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University Letter

March 28, 1997

Volume 34 No. 30



UNIVERSITY LETTER
UNIVERSITY LETTER IS ALSO AVAILABLE ELECTRONICALLY in the Events and News
section of UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address
is: http://www.und.nodak.edu

The University Relations Office maintains an index for the University Letter.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Employees Encouraged To Participate In Flood Preparation Activities
Flood Coordination Team Named
Spring Commencements Set For May 10 And 11
Planning Council Sponsors Video Conference Forums
Protect Equipment From Flood Threat
Senate To Hear Restructuring Report
     EVENTS TO NOTE
Computer Science Lists Colloquiums
Counseling Course Lists Seminars
Distinguished Lecturer To Present "Laser Medicine"
Engineering Sets Open House
IRB Sets Meeting For April 4
Biology To Hold Seminar
Soils Expert To Give LEEPS Lecture
Dean's Hour Lecture Will Consider Euthanasia
Grand Forks Native To Give Lecture
Conference To Discuss Genetics
Honors Students To Host "End Of Science" Forum
Psychology Announces Colloquium
Phi Beta Kappa Lecture Set
Psychology Schedules Colloquium
     OF ACADEMIC INTEREST
Help Update Directory Of Scientists, Artists & Scholars
Summer, Fall Registration Begins April 7
Faculty, Counselors Sought For Summer Camp
Doctoral Exam Set For Michael Mann
     GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS
Faculty May Apply For WAC Workshop
Grant Opportunities Listed
EPSCoR Awards Grants
     BILLBOARD
Former Faculty Member Dies
Laundry Discontinues Dry Cleaning Service
Beware Of Phone Solicitations
Computer Center Offers Win '95 Class
Meritorious Service Nominations Due April 11
Nominations Sought For Organization Award
Good Friday Is Holiday
Easter Holiday Hours Listed For Chester Fritz Library,
   Health Sciences Library, Computer Center, Memorial Union
Encourage Students To Attend Career Fair
NDUS Legal News: The ADA On College Campuses
Internal Medicine Contacts Moved To Fargo
     ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT
Women's Center Lists Events
International Centre Lists Events
Burtness Theatre Presents "She Stoops To Conquer"
     CALENDAR OF EVENTS

ATTACHMENTS:
Bookstore Sells NCAA Division II/WCHA Champion T-Shirts/Sweatshirts 
Bookstore Paperback Bestsellers/Susan Yuzna awarded for book
*******

Employees Encouraged To Participate In Flood Preparation Activities

University employees are encouraged to help the city prepare for the impending
flood, and to participate in flood control and flood fighting activities as
become necessary.  Employees who wish to take time off during work hours to
deal with personal flood emergencies or to assist as volunteers should
arrange annual leave with their supervisors according to standard procedure. 
However, employees participating in a flood-related activity sponsored and 
coordinated by the University, will not be required to take personal leave. --Kendall L. 
Baker, President, 3-25-97.
*******

Flood Coordination Team Named

The University has appointed a three-person team to coordinate UND's response
to the flood emergency. Al Hoffarth, vice president for operations, will serve
as over all manager of UND's flood fighting effort.  Reporting to him will be
LeRoy Sondrol, Director of Plant Services, who will be in charge of protection
of the UND campus, and Mark Thompson, Director of Career Services, who will
coordinate UND staff and student volunteers, UND-sponsored community service
activity, and liaison with the academic division and with student
government.--Kendall L. Baker, President, 3-26-97.
*******

Spring Commencements Set For May 10 and 11

Preparations have begun for the University's annual round of spring
commencements. The Honorable Clarence Thomas, Associate Justice, United States
Supreme Court, will be the main speaker for the Law School Commencement at
1:30 p.m. Saturday, May 10, in the Chester Fritz Auditorium. John H. Stone
III, M.D., Associate Dean and Director of Admissions, Emory University School
of Medicine, will be the speaker at the Medical School Commencement at 4 p.m.
Saturday, May 10, in the Chester Fritz Auditorium. General Commencement will
take place at 1:30 p.m. Sunday, May 11, in the Hyslop Sports Center. President
Baker will give the Charge to the Class. -- Rita Galloway (University
Relations), Associate Commencement Coordinator.
*******

Planning Council Sponsors Video Conference Forums

The University of North Dakota Planning Council is sponsoring UND's
participation in a national live video conference on Thursday, April 10 on the
subject of "The New Public University: How Do We Compete in a Changing
Environment?"  The session, from noon to 2 p.m., will take place in 1360 Bio-LRC, Medical
Science North, and is free and open to the public. Please note
the change in location.

In the days following the video conference, the Council will host two forums
to solicit input on the Planning Document that has guided much of UND's
Restructuring and Reallocation effort and which is in the process of being
revised. The first forum will be held at noon Friday, April 11, North
Ballroom, Memorial Union, and the second at 7 p.m. Monday, April 14, in the
Loft at the Engelstad Arena. Copies of the planning document are available
from the President's Office (777-2121) or by accessing the University's Web
Site (http://www.und.edu).

Produced by the Public Broadcasting Service, the video conference will feature
a panel made up of Constantine Curtis, President of Clemson University and a
member of the Kellogg Commission to explore the public university mission; Gil
Whitaker, Professor of Business Administration and former Provost of the
University of Michigan; Judith Eaton, Chancellor of the Minnesota State
Colleges and Universities; and Colorado Governor Roy Romer, Chair of the
National Education Goals Panel. The panel will address the question, "If you
could design the ideal public university for today's world, what choices would
you make?" Among topics to be considered are expected to be the need to
restructure and re-order the public university; successful institutional
models that meet community and corporate needs; involving and motivating
faculty, students and community to change; competition outside the academy;
new delivery systems; ensuring diversity; and using alternative learning
assessments. -- Dave Vorland, Assistant to the President and Recording
Secretary to the Planning Council.
*******

Protect Equipment From Flood Threat

State Fire and Tornado provides the insurance coverage for all state-owned
facilities and equipment. Flood damage is a covered loss, but only at a
minimal level ($10,000 per occurrence). The University has obtained additional
flood insurance for three high-risk facilities on campus: Hughes Fine Arts
Center, Wilkerson and Smith Hall. This additional insurance is on the
structure only. Therefore, ALL departments are strongly encouraged to take the
necessary action to protect their equipment and supplies. Appropriate action
may include moving equipment from basement areas and/or raising equipment off
the floor. If you have any questions, please call. -- Pat Hanson, Director of
Payroll, 7-4228, or Leroy Sondrol, Director of Physical Plant, 7-2592.
*******

Senate To Hear Restructuring Report

The University Senate will meet at 4:05 p.m. Thursday, April 3, 
in Room 7, Gamble Hall.

AGENDA

1. Announcements.
2. Minutes of the previous meeting and business arising from the minutes.
3. Question Period.

CONSENT CALENDAR:

4. Report of the Senate Restructuring and Reallocation Committee. Carla Hess,
Chair (Attachment No. 1).

5. Annual Report of the Committee on Committees. David Uherka, Chair
(Attachment No. 2).

6. Annual Report of the Intercollegiate Athletics Committee. Mary Jo Schill,
Chair. (Attachment No. 3).

7. Annual Report of the ROTC Committee. Kevin Fire, Chair. (Attachment No. 4).

8. Annual Report of the University Curriculum Committee. Carl Barrentine, Co-Chair.
(Attachment No. 5).

BUSINESS CALENDAR:

9. Resolution for Constitutional Reform of Higher Education. Andrew Varvel.
(Attachment No. 6).

10. Resolution for Higher Education Finance Reform. Andrew Varvel. (Attachment
No. 7).

11. Report from the Committee on Committees of Senate Committees Chosen by
Preference Vote of the Senate, March 6, 1997. David Uherka, Chair. (Attachment
No. 8).

12. Recommendations from the University Curriculum Committee for New Program
Request, Program Terminations, Change in Title of Program, New Courses, Course
Deletions, and Requests to Change Program Admission Requirements. Carl
Barrentine, Chair. (Attachment No. 9).

13. Recommended changes from the Student Policy Committee for changes to the
Code of Student Life, Section 2.2.0. Jan Zahrly, Vice Chair. (Attachment No.
10).

-- Alice Poehls (Admissions and Records), Secretary of the Senate.
*******

EVENTS TO NOTE

Computer Science Lists Colloquiums

On Thursday, March 27, the Computer Science Colloquium Series will present
James Peters from the University of Manitoba and Sheela Ramana from the
University of Winnipeg. Dr. Peters will present "Time and Roughly Fuzzy
Process Models of Clocks: Concepts and Applications" at 2:30 p.m. in 107 CAS
I, and Dr. Ramana will present "Fuzzy Software Cost Estimation: A Multi-Criteria Decision
Making Approach with Applications" at 4:15 p.m. in 102 CAS
I.

All students and faculty are invited. Please join us. -- Bruce Maxwell,
Assistant Professor of Computer Science.
*******

Counseling Course Lists Seminars

The Department of Counseling 565N Topics Seminar Presents "Counseling
Research, Determinism and Positivism: Postmodern, Critical Person-Centered
Musings," with J. Wade Hannon, at noon Thursday, March 27, in 318 Montgomery
Hall. "The Efficacy of Counselor Training Using the Bug-In-the-Ear Approach,"
with Shan Jumper,will be held Thursday, April 3, at noon in 318 Montgomery
Hall. -- Linda Winter, Coordinator, Counseling 565N Topics Seminar.
*******

Distinguished Lecturer To Present "Laser Medicine"

The Office of Research and Program Development, and the Departments of
Industrial Technology and Physics are proud to sponsor AWU-DOE Distinguished
Lecturer, Luiz B. Da Silva, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore,
Calif. He will present "Laser Medicine" at noon Thursday, April 3, in the Reed
T. Keller Auditorium, School of Medicine and Health Sciences. Enter by the
south door of the Medical School, and turn left down the hall to the Reed T.
Keller Auditorium.

Dr. Da Silva will present information on his current research into the use of
lasers for medical therapy. The laboratory has been studying the interaction
of short (~200 fs) lasers for ablating soft and hard tissue. These laser
systems produce minimal collateral damage and represent a unique tool for
precise surgery. Other current work includes the use of lasers for tissue
welding, and for tomographic imaging.

A recipient of the IEEE Early Achievement Award, Dr. Da Silva earned his
degrees from the University of British Columbia, in Vancouver, B.C.
He has performed experimental and theoretical research on the equation of
state and opacity of strongly coupled plasmas. This work used laser driven
shock waves to produce uniform high density material. As part of this work,
new optical diagnostic techniques were developed to measure the electron
temperature of shock compressed material. The opacity of shocked aluminum near
the K-shell was measured using time resolved x-ray diagnostics.

He has also served as a visiting scientist at the Laboratory for Laser
Energetics at the University of Rochester, where under the supervision of Dr.
Paul Jaanimagi, he conducted experiments on direct drive inertial confinement
fusion (ICF). Time resolved x-ray spectroscopy of thin buried layers was used
to measure the mass ablation rate and investigate the effects of beam
uniformity. -- Ray Diez, Assistant Professor of Industrial Technology.
*******

Engineering Sets Open House

On Thursday, April 3, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., the School of Engineering and
Mines (SEM) invites the area schools, general public, and UND students and
faculty to view engineering students' activities.

The Open House is sponsored by the Dean's Office and the Engineers' Council.
There will be presentations throughout the day of interest to the general
public and perspective students. Many students have worked on cooperative
education positions and may be willing to give insight about their co-op
experiences. There will also be financial aid and scholarship information
available for students already in the program and for prospective students.

As an added attraction this year, the Society of Energy Alternatives will have
on display a solar-powered car they built for Sunrayce 97. Sunrayce is a
biennial intercollegiate event which brings together university students from
across the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Puerto Rico in a competition to
build and race cars powered only by sunlight. The University of North Dakota
is participating in this competition, and this is where people can see cutting
edge engineering at its best.

Have you ever wondered how to explode a garbage can? A cryogenics (liquid
nitrogen) display show will demonstrate it. In addition, a large number of SEM
students will display their design projects and lab experiments in a
competition that takes place throughout the day. The Society of Women
Engineers (SWE) will also have some hands-on experiments for visitors to take
part in. These experiments show how fun science, math, and engineering can be.
Children of all ages are guaranteed to enjoy the activities SWE has planned
for the day.

There are a number of other attractions taking place throughout the
Engineering facilities, including laboratory tours, a chance to meet the SEM
faculty, and the opportunity to talk to people about careers in engineering. -- Don Richard, Dean
of Engineering and Mines.
*******

IRB Sets Meeting For April 4

The UND's Institutional Review Board will meet at 4 p.m. Friday, April 4, in
305 Twamley Hall, to consider all research proposals submitted to the Office
of Research and Program Development before Tuesday, March 25. Proposals
received later will be considered only if a quorum has reviewed them and time
permits.  

Clinical medical projects must be reviewed by the Clinical Medical Subcom-
mittee before being brought to the full Board.  Proposals for these projects
are due in the Office of Research and Program Development Tuesday, March 18.

Notes from the meeting will be available in ORPD approximately one week after
the meeting.

-- F. R. Ferraro (Psychology), Chair, Institutional Review Board.
*******

Biology To Hold Seminar

The Department of Biology will present a seminar at noon 
Friday, April 4, in 141 Starcher Hall. Tom Hill (Microbiology),  will present
"The End of DNA Replication as We Know It." All are welcome. -- Colin Hughes,
Assistant Professor of Biology.
*******

Soils Expert To Give LEEPS Lecture

A LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary Sciences) lecture and workshop
will be presented by Jimmie Richardson, North Dakota State University, on
Friday, April 4. 

At noon in Leonard Hall Lecture Bowl, Room 100, he will consider "Soils and
Groundwater on the Lake Agassiz Plain." From 2 to 4 p.m. in 214 Leonard Hall,
he will conduct a Soils and Hydrogeology Workshop. 

Dr. Richardson is a dynamic lecturer with a broad base in both geology and
soils. The LEEPS Lecture Series is supported by the Department of Geology and
Geological Engineering, the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Office
of Research and Program Development, Office of Instructional Development and
the Advancing Science Excellence in North Dakota (ASEND) Program. All
interested persons are welcome to attend. For additional information, contact
John Reid at 777-2131. -- Dexter Perkins, Professor of Geology and Geological
Engineering.
*******

Dean's Hour Lecture Will Consider Euthanasia

The School of Medicine and Health Sciences Dean's Hour seminar will feature a
presentation by Marsha Fowler, Professor of Theology and Nursing and Director
of Health Ministries Programs, San Francisco Theological Seminary. She will
discuss "Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia," at noon Friday, April 4, in the
Reed T. Keller Auditorium, Room 1350, Wold Bio-Information Learning Resources
Center, Health Sciences Building. -- Thomas Norris, Executive Associate Dean,
Academic Affairs and Research, School of Medicine and Health Sciences.
*******

Grand Forks Native To Give Lecture

The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology will present a special
lecture at 10 a.m. Tuesday, April 4, in 1360 Clifford Haugen Lecture Hall,
Medical Science. "Gene Expression Associated with Chromosome 6-Mediated Tumor
Suppression of Human Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma" will be presented by
Michael Ray, Department of Human Genetics, University of Michigan School of
Medicine in Ann Arbor. An informal reception will immediately follow the
presentation and all are invited.

Michael Ray is a native of Grand Forks who graduated at the top of his class
from Red River High School in 1986. He attended Concordia College in Moorhead,
and graduated summa cum laude in 1990. Dr. Ray then was accepted into the
M.D./Ph.D. Medical Scientist Training Program at the University of Michigan
School of Medicine. He recently completed his Ph.D. studies at the National
Center for Human Genome Research at the National Institutes of Health in
Bethesda, Md., under the direction of Dr. Jeffrey Trent. The work, begun in
the Human Genetics Department at the University of Michigan, transferred to
NIH when Dr. Trent was named scientific director of the Human Genome project
by Dr. Francis Collins, the project's director. Dr. Ray is co-author of eight
full professional papers and eight abstracts of papers presented at
professional meetings. He will lecture on studies constituting his Ph.D.
dissertation. He has recently returned to Ann Arbor where he is completing his
third year of Medicine. 

Dr. Ray is the son of Annette and Dr. Paul Ray, distinguished long-time
professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the UND School of Medicine
and Health Sciences. -- Robert Nordlie, Professor and Chair of Biochemistry
and Molecular Biology.
*******

Conference To Discuss Genetics

The Department of Pediatrics/Genetics will present a conference, "Practical
Genetics in Primary Health Care" on Friday, April 4, via Interactive Video
Network at Gamble Hall. Nationally known experts will present information on
gene testing for breast cancer, fetal alcohol syndrome screening, diabetes and
other common adult diseases, diabetes prevention trials in North Dakota,
sorting out the diagnosis of ADHD, DD, and MR, and harmful exposures during
pregnancy.

The conference is free to students. Please call Mary Ebertowski, Department of
Pediatrics, for more information, before April 1, at 777-4243. -- Mary
Ebertowski, Nurse Geneticist, Pediatrics/Genetics.
*******

Honors Students To Host "End of Science" Forum

Honors Program students will host a University-wide forum on "The End of 
Science" Sunday, April 6, at 6:30 p.m. in 1618 Swanson, Memorial Union.
Professors, students and anyone else interested in the topic are invited to
attend and share their views.  The forum will focus both on the  topic and on
the book "The End of Science" by John Horgan.  For more information, contact
me. -- Tami Carmichael, Honors Program, 777-2219. 
*******

Psychology Announces Colloquium

The Psychology Department will hold a colloquium at which Mark Grabe
(Psychology) will present "Consequences of Personal Philosophies of Learning:
Educator Beliefs Determining Student Opportunities," Monday, April 7, in Room
102, Nursing Building, from noon to 1 p.m. Everyone is welcome. -- Joan
Peterson, Psychology Department.
*******

Phi Beta Kappa Lecture Set

This year's Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar is Dennis O'Brien, President
Emeritus of the University of Rochester, and previously Professor of
Philosophy at Rochester and Bucknell Universities. He will present a lecture
Thursday, April 10, at 8 p.m. in 101 Abbott Hall on "The Logic of Cursing."
The lecture will address the nature of primary religious discourse from the
perspective of its converse, cursing. He is also the speaker in the "Theology
for Lunch" series, Thursday, April 10. The noon discussion, at Christus Rex,
is on "The Anger World and Theology." Both events are free and open to the
public. Dr. O'Brien's visit is sponsored by the UND chapter of Phi Beta Kappa,
the Department of Philosophy and Religion, Christus Rex, the Newman Center,
the College of Arts and Sciences, and the Office of the President. -- Patricia
Kelley (Geology and Geological Engineering), Vice President, Phi Beta Kappa.
*******

Psychology Schedules Colloquium

The Psychology Department will hold a colloquium in which James Coyne,
University of Michigan, will present "Psychology's New Frontier? Depression in
Primary Care," at 11 a.m. Friday, April 11, in Room 102, Nursing Building.
Everyone is welcome. -- Joan Peterson, Psychology Department.
*******

OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

Help Update Directory Of Scientists, Artists & Scholars

The Graduate School and the Office of University Relations are in the process
of updating the Directory of Scientists, Artists & Scholars. Faculty and
researchers should soon receive in the mail a form, a copy of an entry from
the last directory and a letter from Graduate School Dean Harvey Knull asking
them to participate in the project. Please fill out the form and return it to
Research Directory, Office of University Relations, Box 7144, by Friday, March
28. To help expedite the process, you may wish to use the form on the world
wide web. It can be found at http://www.und.nodak.edu/form. Thank you in
advance for your help on this important project. -- Peter Johnson, Assistant
Director, University Relations.
*******

Summer, Fall Registration Begins April 7

Registration for the 1997 summer term will be from Monday, April 7, through
Friday, May 9, and for the fall term from Monday, April 7, through Friday,
Sept. 4. Students will register and drop/add using the ALFI System (Access
Line For Information). Students who have proper signatures for registration
actions not permitted by ALFI may add these courses at the Office of
Admissions and Records, second floor, Twamley Hall, during normal office hours
starting April 7. Students may register on or after appointment times as
printed on their registration forms. -- Veriena Garver, Admissions and Records
Officer.
*******

Faculty, Counselors Sought For Summer Camp

The Science in the Circle of Life summer program, a 10-day summer camp held on
the UND campus June 8-21, for seventh and eighth grade rural and minority
students, is searching for energetic, enthusiastic individuals to serve as
Faculty Mentors, Program Leaders, and Counselors. Faculty Mentors and Program
Leaders are integral in the implementation of program curriculum while
Counselors will be responsible for leading evening activities and providing
guidance to camp participants. Camp participants will explore and investigate
science and technology through multiple sites on campus including Chemistry,
Engineering, Biology, Geology, and Computer Science, as well as discover
information on career options. Listed below are the staff job descriptions.

Faculty Mentor Job Description

Duties will include: provide and prepare lab space appropriate to your
discipline; collaborate with Program Leaders to develop an introduction to
your field; and work with a small group of students on the completion of a
final investigative project. Salary: $1,000. Submit letter of application,
resume, two references to: Science in the Circle of Life, Box 5023, Grand
Forks, ND 58206. Deadline 3-25-97.

Program Leader Job Description

Teaching/science experience with middle school students necessary. Prior work
in a multi-cultural educational setting preferred. Live in the UND residence
halls with students and staff during the camp. On-duty during camp from 9 a.m.
to 5:30 p.m. Salary: $1,000. Submit letter of application, resume, two
references to: Science in the Circle of Life, Box 5023, Grand Forks, ND 58206.
Deadline 3/25/97.

Counseling Job Description

Prior experience working with youth programs or middle school students
necessary. Prior work in a multi-cultural educational setting preferred. Live
in the UND residence halls with students and staff during the camp. On-duty
during camp from 5 p.m. to 9:30 a.m. and on call during two days of camp.
Salary: $1,000. Submit letter of application, resume, transcripts, and two
references to: Science in the Circle of Life, Box 5023, Grand Forks, ND 58206.
Deadline 4/7/97.

-- Jan Orvik, Editor, for Diane Hiltner, Director, Science in the Circle of
Life.
*******

Doctoral Exam Set For Michael Mann

The final examination for Michael Mann, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with
a major in Energy Engineering, is set for 10 a.m. Monday, April 7, in 360A
Harrington Hall. The dissertation title is "Capture of Alkali During
Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion Using In-Bed Sorbents." Douglas Ludlow
(Chemical Engineering) is the committee chair.

Members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend. -- Harvey Knull, Dean,
Graduate School.
*******

GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

Faculty May Apply For WAC Workshop

Faculty who plan to develop a writing component for a course, or to reconsider
and restructure writing activities currently being used, are invited to apply
to participate in a seven-session May Extended Writing Across the Curriculum
Workshop. The workshop is scheduled for seven mornings (May 12-13, 15-16, and
19-21), from 8:30 a.m. until noon each day. Group members will work together
during those sessions to address teaching with writing issues as they relate
to their own course projects. Stipends of $600 will be awarded to
participants.

Faculty who are interested in participating in this workshop should apply by
April 1, since participation is limited. For more information on the workshop,
contact me. -- Joan Hawthorne, WAC Coordinator, 7-6381 or
hawthorn@badlands.nodak.edu.
*******

Grant Opportunities Listed

Following are research and grant opportunities. For more information, please
contact the Office of Research and Program Development at 777-4278.

MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH SPECIAL PROJECTS OF
REGIONAL AND NATIONAL SIGNIFICANCE (SPRANS)

The maternal and child health SPRANS program of the Health Resources and
Services Administration (HRSA) is accepting proposals addressing genetic
disease testing, counseling and information services, maternal and child
health improvement projects (MCHIP), research and training, and hemophilia
diagnostic treatment centers.  Deadline: April 28, 1997.  Contact:  Jane Lin-Fu, M.D.,
(301)443-1080.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY GRANT PROGRAM NOTICE

The Department of Education Technology Innovation Challenge Grants program
will soon be open for competition.  A notice inviting applications will be
published in the Federal Register in mid-March.  Applications will be due in
late May or early June.  This initiative provides competitive grants to
educational consortia for the development or expansion of technology systems
that contribute to education reform, improve student performance and lead to
sustained professional development. Funds may be used to purchase hardware and
software, to connect with networks to access information and educational
programming, and for training of teachers, principals, administrators and
library media personnel.  Contact: Office of Educational Research and
Improvement, Department of Education, Capitol Place Room 606, 555 New Jersey
Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20208-5544; (202)208-3882; Fax (202)208-4042.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH PROGRAMS
HEALTH RESOURCES AND SERVICES ADMINISTRATION (HRSA)

The HRSA is accepting grant and cooperative agreement applications for federal
set-aside programs under the Maternal and Child Health program, including
genetic services and Maternal and Child Health Improvement Projects. 
Deadline: Varies by program. Contact: Sandra Perry, (301)443-1440.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

BERNICE BARBOUR FOUNDATION, INC.

The Bernice Barbour Foundation, Inc., gives throughout the U.S. for the
preservation, care, and prevention of cruelty toward domestic animals and
wildlife.  Grant types include capital, conference/seminar,
multiyear/continuing support, operating expenses, project, and research. 
Deadline: August 10.  Contact: Eve Lloyd Thompson, Treasurer and Secretary,
Bernice Barbour Foundation, Inc., 130 Main St., Hackensack, NJ 07601;
Telephone 407/791-0861.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

CARNEGIE CORPORATION OF NEW YORK

Major priorities of the Carnegie Corporation of New York are national and
regional organizations that promote programs for the education and healthy
development of children and youth, prevention of deadly conflict, and
strengthening human resources in developing countries.  Grant types include
general support, project, research and seed money.  Deadline: July 1 for
grants of $10,000 or higher; March 1 for smaller grants. Contact: Dorothy
Wills Knapp, Secretary, Carnegie Corporation of New York, 437 Madison Avenue,
New York, NY 10022; Telephone (212)371-3200; http://carnegie.org.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

ALFRED P. SLOAN FOUNDATION

Major priorities of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation are science and technology,
science education, national issues, and economics and competitiveness.  Grant
types are conference/seminar, department, fellowship, multiyear/continuing
support, project and research.  Deadline: None.  Contact: Ralph E. Gomory,
President, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, 630 Fifth Ave., Ste. 2550, New York, NY
10111; telephone (212) 649-1649; Fax (212) 757-5117.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

RETIREMENT RESEARCH FOUNDATION

Major priorities of the Retirement Research Foundation are health and social
services for the elderly and medical research.  Grant types include challenge,
multiyear/continuing support, project, research and seed money.  The
foundation is particularly interested in innovative programs with potential
for national and regional impact.  Deadlines: May 1, August 1, February 1. 
Contact: Marilyn Hennessy, President, Retirement Research Foundation, 8765 W.
Higgins Rd., No. 401, Chicago, IL 60631-4170, telephone (312) 714-8080; Fax
(312) 714-8089.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

ARMSTRONG LABORATORY'S DUAL-USE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAM

Armstrong Laboratory (AL) is interested in receiving proposals (technical and
cost) in the area of Dual Use Science and Technology (S&T). This is an
unrestricted solicitation. Small businesses are encouraged to propose on all
or any part of this solicitation.  There will be no other solicitation issued
in regard to this requirement. Offerors should be alert for any BAA amendments
that may permit subsequent submission of proposal dates.  Offerors should
request a copy of the Guide titled, "PRDA and BAA Guide for Industry" dated
November 1992. This guide was specifically designed to assist offerors in
understanding the PRDA/BAA proposal process. (SOL PKR-97-AL-01, Commerce
Business Daily, 3/14/97, PSA#1802.)  Deadline: 4/14/97.  Contact: POC Sharon
Bickford, 210/536-6399, HSC/PKR, 8005 9th St, Bldg 626, Brooks AFB, TX
78235-5353; WEB:  San Antonio Acquisition RFP Highway, http://www.
brooks.af.mil/HSC/ PKA/sarah.htm; E-MAIL: sharon_bickford@ pkrccmail.
brooks.af.mil; URL: http://web.fie. com/htdoc/fed/afr/arm/any/proc/any/
03149707.htm.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

USDA/CSREES: NATIONAL NEEDS GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP 
GRANTS PROGRAM

The Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES) is
announcing the Food and Agricultural Sciences National Needs Graduate
Fellowship Grants Program Solicitation of Proposals for Fiscal Years (FY)
1997-98 and 1997 Supplemental Grants for Special International Study or
Thesis/Dissertation Research Travel Allowances.  Applications are invited for
competitive grant awards to colleges and universities for doctoral fellowships
to meet national needs for the development of professional and scientific
expertise in the food and agricultural sciences for FYs 1997-98. 
Additionally, CSREES seeks applications  from  recipients  of presently active
national needs fellowship  grants  for  supplemental grants.  (Federal
Register, Vol. 62, No. 047, Part III, 62 FR 11266, Tuesday, March 11, 1997.) 
Deadline: 5/15/97.  Contact:  Jeffrey L. Gilmore, USDA/Higher Education
Programs, 202-720-1973, jgilmore@ reeusda.gov ; URL :
http://web.fie.com/htdoc/fed/agr/ crs/any/proc/any/03119701.htm. 
- - - - - - - - - - - -

AMERICAN SEED RESEARCH FOUNDATION

The Foundation provides research or dissertation funding.  Contact the
Foundation, 601 13th Street, NW, Suite 570 South, Washington, DC 20005-3807;
(202)638-3128.  Deadline: 4/20/97.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

COUNCIL FOR INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE OF SCHOLARS, 
FULBRIGHT SCHOLAR PROGRAM. 

Chairs in Western Europe, Canada, Netherlands; Thomas Jefferson Chair 
in American Social Studies or Walt Whitman Chair in American Literature.  The
Program provides funds for teaching or curriculum/program development,
consultants, or visiting personnel.  Contact Ms. Margo Cunniffe, Chairs
Program Associate, 3007 Tilden Street, NW, Suite 5M, Washington, DC 20008-3009;
(202)686-6242; Fax (202)362-3442; we6@ciesnet.cies.org;
http://www.cies.org.  Deadline: 5/1/97.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

INTERNATIONAL LIFE SCIENCES INSTITUTE NORTH AMERICA (ILSI)

Future Leader Awards.  Funds for research or dissertation.  Deadline: 6/1/97. 
Contact Connie Herndon, Future Leader Grant Administrator, 1126 - 16th Street,
NW, Washington, DC 20036-4804; (202)659-0074; Fax (202)659-3859;
connie@dc.ilsi.org; http://www.ilsi.org.  The ILSI Allergy and Immunology
Institute New Investigator Award also provides funds for research and
dissertation.  Contact the Award Administrator at the above address. 
Deadline: 6/16/97.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

WILLIAM T. GRANT FOUNDATION FACULTY SCHOLARS PROGRAMS

This foundation provides funds for research and dissertations.  Major
priorities are research on child and youth development, emphasizing stress and
coping; evaluation of interventions relevent to program interests; and
research projects that address the problems of adolescents' transition to
adulthood.  Contact Grants Coordinator, 515 Madison Avenue, New York, NY
10022-5403; (212)752-0071, Fax (212)752-1398.  Deadline: 7/1/97.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

ASSOCIATION FOR WOMEN IN MATHEMATICS NSF-AWM TRAVEL GRANTS

The Association provides funds for women to travel to seminars or conferences. 
Contact the Association at 4114 Computer and Space Sciences Building,
University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2461; (301)405-7892;
awm@math.umd.edu.  Deadlines: May 1, October 1, February 1.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF WISCONSIN ALICE E. SMITH 
FELLOWSHIP  

The Society provides research or dissertation funding for women.  Contact
State Historian, 816 State Street, Madison, WI 53706-1488.  Deadline: 7/15/97.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

COUNCIL OF GREAT LAKES GOVERNORS 
GREAT LAKES REGIONAL BIOMASS ENERGY PROGRAM.  

This program provides research or dissertation funding.  Contact Frederic
Kuzel, Director, 35 East Wacker Drive, Suite 1850, Chicago, IL 60601;
(312)407-0177; Fax (312)407-0038; fkuzel@cglg.com;
http://www.cglg.org/projects/biomass/. Deadline: None.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

ENERGY FOUNDATION

The Energy Foundation provides funding for research, dissertations, and
training programs.  Major interests are energy and transportation.  Contact
the Foundation at Presidio Building 1012, Second Floor, Torney Avenue, P. O.
Box 29905, San Francisco, CA 94129-0905; (415)561-6700; Fax (415)561-6709;
energyfund@ef.org; http://www.ef.org/.  Deadline: None.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

JOYCE MERTZ-GILMORE FOUNDATION ENERGY PROGRAM

This program provides operating/general support funding.  The Foundation's
environmental interests focus on energy efficiency renewables.  Contact Moy
Eng, Program Officer, 218 East 18th Street, New York, NY 10003-3694; Phone
(212)475-1137; Fax (212)777-5226.  Deadline: None.

-- Carl Fox, Director of Research and Program Development.
*******

EPSCoR Awards Grants

The North Dakota Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (ND
EPSCoR) recently awarded four North Dakota University System (NDUS)
researchers $3,000 each to examine the feasibility of developing their
research into commercial products. The award winners are:

Frank Beaver (Geology and Geological Engineering, UND),
and John Rindt of GeoDynamics, Inc., Grand Forks, are investigating "Container
Decontamination Using Oxygen Plasma."

Mark Doll (Pharmacology and Toxicology, UND), is pursuing a novel approach to
an "RNA Purification Procedure."  He is also affiliated with the Grand Forks
technology company, Gene Finders.

Robert Groves (Fine Arts, NDSU), is developing "A Technical Approach for
Relieving Repetitive Stress Injury at the Computer Keyboard."

Harvey Gullicks (Civil Engineering, UND), is investigating waste water
treatment based on "A Prototype for Energy Capitalization by an Innovative
Combination of Attached and Suspended Growth."

ND EPSCoR's Phase 0 Technology Transfer Into Commercialization program helps
North Dakota university researchers prepare for submittal to the Small
Business Innovative Research (SBIR) grants program. Eleven federal agencies
use SBIR to contract with small companies to commercialize innovative
research. The SBIR program provides over $1 billion in annual awards.

The Phase 0 award is used to obtain data leading to a "proof of concept" that
the research has merit for commercialization. The 1997 Phase 0 award winners
responded to an RFP issued to the University system on Nov. 20, 1996. This is
the second year of the Phase 0 program. Gale Mayer (Energy and Environmental
Research Center) and President of Western Environmental Services and
Technology, Inc., Grand Forks, received a Phase 0 award in 1996. Dr. Mayer
submitted a Phase 1 proposal to NSF and was recently awarded $75,000 to
continue development of his innovative method of soil decontamination.

ND EPSCoR is a North Dakota University System program aimed at increasing
research and developing human resources. The purpose is to make North Dakota
more competitive nationally in science, engineering, and mathematics research
and development. ND EPSCoR, also known as ASEND (Advancing Science Excellence
in North Dakota), is open to student and faculty at all state university
system campuses.

To learn more about ND EPSCoR technology transfer programs, contact me. --
David R. Givers, North Dakota State University, (701) 231-7516 or
givers@badlands.nodak.edu, or visit the EPSCoR homepage at:
http://www.ndsu.nodak.edu/epscor/index.html.
*******

BILLBOARD

Former Faculty Member Dies

It is with regret that the University announces the death on March 20, of
former faculty member Dr. Douglas M. Wills (D.A.T., History, 1973) of Poway,
Calif. Dr. Wills taught in the Humanities Program from 1973 to 1988. He was
58. -- Ellen  Erickson, Administrative Officer, College of Arts and Sciences.
*******

Laundry Discontinues Dry Cleaning Service

The University Laundry has discontinued its dry cleaning operation. The
University has contracted with Valley Queen Dry Cleaning to provide for your
departmental dry cleaning needs. You may contact the Purchasing Office at 777-2681 for further
information. Alterations will continue to be serviced through
the University Laundry. -- Paul Clark, Associate Director of Plant Services,
and Jerry Clancy, Buyer, Purchasing.
*******

Beware Of Phone Solicitations

Phone solicitations for selling office supplies have been made by vendors not
normally conducting business with the University. Tactics, such as getting
your address to mail you supplies, offering something free with or without an
order, offering a great deal, and the need to get an order in before the sale
goes off, are some of the sales pitches used. An actual solicitation is
summarized as follows:

"Their usual practice is to thank you for inquiring in some manner about their
product. Then they talk so fast that it is hard to follow what they are
saying. The result is to fluster you because you may not remember doing any
inquiring, are to embarrassed to admit it, and you will say yes to everything
they ask."

Solicitations generated by these tactics are not the University's accepted
methods of business transactions. When such phone solicitations occur, please
do not give them any information to lead the caller in to sending you
anything. You may ask them to send information in writing or just offer to
transfer the call to the Purchasing office at 777-2681.

For further information on phone solicitations, please refer to the Oct. 11,
1996, "University letter," page 11. If there are questions or concerns
regarding this manner, please call Purchasing at 777-2681. -- Linda Romuld,
Director of Purchasing.
*******

Computer Center Offers Win '95 Class

A training session, "Windows 95 Transition," will be offered by the Computer
Center to faculty, staff, and students for a $20 fee. The fee will cover the
cost of a learning guide for each participant. The session will be held
Monday, Wednesday and Friday, April 21, 23, and 25 at 1:30 p.m. in
361 Upson II. You must register in advance by calling Bonnie or Shelly at
777-3171, and providing an account number to be charged. Requests for
accommodation related to disability need to be made when registering.

The course presents the new concepts of Windows 95 for Windows 3.x users.
Participants will be introduced to Windows 95 features and complete
corresponding step-by-step exercises in a learning guide that will be theirs
to keep. Topics covered include navigating the desktop, using online help,
using Windows Explorer, and using the find utility. -- Marlys Hanson,  User
Services Consultant, Computer Center.
*******

Meritorious Service Nominations Due April 11

This is a reminder to all faculty, staff and others associated with UND that
the deadline for nominations for Meritorious Service Awards for staff
employees is Friday, April 11.  The completed nomination form must be
forwarded to Personnel Services, 313 Twamley Hall, Box 8010, by that date. 
Any questions regarding this award program should be directed to Personnel
Services at 7-4361. -- Cheryl Osowski, Personnel Services.
*******

Nominations Sought for Organization Award

Each year student organizations are recognized for their work within the
University community. The awards highlight organizations' programming efforts,
community service, leadership development programs and overall accomplishments
throughout the year. The awards recognize the outside-the-classroom work of
students and student organizations.
Please stop by the Student Organization Center or call 7-3620 for an
application.  Completed applications must be submitted by 4:30 p.m. Wednesday,
April 16, to the Student Organizations Center, Memorial Union. The awards will
be presented during the Memorial Union Leadership Program on April 25.

-- Ben Subedi, Coordinator of Student Organizations.
*******

Good Friday Is Holiday

In accordance with State Board of Higher Education directives, Friday, March
28, will be observed as Good Friday by faculty and staff members of the
University. Only those employees designated by their department heads will be
required to work on this holiday. -- Marlene Strathe, Vice President for
Academic Affairs and Provost, and Diane Nelson, Director, Personnel Services.
*******

Chester Fritz Library:

The Easter Weekend hours at the Chester Fritz Library are: Thursday, March 27,
8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Friday, March 28, closed; Saturday, March 29, 1 to 5
p.m.; Sunday, March 30, closed. Regular hours will resume Monday, March 31. --
Patricia Berntsen, Assistant Director, Chester Fritz Library.
*******

Health Sciences Library:

Easter hours are: Thursday, March 27, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Friday, March 28,
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, March 29, 1 to 5 p.m.; Sunday, March 30, closed.
-- April Byars, Administrative Assistant, Library of the Health Sciences.
*******

Computer Center:

The Computer Center will close for the Good Friday holiday at midnight on
Thursday, March 27, and will reopen at midnight on Friday, March 28. -- Nadine
Kotowicz, Operations Manager, Computer Center.
*******

Memorial Union:

Easter Break hours for the Memorial Union follow.

All areas will be closed Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, March 28-30.
Hours for Thursday, March 27, are:

LIFETIME SPORTS CENTER, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; INFO CENTER, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.;
SERVICE CENTER, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; COPY STOP, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; BURGER KING,
7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; BOOKSTORE, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE, 8
a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; CRAFT CENTER/SIGN AND DESIGN STUDIO, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.;
DINING CENTER, 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.; BARBER SHOP, 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.;
CENTENNIAL ROOM, 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.; ESPRESSO BAR, 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.;
CORNER DELI, 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.; UNIVERSITY LEARNING CENTER, 8 a.m. to 4:30
p.m.; UNION STATION, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; PASSPORT IDs, 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.;
COMPUTER LEARNING LAB, 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.; BUILDING HOURS, 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.

-- Marsha Nelson, Facilities Coordinator, Memorial Union.
*******

Encourage Students To Attend Career Fair

The 1997 Forks Area Career Fair will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Wednesday, April 9, in the National Guard Armory, 1501 S. 48th St. This is the
first year that UND has cooperated with the area entities which sponsor this
Fair and we need your cooperation to make it a success. Shuttle buses have
been engaged to shuttle our students to and from the Armory. 

The Career Fair schedule follows: 10 a.m., "I'm Graduating, What Do I Do Now?"
how to use the Internet to find a job and explore careers; 11 a.m., "Putting
the Pieces Together: Job Search Basics," hot jobs for the future: panel of
industry representatives; 12:15 p.m., "Planning for Career Change"; 1:30 p.m.,
"I'm Graduating, What Do I Do Now?" (repeat); 2:30 p.m., "Putting the Pieces
Together: Job Search Basics" (repeat); continuous presentation, "How to Get
the Most out of the Career Fair." 

Shuttle buses will run on the following schedule: 

Depart from UND to Career Fair/Armory: 10 a.m., 11 a.m., noon, 1 p.m., 
2 p.m.

Depart from the Career Fair to UND: 10:45 a.m., 11:45 a.m., 12:45 p.m., 1:45
p.m., 2:45 p.m.

-- Terry Erickson, Cooperative Education, 7-4136.
*******

NDUS Legal News: The ADA on College Campuses

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act
(ADA) prohibit discrimination on the basis of disability in employment or
access to facilities, programs, services or activities at colleges and
universities.

Protected individuals include those with a physical or mental impairment that
substantially limits a major life activity. In employment, admissions, and in
all programs and services, institutions must make reasonable accommodations
enabling protected persons to participate fully in the program or activity.

A reasonable accommodation means a change or adjustment that permits a
qualified individual to perform the essential job functions, or to participate
in and fully enjoy the benefits of the program or activity. An accommodation
is not required if it is unduly costly or disruptive, or if it would
fundamentally alter the nature or operation of the business or program.

Colleges and universities may not make pre-admission inquiries concerning
disabilities. Eligibility criteria, including standardized tests, that tend to
screen out qualified applicants with disabilities are suspect. If a testing
company "flags" tests given under nonstandard conditions, college officials
may not ask an applicant why that was done, or what testing accommodations
were made. Applicants with a disability may always voluntarily disclose the
condition and request an accommodation or special consideration.

Institutions are required to make an individualized inquiry into every request
for an accommodation. Although documentation of the disabling condition can
(and should) be required whenever a request is made, requests should not be
denied merely because documentation is not readily available to the person to
whom the request is made, and such requests should never be disregarded.
Documentation may already be on file in another department. To ensure that
disabled student needs are not ignored, it is important that all employees
have a basic understanding of Section 504 and the ADA and be familiar with
procedures for responding to accommodations requests.

There are three basic categories of accommodations to assist students with
disabilities: academic adjustments, modification or alteration in course
examinations, and the provision of auxiliary aids. Examples of accommodations
include moving a class to an accessible room, providing notetakers or
interpreters, providing written copies or tapes of lectures, providing
individual orientation to science labs and extra practice with equipment or
extra lab time, providing extra exam time or a secluded, quiet room for an
exam, using alternative test designs, or allowing the use of aids such as
notebook computers, calculators, dictionaries, etc., during exams. Faculty
must be sensitive to disabled student needs and understand that academic
freedom does not justify denial of a reasonable accommodation.

Discrimination is prohibited, and reasonable accommodations must be provided,
in all programs and activities, including activities off campus. For example,
reasonable accommodations must be made to enable qualified students to
participate in clinical programs or internships.

The cost of an accommodation is the institution's responsibility. However, the
state vocational rehabilitation department may be responsible for those costs
in some cases (although institutions may not require students to apply for voc
rehab as a condition of granting a request). Personal services not available
to other students are not a reasonable accommodation and they are not the
institution's responsibility. For example, a personal attendant to assist a
disabled student with daily living tasks, or hearing aids, eyeglasses and
other personal items, are not the institution's responsibility. If
transportation is not provided to students generally, the institution is not
required to provide that service to disabled students (but if transportation
is provided to the general student population, it must be accessible to
disabled students).

Institutions are not required to grant a "second chance" if a request is made
after an unsatisfactory grade, failed test or poor performance, at least when
the student was earlier aware of the disability. However, entitlement to
readmission or reconsideration is unclear when the student is diagnosed after
the fact and had no knowledge of the condition earlier. College officials
should exercise discretion in these cases, and at least consider whether the
student's performance may have been different had the condition been known,
and accommodations provided earlier.

-- Pat Seaworthy, NDUS Legal Counsel.
*******

Internal Medicine Contacts Moved To Fargo

Effective April 1, anyone wishing to contact the chairperson of Internal
Medicine must call (701)293-4132. For information regarding Accounts Payable,
Payroll, Personnel, etc., contact Patty Mastel at (701)293-4156. All
correspondence must be mailed to: Department of Internal Medicine, UND Medical
Education Center, 1919 Elm Street North, Fargo, ND 58102.  There will no
longer be a contact person for Internal Medicine in Grand Forks. -- Roxanne
Korynta, Internal Medicine.
*******

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

Women's Center Lists Events

The Wednesday, April 2, Feast and Focus program at noon in the Women's Center,
305 Hamline St., is "Gender and Communication in the Media Context." Forms of
media are strong learning sources for shaping our perceptions of women and
men. In the media, women are generally under-represented, and both women and
men are portrayed in narrow sex roles. Bias toward or against either sex is
injurious to both men and women. Stereotyping, or oversimplifying the roles
women and men play, has a variety of negative outcomes. In this program, we
will examine various forms of media and discuss its impact on our lives.

The Thursday, April 3, For Women Only program will feature Sue Goebel from
Valley Health, who will lead us in a discussion of women's sexuality issues.

Sarah Weddington, the attorney who gained national attention in the 1973 Roe
vs. Wade case will speak on campus Thursday, April 3, at 8 p.m. For location
and more information, contact the university Program Council at 777-4202.

-- Donna Oltmanns, Coordinator, Women's Center.
*******

International Centre Lists Events

The Thursday, April 3, program at 7 p.m. in the International Centre, 2908
University Ave., is "Celebrating Turkish Culture," featuring Turkish foods,
history, artifacts and discussion of Turkish culture.

Tickets are now on sale for the 36th Annual Feast of Nations to be held
Saturday, April 19, at 6 p.m. at the Grand Forks Civic Auditorium. Join us for
an international extravaganza including world vignettes, an international
candlelight dinner, intercultural entertainment, music, attire, and artifacts.
All are welcome. Tickets for non-students are $15, $7 for students. Call the
International Centre for reservations at 777-4231. -- Sharon Rezac Andersen,
Director, International Centre, 777-4231.
*******

Burtness Theatre Presents "She Stoops To Conquer"

The Department of Theatre Arts is proud to present the Restoration comedy,
"She Stoops to Conquer." Set in 18th century England, the production shows the
humorous relationship between an upper class lady who must present herself as
a commoner to win the heart of a gentleman who becomes incredibly shy around
women of the same social standing.

Although the play makes light of social situations found in the 1700s,
contemporary audiences will find the comedy just as funny today because many
of the same situations exist in the 1990s. 

The production is directed by Dean Bruce Jacobsen and runs Tuesday through
Saturday, April 15-19, at the Burtness Theatre. Curtain time is 7:30 p.m.
Tickets are $5 and will be available at the Burtness Box Office beginning
April 1; call 777-2587. -- Joel Svendsen, Burtness Theatre Publicity Manager.
*******


MARCH 1997

(Please contact Mavis at the Office of University Relations, Box 7144, or call
777-4304, if you wish to make changes or have an event included.)

Thurs., March 27 -- LAST DAY TO DROP A FULL-TERM CLASS OR WITHDRAW FROM
SCHOOL
IN SPRING SEMESTER.

Thurs., March 27 -- COMPUTER SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM SERIES, James Peters,
University of Manitoba, will present "Time and Roughly Fuzzy Process Models of
Clocks: Concepts and Applications," 107 CAS I, 2:30 p.m.; Sheela Ramana,
University of Winnipeg, will present "Fuzzy Software Cost Estimation: A Multi-Criteria Decision
Making Approach with Applications," 102 CAS I, 4:15 p.m.;
all faculty and students are invited to attend.

Thurs., March 27 -- COUNSELING TOPICS SEMINAR, "Counseling Research,
Determinism and Positivism: Postmodern, Critical Person-Centered Musings,"
presented by J. Wade Hannon, 318 Montgomery Hall, noon to 1:30 p.m.

Thurs., March 27 -- FOR WOMEN ONLY PROGRAM, "Fill Your Mind With Empty," the
program is about bringing your body and mind back in touch with each other -
and giving yourself a chance to heal, Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

Thurs., March 27 -- WOMEN'S HISTORY MONTH PROGRAM, "Female Composers: A Look
at Their Lives and Works in the History of Music," presented by Diane Lee
(Music), East Grand Forks Public Library, 7:30 p.m.

Thurs., March 27 -- INTERNATIONAL EGG DYEING featuring arts from the various
cultures used for dyeing of eggs; international students will present their
artistic work and all participants will have an opportunity to create their
own international egg art piece, UND International Centre, 2908 University
Ave., 7 p.m.; all are welcome; call 777-4231 for more information.

Thurs., March 27 -- PARENTING SERIES, "How Do Adolescents Think?" presented by
Doug Knowlton, clinical psychologist and professor in the Department of
Teaching and Learning, Parent Education Resource Center (PERC), 500 Stanford
Road, 12:10 to 12:50 p.m.; bring your lunch; child care will be provided.

Thurs. through Sat., March 27-29 -- HOCKEY, National Collegiate Athletic
Association Championship.

Fri., March 28 -- HOLIDAY, GOOD FRIDAY.

Fri. and Sat., March 28-29 -- BASEBALL, UND at South Dakota State University
(DII), Brookings, S.D., 2/4 p.m. on Friday, and 1/3 p.m. on  Saturday.

Fri. and Sat., March 28-29 -- SOFTBALL, UND at University of South Dakota Dome
Tournament, Vermillion, S.D.

Mon., March 31 -- STUDENT HOLIDAY, EASTER MONDAY.

Mon., March 31, through Thurs., April 10 -- BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS EXHIBITION,
Jane Feichtner, drawings; John Lee, paintings; and Holly Resch, drawings;
Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center.



APRIL 1997

Through Thurs., April 10 -- BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS EXHIBIT, Jane Feichtner,
drawings; John Lee, paintings; and Holly Resch, drawings; Gallery, Hughes Fine
Arts Center.

Through Sun., April 13 -- ART EXHIBITION, Maryland artist, David Kreuger, who
creates paintings on the bizarre world of fishing as he knew it in his native
North Dakota; large painting from his Parallel Duck Hunting series owned by
the Metropolitan Museum in New York, North Dakota Museum of Art.

Tues., April 1 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for Marge R. Norton, a candidate for the Ph.D.
degree with a major in Clinical Psychology, 210 Corwin-Larimore Hall, 9 a.m.;
members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Tues., April 1 -- CONFLICT RESOLUTION SKILLS: ANALYZING CONFLICT SEMINAR
offered by the UND Conflict Resolution Center, Memorial Union, 9 a.m. to 4
p.m.; designed to teach participants how to identify the major components
influencing conflict and its outcome and how to apply various types of
resolution outcomes to particular characteristics of a conflict; call 777-3664
or contact udcrc@badlands.nodak.edu for more information.

Tues., April 1 -- FACULTY/STAFF BOOK STUDY, "The Death of Ivan Ilyich" by Leo
Tolstoy, Christus Rex, 3012 University Ave., noon; study held each Tuesday in
April; call 775-5581 for more information.

Wed., April 2 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for Richard Allan Goeb, a candidate for the
Ph.D. degree with a major in Educational Administration, 208 Education
Building, 2 p.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Wed., April 2 -- TRAINING SESSION, Controller's Office and Purchasing Office
will present this training session for new employees and current employees who
have not attended a previous session; call Allison at 777-2968 for more
information.

Wed., April 2 -- FEAST AND FOCUS PROGRAM, "Gender and Communication in the
Media Context," Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

Thurs., April 3 -- MEETING, University Senate, Room 7, Gamble Hall, 4:05 p.m.

Thurs., April 3 -- HONORS DAY LUNCHEON, Ballroom, Memorial Union, noon;
speaker will be Mary Muehlen Maring, North Dakota Supreme Court Justice; event
recognizes presidents and advisors of honor societies, seniors on the
President's Roll of Honor, and outstanding students recommended by departments
that do not have honor societies; tickets may be purchased ($5 each) in the
Office of University Relations, 411 Twamley Hall.

Thurs., April 3 -- LECTURE, AWU-DOE Distinguished Lecturer, Luiz B. Da Silva,
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, Calif., will present "Laser
Medicine," Reed T. Keller Auditorium, School of Medicine and Health Sciences,
noon; sponsored by the Office of Research and Program Development, Industrial
Technology and Physics.

Thurs., April 3 -- SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND MINES OPEN HOUSE, the School
invites the area schools, general public, and UND students and faculty to view
engineering students' activities; 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Thurs., April 3 -- CELEBRATING TURKISH CULTURE featuring Turkish foods,
history, artifacts, and discussion of Turkish culture, UND International
Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; all are welcome; call 777-4231 for more
information.

Thurs., April 3 -- FOR WOMEN ONLY PROGRAM, Sue Goebel from Valley Health will
lead us in a discussion of women's sexuality issues, Women's Center, 305
Hamline St., noon.

Thurs., April 3 -- LECTURE, Sarah Weddington, the attorney who gained national
attention in the 1973 Roe vs. Wade case will speak on campus at 3 p.m.; call
the University Program Council at 777-4202 for location and more information.

Fri., April 4 -- MEETING, Institutional Review Board, 305 Twamley Hall, 4 p.m.

Fri., April 4 -- BIOLOGY SEMINAR, "The End of DNA Replication as We Know It,"
presented by Tom Hill (Microbiology), 141 Starcher Hall, noon; all are
welcome.

Fri., April 4 -- BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY SPECIAL LECTURE, "Gene
Expression Associated with Chromosome 6-Mediated Tumor Suppression of Human
Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma" will be presented by Michael Ray, Department of
Human Genetics, University of Michigan School of Medicine in Ann Arbor, 1360
Clifford Haugen Room, Medical Science, 10 a.m.; Dr. Ray is a native of Grand
Forks.

Fri., April 4 -- DEAN'S HOUR SEMINAR, "Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia,"
presented by Marsha Fowler, Professor of Theology and Nursing and Director of
Health Ministries Programs, San Francisco Theological Seminar, Reed T. Keller
Auditorium, Room 1350, Wold Bio-Information Learning Resources Center, Health
Sciences Building.

Fri., April 4 -- CONFERENCE, "Practical Genetics in Primary Health Care," via
Interactive Video Network, Gamble Hall; conference is free to students; call
Mary Ebertowski before April 1 at 777-4243 for more information.

Fri., April 4 -- LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary Sciences) LECTURE
by Jimmie Richardson, North Dakota State University, at noon in Leonard Hall
Lecture Bowl, Room 100, he will consider "Soils and Groundwater on the Lake
Agassiz Plain," and from 2 to 4 p.m. in 214 Leonard Hall, he will conduct a
Soils and Hydrogeology Workshop; call John Reid at 777-2131 for more
information.

Fri. and Sat., April 4-5 -- BASEBALL, UND at Augustana College (DII), Sioux
Falls, S.D., 2/4 p.m. on Friday, and 11:30 p.m. Saturday.

Sat., April 5 -- DENTAL ADMISSION TEST (DAT), Room 114, Witmer Hall, 8 a.m.

Sat., April 5 -- BASEBALL, UND vs. Wayne State College (DII) at Sioux Falls,
S.D., 1:30 p.m.

Sun., April 6 -- UNIVERSITY-WIDE FORUM, "The End of Science," 1618 Swanson,
Memorial Union, 6:30 p.m.; forum, hosted by Honors Program students, will
focus both on the topic and on the book "The End of Science" by John Horgan;
call Tami at 777-2219 for more information.

Sun. and Mon., April 6-7 -- GOLF, WOMEN'S, UND at Northeast Missouri State
University, Kirksville, Mo. (tentative).

Mon., April 7 -- PSYCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM, "Consequences of Personal Philosophies
of Learning: Educator Beliefs Determining Student Opportunities," Room 102,
Nursing Building, noon to 1 p.m.; everyone is welcome.

Mon., April 7 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for Michael Mann, a candidate for the Ph.D.
degree with a major in Energy Engineering, 360A Harrington Hall, 10 a.m.;
members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Mon., April 7 -- LEADERSHIP SERIES, "Presenting a Leadership Image," presented
by Leadership Inspiration Center staff, Leadership Inspiration Center, third
floor, Memorial Union, 3 p.m.; non-credit sessions are designed to help
students explore leadership from a variety of perspectives and develop an
understanding of themselves; sessions are free and open to the public.

*******

__________Specials @ University Bookstore_________

March 27, 1997


________University Bookstore________


SPECIALS INDEX:

NCAA Division II Champion Clothing - Actionwear Department
______

WCHA Champion Clothing - Actionwear Department
______

Susan Yuzna's Book Won National Award - General Book Department
______

New York Times Paperback Bestsellers 30% Off - General Book Department
______

Writing Nature / The Nature of Writing - General Book Department
______

Please Remember Your Bookstore Charge Card - University Bookstore
______

April Bookstore Journal is Coming Soon - University Bookstore
______


________University Bookstore________

Congratulations NCAA Division II CHAMPIONS
UND Women's Basketball Team!!!

Pick up your NCAA Division II Champion T-Shirts and Sweatshirts at the
University Bookstore!


________University Bookstore________

Congratulations WCHA CHAMPIONS and Final Four Playoff Contenders
UND Hockey Team!!!

Pick up your WCHA Champion T-Shirts, Sweatshirts, and caps at the
University Bookstore!


________University Bookstore________

Susan Yuzna's Book Won National Award

Susan Yuzna was recently awarded the Norma Farber First Book Award by the
Poetry Society of America for her book "Her Slender Dress."  This book is
available in our General Book department.  Congratulations Susan!


________University Bookstore________

New York Times Paperback Bestsellers 30% Off

The University Bookstore is pleased to announce that New York Times Paperback
Bestsellers are now 30% off everyday!!  Stop in to check out the latest
bestsellers and pick up a copy!


________University Bookstore________

Writing Nature / The Nature of Writing

Although the 28th Annual Writers Conference is over, it is still not to late
to pick up any of the authors books at the University Bookstore.

Stop by and check out our selection.


________University Bookstore________

Please Remember Your Bookstore Charge Cards

Please remember, following a review of internal control procedures, Internal
Auditing and the Controller's Office have advised us that departments must
present their Bookstore Charge Card to the cashier when making a purchase at
the Bookstore.  Departments will not be allowed to charge any merchandise to
their departmental account unless they present their Bookstore Charge Card at
the time of purchase.

New/additional cards may be obtained by submitting the "Charge Card Request /
Change Form", signed by the department head/chair.  The form is available at
the University Bookstore.

If you have any questions or concerns, contact us at 7-2746.


________University Bookstore________

April Bookstore Journal is Coming Soon

The next edition of the University Bookstore's Bookstore Journal is scheduled
to come out next week!  Please contact the University Bookstore if you would
like a copy sent directly to you.


________University Bookstore________

The University Bookstore is located on the main floor of the Memorial Union.
We can be reached at . . .

(701) 777-2746, toll free 1-800-671-0948,

or by fax at (701) 777-3410

If you are online, please check out our web site at . . .

http://bookstore.und.nodak.edu/bookstore/

or send us email . . .

bookstor@operations.und.nodak.edu

Have a nice day and please check out our web site!

________University Bookstore________

*******


UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and
distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is
also available electronically through UNDInfo, the University's menu
system on the Internet. The addresses are http://www.und.nodak.edu for
World-Wide Web and uninfo.und.nodak.edu for gopher.
  
All articles submitted for publication should be labeled "University
Letter" and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic
submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu. Attachments to
University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number.
University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations,
Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.
  
UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.
  
*******


  





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