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University Letter

May 15, 1998

Volume 35 No. 37



UNIVERSITY LETTER
University of North Dakota at Grand Forks
Vol. 35, Number 37, May 15, 1998

UNIVERSITY LETTER IS ALSO AVAILABLE ELECTRONICALLY in the Events and News
section of UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address
is: http://www.und.edu/dept/our/uletter.htm

The University Relations Office maintains an index for the University Letter.

------------------------
          CONTENTS
Center For Innovation Becomes Part Of BPA
New  Zero Time To jet RWating' Pilot Training Team Formed
University Letter Summer Schedule
     EVENTS TO NOTE
Nebraska Professor Who Aided Anatomy After Flood Visits Campus
Alumni Days Schedule Listed
Presidential Briefing Set For May 26
Employee Assistance Program Information Session To Be Held
Institutional Review Board Meets June 3
     OF ACADEMIC INTEREST
University Senate Members Elected
Faculty Selected For National Institute
Instructional Development Has New Web Site
     GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS
Research, Grant Opportunities Listed
     BILLBOARD
Ten Employees Receive Meritorious Service Awards
Knutsvig Named Forecast Research And Development Assistant
Senate Hears GF Chamber Response To Support Request Regarding Cutbacks
Submit Items For Summer Datebook By May 20
Printing Center Will Close For Inventory
Memorial Day Holiday Hours Listed
     MONEY MATTERS
Fiscal Year End Procedures Detailed
     ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT
Television Center To Telecast Flood Footage
Local Actress Writes And Stars In "Flood Of Memories" At Museum
Exhibition Of Children's Flood Murals, Other Works, Opens May 14
Museum Of Art Announces Summer Art Camp For Kids
     EVENTS CALENDAR
------------------------

CENTER FOR INNOVATION BECOMES PART OF BPA

The Center for Innovation has become part of the College of Business and
Public Administration. The Center has served as a leader in the state and
region in developing entrepreneurial efforts and economic development
initiatives.

This new relationship will enable the College and the Center to work more
closely on opportunities related to economic development, assisting
manufacturers and entrepreneurs while promoting each organization's mission. 
The advantages of this new relationship will capitalize on the strengths of
the college such as the vast expertise of our faculty and students. We have a
lot to offer concerning economic development and this relationship with the
Center will allow us to tap into more private sector contracts and better
utilize that experience and expertise.

The Center for Innovation has always had a good relationship with the College
of Business and Public Administration. The new relationship will allow current
and future clients benefits such as possibilities for securing interns and
other projects which will help entrepreneurs expand their business while at
the same time provide more opportunities for students and faculty of the
College. The only difference our clients will see is more opportunities to
interact and utilize the strengths of the state's only accredited business
college.

The College of Business and Public Administration will have a seat on the
Center's Advisory Board, and both entities agree to act as an advocate for the
other.

-- Dennis Elbert, Dean, College of Business and Public Administration, and
Bruce Gjovig, Director, Center for Innovation.
*******

NEW  ZERO TIME TO JET RATING' PILOT TRAINING TEAM FORMED

Raytheon Systems Ltd., United Kingdom, a unit of Raytheon Company, UND
Aerospace, and Oxford Air Training School have formed an aviation training
team that will provide a complete range of pilot training services for
customers anywhere in the world.

The new team combines the ab initio to ATP-level training capabilities of both
Oxford Air Training School in the United Kingdom and UND Aerospace in the
United States with the professional services, including comprehensive ground
school courses and a full fleet of full flight simulators, offered at Raytheon
Flight Training Centre at London-Gatwick Airport.

"This teaming is a landmark event that creates a single source for the total
range of pilot training any airline or individual could need," said Bill
McGrath, Executive Director, Raytheon's executive director for Air Transport
Products and Services. "From zero-time to type-ratings in the world's most
sophisticated passenger aircraft, the Raytheon, UND, Oxford alliance can
provide professional world-class training to meet the required standards of
all licensing authorities including JAA, CAA and FAA."

The training team has four state-of-the-art training facilities: the Oxford
Aviation Training School facility near Oxford, England; two UND Aerospace
facilities in the United States, one in Grand Forks and the other in Mesa,
Ariz.; and the Raytheon Flight Training Centre at London-Gatwick Airport.

"The new team provides our customers with access to a complete range of
training services to meet worldwide licensing criteria," said Michael Daw,
Chief Executive Officer of Oxford Aviation Services Ltd., the parent company
of Oxford Air Training School. "Furthermore, these training services are
provided by top quality organizations in each of their respective areas of
expertise."

The team will provide the industry with the highest quality of training at
centers where 1,000 can be accommodated in-house. It is anticipated that
between 300 and 500 pilots will graduate annually. 

"UND Aerospace is pleased to join forces with two outstanding training groups
that share our commitment to quality, safety and value," said John Odegard,
UND Aerospace President and Chief Executive Officer. "All three organizations
bring decades of training experience for airlines from around the world. I
believe our team brings together talents and capabilities unmatched anywhere
else in the industry."

UND Aerospace, celebrating its 30th anniversary in 1998, is an international
leader in aviation education and training. In addition to its contract pilot
training services, its John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences is the
second largest college at the University, with 1,500 students enrolled. Its
training complex is the most technologically advanced environment for
aerospace education, training and research in the world. UND Aerospace Flight
Training Centers also have been established at Huntsville (Ala.) International
Airport, Williams Gateway (Mesa, Ariz.) Airport and Crookston (Minn.)
Municipal Airport.

Raytheon Company, based in Lexington, Mass., is a global technology leader
with worldwide sales of more than US$20 billion and more than 118,000
employees. The company provides state-of-the-art products and services in the
areas of commercial and defense electronics, engineering and construction, and
business and special mission aircraft. Raytheon has operations throughout the
United States and serves customers in more than 90 countries around the world.

The Raytheon organization at London-Gatwick is Europe's largest independent
flight training centre with complete groundschool and flight simulator
training for the A320, B737, B747, B757, B767, MD83 and Bae125 aircraft types.

Oxford Air Training School (OATS) is a division of Oxford Aviation Services.
OATS has been providing top-quality professional pilot and engineer training
services for over 30 years to CAA standards. Now one of the leading flight
training organizations in Europe, OATS can provide comprehensive JAA training
at its home base at Oxford, England from ab initio to jet transition courses.
Ancillary services include a full range of ground school, engineering training
and engineering maintenance services.

-- John Odegard, Dean, UND Aerospace.
*******

UNIVERSITY LETTER LISTS SUMMER SCHEDULE

The summer schedule for University Letter follows.  University Letter will be
published on the following dates: May 15 and 29, June 12 and 26, July 10 and
24, Aug. 7,21 and 28.  The deadline for article submission remains at 1 p.m.
the Tuesday before you wish the article published. Articles will be run only
once due to space and budget considerations. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, University
Letter.
*******


EVENTS TO NOTE


NEBRASKA PROFESSOR WHO AIDED ANATOMY 
AFTER FLOOD VISITS CAMPUS

In the aftermath of the 1997 flood, Thomas Rosenquist, Professor and Chair of
Cell Biology and Anatomy at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in
Omaha, was a central figure in an academic rescue of UND's first year medical
students. Dr. Rosenquist and his colleagues at UNMC invited students to come
to their department to complete their foreshortened course in Gross Anatomy.
This resulted in more than 30 students spending two weeks at the Department of
Cell Biology and Anatomy in the UNMC. The faculty provided excellent
instruction for our students and supplied all instructional materials
(including laboratory specimens) at no cost to them. Moreover, students were
given free housing in the homes of UNMC faculty. A quote from Dr. Rosenquist,
carried in an article from the Alumni news of the University of Nebraska, puts
another perspective on the event: "We anatomy faculty members are a family,
and we at UNMC were just taking care of family business. They would most
certainly do the same for us."

Dr. Rosenquist will visit campus Monday, May 18, to present a seminar titled
"Homocysteine and Congenital Defects -- A New Hypothesis" in the United
Hospital lecture Hall, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, at noon. The
School of Medicine and Health Sciences extends to Dr. Rosenquist and his
colleagues at UNMC our deepest gratitude and appreciation. We are honored to
have him with us.

-- Edward Carlson, Professor and Chair, and Mike Atkinson, Associate Professor
and Spring Seminar Series Coordinator, Anatomy and Cell Biology.
*******

ALUMNI DAYS SCHEDULE LISTED

The Alumni Association invites all faculty and staff to join in the activities
of Alumni Days  98. This year's festivities feature the classes of 1937, 1938,
1942, 1943, 1947, 1948, 1952 and 1953. The class reunions postponed last year
due to the flood have been rescheduled for this year; so we are anticipating
our biggest and best Alumni Days ever. We hope you will be able to join us.
Alumni Days will begin Wednesday, May 20, with campus tours in the morning.
The afternoon includes class socials and an open house at the J. Lloyd Stone
Alumni Center from 3:30 to 5 p.m. The Get Reacquainted Dinner is at 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday in the Memorial Union Ballroom. We will have a special video
presentation and entertainment which will stir up campus memories from the
1930s, 1940s and 1950s.

Special reunion breakfasts for the Schools of Engineering and Mines, Law,
Medicine and Health Sciences, Communication, the College of Education and
Human Development, and the Departments of Accounting and Business Law, and
Nutrition and Dietetics (Home Economics), will be held Thursday, May 21, from
8 to 9:45 a.m.

This year we are proud to honor the "Boys of Camp Depression" at a Dedication
Ceremony and Luncheon at 11:30 a.m. on Thursday. An impressive monument has
been commissioned in honor of those who lived a part or all of their
University days in the railroad caboose complex. The monument stands south of
the Chester Fritz Library. Following the ceremony, a luncheon will be held at
the River Valley Room in the Memorial Union.

The Citations Committee of the UND Alumni Association has selected four
outstanding alumni to receive the Sioux Award to be presented during the
annual Alumni Days Awards Banquet. The awards banquet will be at the Westward
Ho on Thursday evening with a social at 6:30 p.m., followed by a dinner and
program at 7 p.m. Alumni Days  98 Award recipients are: Sam Silverman,  37,
 39; Norma (Peterson) Oreskovich, ..'37; Dr. Robert A. Kyle,  48; and The Rev.
Harry Durkee, ..'43.

After class breakfasts on Friday, May 22, a memorial service in honor of
friends and classmates will be held at 10:15 a.m. in the Swanson Hall
Courtyard. The three-day festivities conclude with an "Until We Meet Again"
Buffet at 12:30 p.m. in the Memorial Union Ballroom.

For more information or to make reservations, contact the Alumni Association
at 777-2611. -- Kirsten Carolin, Alumni Association and Foundation.

*******
PRESIDENTIAL BRIEFING SET FOR MAY 26

The 9 o'clock briefing for May will be held Tuesday, May 26, at 9 a.m. in the
Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. President Ken Baker will lead the briefing. --
Jan Orvik, Editor.
*******

EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM 
INFORMATION SESSION TO BE HELD

A general information session on Employee Assistance Program (EAP) will be
held at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 27, in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. John
Jarman will explain the resources and services available through the program.
If you have any questions, call Desi Sporbert at Personnel Services, 777-4361.
-- Diane Nelson, Director, Personnel Services.
*******

INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARD MEETS JUNE 3

The Institutional Review Board will meet at 4 p.m. Wednesday, June 3, in 305
Twamley Hall to consider all research proposals submitted to the Office of
Research and Program Development before Tuesday, May 26. Proposals received
later will be considered only if a quorum has reviewed them and time permits.
Clinical medical projects must be reviewed by the Clinical medical
Subcommittee before being brought to the full Board. Proposals for these
projects are due in the Office of Research and Program Development Monday, May
18. Notes from the meeting will be available in ORPD approximately one week
after the meeting. -- F.R. Ferraro (Psychology), Chair, Institutional Review
Board.
*******


OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

UNIVERSITY SENATE MEMBERS ELECTED

Council members who have been elected to serve one-year terms on the
University Senate are the following:

Center for Aerospace Sciences: John Bridewell and Charles Robertson; College
of Arts and Sciences: Mark Hoffmann, Shihlung Huang, James Mochoruk, Janet
Kelly Moen, Mary Jane Schneider, and John Wagner; College of Business and
Public Administration: Fathollah Bagheri and Kenneth Hansen; College of
Education and Human Development: Gerald Bass and Dan Rice; School of
Engineering and Mines: Scott Korom and Charles Moretti; College of Fine Arts
and Communication: Patrick Luber and Elizabeth Meyers; School of Law: Patricia
Fry and Marcia O'Kelly; School of Medicine: Thomas Mohr and Katherine
Sukalski; College of Nursing: Susan Hunter and Helen Melland; and Libraries:
Judy Rieke and Rhonda Schwartz.

-- Alice Poehls (Admissions and Records), Secretary, University Senate.
*******

FACULTY SELECTED FOR NATIONAL INSTITUTE

Four faculty members have been selected to participate in the faculty
institute offered through the SCRIPT (Supporting Change and Reform in
Interprofessional Preservice Training) project. They are Barb Jacobsen (Social
Work), Peggy Mohr (Physical Therapy), Linda Olson (School of Medicine), and
Peggy Shaeffer (Teaching and Learning).

Based at the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center at the University of
North Carolina, Chapel Hill, SCRIPT is a project funded by the U.S. Department
of Education.  The faculty institute is designed to prepare interprofessional
teams of faculty, family members, and practitioners to serve as leaders in
providing effective preservice preparation in the area of early intervention.

Jacobsen, Mohr, Olson and Shaeffer are four of only 16 team members selected
from the state of North Dakota.  They will participate in a four-day institute
and will return to North Dakota to serve as a resource in improving state
systems for preparing individuals to serve infants, toddlers, and families.

The selection of state team members was based on professional expertise,
knowledge about early intervention, and willingness to serve as a state
personnel preparation resource. Through their efforts, information related to
early intervention will be disseminated to others in the community and state.

-- Jan Orvik, Editor, University Letter.
*******

INSTRUCTIONAL DEVELOPMENT HAS NEW WEB SITE

The new web site for the Office of Instructional Development is now online and
may be visited through the UND home page at http://www.und.edu. Faculty are
encouraged to visit the page for information about OID programs and schedules.
OID guidelines and forms are available through the new site. We wish to thank
Keith Stenehjem, Chair of the Faculty Instructional Development Committee, for
designing and constructing the new site for us. -- Dan Rice, Office of
Instructional Development.
*******


GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

RESEARCH, GRANT OPPORTUNITIES LISTED

Following are research and grant opportunities. For more information, contact
the Office of Research and Program Development at 777-4278.

PARENTERAL DRUG ASSOCIATION FOUNDATION

Grants in Parenteral Research are intended to stimulate research in the
parenteral sciences through the support of graduate students in fields such as
biology, chemistry, engineering, manufacturing, microbiology, pharmaceutics,
pharmacology, pharmacy, quality assurance and other appropriate disciplines
related to parenteral science and technology.  Grants provide up to $15,000
for one year.  Deadline: 7/1/98.  Contact: the Foundation at P.O. Box 242,
Garden City, New York 11530; 516/248-6713;
http://www.millipore.com:80/corporate/pda/#grants.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION (NSF)

The Instrumentation Grants for Research in Computer and Information Science
and Engineering (NSF 96-113) program provides support for the purchase of
research equipment, instrumentation, or software for research in areas of
science or engineering supported in the CISE Directorate.  Proposals involving
inter-departmental and inter-institutional sharing arrangements are welcome. 
Emphasis is on unique or new research capabilities that will ensue from
acquisition of the equipment.  Awards range from $30,000-$200,000.  Deadline:
8/5/98.  Contact: Rita Rodriguez, Program Director; 703/306-1981; fax
703/306-0589; rrodrigu@nsf.gov. 

The Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program (98-103) is a
Foundation-wide instrument for support of new faculty within the context of
their overall career development.  Support is provided to foster integration
of research and education components of a faculty career.  Applicants are
encouraged to describe a range of activities that include research, assigned
instructional activities, and education innovations that move beyond routine
education and service responsibilities.  There should be a direct relationship
between research and education aspects.  Education activities may address
curriculum, pedagogy, outreach, or mentoring at any level, including graduate
and undergraduate students, majors and non-majors, teacher preparation or
enhancement, K-12 students, or the general public.  Only single investigator
proposals are appropriate.  Establishing collaborations with partners from
other sectors, or with foreign researchers and educators, is encouraged. 
Awards range from $200,000-$500,000 for 4-5 years.  Deadline: 7/22/98. 
Contact: ORPD or http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/getpub?nsf98103 for names/addresses/programs of specific divisions. 

SBE and SDEST grants are awarded for Research, Infrastructure and Education
Projects (97-28) on ethics, values and the conduct and impacts of science and
engineering.  Also of interest are proposals for research on the implications
of different national strategies towards science and technology questions, on
development of models and other approaches with which to gather and interpret
information, and on improvement of data resources.  Projects to summarize and
assess the knowledge base about an important issue can also be considered. 
Infrastructure projects may involve a variety of activities to stimulate new
research areas, outreach efforts, or development and dissemination of
appropriate data bases, text retrieval systems, and graphic resources for
research, educational or public use.  Education projects can include such
activities as national summer workshops for graduate students or faculty, or
projects by professional societies to develop concentrations in ethics and the
social context of science and engineering for undergraduate or graduate level
science and engineering students.  Preliminary proposals can be submitted at
any time.  Applicants should contact the program to discuss their ideas before
preparing written submission for education projects.  Single investigators or
groups may apply.  Projects may involve additional collaborators, advisors,
postdoctoral researchers, or graduate or undergraduate student assistants. 
Contact: Rachelle Hollander, Program Director; 703-306-1743; fax 703/306-0485;
rholland@nsf.gov; http://www.nsf.gov/sbe/sber/sdest/start.htm.  Deadline: 
8/1/98.  
- - - - - - - - - - - -

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE 

The Publication Grant Program provides short-term financial assistance (up to
$25,000 for 3 years) for preparation of book-length manuscripts and, in some
cases, publication of important scientific information needed by U.S. health
professionals.  Objectives of the program are to provide financial support for
not-for-profit scientific publications which will synthesize, increase the
availability of, and facilitate utilization of biomedical information, and to
assist in closing communication gaps in the application of scientific research
findings to medical practice.  Contact: 301/496-4621; fax 301/402-0421;
sparks@nlm.nih.gov; http://www.nlm.nih.gov.  Deadlines: 6/1/98, 10/1/98.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE (NPS)

The Canon National Parks Science Scholars Program provides graduate student
scholarships of $25,000/yr. for up to 3 years to support research in the
national parks in the biological sciences (to identify the relationship of
fire regimes to landscape processes/patterns), physical sciences (to access
waste treatment technologies and understand their impact on soil, water,
etc.), social sciences (to determine long-term impacts NPS interpretive and/or
outreach programs have on visitors, general public, etc.) and cultural
sciences (to determine what techniques are more effective in preserving rock
art).  Deadline: 6/15/98.  Contact:  Dr. Gary E. Machlis, Program Coordinator,
202/208-5391; gmachlis@uidaho.edu. 
- - - - - - - - - - - -

MERRILL LYNCH & COMPANY, INC.

The Innovation Grants Competition provides support to encourage entrepreneur-
ial literacy among the academic research community.  It seeks to spark new
levels of creativity and ingenuity at research universities by challenging
doctoral candidates in the sciences, liberal arts and engineering disciplines
to examine their dissertations in light of their commercial potential.  Cash
prizes are available for Ph.D. students in all disciplines except business,
law or journalism.  Deadline: 7/1/98.  Contact: Michael Schrange,
888/333-6786; InnovationGrants@ML.com; http://www.merrilllynch.com.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

CAMILLE AND HENRY DREYFUS FOUNDATION

The goal of the Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program is to strengthen
the teaching and research careers of talented young faculty in the chemical
sciences.  Nominees must hold a full-time tenure-track academic appointment,
be between the 4th-9th years of their independent academic careers, and engage
in teaching and research primarily with undergraduates.  Awards are for
$60,000.  Contact:  Robert L. Lichter, Ph.D., Executive Director;
212/753-1760; admin@dreyfus.org; http://www.dreyfus.org.  Deadline: 7/1/98.  
- - - - - - - - - - - -

CHEVRON CORPORATION

Chevron Corporate Grants are awarded to U.S. national or international
programs in Education, with emphasis on efforts to promote excellence in math
and science education, human resources development, equal access and quality
in schools; and Environment, with emphasis on conservation or habitat and
wildlife  preservation.  Deadlines: 7/1/98, 11/1/98, 3/1/99.  Contact: Grants
Administrator, 415/894-7700; chevweb@chevron.com;
http://www.chevron.com/community/index.html.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS FOUNDATION

Grants provide support to civic, research, educational, health, welfare,
charitable, and cultural organizations for a variety of projects.  Main areas
of interest are educational, medical, and social programs.  Application may be
made in the form of a 1-2 page letter briefly outlining the purpose of the
organization, the population it serves, and how the requested funds will be
used.  Deadline: None.  Contact: 972/917-4505; fax 972/917-4583;
a-minnis@ti.com.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

GLADYS KRIEBLE DELMAS FOUNDATION

The Humanities Program provides support for projects to further the humanities
along a broad front, including programs at the postgraduate and university
level, as well as those aimed toward humanistic disciplines in secondary
education.  Research institutions as well as cultural and educational
organizations are eligible for both general operating and project support. 
Areas of interest are modern and classical languages; linguistics; literature;
history; jurisprudence; philosophy; archaeology; comparative religion; ethics;
the history, criticism, and theory of the arts; and aspects of the social
sciences which share the content and methods of these humanistic disciplines.  

The Library Program provides support to improve the ability of research
libraries to serve the needs of scholarship in the humanities and performing
arts so Foundation funds benefit scholars beyond the recipient organization. 
Proposals are considered for cooperative cataloguing projects, some elements
of interpretation and exhibition, scholarly library publications,
bibliographical and publishing projects of interest to research libraries,
preservations and conservation work and research, and, in rare instances,
unusual acquisitions opportunities.  The geographical concentration will be
primarily European and American history and letters, broadly defined. 
Technological developments that support humanities research and access to
humanities resources are also eligible.  Conferences designed to address these
issues in collaborative ways and programs formulated to enhance or leverage
similar activities by other institutions, consortia, or funding agencies will
also be considered.

Applications are by invitation only.  Letters of inquiry, within the scope of
the programs outlined, should be addressed to the Secretary to the Board. 
Contact: 212/687-0011; fax 212/687-8877; DelmasFdtn@aol.com;
http://www.delmas.org.  Deadline: None.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION OF AMERICA 

Grants range from $10,000-$100,000 in the following areas: the arts
(performing arts, arts education, children's programming, ticket subsidy
projects), education (incest prevention, natural science education, adolescent
substance rehabilitation, environmental education, day programs, newsletters, 
communications programs, after school programs, teacher training,
multi-cultural curriculum development), environment (conserving natural
resources; public education and advocacy, farming innovations, endangered
species, nuclear waste management, recycling, transportation policy, forest
management), medicine (clinics in underserved areas, studies of Non-Hodgkin's
Lymphoma, adolescent medicine), Native Americans (videos and films;
scholarships; arts exhibits; storytelling, music and dance; child development;
reproductive and environmental health; diabetes; computer education; legal
services; conference support), peace/conflict resolution (public education and
fellowships); and overpopulation and reproduction (defense of reproductive
rights; distribution of contraceptives; public education; family planning
programs).  Applicants should submit a letter of inquiry.  Deadline: If a full
proposal is invited, a deadline will be given.  Contact: Diane M. Allison,
Executive Director, 203/226-6498; fax 203/227-0424. 
- - - - - - - - - - - -

THE GEORGE A. AND ELIZA GARDNER HOWARD FOUNDATION

The Foundation is accepting nominations for 10 fellowships of $20,000 each in
the fields of Literary Criticism, Film Criticism, and Translations written in
English.  The primary goal is to support people in the middle stages of their
careers whose work to date is evidence of their promise and achievement.
Faculty members must be eligible for release time from teaching
responsibilities and for financial support from the institution during the
fellowship year (7/1/99-6/30/2000).  Independent scholars may also be
nominated.  Contact: http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/gradschool/howard. 
Deadline: Because each institution may submit only 3 nominations, one in each
area of interest, nominations must be submitted to ORPD on or before 10/19/98. 
Deadline for full applications is 11/30/98.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

BURROUGHS WELLCOME FUND (BWF)

Clinical Scientist Awards in Translational Research support the career
development of established independent U.S. and Canadian physician-scientists
whose work bridges the gap between basic research and patient care.  Awards
provide $750,000 over 5 years and are intended to help free awardees from
general clinical responsibilities, enabling them to pursue the link between
basic and clinical research.  BWF is particularly interested in supporting
investigators who will bring novel ideas and new approaches to translational
research.  Applications from women and members of underrepresented minority
groups are encouraged.  Deadline: 9/1/98.  Contact: Debra Linkous, 919/991-5116; mailback@bwfund.org (type "menu" on subject line for list of programs);
http://www.bwfund.org.

-- Sally Eckert-Tilotta, Assistant to the Director of of Research and Program
Development.
*******


BILLBOARD

TEN EMPLOYEES RECEIVE MERITORIOUS SERVICE AWARDS

Ten employees were recognized for their service to UND with Meritorious
Service Awards at the annual Recognition Ceremony for Staff Personnel Tuesday,
May 12. The Meritorious Service Award consists of a plaque and $1,000. Winners
are nominated by their fellow employees. This year's winners are:

Terry Aubol, Administrative Assistant, Office of the Vice President for
Academic Affairs and Provost;  Becky Bohlman, Administrative Secretary,
Department of Industrial Technology; Jerry Bulisco, Coordinator of Judicial
Affairs and Crisis Programs, Division of Student Affairs; Robert Coulthart,
Carpenter, Plant Services; Marsha Larson, Building Services Manager, Plant
Services; Cathy Perry, Administrative Officer, Department of Pathology; Heidi
Smart, Collection Officer, Business Office; Duane Stavig, Building Services
Manager, Plant Services; Mark Thompson, Director of Career Services; and
Sandra Walen, Secretary, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Many staff members were recognized for their years of service to UND and were
awarded years of service certificates:

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE DIVISION, 5 years: Kendall Baker (President), Donald Cox
(Energy and Environmental Research Center [EERC]), Grant Dunham (EERC), Dean
Goebel (EERC), Forrest Haug (EERC), Wesley Peck (EERC); 10 years: Roy Beard
(EERC), Patricia Bohnet (President's Office), Darlyne Frericks (EERC), John
Haugen (EERC), Marlys Heidt (EERC), Joyce Hoverson (Human Nutrition Research
Center [HNRC]), Kin-Chung Siu (HNRC), Kathleen Svare (HNRC), Christopher
Zygarlicke (EERC); 15 years: Jean Altepeter (HNRC), Steven Benson (EERC),
Steven Cisney (EERC), Gail Confer (HNRC), Raymond DeWall (EERC), Dean Evenstad
(EERC), James Ford (EERC), Gerald Groenewold (EERC), Ken Grohs (EERC), Paul
Gronhovd (EERC), Mylan Hackett (EERC), Douglas Hajicek (EERC), John Hendrikson
(EERC), Doris Hustad (HNRC), Joyleen Johnson (Affirmative Action), Michael
Jones (EERC), Alan Lilke (EERC), Randall Lillibridge (EERC), John Lutheran
(EERC), Michael Mann (EERC), Gale Mayer (EERC), Donald McCollor (EERC),
Kathleen McIntyre (HNRC), Stanley Miller (EERC), David Miller (EERC), Daniel
Nerby (Athletics), Edwin Olson (EERC), Hilary Riske (EERC), Grant Schelkoph
(EERC), Richard Shockey (EERC), Elaine Speare (HNRC), Mary Stempinski (HNRC),
Joyce Sundby (EERC), Michael Swanson (EERC), Carolyn Thompson (HNRC), James
Tibbetts (EERC), Donald Toman (EERC), Karen Uhrich (EERC), Jean Vorachek
(EERC), Gregory Weber (EERC), Constance Wixo (EERC); 20 years: Debra Haley
(EERC), Debbie Krause (HNRC), Sally Page (Affirmative Action), Leone "Lee"
Troutman (University Relations; 25 years: Jean Westman (HNRC); 35 years: Rita
Galloway (University Relations).

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS DIVISION, 5 years: Janie Adam (Computer
Center), Vicki Anderson (Flight Operations and Training), Craig Cerkowniak
(Nursing), Sheila Evans (Regional Weather Information Center), Jennifer Foss
(Aerospace Science Divisional), Deb Hager (Flight Operations and Training),
Lisa Hankins (Flight Operations and Training), Laurie Hanson (Outreach
Programs), Neelufar Hasan (Computer Center), Cathy Lerud (ASEND/EPSCoR), Helen
Murphy (College of Arts and Sciences), Linda Quern (Admissions and Records),
Leopoldo Saucedo (Flight Operations and Training), Cynthia Shabb (Chester
Fritz Library), Lee Smith (Atmospherium), Lori Swinney (Center for
Instructional and Learning Technologies), Wayne Turnquist (Law Library),
Sherman Weigel (Flight Operations and Training), Neal Wilkerson (Chemistry),
Willian Yon (Flight Operations and Training); 10 years: Julie Arnold
(Gerontology), Tammy Batzer (Nursing), Diane Blue (Accounting and Business
Law), Jeanne Boppre (Instructional Development), Wilfred Cloutier (Flight
Support Services), Julie Entzminger (Nursing), Sharon Gustafson (Flight
Operations and Training), Justina Hager (Aviation Instruction), Jerald Iverson
(Flight Operations and Training), Sharon Johnson (Teaching and Learning),
Deneen Marynik (History), Virginia Millette (Law Library), Joel Nybo (Flight
Operations and Training), Frederick Oldroyd (Flight Support Services), Kristi
Plante (Social Work), Dick Schultz (Flight Operations and Training), Beth
Smestad (Nursing), Stacie Varnson (Aviation Instruction), Lynn Wolf (Computer
Center); 15 years: Tammy Anderson (Scientific Computing Center), Doris
Bornhoeft (Computer Center), Michael Coleman (Flight Operations and Training),
Shannon Gullickson (School of Communication), Bonnie Jundt (Computer Center);
Nancy Mulhern (Chester Fritz Library). Lona Spicer (Mathematics), Debra Wilson
(Nursing); 20 years: David Bowen (College of Business and Public
Administration), Kathryn Klemisch (Business and Vocational Education), David
Knittel (Chemistry), Nadine Kotowicz (Computer Center), Cleo Rowe (Chester
Fritz Library), Deborah Vonasek (Chester Fritz Library); 25 years: Patricia
Berntsen (Chester Fritz Library), Linda Duckstad (College of Business and
Public Administration), Kathi Hjelmstad (Nursing); 30 years: Harriet Powers
(Education and Human Development);  35 years: Karen Holte (Chester Fritz
Library), Caryl Pederson (Computer Center).

VICE PRESIDENT FOR FINANCE AND OPERATIONS DIVISION, 5 years: Ramona Baker
(Bookstore), Anita Bostad (Bookstore), Frank Brant (Plant Services - Medical
School), Leonard Conley (Plant Services), Christopher Dingle (Housing),
Veronica Dockter (University Children's Center), Teri Furstenau (Word
Processing and Mailing), Richard Indridason (Plant Services), Thomas Leake
(Plant Services), Darin Lee (Word Processing and Mailing), Helen Lund (Word
Processing and Mailing), Thomas Martzall (Transportation), John Meenk (Plant
Services), Douglas Norgard (Plant Services), Maryann Olson (Plant Services),
Cheryl Ramberg (Dining Services), Stephen Reller (Controller's Office), Judy
Slominski (Dining Services); 10 years: Janice Bakken (Controller's Office),
Shirley Boushee (Dining Services), Sherri Brossart (Word Processing and
Mailing), Loran Carl (Plant Services), Robert Davidson (Plant Services),
William Ekren (Plant Services), Phyllis Felchle (UND Police), Roger Gores
(Plant Services), Colleen Grassel (Vending and Special Services), Julie
Gurbada (Chester Fritz Auditorium), Arden Johnson (Plant Services), Darlene
Kenmir (Plant Services), Gary Lovejoy (Plant Services), Allan Moen (Plant
Services), Keith Myers (UND Police), Bernice Nokelby (Plant Services), Dennis
Pazderic (Plant Services), Frances Scholand (Dining Services), Jon Schumacher
(Plant Services), Wanda Sporbert (Business Office); 15 years: Daniel Bina
(Plant Services), Gregory Boushee (Plant Services), John Deitz (Plant
Services), Sharon Elden (Dining Services), Mabel Fee (Dining Services), Rose
Hanson (UND Police), Glen Hoffarth (Plant Services), Jerry Johnson (Plant
Services), Vicki Kavadas (Dining Services), Carla Kellner (Housing), Kimberly
Kennedy (Dining Services), Mark Kobe (Plant Services), Arlyn Pearson (Plant
Services), Allison Peyton (Controller's Office), Darline Pokrzywinski (Dining
Services), Randy Rasmussen (Bookstore), Robert Russell (Plant Services), Judy
Sondrol (Payroll), Milton Stai (Plant Services), Duane Stavig (Plant
Services); 20 years: Dominga Alameda (Plant Services), Byron Anderson (Plant
Services), Suzanne Belyea (Housing), Doris Benson (Plant Services), Michael
Dohman (Plant Services), Veronica Fredrick (Plant Services), Ronald Guthmiller
(Plant Services), Mary Dawn Howard (Dining Services), Paulette Lindquist
(Payroll), DeLaine McGurran (University Children's Center), Judy Rosinski
(Transportation), Paul Tollefsrud (Plant Services), Raymond Tozer Jr. (Plant
Services), Terrence Webb (Housing); 25 years: Dorothy Arvidson (Plant
Services), Paul Clark (Plant Services), Sharon Metzger (Word Processing and
Mailing), Karen Myerchin (Plant Services), Samuel Pupino (Dining Services),
Dale Wilhelmi (Plant Services), Holly Wilson (Plant Services), Larry Zitzow
(Plant Services); 30 years: Vernon Anderson (Plant Services), Bonnie Nerby
(Controller's Office), David Peterson (Dining Services); 35 years: Herman
Zahradka (Plant Services.

VICE PRESIDENT FOR STUDENT AFFAIRS DIVISION, 5 years: Alan Allery (Native
American Programs), Gerald Bulisco (Student Affairs Office), Robin Holden
(Financial Aid), Kari Nelson (Student Health), Donna Oltmanns (Memorial
Union), Joseph Primeau (Upward Bound), Terrie Jo Wold (Student Health); 10
years: Melissa Adams (Central Dictate), Susan Applegren (Financial Aid),
Carole Beier (Vice President for Student Affairs), DaLonna Bjorge (Student
Affairs Office), Elaine Metcalfe (Talent Search), Timothy Seaworth (Counseling
Center), Bonita Thompson (Career Services); 15 years: Corliss Greer (Student
Health), Carolyn Kryzsko (Upward Bound), Deann Purcell (Student Health); 25
years: Neil Reuter (Upward Bound).

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, 25 years: Linda Hussey (Alumni Association).

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND HEALTH SCIENCES, 5 years: Steven Adkins (Physiology),
Perry Benson (Neuroscience), John Bossoletti (Anatomy), Anita Brazier
(Biomedical Communications), Kathleen Call (Physiology), Edith Green
(Physiology), Mary Larson (Internal Medicine), Geralyn Lunski (Surgery),
Roxanne Miller (Family Practice-Grand Forks), Wallace Muhonen (Biochemistry),
Cheryl Parvey (Family Practice-Grand Forks), Cheryll Perry (Anatomy), Sharlene
Rakoczy (Physiology), Lesli Riskey (INMED), Janet Suda (Occupational Therapy);
10 years: Susan Carlson (School of Medicine), Linda Dammen (Family Practice-Minot), Carol Harr (Family Practice-Bismarck), Phyllis Hustoft (Library of
Health Sciences), Susan Mullins (Internal Medicine), Tonya Murphy
(Physiology), Allison Ranisate (Library of Health Sciences), Linda Reidhammer
(Rural Health), Donna Rieske (INMED), Kathryn Williams (Academic Affairs-Medical School); 15 years: Marilyn Fundingsland (Rural Health), Kathleen Kraft
(Pediatrics-Fargo); 20 years: Nora Amann (Rural Health), Roxanne Korynta
(Academic Affairs-Medical School), Sandra Krom (Pediatrics), Lee Nelson
(Biomedical Communications), Catherine Perry (Pathology), Lorna Pesek
(Internal Medicine).

-- Diane Nelson, Director, Personnel Services.
*******

KNUTSVIG NAMED FORECAST RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANT

Ryan Knutsvig has joined the Regional Weather Information Center (RWIC) at the
John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences as a weather forecasting research
and development assistant. Knutsvig is from Buxton, N.D., and is a 1997 UND
graduate. He has experience in operational weather forecasting and analysis
with an extensive background in communications within operational situations.
Knutsvig has worked as a student forecaster for the RWIC since April 1996.

Knutsvig will be a lead forecaster with the Advanced Transportation Weather
Information System (ATWIS). The ATWIS project grew out of the development of
the University of North Dakota's participation in the U.S. Department of
Transportation's Intelligent Transportation System. Established in FY1995 to
provide a national prototype of an advanced transportation system for rural
America, ATWIS began operational distribution of weather information Nov. 1,
1996 for 2,200 road miles in North and South Dakota. 

This prototype project, the only operational program of its type in the world,
provides short range weather and road condition forecasts to the traveling
public and commercial vehicles. More than 73,330 cellular telephone accesses
have been made to the system as of February 1998. Funding for this project has
included federal, state, university, and private sector sources totaling $4.7
million ($3.5 million federal and $1.2 million non-federal). Private sector
sources have included telecommunications, and weather sensor companies' in-kind support. Present participants in the program include the University of
North Dakota, the Federal Highway Administration, the North Dakota Department
of Transportation, the South Dakota Department of Transportation, Cellular
One, CommNet Cellular, Glacial Lakes Cellular 2000, AirTouch Cellular, Surface
Systems Inc., and Autometrics Inc. 

-- Regional Weather Information Center.
*******

SENATE HEARS GF CHAMBER RESPONSE
TO SUPPORT REQUEST REGARDING CUTBACKS 

University Senate, at its regular monthly meeting May 7, heard a response from
a Grand Forks Chamber of Commerce representative to a resolution that Senate
had made at its April meeting. That resolution was about the governor's
mandate that North Dakota state colleges prepare budgets for the next biennium
at 95 percent of that for this biennium. The resolution requested the Chamber
"to use its influence to express concern that any reduction in [UND] funding
from the present level would have negative impact on the University's ability
to serve students, the community and the state."

Don Fisk, Grand Forks businessman who is chair-elect of the Chamber, in his
response to that resolution, stated that the Chamber supports UND because of
its commitment to excellence, its effect on the city's economy, and
partnerships between UND and Grand Forks. He noted that part of the Chamber's
mission is to promote education, including advocacy for the University.

Senate also passed a resolution asking for representation "in any and all
future budget reduction and reallocation deliberations, including any returns
of resources to the University for prioritized reallocation."

Details on proceedings of the May meeting, and other Senate information such
as agendas, minutes of other meetings, and announcements, can be accessed
under the UND Internet home page, Academics -- Senate
(http://www.und.nodak.edu). -- Jim Penwarden, University Relations.
*******

SUBMIT ITEMS FOR SUMMER DATEBOOK BY MAY 20

You are invited to submit your UND events for inclusion in the Summer Datebook
of activities by Wednesday, May 20. The Datebook is published each semester
and summer and is distributed across the campus, community, region and state.
The Datebook is also available electronically in the Calendar section of
UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address is:
http://www.und.edu/calendar for World Wide Web.

Examples of the kind of activities you may submit include departmental-sponsored lectures and presentations and cultural/academic displays and
exhibitions. Submit the date, type of event, names of speakers and their
titles, location and time of event to Mavis in the Office of University
Relations, 411 Twamley Hall, Box 7144, or send via e-mail to
mavis_ness@mail.und.nodak.edu and include your name, department and phone
number as a contact person. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, University Letter.
*******

PRINTING CENTER WILL CLOSE FOR INVENTORY\

The University Printing Center will be closed Thursday, May 21, for annual
inventory. -- Dic Ganyo, Manager, Printing Center.
*******

MEMORIAL DAY HOLIDAY HOURS LISTED:

MEMORIAL DAY IS HOLIDAY

In accordance with State Board of Higher Education directives, Monday, May 25,
will be observed as Memorial Day by faculty and staff members of the
University. Only those employees designated by their department heads will be
required to work on this holiday. -- Marlene Strathe, Vice President for
Academic Affairs and Provost, and Diane Nelson, Director, Personnel Services.
*******

CHESTER FRITZ LIBRARY:

The Chester Fritz Library hours for Memorial Day are: Saturday and Sunday, May
23-24, closed; Monday, May 25 (Memorial Day), 5 to 9 p.m. -- Karen Cloud,
Chester Fritz Library.
*******

HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY:

Health Science Library hours are:

Regular hours until Memorial Day weekend.

Memorial Day Weekend: Saturday, May 23, 1 to 5 p.m.; Sunday, May 24, 5 to 10
p.m.; Monday, May 25, 1 to 10 p.m.

Interim Hours: Tuesday, May 26, through Thursday, May 28, 7:30 a.m. to
midnight; Friday, May 29, 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday, May 30, and Sunday,
May 31, 1 to 5 p.m.; Monday, June 1, through Thursday, June 4, 8 a.m. to 10
p.m.; Friday, June 5, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday, June 6, and Sunday, June 7,
1 to 5 p.m.; Monday, June 8, and Tuesday, June 9, 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.

Summer Hours start Wednesday, June 10: Monday and Wednesday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.;
Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, 1 to 5 p.m.;
Sunday, closed. -- April Byars, Administrative Assistant, Library of the
Health Sciences.
*******

MEMORIAL UNION:

All areas of the Memorial Union are closed Saturday through Monday, May 23-25,
for the Memorial Day weekend. Following are the hours for Friday, May 22:

Lifetime Sports Center, 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Info Center, 8 a.m. to 4:30
p.m.; Service Center, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Copy Stop, 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.;
Union Food Court, 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Bookstore, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.;
Administrative Office, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Craft Center/Sign and Design
Studio, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Dining Center Office, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Barber
Shop, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Corner Deli, closed; University Learning Center,
8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Computer Learning Lab, 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.; and Building
Hours, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. -- Marsha Nelson, Facilities Coordinator, Memorial
Union.
*******


MONEY MATTERS

FISCAL YEAR END PROCEDURES DETAILED

At the close of each fiscal year, the Controller's Office is required to
prepare financial statements which properly reflect the expenditures for the
fiscal year ending Tuesday, June 30. For accurate financial statement
presentation we MUST charge all materials and services received by June 30,
1998, to fiscal year 1998 funds. This is true for all funds, appropriated and
non-appropriated, including grants and contracts.

Payments for new subscriptions will be processed from fiscal year  98 funds
until June 1, 1998. Renewals for subscriptions that expire in fiscal year  99
must be paid from fiscal year  99 funds.

For prepayments, the department should verify with the vendor that delivery
will be made by June 30. This should be documented on the Purchase Requisition
and/or Request for Payment. If the company does not guarantee delivery by June
30, the payment can not be made from the 1998 budget.
-- Allison Peyton, Accounts Payable Manager, Controller's Office.  
*******


ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

TELEVISION CENTER TO TELECAST FLOOD FOOTAGE

The Greater Grand Forks community will get its last chance to tape much of
UND's flood footage Sunday and Monday, May 17 and 18, when the UND Television
Center telecasts various flood videos as part of the City of Grand Forks'
"Celebration of Thanks." The footage will be shown on cable channel 3 at 7
p.m. each night. 

During the flood, UND became the staging site for managing much of the crisis
and recovery in Grand Forks. Key municipal, county and state official offices,
including the Emergency Operations Center, operated out of the UND Plant
Services building and later other buildings on campus. UND was home to nearly
40 businesses which were flooded out and which needed a helping hand getting
back on their feet, and thousands of residents and volunteers lived at UND
through the summer as the city got back on its feet.

UND videographers Monte Koshel and Marv Leier documented much of the damage to
the university. On May 17, UND will air approximately two hours of unedited
video that includes footage shot from a helicopter, the School of Medicine and
Health Sciences, and the near-fire at the Human Nutrition Lab.

On May 18, UND will air approximately an hour and a half of video that
includes national network pool footage, as well as boat views of downtown and
East Grand Forks and helicopter footage of the area. 

This will be the last opportunity for members of the community to tape UND's
footage. The footage is unedited and there may be some language not suitable
for younger audiences. -- Barry Brode, Director, Television Center.
*******

LOCAL ACTRESS WRITES AND STARS 
IN "FLOOD OF MEMORIES" AT MUSEUM

"There must be a million stories down there," said President Clinton as he
flew over the devastated area on April 22, 1997. 

"Flood of Memories," a play written and acted by Frances Ford (Theatre Arts),
tells some of these stories. Its premier performance will be at the North
Dakota Museum of Art Thursday through Saturday, May 14, 15 and 16, at 8 p.m.
Tickets may be purchased at the door for $5; student tickets are $3.

"Flood of Memories" takes place on a berm, designed and built by local
sculptor Adam Kemp. Ford plays 15 different characters who reappear throughout
the play. The audience watches each character tell of their lives before,
during and after the flood. We see them going through changes in response to
the disaster. Some are strengthened by the experience, others are not yet
recovered.

The characters are based on several hundred interviews done by volunteers for
the North Dakota Museum of Art's Oral History Project. After listening to the
tapes, Ford created the 12 fictional characters by combining many people's
experiences.

Ford said the impulse for the play was "to celebrate how far people have come
and the quiet strength and humor of their reaction to the flood." "I wanted to
share the stories in a form that might speak to people all over the country
who have had actual or emotional floods in their lives. The feelings, the
losses, the needs that emerge from this flood are similar to any disaster a
person has suffered." Ford hopes the play will be performed in other U.S.
cities.

This fall Ford starred in the Burtness Theatre production of "The Belle of
Amherst," a one-woman performance based on the life and poems of Emily
Dickinson. She also performed an evening of Cabaret Songs at Urban Stampede
during New Year's Eve festivities.

Before coming to North Dakota, Ford had acted in off-Broadway performances of
"Three Penny Opera," "The Importance of Being Earnest," and "She Stoops to
Conquer." She was in the movie "Tootsie," directed by Sidney Pollack, and
Cable TV productions of "One Third of A Nation" and "Uncle Tom's Cabin."

Ford played Aunt Eller in "Oklahoma!" in seven European countries and toured
the United States with the Glorianna Opera Company for several years playing
roles in "The Pirates of Penzance," "The Mikado," and "H.M.S. Pinafore."

She has directed "The Sound of Music," "Twelfth Night," "You Can't Take It
With You," "A Kurt Weill Cabaret" and staged readings of plays by George
Bernard Shaw.

-- Marsy Schroeder, North Dakota Museum of Art.
*******

EXHIBITION OF CHILDREN'S FLOOD MURALS, 
OTHER WORKS, OPENS MAY 14

Though the flood of  97 brought destruction and depression, it also called
forth creative responses. Throughout the Red River Valley, children in many
communities dealt with the flood by making new things. An exhibition of their
works, "Through the Eyes of Children: the Flood of 1997," will open at the
North Dakota Museum of Art on Thursday, May 14, and run through Sunday, June
7. The Thursday opening will be from 4 to 7 p.m.

The idea for the exhibition grew out of a children's summer art workshop
inaugurated by the Museum last June in response to the flood. Each week groups
of children made a mural to record their impressions of different stages of
the flood. The five murals are titled Water, Fire, Evacuation, Return and
Recovery. Three murals made by East Grand Forks Central Middle School students
and five murals made by Pembina elementary students will also be on exhibit.

In addition to the flood murals, the exhibition will feature: puppets and the
decorated stage for a flood puppet show; a model cityscape of a flooded East
Grand Forks; a time capsule containing 54 children's foot prints to represent
the height of the river; two flood quilts with each square painted by
children; laminated books containing drawings and writings about the flood,
and 50 other flood-related paintings, drawings, and sketches by children.

The Museum's exhibition of children's flood-related art works is made possible
through the cooperation of: Northwestern Minnesota Disaster Response Network,
LaGrave Youth Center, First Season Community Center, Disaster Outreach,
Pembina Public Schools, Sacred Heart School, Valley Middle School, Lincoln
Elementary School, East Grand Forks Cub Scouts, East Grand Forks Central
Middle School, and Schroeder Middle School.

The children's art exhibition will open on the same night as the first
performance of Frances Ford's play, "Flood of Memories," which will run May
14, 15 and 16 at 8 p.m. at the North Dakota Museum of Art. The play consists
of themes and stories taken from 100 oral interviews about the flood selected,
altered and woven together by Ms. Ford, who also acts the parts of all 15
characters. To cover production costs the Museum is asking $5 for adults and
$3 for students.

The Museum is located on Centennial Drive on the UND campus and is open 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1 to 5 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. There
is no admission charge for the exhibition. -- Marsy Schroeder, North Dakota
Museum of Art.
*******

MUSEUM OF ART ANNOUNCES SUMMER 
ART CAMP FOR KIDS

Beginning Thursday, May 14, children are the focus at the North Dakota Museum
of Art in a children's art exhibition and with registration for the Museum
Summer Art Camp.

"Through the Eyes of Children: The 1997 Flood of the Red River of the North,"
is an exhibition of children's art in response to the flood of 1997. The
exhibition is up through June 7.

This summer the Museum is sponsoring the Summer Art Camp for kids. Beginning
Monday, June 15, children grades 1 through 8 will join a different
professional artist each week to create sculptures, paintings, drawings and
works in multi-media. Sessions run for two weeks and are held from 9:30 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. They are limited to 22 participants each.

Session 1, June 15 through June 26, Grades 1-3: Sculptor Joel Piper from
Minneapolis and painter/sculptor Duane Penske from Marshall, Minn.; Session 2,
June 29 through July 10, Grades 4-6: Cartoonist Aaron Brudvig from Dickinson
and fiber artist Diane Paulson of Grand Forks; Session 3, July 13 through July
24, Grades 1-3: Painter Annette Rorvig from McVille and painter Dyan Rey from
Grand Forks; Session 4, July 27 through August 7, Grades 7-8: Painter and
draftsman Walter Piehl from Minot.

The fee is $75 for Museum members and $100 for Museum non-members per child,
per session. A limited number of scholarships are available. This North Dakota
Museum of Art program is supported in part by a grant from the Bremer
Foundation. Call the Museum today at (701) 777-4195 to register. -- Morgan
Owens, North Dakota Museum of Art.
*******


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

MAY 1998


(Please contact Mavis at the Office of University Relations, Box 7144, or call
777-4304, if you wish to make changes or have an event included.)

Through Fri., May 15 -- DEPARTMENT CLOSED, Elwyn B. Robinson Department of
Special Collections, Chester Fritz Library, will be closed for four days for
floor restoration; limited reference service by calling 777-4625.

Thurs., May 14 -- ANNUAL PLANT SERVICES STEAM SHUT DOWN.

Thurs., May 14 -- LAST DAY TO ADD A COURSE FOR FIRST SIX-WEEK SUMMER SESSION.

Thurs., May 14 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for Sandy Owens, a candidate for the Ph.D.
degree with a major in Clinical Psychology, 210 Corwin-Larimore Hall, 10 a.m.;
members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Thurs., May 14 -- ART EXHIBIT OPENING, "Through the Eyes of Children: The 1997
Flood of the Red River of the North"; North Dakota Museum of Art, 4 to 7 p.m.;
runs through Sunday, June 7.

Thurs., May 14, through Sat., May 16 -- THEATRE, "Flood of Memories," a play
written and acted by Frances Ford, Assistant Professor of Theatre Arts, North
Dakota Museum of Art, 8 p.m.; tickets may be purchased at the door for $5;
student tickets are $3.

Thurs., May 14, through Sun., May 17 -- BASEBALL, Central Regional Tournament,
place to be determined.

Sun. and Mon., May 17-18 -- FLOOD FOOTAGE, Television Center will telecast
various flood videos as part of the City of Grand Forks' "Celebration of
Thanks"; footage will be shown on cable channel 3 at 7 p.m. each night. The
footage is unedited and there may be some language not suitable for younger
audiences.

Mon., May 18 -- SEMINAR, "Homocysteine and Congenital Defects -- A New
Hypothesis," presented by Thomas Rosenquist, Professor and Chair of Cell
Biology and Anatomy at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, who
was a central figure in an academic rescue of UND's first year medical
students after the flood, United Hospital Lecture Hall, School of Medicine and
Health Sciences, noon.

Mon., May 18, through Fri., June 19 -- FEE PAYMENT PERIOD/FINANCIAL AID
DISTRIBUTION FOR SUMMER SESSIONS.

Wed., May 20 -- LAST DAY TO ADD A COURSE FOR 12-WEEK SUMMER SESSION.

Wed., May 20 -- 9 O'CLOCK BRIEFING by President Kendall Baker, Memorial Union,
9 a.m.

Wed. through Fri., May 20-22 -- UND ALUMNI DAYS, UND campus; call 777-2611 for
more information or to make reservations.
      Wed., May 20: campus tours in the morning; class socials and open house
at the J. Lloyd Stone Alumni Center from 3:30 to 5 p.m.; Get Reacquainted
Dinner is at 6:30 p.m. in the Memorial Union Ballroom.
      Thurs., May 21: special reunion breakfasts for the Schools of Engineering
and Mines, Law, Medicine and Health Sciences, Communication, the College of
Education and Human Development, and the Departments of Accounting and
Business Law, and Nutrition and Dietetics (Home Economics), 8 to 9:45 a.m.;
dedication ceremony and luncheon at 11:30 a.m. in the River Valley Room,
Memorial Union, to honor the "Boys of Camp Depression"; Alumni Days Awards
Banquet at the Westward Ho with a social at 6:30 p.m., followed by a dinner
and program at 7 p.m.

      Fri., May 21: after class breakfasts, a memorial service in honor of
friends and classmates will be held at 10:15 a.m. in the Swanson Hall
Courtyard; at 12:30 p.m. the festivities will conclude with an "Until We Meet
Again" Buffet at 12:30 p.m. in the Memorial Union Ballroom.

Thurs., May 21 -- TEST, College-Level Examination Program (CLEP), 200 
McCannel Hall, 8:30 a.m.

Thurs., May 21 -- ANNUAL INVENTORY, Printing Center will be closed all day.

Fri., May 22, through Sat., May 30 -- BASEBALL, National Collegiate Athletic
Association Division II World Series, Montgomery, Ala.

Mon., May 25 -- HOLIDAY, MEMORIAL DAY.

Tues., May 26 -- PRESIDENTIAL BRIEFING led by President Baker, Lecture Bowl,
Memorial Union, 9 a.m.

Wed., May 27 -- GENERAL INFORMATION SESSION, Employee Assistance Program
(EAP), Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, 3:30 p.m.

Thurs. through Sun., May 28-31, CONFERENCE, "Protein-Protein Interactions,"
Reed Keller Auditorium, School of Medicine and Health Sciences; sponsored by
ND EPSCoR; contact Dawn Botsford (Continuing Education) at 777-2663 for more
information.

Fri., May 29 -- LAST DAY TO CHANGE A COURSE TO/FROM S/U GRADING OR TO/FROM
AUDIT GRADING FOR FOUR-WEEK SUMMER SESSION.

Fri., May 29 -- LAST DAY TO DROP A COURSE OR WITHDRAW FROM THE PROGRAM FOR
FOUR-WEEK SUMMER SESSION.


JUNE 1998

Mon., June 1, through Sun., June 7 -- GIRLS STATE, UND campus.

Mon, June 1, through Fri., July 31 -- SUMMER INSTITUTE OF LINGUISTICS, UND
campus; contact David Marshall (English) or Stephen Marlett (800) 292-1621 or
e-mail steve.marlett@sil.org for more information.

Wed., June 3 -- MEETING, Institutional Review Board, 305 Twamley Hall, 4 p.m.;
to consider all research proposals submitted to the Office of Research and
Program Development before Tuesday, May 26.

Fri., June 5 -- LAST DAY TO SUBMIT EMPLOYEE TUITION FEE WAIVER FOR EIGHT-WEEK
SUMMER SESSION.

Fri., June 5 -- LAST DAY TO CHANGE A COURSE TO/FROM S/U GRADING OR TO/FROM
AUDIT GRADING FOR FIRST SIX-WEEK SUMMER SESSION.

Fri., June 5 -- LAST DAY TO DROP A COURSE OR WITHDRAW FROM THE PROGRAM FOR
FIRST SIX-WEEK SUMMER SESSION.

Fri., June 5 -- FINAL EXAMINATIONS FOR FOUR-WEEK SUMMER SESSION.

Sun., June 7, through Tues., July 28 -- 43RD ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL MUSIC CAMP
AND MUSIC DIRECTOR'S WORKSHOPS, International Peace Garden; call Joseph Alme,
Director, at (701) 838-8472 for more information.

Mon., June 8 -- INSTRUCTION BEGINS FOR EIGHT-WEEK SUMMER SESSION.

Mon., June 8 -- LAST DAY FOR CANDIDATES TO APPLY FOR DEGREES FOR JULY
COMMENCEMENT.

Fri., June 12 -- LAST DAY TO ADD A COURSE FOR EIGHT-WEEK SUMMER SESSION.

Sat., June 13 -- TEST, American College Test (ACT), place and time to be
announced.

Sun., June 14 -- EXHIBITION OPENING, "Under the Whelming Tide: The 1997 Flood
of the Red River of the North," North Dakota Museum of Art, 2 p.m.; runs
through Sun., July 26; originally titled "Voices of the Flood" and scheduled
for a May 31 opening.

Mon., June 15 -- TEST, Law School Admission Test (LSAT), place and time to be
announced.

Mon., June 15, through Fri., June 26 -- SUMMER ART CAMP FOR KIDS, Session 1
for grades 1-3 with sculptor Joel Piper from Minneapolis and painter/sculptor
Duane Penske from Marshall, Minn.; North Dakota Museum of Art, UND campus; fee
is $75 for Museum members and $100 for Museum non-members per child, per
session; call the Museum at 777-4195 to register; Session 3, July 13 through
July 24, is also for grades 1-3.

Thurs., June 18 -- TEST, College-Level Examination Program (CLEP), place and
time to be announced.

Fri., June 19 -- LAST DAY TO SUBMIT EMPLOYEE TUITION FEE WAIVER FOR SECOND
SIX-WEEK SUMMER SESSION.

Fri., June 19 -- LAST DAY TO PAY TUITION/FEES (STUDENTS WHO DO NOT PAY ARE
SUBJECT TO HAVING REGISTRATION CANCELLED) FOR SUMMER SESSIONS.

Fri., June 19 -- FINAL EXAMINATIONS FOR FIRST SIX-WEEK SUMMER SESSION.

Mon., June 22 -- INSTRUCTION BEGINS FOR SECOND SIX-WEEK SUMMER SESSION.

Thurs., June 25 -- LAST DAY TO ADD A COURSE FOR SECOND SIX-WEEK SUMMER
SESSION.

Mon., June 29, through Fri., July 10 -- SUMMER ART CAMP FOR KIDS, Session 2
for grades 4-6 with cartoonist Aaron Brudvig from Dickinson and fiber artist
Diane Paulson of Grand Forks; North Dakota Museum of Art, UND campus; fee is
$75 for Museum members and $100 for Museum non-members per child, per session;
call the Museum at 777-4195 to register.
*******


UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and
distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is
also available electronically through UNDInfo, the University's menu
system on the Internet. The address is http://www.und.nodak.edu.
  
All articles submitted for publication should be labeled "University
Letter" and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic
submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu. Attachments to
University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number.
University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations,
Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.
  
UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.
  
*******


  





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