 
Subsequent funding was provided by the National Science Foundation and the
National Aeronautics and Space Administration. She and another student had
abstracts accepted for the National Conference on Undergraduate Research to
give papers on their extended REU projects in Austin, Texas. . . .  Melinda
Leach (Anthropology) co-chaired the symposium,  Invisible No More: Identifying
Women's Roles and Activities in the Great Basin Archaeological Record.    She
also presented "Traveling Light: Women and Tools in the Prehistoric Massacre
Lake Basin" at the Great Basin Anthropological Conference at Lake Tahoe. . . . 
Wendelin Hume (Sociology/Criminal Justice/Women Studies) presented "Anecdotes
and Recommendations:  Wrapping Up the Work of the North Dakota Supreme Court
Gender Fairness Commission"  at the annual conference of the Midwestern
Criminal Justice Association in Indianapolis. He has been selected to serve a
two year term on the editorial board of the Journal of Crime & Justice, the
journal of the Midwestern Criminal Justice Association.  He has also been
selected for inclusion in Who's Who Among America's Teachers 1996, which
honors a select five percent of the nation's teachers. . . .  John Anderton,
Paul Todhunter and Mohammad Hemmasi (all Geography) attended the Great
Plains/Rocky Mountain Division of the Association of American Geographers
Annual Meeting at Greeley, Colo.  Anderton presented "Fire Chronologies in
Northern Great Lakes Coastal Pine Forests: A Case for Probable Native American
Influence." Hemmasi presented "Iran's Policies in the Persian Gulf: Potentials
for Conflict or Cooperation." . . .  Morten Ender (Sociology) published
"Working with the Bereaved: U.S. Army Experiences with Nontraditional
Families" in Death Studies, 20:557-575 (Nov/Dec., 1996).  He also presented
"The Real World: Undergraduate Participation in an Optional Service Learning
Project" at the Great Plains Sociological Society Meeting in Bismarck, and
"Who Am I?: Autophotography as a Pedagogical Tool" at the Association of
Humanist Sociology Association Meetings in Hartford, Conn.  And, he published
"Syllabus: The Sociology of Death and Dying" in G.R. Cox and R.A. Bendisken
(eds.), Death, Dying, and Bioethics: A Teaching Resource Manual for Courses on
the Sociology of Death (1996, Second Edition, 83-89). . .  Curtis Stofferahn
(Sociology) has been appointed to the national review panel for the USDA's
National Research Initiative (NRI) in Rural Development.  He will be the
principal reviewer for seven research proposals and secondary reviewer for
another seven.  The panel will meet in Washington, D.C.  He has previously
served as third party reviewer for the USDA's NRI. . . .  James Vivian
(History) published "Our Forgotten Naval Victory: Theodore Roosevelt and the
Commitment to the U.S.S. North Dakota, 1907," in North Dakota History, Vol. 63
(Fall 1996), 24-31. . . .  William Borden (English) has a short story, "In the
Autumn," in Grow Old Along With Me, The Best Is Yet To Be, Paper-Mache Press,
Watsonville, Calif., 1996.  The audio edition of the book was nominated for a
1997 Grammy Award, and Ed Asner reads "In the Autumn" on the audio edition. 
The short story was one of 60 stories and poems selected from more than 1,700
submissions.  Borden has another story, "Bear Dances," in American Fiction,
Ed. Alan Davis, New Rivers Press, Minneapolis, 1996.  The story was one of 12
chosen from more than 1,000 submissions.  His poem, "Rolling Up Sidewalks,"
was nominated for a Pushcart Prize XXII by the Briar Cliff Review.  His poem,
"Geese Fly South," won an honorable mention in the 1997 Nostalgia magazine
poetry contest. Other recent poetry publications include "Bear Warning" and "A
Man Stands in His Driveway" in the 1997 Minnesota Poetry Calendar, Black Hat
Press, Goodhue, Minn.; "Watching Eagle Lake," in the anthology Going to the
Lake, Loonfeather Press, Bemidji, Minn., 1996; "Greenspeak," on the
Minneapolis Star Tribune Web site, 1997; "At the Museum of Modern Art,"
CityLegacy, Spring, 1997; "Great Blue Heron," Loonfeather, Vol. 17, No. 1,
1996; and "On the Way," Main Street Rag, No. 2, Winter, 1996.  His play,
Garage Sale, won the 1996 Grand View College Prairie Playwrights Festival, Des
Moines; his play, Something Lighter, was produced by the Attic Theatre, Los
Angeles. The Alien Hypothesis was produced by Loft Productions, Tampa, Fla. 
He has given readings from his published novel, Superstoe, in Indianapolis,
Des Moines, Minneapolis, St. Paul, Fargo, Devils Lake, and Bemidji. His
screenplay, Loon Dance, was optioned by Wellington Studies in Minneapolis.
Sakakawea, the musical drama for which he write the libretto, is discussed at
length in Cultural Images of Sacagawea by Donna J. Kessler, University of
Alabama Press, 1996.  He was a reviewer for Minnesota Arts Experience grant
applications, 1996.

College of Business and Public Administration

Dennis Elbert (Marketing) and Phil Harmeson (Accounting and Business Law)
attended the 21st National Small Business Consulting Conference, Small
Business Institute Director's Association in Orlando.  Three papers were
published in the Proceedings: Elbert and Harmeson co-authored "SBI Videotaped
Presentation: A Decade in Review," and "Small Business Advertising: Is TV
Overrated?"; Harmeson authored "Small Business and Small Claims Court: An
Attractive Response to Unattractive Problems." . . . .  Ben Nwoke (Industrial
Technology) presented "Strengths and Limitations of the Histogram in
Statistical Quality Analysis" at the 29th Annual Convention of the National
Association of Industrial Technology in Los Angeles.  His paper was published
in the Proceedings. . . .  Ute Sartorius (Industrial Technology) presented
"Persuasion and Creativity in Visual Metaphors: The Case of Advertising" at
the 1996 Speech Communication Association Convention in San Diego. . . .

College of Education and Human Development

Lynn Anderson (HPER) co-authored "Exemplary Programs in Inclusive Recreation:
Connecting Recreation and Human Service Providers to Better Meet the Leisure
Needs of People with Disabilities" in Community Recreation and People with
Disabilities, Brookes Publishing, 1997 and "Effective Partnerships with the
Rural Recreation Integration Project" in Impact, 9(4), pp. 14-15, 23, 1996. .
. .  Glenn Olsen (Teaching & Learning) and John Hoover (Teaching and Learning)
published "Conflict Resolution in Schools: A Review" in the North Dakota
Journal of Human Services, 1(2), pp. 28-37, 1997. . . .  Myrna Olson (Teaching
& Learning) published a biography, Longing to Die/Fighting to Live:  An Incest
Survivor's Story, Nathan Star Press, 1997. . . .  Myrna Olson, Lynne Chalmers
and John Hoover (Teaching & Learning) published "Attitudes and Attributes of
General Education Teachers Identified as Effective Inclusionists" in Remedial
and Special Education, 18(1), pp. 28-35, 1997. . . .  John D. Williams
(Educational Foundations and Research) published "Missing Cells in
Developmental Research" in Midwest Educational Research, 9(4), pp. 2-3+, 1996.
. . .  John D. Williams and Marilyn Klug (Educational Foundations & Research)
published "Aging and Cognition-Methodological Differences in Outcome" in
Experimental Aging Research, 22, pp. 219-244, 1996. . . .  Ralph Woehle
(Social Work) had a book chapter re-published in Comton and Galaway's Social
Work Processes titled "Variations on the Problem Solving Theme."
 
Lynn Anderson (HPER) presented "Effective Community Partnerships" at the
Health and Wellness Across the Lifespan Conference in Winnipeg. . . .  Clarice
Baker-BigBack (Teaching & Learning) presented "Reflective Coaching and the
Native American Teacher:  A Phenomenological Study" at the National Indian
Education Conference in Rapid City, S.D. . . .  Ron Brinkert (HPER) presented
"Training the Adolescent Female Athlete: Myths, Realities and Danger Signals"
at the North Dakota Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation &
Dance in Bismarck. . . .  Mary Lou Fuller (Teaching & Learning) co-presented
with graduate students "Providing Multicultural Experiences for Monocultural
Students" at the National Association of Multicultural Education Annual
Meeting in Minneapolis. . . .  Sue Jacobs (Counseling), was a discussant in
the clinical round table "How to Grow a Heck of a Lot Wiser, and  A Great Deal
Happier About Getting a Little Bit Older" at the annual meeting of the
Association for the Advancement of Behavior Therapy in New York City.  She
also made poster co-presentations at the North Dakota Psychological
Association annual meeting in Grand Forks, "Effects of Trait Anger on
Cardiovascular Reactivity in Women During an Anger Recall Task"; "Reliability
of the M.I. Onset Study Anger Scale in a Non-Cardiac Population"; and "Does
Research Assistant Gender Impact Physiological Reactivity or Self Report of
Anger?" She served as program committee host of a poster session on Behavior
Problems of the Elderly and Depression at the annual meeting of the
Association for the Advancement of Behavior Therapy held in Washington D.C. .
. .  Cindy Juntunen (Counseling) made a presentation to the Society of
Vocational Psychologists working conference on the School to Work movement
titled "Diversity Issues in School to Work" in Washington D.C. . . .  Dick
Landry (Educational Foundations & Research) chaired a session at the American
Evaluation Association meeting in Atlanta on "How to Become a Better
Professor:  Observations and Evaluations of Peers to Improve Teaching" with
Vicky Downy (Nursing), Marlene Bengiamin (Sociology), and former and present
doctoral students. . . .  Gayle Nelson (Children's Center) made a presentation
at the National Association for the Education of Young Children 1996 annual
conference in Dallas titled "Advocating for Equitable Early Childhood." . . . 
Glenn Olsen (Teaching & Learning) gave presentations at Lincoln, Belmont and
Lake Agassiz Elementary Schools in Grand Forks on "Mediation and Conflict
Resolution in the Elementary Schools." . . . Melissa Parker (HPER) presented a
paper at the North Dakota Association for Health, Physical Education,
Recreation and Dance Annual Workshop in Bismarck titled "National Standards,
Scoring Rubrics, and Authentic Assessment: What Does All This Mean and How
Does it Fit in My Gym?"

Dale Anderson (HPER) was re-elected President of the Board of Directors, Red
River Valley Gymnastics Club, a non-profit, youth serving corporation with
more than 600 active participants. . . .  Lynn Anderson (HPER) serves on the
Board of Directors of the North Dakota Recreation & Park Association and the
ARC Upper Valley and is on the National Council for Therapeutic Recreation
Exam Development Committee. She also co-authored a proposal, "Four Cooperating
Agencies and Recreation Inclusion," which resulted in a $50,000 grant from The
Bremer Foundation. . . .  Sue Jacobs (Counseling) was named Program Chair for
American Heart Month for the Greater Grand Forks Division, Dakota Affiliate of
the American Heart Association; was reappointed to the Program Committee of
the Association for the Advancement of Behavior Therapy; was appointed as a
Peer Reviewer, Program Committee, Division 17 (Counseling Psychology) of the
American Psychological Association; and is serving as a Reviewer for the
1996-97 Dissertation Research Awards Program, Science Directorate, of the
American Psychological Association. . . .  Melissa Parker (HPER) received the
North Dakota Association of Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance
Honor Award.  She is also serving as President of the Northern Rocky Mountain
Educational Research Association for 1996-97. . . .  Tim Schroeder (HPER) is
chairing the Conference Planning Committee for Central States Travel and
Tourism Research Conference to be held in Bismarck next September. 
Mary Lou Fuller (Teaching & Learning) served as a panel member for 
Connections Between Multicultural Education and Global Education  at the
National Association of Multicultural Education annual meeting held in
Minneapolis. . . .  Sue Jacobs (Counseling) served as Parole Board Member for
Cardiac Arrest fund raiser, Greater Grand Forks Division, Dakota Affiliate of
the American Heart Association.  She also gave a presentation titled "Give
Stress the Pink Slip" on the Laboratory Science Seminar Series, Educational
Telephone Network. . . .  Dick Landry (Educational Foundations & Research) has
been named a research associate for an evaluation project from Harvard
University on the Annenberg Rural Challenge, dealing with a network of rural
schools in South Dakota. . . .  Gayle Nelson (Children's Center) is a member
of the Foster Grandparent Advisory Board. . . .  Melissa Parker (HPER) is
serving as a project evaluator for an $80,000 grant for the development of
programming for the city of East Grand Forks, Minnesota Department of
Children's Services.

College of Fine Arts and Communication

Marwan Kraidy (Communication) presented "Writing Culture, Writing Against
Culture: The Predicament of Native Ethnography," at the Intercultural and
International Division of the Speech Communication Association Convention in
San Diego. He also presented "Freedom, Democracy and the Information
Superhighway in the Middle East," as part of a panel at the convention. . . . 
Dan Plato (Theatre Arts) was awarded the Kennedy Center/American College
Theatre Festival Gold Medallion of Excellence at the KC/ACTF Region V Festival
in Cedar Falls, Iowa.  He was cited to his service to the organization over
the past 11 years, most recently serving as Chair of Play writing for Region
V.  In this capacity he has fostered the growth of student playwrights from
colleges and universities in the eight state Upper Plains region.

School of Engineering and Mines

Richard Schultz (Electrical Engineering) has been chosen by the students of
the School as the 1996 Outstanding Professor.  The award was given at the
Engineers Week banquet.  

School of Medicine and Health Sciences

Mary Amundson (Center for Rural Health, Primary Care Office) was a presenter
at the National Health Service Corps 1996 Annual Conference in Denver. Her
presentation covered information about federal loan repayment sites, training
opportunities in community practice, and how shortage areas are designated for
federal loan repayment assistance. . . .  Kyle Muus (Center for Rural Health)
published "Comparing Urban and Rural Primary Care Physician Assistants:
Implications for Rural Recruitment" in the August 1996 issue of The Journal of
the American Academy of Physician Assistants.  Co-authors were Richard Ludtke
(Sociology/Center for Rural Health) and Jack Geller (formerly Center for Rural
Health).

Energy and Environmental Research Center

Ramesh Sharma presented a paper, co-authored with Ed Olson and Ron
Kulas, titled "Chemical Vapor Deposition:  Stable Carbons from
Low-Rank Coals" at the American Chemical Society Annual Meeting in
Orlando.  The EERC participated in the Thirteenth Annual International
Pittsburgh Coal Conference, "Coal Energy and the Environment" in Pittsburgh
and sponsored the Low-Rank Fuels Symposium hosted by the conference.  Chris
Zygarlicke co-chaired the Utilization Properties of Low-Rank Fuels session. 
Mike Swanson presented a paper, co-authored with Bob Ness and Mike Mann,
titled "Hot-Gas Filter Testing with a Transport Reactor Development Unit" in
the Hot-Gas Cleanup Particulate I session.  John Hurley presented a paper, co-authored with Cathy O'Keefe, Karen Katrinak, Jan Nowok, Troy Roling, and Bruce
Dockter, titled "Chemical and Physical Analyses of Tidd Hot-Gas Filter Ash" in
the same session.  Steve Benson co-chaired the Use of Low-Rank Fuels in
Conversion Systems session.  Chris Zygarlicke presented a paper, co-authored
with Steve Benson and others, titled "Computer-Controlled SEM Analyses of
Minerals of Coal" in the same session.  Zygarlicke also presented a paper, co-authored with John Pavlish, titled "The Fate and Control of Mercury Emissions
from Coal-Fired Systems" in the same session.  Brian Young co-chaired the
Future Opportunities for Low-Rank Fuels session and presented a paper, co-authored with Bob Ness, Chris Anderson, Mark Musich, John Richter, Ray DeWall,
and others, titled "Preparation and Gasification of a Thailand Coal Water
Fuel" in the same session.  Jaroslav Solc presented a paper, co-authored with
Brian Young, Craig Schmit, and others, titled "The Commercial Feasibility of
Underground
Coal Gasification in Southern Thailand" in the same session.  Steve Benson
presented a paper, co-authored with Everett Sondreal, titled "Impact of
Low-Rank Coal Properties on Advanced Power Systems" in the same session. 
Steve Benson presented a paper, co-authored with Gerald Groenewold, titled
"Energy & Environmental Research Center" in the Combustion Research Centers
session.  Tom Erickson co-chaired the Environmental Control Gas Contaminants
session.  Wes Peck presented a paper, co-authored with Erin O'Leary and Tom
Erickson, titled  Application of the Center for Air Toxic Metals (CATM)
Database" in the same session.  Debbie Pflughoeft-Hassett presented a paper
titled "Coal Combustion Byproducts (CCBs) Applications and Opportunities  in
the Economic Aspects of Coal Combustion By-Product Management session.  She
also served as a series coordinator for the Pre-and Post-Utilization
Processing series.  Everett Sondreal serves on the Advisory Board of the
Pittsburgh Coal Conference. . . .  Ed Olson presented a paper, co-authored
with Ramesh Sharma and Kristin Pavlish, titled "Waste Plastic Binders for Coal
Fines" at Energy Technology in Hazardous Waste Management VIII in Birmingham,
Ala. . . .  Stan Miller gave a presentation entitled "Advanced Hybrid
Particulate Collector" at the Third DOE Japan AIST/ANRE Joint Technical
Meeting, State College, Penn. . . .  Debbie Pflughoeft-Hassett, Bruce Dockter,
and Kurt Eylands presented a
Coal Combustion By-Products Utilization Workshop in Bismarck-Mandan. . . .  
Ed Steadman gave a presentation at the Industrial Partnerships to Deploy
Environmental Technologies Conference at the Federal Energy Technology Center,
Morgantown, W.Va. . . .  John Gallagher presented a paper, co-authored with
Jim Sorensen and others, titled "Fate and Transport of Alkanolamines from
Sweetening of 'Sour' Natural Gas" at the Ninth International IGT Symposium on
Environmental Biotechnology and Site Remediation Technologies in
Colorado Springs. . . .  The EERC participated in the American Coal Ash
Association Twelfth International Symposium on Management & Use of Coal
Combustion Byproducts, "Innovation for a Sustainable Future," in Orlando. 
Debbie Pflughoeft-Hassett presented a paper, co-authored with Kurt Eylands and
Dave Hassett, titled "Fundamental Behavior of Fly Ash:  Heat of
Hydration."  Bruce Dockter presented  a paper, co-authored with Diane
Ingvalson and Dave Hassett, titled "Fly Ash in Composites: 
High-Flexural-Strength Ceramics and Plastics.  He also moderated the
Base Stabilization I session in which he presented a paper, co-authored with
Debbie Pflughoeft-Hassett, titled "Utilization of North Dakota
Lignite Combustion By-Products in Road-Building Applications."  Debbie
Pflughoeft-Hassett presented a paper co-authored with Dave Hassett, titled
"Scientific Advancements and Their Impact on the Regulatory Process:  Is
Science Really Important in Regulation?"  Debbie Pflughoeft-Hassett presented
a paper, co-authored with Bruce Dockter, Kurt Eylands, Dave Hassett, and John
Pavlish, titled "Impact of Mercury Emission Control Technologies on
Conventional Coal Combustion By-Product Management."  Erin O'Leary presented a
paper, co-authored with Wes Peck, Debbie Pflughoeft-Hassett, and others,
titled "Development of a Database Management System for Coal Combustion
By-Products (CCBs)." . . .  Dennis Laudal gave a presentation, co-authored
with Marlys Heidt and others, titled "Bench-and Pilot-Scale Evaluation of
Mercury Measurement Methods" at the Mercury Measurement and Speciation Methods
for Stationary Sources Workshop in Research Triangle Park, N.C.

Division of Student Affairs
Lillian Elsinga (Student Affairs) served as co-chair of the 8th Circuit
Conference of the Association for Student Judicial Affairs at St. Cloud State
University. She co-presented two sessions: "Computer Crime/Misconduct:
Responding to Computer Misconduct on Campus," and "Hate Crimes and the First
Amendment." Jerry Bulisco (Judicial Affairs and Crisis Programs) presented
"Working with Disruptive Students," and will co-chair the conference next
year.

Plant Services

LeRoy Sondrol (Plant Services) was inducted into the Studio One Hall of Fame
for his leadership in developing studio facilities.  He is the fifth recipient
of the award.  The Plant Services division was also inducted into the Hall of
Fame for their service to Studio One.  Milt Stai (Carpentry) accepted the
award on the behalf of Plant Services.

Other

The North Dakota Museum of Art ranked as one of the top art museums in the
U.S. in a highly competitive grant competition run by the federal Institute of
Museum Services.  The Museum received a two-year general operating grant of
$99,786. The Museum was one of 953 applicants; only 46 museums received a
grant out of the 192 total grants awarded.
*******

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

MARCH 1997

(Please contact Mavis at the Office of University Relations, Box 7144, or call
777-4304, if you wish to make changes or have an event included.)

Through Thurs., March 27 -- MFA EXHIBITION, "Common Threads," a Master of Fine
Arts exhibition by Terry Cuddington, will open with a reception Monday, March
17, from 7 to 9 p.m. in the Hughes Fine Arts Center Gallery.

Through Sun., April 20 -- ART EXHIBITION, Maryland artist, David Kreuger, who
creates paintings on the bizarre world of fishing as he knew it in his native
North Dakota; large painting from his Parallel Duck Hunting series owned by
the Metropolitan Museum in New York, North Dakota Museum of Art; paintings by
Emily Lunde will be exhibited in the small gallery located upstairs in the
museum.

Through Sat., March 22 -- 28TH ANNUAL UND WRITERS CONFERENCE, "Writing
Nature/The Nature of Writing," UND Memorial Union; featuring Bill McKibben,
Susan Griffin, Linda Hogan, Garret Hongo, Bill Morrissey, Annick Smith, David
Treuer, and several others; following is the schedule of events:

  Thursday, March 20: Noon, Panel: "Writing Nature," Susan Griffin, Bill
McKibben, David Treuer; 3 p.m., Reading, David Treuer; 8 p.m., Linda Hogan.

  Friday, March 21: Noon, Panel: "The Nature of Writing," Susan Griffin,
Linda Hogan, Bill Morrissey, and David Treuer; 3 p.m., Reading, Bill
Morrissey; 8 p.m., Susan Griffin.

  Saturday, March 22: 8 p.m., Bill Morrissey Concert.

  All events except the Bill Morrissey Concert Saturday night are free;
related events include an exhibit of new oils by David Krueger at the North
Dakota Museum of Art; contact James McKenzie at 777-2768 for more information.

Through Sat., March 22 -- SWIMMING AND DIVING, Speedo Junior Championships,
College Station, Texas.

Through Sat., March 22 -- NCAA BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIPS, Women's Elite Eight,
Hyslop Sports Center; call 777-2236 or 772-5151 for ticket information.

Thurs., March 20 -- UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM COMMITTEE, 303 Twamley Hall, 3 p.m.

Thurs., March 20 -- MEETING, Underrepresented Student Recruitment Committee,
305 Twamley Hall, 9 to 10 a.m.

Thurs., March 20 -- MEDICAL SCHOOL DEAN'S HOUR PRESENTATION, "The Faith
Factor: Religious Commitment and Clinical Medicine," presented by Dale
Matthews, M.D., FACP, Reed T. Keller Auditorium, Room 1350, School of Medicine
and Health Sciences, noon.

Thurs., March 20 -- PARENTING SERIES, "Lifelong Learning" presented by Dave
Godfread, director of the Adult learning Center and Community High School,
Parent Education Resource Center (PERC), 500 Stanford Road, 12:10 to 12:50
p.m.; bring your lunch; child care will be provided.

Thurs., March. 20 -- WOMEN STUDIES SALON, the Women Studies Program will
inaugurate this reading group to discuss selected readings by feminist
writers; called "Salon" after 19th-century meetings of intellectuals in
patrons' parlors and salons, the group meets monthly at the Women's Center,
305 Hamline St. from 4 to 5 p.m.; feminist writer Susan Griffin will join this
meeting; call 777-4115 for more information.

Thurs., March 20 -- UND WRITERS CONFERENCE, "Writing Nature/The Nature of
Writing," UND Memorial Union Ballroom, with a reception following at the UND
International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; all are welcome to meet
the authors at the reception; call 777-4231 for more information.


Sat. and Sun., March 22-23 -- HOCKEY, National Collegiate Athletic Association
Regionals, Grand Rapids, Mich.; UND will play the winner of Saturday's game
between Cornell and Miami of Ohio at 1 p.m. Sunday at Van Andel Arena.

Fri., March 21 -- ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING, Americans with Disabilities Act
(ADA), 305 Twamley Hall, 8:45 to 9:45 a.m.

Fri., March 21 -- LEEPS Lecture with Erich Petersen has been cancelled due to
illness.

Fri., March 21 -- MAXWELL ANDERSON AWARD, two English grads will be honored;
Janet Daley Lysengen, publications editor with the State Historical Society of
North Dakota, will receive the undergraduate Maxie award; and Emily Rhoads
Johnson, founder of the Writers Conference in Children's Literature, will
receive the graduate Maxie award; both will take part in a panel, "Is There
Life After the English Major?" at 10:30 a.m. in the Alumni Room, Memorial
Union.

Fri., March 21 -- GREEN AND WHITE DAY, President Baker has approved wearing
jeans and UND colors (men's and women's basketball NCAA Finals).

Fri. and Sat., March 21-22 -- BASEBALL, UND at Dickinson State University
(NAIA).

Sat., March 22 -- PRAXIS SERIES (Specialty Areas), Room 114, Witmer Hall, 7:30
a.m.

Sat., March 22 -- PRAXIS SERIES (PPST), Room 116, Witmer Hall, 7:30 a.m.

Sat., March 22 -- UNIVERSITY CRAFT CENTER WORKSHOP, "Bunny Hut," third floor,
Memorial Union, 2 to 4 p.m.; adults are invited to bring a child to build
these together; pre-registration is required and enrollment is limited; cost
is $5 per hut; call 777-3979 for registration information.

Sun., March 23 -- MUSEUM CONCERT SERIES, Guild Trio, violin, North Dakota
Museum of Art, UND campus, 2 p.m.; contact Madelyn at 777-4195 for performer
or ticket information.

Sun., March 23 -- UNIVERSITY CRAFT CENTER SECOND "BUNNY HUT" WORKSHOP, Craft
Center, third floor, Memorial Union, 2 to 4 p.m.; adults are invited to bring
a child and build a hut together; cost of $5 per hut includes all supplies;
call 777-3979 for more information or send registrations to Box 8385 with your
name, phone number, payment for the number of "huts" you wish to make, and the
total number of people that will be coming; the Craft Center will be closed
over spring break period, March 8-16.

Mon., March 24 -- GRADUATE COMMITTEE MEETING, Memorial Room, Memorial Union,
3:05 p.m. (note change in meeting location).

Mon., March 24 -- NATIONAL LEAGUE FOR NURSING PHARMACOLOGY EXAM (NLN), place
to be announced, 10 a.m. (location cannot be determined until the University
Counseling Center's move back to McCannel Hall is set).

Mon., March 24 -- LEADERSHIP SERIES, "Presenting a Leadership Image,"
presented by Leadership Inspiration Center staff, Leadership Inspiration
Center, third floor, Memorial Union, 3 p.m.; non-credit sessions are designed
to help students explore leadership from a variety of perspectives and develop
an understanding of themselves; sessions are free and open to the public.

Mon., March 24 -- TIME SCHEDULE OF CLASSES for Summer and Fall 1997 to be used
by departments for advising purposes, will be available for pickup in the
reception area of the Office of Admissions and Records, second floor, Twamley
Hall, beginning at 9 a.m.; call 777-2711 for more information.

Mon., March 24 -- PSYCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM, Joseph Plaud (Psychology) will
present "Verbal Sexual Stimuli and the Formation of Stimulus Equivalence
Classes," Room 102, Nursing Building, noon; everyone is welcome.

Mon., March 24 -- PSYCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM, Sherry Ferguson, a faculty candidate
from Jefferson, Ark., will present "Developmental Cerebellar Stunting in Rats
Results in Behavioral Alterations Similar to Those in Attention Deficit
Hyperactivity Disorder, Room 108, Nursing Building, 4 to 5 p.m.; everyone is
welcome.

Mon., March 24 -- MAJORS FAIR, Ballroom, Memorial Union, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.;
academic departments will have faculty representatives on hand to answer
students' questions and to discuss the majors available; call 777-2117 for
more information.

Mon., March 24 -- WOMEN'S HISTORY MONTH PROGRAM, "Rosa Luxembourg: Woman as
Revolutionary," presented by Jim Mochoruk (History), Women's Center, 305
Hamline St., noon to 1 p.m.

Mon., March 24 -- WOMEN'S HISTORY MONTH PROGRAM, "It's a Female Thing: Gender
Roles," presented by Donna Oltmanns (Women's Center), Sioux Room, Memorial
Union, 7 p.m.; video documentary about 21 girls and women ages 8 to 91 who
speak to issues important to women's lives.

Mon., March 24 -- BASEBALL, UND at Huron University (NAIA), Huron, S.D., 2/4
p.m.

Mon. through Wed., March 24-26 -- ASBESTOS CLASS, Environmental Training
Institute project design initial course (2927), Comfort Inn, Highway 2 East,
East Grand Forks, Minn.; cost is $400; call 777-3341 for more information.

Tues., March 25 -- MULTICULTURAL AWARENESS COMMITTEE PROGRAM, Arun Gandhi,
grandson of India's late spiritual leader, Mohandas K. "Mahatma" Gandhi, will
speak on "Understanding Race, Overcoming Prejudice," Chester Fritz Auditorium,
6:30 p.m.; program is free and open to the public; a journalist, scholar and
author, Arun has just finished his fifth book, "A Testament of Truth," a
collection of The Mahatma's writings set in a contemporary context.

Tues., March 25 -- ENGLISH COLLOQUIUM, "Great Teachers and Teaching," the
Department of English, hosted by Elizabeth Hampsten (English), invites
faculty, staff, and students to attend a colloquium on teaching led by panel
members Colin Hughes (Biology), Melinda Leach (Anthropology), and Ron Pynn
(Political Science), and moderated by Dan Rice (Instructional Development);
116 Merrifield Hall, 4 p.m.; call 777-3325 for more information.

Tues., March 25 -- INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARD deadline requiring full board
review for Friday, April 4, meeting. 

Tues., March 25 -- WOMEN'S HISTORY MONTH PROGRAM, "It's a Female Thing:
Women's Wisdom," River Valley Room, Memorial Union, 7 p.m.; video documentary
about 21 girls and women ages 8 to 91 who speak to issues important to women's
lives.

Tues. through Thurs., March 25-27 -- GRADUATE THESIS SHOW by Andrea Harris-Weir, "How to be Popular in Six Easy Steps and Other Lies They Told Us," an
experimental theatre piece that looks at media images of women in the late 50s
and early 60s, Studio Theater, Burtness Theatre, 7:30 p.m.; tickets are $2 and
can be purchased at the door.

Wed., March 26 -- NORTH DAKOTA EDUCATION CONNECTION RECRUITING FAIR, Ballroom,
Memorial Union; sponsored by all North Dakota universities that prepare
teachers and is an opportunity for candidates to meet with representatives
from many school districts; registration forms available at Career Services,
120 Hyslop Sports Center.

Wed., March 26 -- "ON TEACHING" SEMINAR, "The Uses of Instructional
Technologies in the Classroom," Room 128, ARTC Building (CAS facility on the
west side of 42nd Street), noon lunch series; faculty and staff who wish to
reserve a complimentary box lunch should call OID by 777-3325 by Monday, March
24.

Wed., March 26 -- HISTORY AND PHI ALPHA THETA BROWN BAG LUNCH SESSION, "Women
of the People's Party," presented by Kimberly Porter, 217 Merrifield Hall,
noon; bring your lunch; a question and discussion period follows the
presentation; third in a series honoring Women's History Month.

Wed., March 26 -- FEAST AND FOCUS PROGRAM, "Earth Quilt: Putting the Pieces
Together for Earth Care," presented by Glinda Crawford (Sociology), Women's
Center, 305 Hamline St., noon to 1 p.m.

Wed., March 26 -- WOMEN'S HISTORY MONTH THEATER PRODUCTION, "Daughters of
Africa," a Mixed Blood theater production, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, 6
p.m.

Wed., March 26 -- DENIM DAY, wear your button, pay your dollar, and enjoy
dressing casual; all money goes to charity.

Thurs., March 27 -- LAST DAY TO DROP A FULL-TERM CLASS OR WITHDRAW FROM SCHOOL
IN SPRING SEMESTER.

Thurs., March 27 -- COUNSELING TOPICS SEMINAR, "Counseling Research,
Determinism & Positivism: Postmodern, Critical Person-Centered Musings,"
presented by J. Wade Hannon, 318 Montgomery Hall, noon to 1:30 p.m.

Thurs., March 27 -- FOR WOMEN ONLY PROGRAM, "Fill Your Mind With Empty," the
program is about bringing your body and mind back in touch with each other -
and giving yourself a chance to heal, Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

Thurs., March 27 -- WOMEN'S HISTORY MONTH PROGRAM, "Female Composers: A Look
at Their Lives and Works in the History of Music," presented by Diane Lee
(Music), East Grand Forks Public Library, 7:30 p.m.

Thurs., March 27 -- INTERNATIONAL EGG DYEING featuring arts from the various
cultures used for dyeing of eggs; international students will present their
artistic work and all participants will have an opportunity to create their
own international egg art piece, UND International Centre, 2908 University
Ave., 7 p.m.; all are welcome; call 777-4231 for more information.

Thurs., March 27 -- PARENTING SERIES, "How Do Adolescents Think?" presented by
Doug Knowlton, clinical psychologist and professor in the Department of
Teaching and Learning, Parent Education Resource Center (PERC), 500 Stanford
Road, 12:10 to 12:50 p.m.; bring your lunch; child care will be provided.

Thurs. through Sat., March 27-29 -- HOCKEY, National Collegiate Athletic
Association Championship.

Fri., March 28 -- HOLIDAY, GOOD FRIDAY.

Fri. and Sat., March 28-29 -- BASEBALL, UND at South Dakota State University
(DII), Brookings, S.D., 2/4 p.m. on Friday, and 1/3 p.m. on  Saturday.

Fri. and Sat., March 28-29 -- SOFTBALL, UND at University of South Dakota Dome
Tournament, Vermillion, S.D.

Mon., March 31 -- STUDENT HOLIDAY, EASTER MONDAY.

Mon., March 31, through Thurs., April 10 -- BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS EXHIBITION,
Jane Feichtner, drawings; John Lee, paintings; and Holly Resch, drawings;
Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center.


APRIL 1997

Through Thurs., April 10 -- BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS EXHIBIT, Jane Feichtner,
drawings; John Lee, paintings; and Holly Resch, drawings; Gallery, Hughes Fine
Arts Center.

Through Sun., April 13 -- ART EXHIBITION, Maryland artist, David Kreuger, who
creates paintings on the bizarre world of fishing as he knew it in his native
North Dakota; large painting from his Parallel Duck Hunting series owned by
the Metropolitan Museum in New York, North Dakota Museum of Art.

Tues., April 1 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for Marge R. Norton, a candidate for the Ph.D.
degree with a major in Clinical Psychology, 210 Corwin-Larimore Hall, 9 a.m.;
members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Tues., April 1 -- CONFLICT RESOLUTION SKILLS: ANALYZING CONFLICT SEMINAR
offered by the UND Conflict Resolution Center, Memorial Union, 9 a.m. to 4
p.m.; designed to teach participants how to identify the major components
influencing conflict and its outcome and how to apply various types of
resolution outcomes to particular characteristics of a conflict; call 777-3664
or contact udcrc@badlands.nodak.edu for more information.

Wed., April 2 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for Richard Allan Goeb, a candidate for the
Ph.D. degree with a major in Educational Administration, 208 Education
Building, 2 p.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Wed., April 2 -- TRAINING SESSION, Controller's Office and Purchasing Office
will present this training session for new employees and current employees who
have not attended a previous session; call Allison at 777-2968 for more
information.

Wed., April 2 -- FEAST AND FOCUS PROGRAM, "Gender and Communication in the
Media Context," Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.
*******


UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and
distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is
also available electronically through UNDInfo, the University's menu
system on the Internet. The addresses are http://www.und.nodak.edu for
World-Wide Web and uninfo.und.nodak.edu for gopher.
  
All articles submitted for publication should be labeled "University
Letter" and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic
submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu. Attachments to
University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number.
University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations,
Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.
  
UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.
*******


  





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