University Letter

Volume 39, Number 12: November 16, 2001

Higher Ed Board Meets On Campus Thursday, Friday

UND Making Strategic Plan Progress In Outreach, Information Technology

Honorary Degree Nominations Sought

Odegard School Awarded $3.3 Million For Advanced Weather Prediction Modeling

EVENTS TO NOTE

Physician Focuses On Medical Aspects Of Lewis And Clark Expedition

Benoit Discusses “How Memory Lies Upon This Land”

“Spirituality For Sale” Is Thursday Colloquium Topic

Aviation Safety Seminar Held Nov. 15

UND Telecasts Program About Replica Vietnam Memorial

Student Health Services Offers Free Stop Smoking Kits Thursday

Quantum Dots Discussed In Physics Colloquium

Biologist Speaks On Duck Nesting, Habitat

Stuttering Association Meets Nov. 17

Metropolitan Opera Auditions Set For Nov. 17

Graduate Committee Meets Monday

Award-Winning Documentary Depicts Afghanistan

International Centre Hosts Thursday Night Program

Red River Hosts Christmas Play

SGID Training Offered For Faculty

Statewide Patriotic Shirt Day Set For Nov. 30

Agenda Items Due For Dec. 6 U Senate Meeting

Nominations Invited For Departmental Research Award

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Nominations/Applications Invited For Clifford Faculty Research Award

Web ALFI Terminals Available In Twamley Hall

Overnight Airport Parking Policy Changed

Parent Volunteers Sought For Study

Thanksgiving Holiday Hours Listed For Chester Fritz
Library, Health Sciences Library, Law Library, Memorial Union

Studio One Lists Guests

Upcoming U2 Classes Announced

GRANTS AND RESEARCH

Senate Scholarly Activities Committee Makes Awards

Summer Bioethics Courses Offered

Research, Grant Opportunities Listed

Higher Ed Board Meets On Campus Thursday, Friday
The State Board of Higher Education will meet on campus Thursday and Friday, Nov. 15 and 16, in 211 Rural Technology Center. An agenda for the meeting is available at http://www.ndus.edu/allAgenda.pdf?sz=28102. – Jim Grijalva, Law.

UND Making Strategic Plan Progress In Outreach, Information Technology
The University is making strides in meeting the goals of service and information technology outlined in UND’s new strategic plan, according to Dr. James Shaeffer, dean of Outreach. At the Nov. 7 meeting of the Planning and Budget Committee, Shaeffer walked through the strategic plan, describing progress in meeting the plan’s goals in the areas of service and information technology:

Honorary Degree Nominations Sought
Members of the University Council are invited to nominate outstanding individuals for an honorary degree. The deadline for submitting nominations is Friday, Nov. 30. Qualifications include, but are not limited to, the following State Board of Higher Education criteria (see SBHE, Policy 430.1):

A. The candidate should have had an association with the State of North Dakota. This association may be by virtue of birth, of residence, of education, of service to the state, the Board, or one of the institutions governed by the Board.

B. The candidate must have achieved a level of distinction which would merit comparable recognition in his or her profession or area of excellence.

C. The renown of the candidate should reflect favorably on the Board, the institutions it governs, and the State of North Dakota.

In order to avoid any embarrassment, no suggestion shall be made to any person to be so honored until the State Board of Higher Education has acted on the nomination.

Institutional criteria and standards for the awarding of honorary degrees at the University have been established by the University Senate. It is recommended that the following criteria be used in considering persons for an honorary degree:

1. Achievement of distinction in scholarship, or in comparable professional or creative achievement.

2. Recognized and outstanding service to the nation, to the state, or to the University of North Dakota.

3. Attendance at or graduation from the University of North Dakota, except as the individual is outstanding with reference to the preceding criteria 1 and 2.

4. Non-membership on the faculty of the University of North Dakota.

5. Scholarship specialization in an area in which the university normally grants an earned degree.

Procedures:

1. Nominations may be made by any member of the University Council.

2. Nominations must be accompanied by a factual dossier providing evidence that the nominee meets the criteria and standards established by the University Senate (Nos. 1-5 above). Factual compilation should include the following, in the order listed:

a. A brief biography

b. A list of scholarly writings, research and publications

c. Description of public service and achievements

d. List of offices and positions held

e. Other factual justifications for consideration

3. The nominee’s scholarship will be evaluated by the departmental faculty in the area of the nominee’s specialization, such evaluation to be a part of the dossier presented to the Honorary Degrees Committee.

4. A nominee will not be informed that he/she is being considered until the nomination has been approved at the SBHE level.

5. The titles of honorary degrees shall be distinct from those of earned degrees at UND.

6. No honorary bachelor’s or master’s degrees will be awarded.

On behalf of the Honorary Degrees Committee, nominations and all supporting materials may be sent to the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, 302 Twamley Hall. The dateline for submitting nominations is Friday, Nov. 30.

Odegard School Awarded $3.3 Million For Advanced Weather Prediction Modeling

The John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences has been awarded an eight-year cooperative agreement through the Army High Performance Computer Research Center (AHPCRC) totaling $3.3 million. The award is part of an Army competitive program to develop advanced high performance computing research in support of the Army’s modernization. The School’s Regional Weather Information Center (RWIC) and the Department of Atmospheric Sciences teamed with five universities on the successful award, which has a total value of $34 million. Other member universities are the University of Minnesota, Clark Atlanta University, Florida A&M University, Howard University, and Jackson State University.

“By participating in this program, researchers in the Regional Weather Information Center and the Atmospheric Sciences department will perform research to improve the current capabilities of predicting battlespace weather conditions and chemical-biological material transport mechanisms on a much smaller scale than is currently available,” said Leon Osborne, director of the Regional Weather Information Center and professor of Atmospheric Sciences. “We are eager to begin the work with the Army High Performance Computing Research Center. This project will provide an important opportunity for faculty, staff and students in both departments to address current national and international issues.”

Mark Askelson and Paul Kucera (both Atmospheric Science) will serve as co-principal investigators in the research activities. Osborne will serve as the overall lead scientist for AHPCRC atmospheric science research activities for the participating universities.

The AHPCRC program provides a unique opportunity for participating universities to strengthen their academic programs in the computational sciences by providing access to state-of-the-art high performance computing resources such as the AHPCRC’s Cray T3E-1200, IBM RS6000s and other systems. The AHPCRC also provides introductory and advanced summer institutes in high performance computing and technology exchange programs with the U.S. Army. The program also provides a mechanism for AHPCRC researchers and students to closely interact with Army and other defense researchers in critical areas of interdisciplinary computational science.

Events to Note

Physician Focuses On Medical Aspects Of Lewis And Clark Expedition

Monica Mayer, family physician and member of the Three Affiliated Tribes at New Town, will present “Medical Aspects of the Lewis and Clark Expedition,” for the Dean’s Hour presentation at noon Thursday, Nov. 15, in the Keller Auditorium, School of Medicine and Health Sciences. The public is invited.

Mayer, an avid student of the American exploration of the Louisiana Purchase in the early 1880s, plans to discuss how medicine was practiced then by members of the Mandan and Hidatsa tribes as well as by the colonists.

The Lewis and Clark Expedition, aided by Sakakawea, was “really a collaborative effort of these two dramatically different cultures,” said Mayer, who will illustrate how “they came together to share not only medicines but all their knowledge including information on geographic land maps. They shared foods, medicines and all the information they had at the time.” “My main theme is that when cultures work together, we can accomplish much more,” she said.

Mayer, who practices at the Trinity Community Clinic in New Town, earned her M.D. degree from UND in 1995. She is an alumna of the UND medical school’s Indians Into Medicine (INMED) Program.

The Dean’s Hour Lecture Series is a forum designed to analyze and discuss ideas and issues related to the practice of medicine and health care. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences, 777-2514.

Benoit Discusses “How Memory Lies Upon This Land”

“How Memory Lies Upon This Land,” a talk by Virgil Benoit, associate professor of French, will take place at 4 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 15, in 116 Merrifield Hall. The program is a part of the English Department lecture series and the Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures.

“Spirituality For Sale” Is Thursday Colloquium Topic

The Department of Philosophy and Religion will hold a colloquium, “Spirituality for Sale: Native American Ceremonies in Navajo Mysteries,” presented by Birgit Hans (Indian Studies), at 4 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 15, in 303 Gillette Hall.

For more information, check out our complete colloquium schedule at: http://www.und.edu/dept/philrel/, or contact me at 777-2887, jack.weinstein@und.nodak.edu. -- Jack Weinstein, Assistant Professor of Philosophy.

Aviation Safety Seminar Held Nov. 15

A fall aviation safety meeting/seminar (FAA Wings approved program), is set for 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 15, in the Memorial Union Ballroom. Guest speakers are Richard Keltner and Leonard Hoffmann.

Richard Keltner is the manager of the Western Region/NationAir Insurance Company. With over 25 years of active flying experience, Keltner is a nationally recognized aviation risk management expert. He is an airline transport pilot with both single- and multi-engine ratings, commercial/instrument helicopter pilot, and commercial glider pilot. He is actively involved in national organizations promoting flight safety, and is a designated FAA Safety counselor for the Northwest region.

Leonard Hoffmann, a Watford City native and a 1978 UND aviation graduate, is presently a captain with Northwest Airlines flying a B-0757. He is based in Minneapolis.
The seminar is free and open to the public.

UND Telecasts Program About Replica Vietnam Memorial

The Television Center will telecast “A Small Town Remembers” Thursday, Nov. 15 at 11:30 a.m. and 9 p.m. on UND Cable Channel 3. The program was produced by Television Center producer/director Aaron Quanbeck. It tells how the Moving Wall, a half-size replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., ended up in Esmond, N.D.The half-hour special includes interviews of surviving family members who lost loved ones in Vietnam and an interview with Tim Williams, a Vietnam veteran from Grand Forks. Williams wrote a song about the Vietnam Veterans memorial called “The Wall.” A music video of “The Wall” is also featured as part of the program. The UND Television Center produced the program last summer as a way to honor veterans.

Student Health Services Offers Free Stop Smoking Kits Thursday

Student Health Services will offer free stop smoking kits to students, faculty and staff in recognition of “The Great American Smoke-Out” Thursday, Nov. 15. The Great American Smoke-Out is a national campaign to encourage smokers to quit for the day and perhaps for life. Those who smoke and those who don’t are encouraged to stop by the table to catch a glimpse of “Mr. Butts,” score some free bubble gum to “blow bubbles, not smoke” and to win prizes playing tobacco trivia. A list of smoke-free restaurants in the community will also be available.

Student Health Services offers individual smoking cessation counseling to students, along with various pharmacological aids such as Zyban (Wellbutrin), nicotine patches, and nicotine gum. A variety of health care professionals are available to offer support and assistance to those who wish to quit smoking. For additional information, contact the Student Health Promotions Office at 777-2097.

Quantum Dots Discussed In Physics Colloquium

A Physics colloquium is set for 4 p.m. Friday, Nov. 16, in 209 Witmer Hall. “Localization - Delocalization Transition in Quantum Dots” will be presented by Myung-Hoon Chung, Physics Department, Yale University.

A model Hamiltonian is proposed for the localization-delocalization transition in quantum dots. By considering most relevant degrees of freedom, we obtain a fineite dimensional Hilbert space. Through exact diagonalization, we find the ground state energies of the system as the number of electrons is varied. This explains the peculiar pattern of the electron addition energies, which are measured as a function of the top and side gate voltages.

Coffee and cookies will be served at 3:30 p.m. in 215 Witmer Hall.

Biologist Speaks On Duck Nesting, Habitat

Darrell Schindler will defend his thesis, “Duck Nesting and Habitat on Privately Owned, Rotation Grazing Systems in North Dakota” Friday, Nov. 16, at noon in 141 Starcher Hall. He is a master’s candidate in Biology and is currently an aquatic biologist with the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians at Red Lake Falls, Minn. The public is invited.

Stuttering Association Meets Nov. 17

The National Stuttering Association will meet Saturday, Nov. 17, at noon in 202 Montgomery Hall. We will serve pizza. For more information, call 777-9667 evenings and weekends or 777-3724 weekdays. – Jan Orvik, Editor, for Elisa Diederich, National Stuttering Association.

Metropolitan Opera Auditions Set For Nov. 17

The public is invited to the 38th annual North Dakota Metropolitan Opera National Council auditions this Saturday, Nov. 17, beginning at noon, in the Josephine Campbell Recital Hall, Hughes Fine Arts Center. The North Dakota auditions are the first step to audition on the MET stage in New York next April.

The competing singers are young adults trained in opera, singing operatic arias in the original language and key. Following the auditions, Gary Arvin, a nationally known voice professor from the University of Indiana, will conduct a public master class.

The auditions and master class are free and open to the public. For more information, contact G. Paul Larson at 777-3360 or gpaul_larson@und.nodak.edu. – G. Paul Larson (Economics), Director, ND District of the MONC Auditions.

Graduate Committee Meets Monday

The Graduate Committee will meet Monday, Nov. 19, from 3:05 to 5 p.m. in 305 Twamley Hall. The agenda will include:

1. Introduction of new graduate committee members. The new graduate committee convenes for the first time Nov. 19.

2. Request to transition from undergraduate to entry-level professional master’s program in Occupational Therapy.

3. Final discussion on the Chemical Engineering program review. Bring any comments that you may have to the meeting.

4. Request to offer a certificate in autistic spectrum disorder by the College of Education and Human Development: Department of Teaching and Learning.

5. Application by History to approve History 332: Women in American History to 1865 and History 333: Women in American History since 1865.

6. Matters arising.

– Joseph Benoit, dean, Graduate School


Award-Winning Documentary Depicts Afghanistan

Many in our community are seeking as much information as possible about Afghanistan, the land, and the people who live there.

The documentary, “Jung (War): In the Land of the Mujaheddin,” will show Tuesday, Nov. 27, from 7 to 10 p.m. in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl, and will be followed by a facilitated discussion. This 114-minute documentary depicts an Italian physician who is intent on building a hospital for war victims and a war correspondent who is intent on telling the stories of those locked in silence. The video, produced by two Italian journalists during 1999-2000, follows the footsteps of these men and presents the complexity of the lives of the Afghani people whom they seek to serve. The video includes some graphic scenes which are respectfully treated and essential to the telling of the story. The documentary was awarded the 2001 Human Rights Watch International Film Festival Nestor Almendros Prize.

For more information describing the video, point your browser to www.hrw.org/iff/traveling/jung/index.html.

The event is free and open to anyone interested in making meaning of these times. -- Glinda Crawford and Janet Moen, Sociology/Criminal Justice Studies and Peace Studies Faculties.

International Centre Hosts Thursday Night Program

The office of International Programs at the International Centre, 2908 University Ave., will hold cultural programs at 7 p.m. Thursdays. The Nov. 29 program features England. Thursday night cultural programs are open to all. Experience different cultures of the world, meet new friends from other nations, and learn about the variety the world has in store. Events feature food prepared and served by international students. For more information, contact the International Centre at 777-4231.

Red River Hosts Christmas Play

The Red River High School Department of Fine Arts presents “The Best Christmas Pageant Ever,” Thursday through Saturday, Nov. 29, 30 and Dec. 1, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, Dec. 2, at 2 p.m. in the Red River Theatre. This hilarious story concerns the efforts of a woman to put on the annual Christmas pageant despite having the cast of the meanest, nastiest, most inventively awful kids in the history of the world - the Herdmans! Come see if there will be a Christmas this year, or if the Herdmans will put a stop to everything. This is a funny and heartwarming story for the entire family.

Tickets for adults are $5, students, $3. For reservations, call 746-2411. – Jan Orvik, Editor, for the Red River High School Department of Fine Arts.

SGID Training Offered For Faculty

The current group of SGID consultants will offer a training session for faculty who are interested in learning to facilitate the SGID process (a process for providing midterm student feedback to faculty). We are seeking experienced teachers who are interested in supporting high quality teaching at UND, both their own and that of colleagues. Training will be held Friday, Nov. 30, from 8 a.m. to noon with lunch to follow; newly trained consultants will be provided with opportunities to shadow experienced consultants during future semesters. If you are interested in participating in this training, please contact Jana Hollands at 777-4998 or jana_hollands@und.nodak.edu to sign up. If you have a colleague to recommend for the training, or if you’d like more information about the training session, contact Joan Hawthorne at 777-6381 or joan_hawthorne@und.nodak.edu.

 

Statewide Patriotic Shirt Day Set For Nov. 30

With the approval and support of the Governor’s Office, a statewide patriotic shirt and casual day will be held Friday, Nov. 30. All statewide donations are designated for the disaster relief operation to help the American Red Cross respond to different disaster needs. The money will be presented to the Burleigh Morton County American Red Cross.

If you wear a patriotic shirt Friday, Nov. 30, please contribute a dollar to your agency representative, who will collect the donations. If you write a check, please make the check payable to the American Red Cross.

The donations can then be sent to Brenda Schuler, COSE board member, Vocational and Technical Education, 600 E. Boulevard Ave., Dept. 270, Bismarck, N.D. 58505-0610.

Agenda Items Due For Dec. 6 U Senate Meeting

The University Senate will meet Thursday, Dec. 6, at 4:05 p.m. in Room 7, Gamble Hall. Agenda items for this meeting are due in the Office of the Registrar by noon Wednesday, Nov. 21. It is recommended that some detail be included in the agenda items submitted. – Nancy Krogh, Secretary, University Senate.

Nominations Invited For Departmental Research Award

Nominations for the Fellows of the University Award for Departmental Excellence in Research, recognizing research, scholarly, and creative productivity, are due at the Office of Research and Program Development Monday, Jan. 7. The winning department will receive a $1,500 award and a plaque at the Founders Day Banquet Thursday, Feb. 27.

Nominations should include information that will allow the selection committee to judge the quantity and quality of the research and scholarly and creative activities of the department. At a minimum, such nominations should include a listing of published research or other creative or scholarly activities for the 2000-2001 year. Additional information for that year, such as a brief synopsis of ongoing research activities, the number and type of active sponsored projects, dissertations or other research papers presented by students, performances or scholarly presentations by faculty, etc., should be included if they contribute to the overall picture of a department’s research, scholarly, and creative activities. A statement of support from the dean is optional. To expedite the review process, five (5) copies of the nomination and supporting documentation should be submitted to ORPD.

Since previous awardees are ineligible for nomination until five years have passed, the departments of Neuroscience, Physics, Chemistry, Counseling, and Biochemistry and Molecular Biology may not be nominated this year.

For more information, please call the Office of Research and Program Development at 777-4278.

Announcements

Nominations/Applications Invited For Clifford Faculty Research Award

Nominations/applications are invited for the UND Foundation Thomas J. Clifford Faculty Achievement Award for Excellence in Research. The winner of this award will receive a plaque and a check for $2,000 at the Founders Day Banquet Thursday, Feb. 27.

The following information should be provided:

(1) a listing of publications of significant, original and high-quality research, scholarly, and creative contributions in nationally recognized professional journals that are refereed by peer reviewers and/or a listing of juried competitions and invited performances/exhibitions.

(2) overall scholarly activities, such as service as a reviewer of research proposals for federal agencies or other funding sources, service as a referee or editor for professional journals, and contributions to training students in research, scholarly, and creative endeavors;

(3) potential for significant contributions to enhancing the effectiveness of the subject matter taught in the class-room.


Faculty, staff and students may make nominations, and faculty are invited to nominate themselves. Since the committee will not engage in the gathering of documentation, each nomination or application must be accompanied by thorough evidence of the nominee’s qualifications for the award. Five copies of each nomination and supporting documentation should be received at the Office of Research and Program Development no later than Monday, Jan. 7.

Since previous awardees are ineligible for nomination until five years have passed, Leon Osborne (2001), Edward Carlson (2000), Diane Langemo and David Lambeth (1999), Jeffrey Stith (1998), and Richard Crawford (1997) may not be nominated this year.
The awardee will be selected by the same committee which selects the Fellows of the University Award for Departmental Excellence in Research. This committee includes the director of the Office of Research and Program Development (Chair), the dean of the Graduate School, the chair of the Senate Scholarly Activities Committee, one faculty member from the Graduate Committee, and one faculty member from the Senate Scholarly Activities Committee.

If further information is desired, please call the Office of Research and Program Development at 777-4278.

Web ALFI Terminals Available In Twamley Hall

Web ALFI terminals are now available for student use in the office of the Registrar. Students who would like to register for classes, add or drop a class, find out times to register, or see their grades can go to 203 Twamley Hall to use the student terminals provided.

Attention students: In order to use the ALFI system, you will need to know your NAID and PAN numbers. If you do not know these numbers, you can stop by the office of the Registrar with a picture ID and we will provide you with the requested information. Please note that federal law prohibits us from giving the student this information over the phone or via fax or e-mail. – Michael Cogan, Associate Registrar.

Overnight Airport Parking Policy Changed

Because of increased enrollment and security concerns at the Airport involving University aviation operations, parking has become extremely limited. The extra security restraints have resulted in loss of approximately 20 spaces and have made it difficult for aviation students to find parking. It is now necessary to eliminate all overnight parking at the airport, effective immediately. We realize this will affect faculty and staff who use the overnight parking area for personal travel as well as business for the University. We ask everyone to use the Grand Forks Airport public parking area and request reimbursement on their travel vouchers for University travel. We are sorry for any inconvenience this may cause; for further information, please contact Sherry Kapella at 777-3645 or Jim Uhlir at 777-3755. We ask for your cooperation as we implement this change. Thank you. -- Traffic Division.

Parent Volunteers Sought For Study
Attention parents! I am seeking married couples with children ages 3, 4, or 5 to participate in a study on parenting issues. Each parent would be required to complete eight questionnaires; it is estimated that this will take approximately 45 minutes. If you are interested in participating or would like more information, please call Erin Tentis, graduate student, at 777-3212.

Thanksgiving Holiday Hours Listed

Thanksgiving Day Is Holiday

In accordance with State Board of Higher Education directives, Thursday, Nov. 22, will be observed as Thanksgiving Day by faculty and staff members of the University. Only those employees designated by their department heads will be required to work on this holiday. – John Ettling, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, and Diane Nelson, Director, Personnel Services.

Chester Fritz Library:
Chester Fritz Library Thanksgiving hours are: Wednesday, Nov. 21, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Thursday, Nov. 22 (Thanksgiving), closed; Friday, Nov. 23, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Saturday, Nov. 24, 1 to 5 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 25, 1 p.m. to midnight.

Health Sciences Library:
Library of the Health Sciences Thanksgiving hours are: Wednesday, Nov. 21, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, Nov. 22, closed; Friday, Nov. 23, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, Nov. 24, 1 to 5 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 25, 1 p.m. to midnight.

Law Library:
Law Library hours for the Thanksgiving weekend are: Thursday, Nov. 22, closed; Friday, Nov. 23, closed; Saturday, Nov. 24, noon to 5 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 25, noon to 11 p.m.

Memorial Union:
The Memorial Union Thanksgiving holiday schedule follows. All of its facilities will be closed Thursday, Thanksgiving Day, Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 22, 24 and 25. Regular hours resume Monday, Nov. 26.

Lifetime Sports Center: Wednesday and Friday, Nov. 21 and 23, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Info/Service Center: Wednesday and Friday, Nov. 21 and 23, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Copy Stop: Wednesday, Nov. 21, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday, Nov. 23, closed; U Turn C-Store: Wednesday, Nov. 21, 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 23, closed; Subway/TCBY/Juiceworks: Wednesday, Nov. 21, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday, Nov. 23, closed; Little Caesar’s: Wednesday, Nov. 21, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday, Nov. 23, closed; Administrative offices: Wednesday and Friday, Nov. 21 and 23, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Craft Center/Sign and Design: Wednesday, Nov. 21, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 23, closed; Student Academic Services: Wednesday, Nov. 21, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 23, closed; Credit Union: Wednesday and Friday, Nov. 21 and 23, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Dining Center: Wednesday, Nov. 21, 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 23, closed; Traffic Division: Wednesday and Friday, Nov. 21 and 23, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Passport ID’s: Wednesday, Nov. 21, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 23, closed; Barber Shop: Wednesday, Nov. 21, 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 23, closed; University Learning Center: Wednesday, Nov. 21, 8 a.m. to noon, Friday, Nov. 23, closed; Computer labs: Wednesday, Nov. 21, 7:30 a.m. to 5:45 p.m., Friday, Nov. 23, 8 a.m. to 5:45 p.m.; Building hours: Wednesday and Friday, Nov. 21 and 23, 7 a.m. to 6:15 p.m.

Studio One Lists Guests

This week on “Studio One,” John Thompson, who survived a traumatic farming accident, will tell his story. The extreme sport of barefoot waterskiing will also be featured. Ron Scarpa, who has been barefoot waterskiing professionally for more than 20 years and is ranked first overall in the world, will discuss the sport.

“Studio One” is an award winning news and information program produced at the University of North Dakota Television Center. The program airs live at 5 p.m. on UND Channel 3 on Thursdays. Rebroadcasts can be seen at noon, 7 and 11 p.m. daily and on Saturdays at 10 a.m. Prairie Public Television airs “Studio One” on Saturday at 6 a.m. The program can also be seen in Fargo, Bismarck/Mandan, Minot, Minneapolis and Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Upcoming U2 Classes Announced

Following are classes offered through the University Within the University (U2) program:

AFFIRMATIVE ACTION
Supervisor’s Role With Work-Related Injuries: Dec. 6, 2 to 3 p.m., Sioux Room, Memorial Union. This class is designed to identify the role and responsibilities of the supervisor when a work-related injury has taken place. The course will review UND’s procedures as well as information about the North Dakota Workers’ Compensations Bureau. Instructor: Claire Moen.

COMPUTER CENTER: Classes are held in 361 Upson II, and require a working knowledge of Windows or a Windows class. Enrollment is limited to 12 in most cases, so please register early. A $10 manual is optional for Word Level 3 classes. The cost for an Access Level I manual is $16. Instructor: Jim Malins.

Word 00, Level III: Nov. 27 and 29, 8:15 a.m. to noon (seven and a half hours total). Create styles, outlines, master documents, and templates; add graphics; advanced tables with formulas; record macros.

Access 00, Level I: Dec. 3-7, 8:30 to 11:45 a.m. (16 hours total). Introduces Access and databases. Create tables, queries, forms, reports, and relationships. Import and export interface.

PERSONNEL SERVICES
Hiring and Interviewing Process: Nov. 28, 1 to 3 p.m., 211 Rural Technology Center. Hiring good employees is one of the most important issues facing supervisors. Learn how to plan and conduct interviews so that you identify the best candidate for the job and follow applicable regulations. Instructor: Joy Johnson, Personnel Services.

Dealing With Difficult People: Dec. 5, 1 to 3 p.m., Sioux Room, Memorial Union. Learn how to work with, and not against, difficult people. Find out what assertiveness is and how to apply it in day-to-day interaction with people. Instructor: Desi Sporbert, Personnel Services.

SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Working in Confined Spaces: Dec. 6, 8:30 to 10:30 a.m., 235 Rural Technology Center. Confined spaces can be deadly. Reinforce understanding of the risks associated with work in confined spaces such as manholes, trenches, cable vaults and attics. The following topics are included in the workshop: identification of a confined space and its conditions; toxic, flammable, and oxygen-deficient atmospheres; hazards and proper personal protective equipment; and roles and responsibilities. Instructor: Jason Uhlir, Safety and Environmental Health.


HOW TO REGISTER: Registering for U2 workshops is easy! Contact Amy Noeldner at the University Within the University office by phone (777-2128), fax (777-2140), e-mail, U2@mail.und.nodak.edu, or mail to: Box 7131. To register online, go to www.conted.und.edu/U2. Please provide the following information when you register: your name, department, box number, phone number, Social Security number (for accurate record keeping), and e-mail address, the title and date of the event, the method of payment (ID billing, personal check, or credit card number and expiration date) if the event has a fee.

Grants and Research

Senate Scholarly Activities Committee Makes Awards

The Senate Scholarly Activities Committee received eight requests for research/creativity funds and three requests for publication funds at the October call for proposals. The following awards were made at the Committee meeting October 31:

Publication Awards
Jun Ren (Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics), $300 for an article in Hypertension; Sandra Short (Physical Education and Exercise Science), $180.25 for an article in Biological Reports: Perceptual and Motor Skills; Chang-Hee Won (Electrical Engineering), $990 for publication of an article in IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems.

Research/Creative Activity Awards
Kathleen Dixon (English), $2,304.41 for “How ‘Little Flanders’ Became Media Savvy: Speech Genres and Gender in Jan Publiek”; Bryon Grove (Anatomy and Cell Biology), $1,400 for “Protein Kinase C Activation and Phosphorylation of Gravin”; Richard Josephs (Geology and Geological Engineering), $2,490 for “Micromorphological Investigations at the Hedden Site: A Paleoindian Site on the Kennebunk Plains of Maine”; Robert Kweit and Mary Kweit (Political Science and Public Administration), $2,000 for “A Study of Citizen Attitudes About Recovery from Disaster”; Donald Miller (Art), $2,363 for “UND Ceramics Department Historic Information Retrieval, Preservation and Publication”;

Matthew Picklo Sr. (Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics), $945 for “Isolation of DNA’s Coding for Succinic Semialdehyde Reductases in the Rat and Mouse”; James Porter (Pharmacology, Physiology and Therapeutics), $2,500 for “Structural Determinants of the Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP) Receptor”; Elizabeth Tyree (Family and Community Nursing), $1,155 for “Oral Histories of Retired Nursing Faculty.” – Garl Rieke (Anatomy and Cell Biology), Chair, Senate Scholarly Activities Committee.

Summer Bioethics Courses Offered

Summer continuing education courses are offered in bioethics at the University of Washington.

Ethics of Research with Humans: Past, Present and Future is held June 17-21. This is an intensive introduction to the ethical issues of research with humans. The course reviews the origins and development of the ethics and regulation of human research, examines the current federal regulations and their applications, and explores the emerging issues in research with humans that ethics and regulations must take into account. Registration is limited to current IRB members and managers, active Ph.D.- and M.D.-level researchers and research professionals who are significantly involved in designing and executing human research protocols. Registration deadline for the research ethics course is May 31.

Summer Seminar in Health Care Ethics will be Aug. 5-9. This seminar will provide an intensive introduction to the concepts, methods, and literature of health care ethics. Registration is limited to physicians, nurses, social workers, chaplains, teachers, and others involved in the care of patients or the education of providers. Registration deadline for the summer seminar is July 19.

Please contact Marilyn J. Barnard at (206) 616-1864 or e-mail at mbarnard@u.washington.edu for more information regarding these two courses and for registration. Registration is limited, so register early. – Office of Research and Program Development.

Research, Grant Opportunities Listed
Following are research and grant opportunities. For more information, contact the Office of Research and Program Development at 777-4278.

NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE (NCI)

The Behavioral Research in Cancer Control Small Grants Program supports cancer control behavioral research. The program is designed to aid and facilitate growth of a nationwide cohort of scientists with a high level of research expertise in behavioral cancer control research. Small grants are short-term awards to support pilot projects, development and testing of new methodologies, secondary data analyzes, or innovative projects that provide a basis for more extended research. The following program areas focused on behavior and cancer are appropriate for small grant applications: screening and early detection, cancer control sciences, tobacco prevention and cessation, applications research, health communications and bioinformatics, basic behavioral research, surveillance, and survivorship. Additionally, investigators may propose high priority secondary analyzes in these areas. New investigators in relevant fields and disciplines (e.g., medicine, public health, health promotion, health communications and informatics, epidemiology, anthropology, social work, nursing research, nutrition, health policy, health services research, and behavioral sciences, such as psychology, health education, and sociology) may apply. Eligible applicants include those who have not previously been Principal Investigator (PI) on a NCI-funded cancer control research grant (R03, R01, P01), or established scientists refocusing their research interests to behavioral research in cancer. Predoctoral investigators currently enrolled in an accredited doctoral degree program also are eligible to apply. The R03 award mechanism will be used. Deadlines: 12/20/01, 4/20/02, 8/20/02. Contact: Veronica Y. Chollette, 301/435-2837; vc24a@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-99-006.html.
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NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT (NICHHD)
The Institutional Pathways Towards Strengthening HIV Prevention in Minority Communities (RFA-HD-01-017) initiative provides support to expand understanding of local community institutions such as churches, voluntary organizations, workplaces, and commercial establishments, and to explore the roles that such institutions play in contributing to/impeding HIV prevention. The program seeks research to examine potential mechanisms through which local institutions can enhance prevention efforts, beyond providing the venue for individual-level interventions and exploratory, collaborative, multidisciplinary research to better understand the way in which the structure and dynamics of community institutions influences HIV prevention as well as ways in which individuals at high risk of HIV infection or infected with HIV are linked to community institutions. The focus is on minority communities in the U.S. The objective is to create a body of data to guide design, implementation, and evaluation of future interventions and prevention strategies. Funded research will help explore potential for novel approaches to involving various types of community institutions or strengthening their impact on HIV risk behaviors, within their own constituents as well as more broadly in the community. This RFA seeks applications for formative or exploratory research. An important goal will be to develop and refine specific causal models (sometimes called ôlogic modelsö), based in theory and observation, that describe mechanisms through which interventions and strategies at the institutional level or involving community institutions are expected to contribute to HIV prevention. The focus is on institutions at the community level, institutions that have ongoing, quantifiable, and direct interaction with at least some proportion of community members. Multidisciplinary approaches are encouraged. Applicants may consider involvement of a wide range of scientists, including but not limited to those who study religion, institutional organization, service delivery, behavior change, persuasive communication, and community organization and dynamics. Anthropologists, geographers, economists, political scientists, psychologists, and sociologists all might have skills of use in developing these studies. Each research team must include significant, substantive involvement of individuals from the institution or institutions to be the focus of the study. NICHD intends to commit approximately $2 million in total costs, NINR intends to commit approximately $750,000 in total costs, and NIMH intends to commit approximately $250,000. The R21 award mechanism will be used. Deadlines : 12/17/01, 1/18/02. Contact: Susan Newcomer, 301/435-6981; Snewcomer@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-HD-01-017.html.
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NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION (NSF)/ NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH)
Appropriate scientific areas of investigations for the Joint NSF/NIH Initiative to Support Collaborative Research in Computational Neuroscience (CRCNS) (NSF 02-018) are those currently supported by or related to the participating NSF and NIH units. Research that will be supported under this initiative must impact on, and relate to, biological processes, and optimally provide hypotheses testable in biological studies. Research activities and computational approaches are supported at all levels of organization including molecular, cellular, systems, behavior and theory-based development studies. Example areas of appropriate research are listed in the announcement. Questions concerning a particular project’s focus, direction and relevance to a participating funding unit should be addressed to the appropriate person in the list of NSF and NIH contacts. Interdisciplinary collaborations are required. Contact: Mita Desai, Experimental and Integrative Activities, 703/292-8909, mdesai@nsf.gov; Christopher Platt, Integrative Biology and Neuroscience, 703/292-8423, cplatt@nsf.gov; Lawrence Parsons, Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences, 703/292-8740, lparsons@nsf.gov; Bruce Hamilton, Bioengineering and Environmental Systems, 703/292-7066, bhamilto@nsf.gov; Rajinder Khosla, Electrical & Communications Systems, 703/292-8339, rkhosla@nsf.gov; Sohi Rastegar, Engineering Education and Centers, 703/292-7946, srastega@nsf.gov; Barry Davis, Taste and Smell, NIDCD, 301/402-3464, barry_davis@nih.gov; Dennis Glanzman, Theoretical and Computational Neuroscience, NIMH, 301/443-1576, glanzman@heliz.nih.gov; Yuan Liu, Channels, Synapses, and Circuits, NINDS, 301/496-1917, liuyuan2@ninds.nih.gov; Antonio Noronha, Neurosciences and Behavioral Research, NIAAA, 301/443-7722, anoronha@willco.niaaa.nih.gov; David Shurtleff, NIDA, Neuroscience and Behavioral Research, 301/443-1887, david_shurtleff@nih.gov; Judith Finkelstein, Sensory/Motor Disorders of Aging, NIA, 301/496-9350, jf119k@nih.gov; Michael Oberdorfer, Visual Neuroscience, NEI, 301/496-5301, oberderfer@nei.nih.gov. Awards are expected to range from $100,000-$500,000/year with durations of 3-5 years. Deadlines: 12/14/01 (Letter of Intent); 2/4/02 (Application).
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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH)
Participating Institutes and Centers (ICs) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) invite applications for R01 awards to support Bioengineering Research Partnerships (BRP) (PAR-02-010) for basic and applied multi-disciplinary research that addresses important biological or medical research problems. A BRP is a multi-disciplinary research team applying an integrative, systems approach to develop knowledge and/or methods to prevent, detect, diagnose, or treat disease or to understand health and behavior. The partnership must include appropriate bioengineering or allied quantitative sciences in combination with biomedical and/or clinical investigators. A BRP may propose hypothesis-driven, discovery-driven, developmental, or design-directed research at universities, national laboratories, medical schools, large or small businesses, or other public and private entities or combinations of these entities. The objectives are to encourage basic and applied bioengineering research that could make a significant contribution to improving human health and to encourage collaborations and partnerships among the allied quantitative and biomedical sciences. The total requested project period may not exceed 5 years. The maximum total (direct plus indirect) costs to be awarded in any year is $2 million. Inquiries are encouraged. Deadlines: 12/21/01, 7/12/02 (Letters of Intent); 1/24/02, 8/12/02 (Applications). Contact: Inquiries concerning institute-specific scientific or financial issues should be directed to the NIH BECON scientific or financial contacts listed at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/becon/becon_contacts.htm. Inquiries regarding general programmatic issues should be directed to: Richard E. Swaja National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering 301/451-6771; swajar@nibib.nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-02-010.html.
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NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS AND STROKE (NINDS)
The Multimodal Integration Research Networks in Cognitive Neuroscience (RFA-NS-02-011) initiative provides support for the formation of cross-disciplinary networks of scientists interested in studying the neural mechanisms of cognition and other complex behaviors. These networks will allow formation of novel collaborations among cognitive scientists, neuroscientists, behavioral and computational neuroscientists, imaging specialists and clinical scientists in order to develop integrative and cutting edge research programs that advance understanding of the circuits and pathways of cognitive function. The research plan for these networks must be driven by a cognitive neuroscience question (e.g., neural mechanisms of attention, emotion, language acquisition, memory, perception, sensorimotor integration in various model systems and in various clinical populations) and must combine imaging techniques with other psychophysiological methods. This program is intended to begin a process where scientists from various disciplines can overcome barriers to cross-disciplinary research agendas addressing the dynamic nature of underlying physiological and cognitive systems. The Networks proposed must present a creative and well-designed research plan that addresses cognitive neuroscience questions that benefit from integrative perspectives. Examples of possible research questions are listed in the announcement. Funded network activities might include opportunities for training and hosting among network scientists at alternative laboratories or research settings to facilitate collaborative grant writing and/or pilot funding for collaborative feasibility studies. The purpose of these activities and meetings will be to refine conceptual frameworks for organizing cross-disciplinary research and identifying which specific questions and possible experiments show the greatest promise for advancement. Networks must include representation from multiple disciplines. Applicants may request project periods of up to 3 years and budgets for direct costs of up to $250,000/year (or up to $275,000/year for network grants that include more than one institution). The R01 award mechanism will be used. Deadlines: 12/17/01 (Letter of Intent), 1/18/02 (Application). Contact: Emmeline Edwards, 301/496-9964; ee48r@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-NS-02-011.html.
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NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION (NSF)

The CISE Networking Research Program supports projects addressing research issues related to next generation networks. The goal is to expand the vision of next generation networks, coalesce the research community around the vision, and support science and technologies that lead to next generation networks. Support extends over the entire spectrum of networking research, from network design and performance evaluation to middleware and software frameworks in support of applications running on top of networks and distributed systems. Also supported are projects addressing how networks and distributed systems interact with underlying communications and signal processing technology and other related disciplines such as operating systems, computer architecture and software technologies. The program also supports generic networking research addressing network design, network management, performance evaluation and other key research issues. Special consideration will be given to proposals that include innovative ideas that potentially lead to revolutionary or paradigm-shifting approaches to networking. Budgets are expected to range from $60,000-$250,000/year for 3 years. Contact: Program Director, CISE; 703/306-1950; net-pd@nsf.gov; http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/1998/nsf98164/nsf98164.htm. Deadlines: 12/1/01, 6/1/02.

The CISE/SBE--International Digital Libraries Collaborative Research program will fund the U.S. portion of international, collaborative digital library projects, which will contribute to the fundamental knowledge required to create information systems that can operate in multiple languages, formats, media, and social and organizational contexts. Proposals should have the overall research goal of enabling users to access and exploit information in new ways. Research issues include information organization, forms of information distribution, scalability and security techniques for worldwide data systems, and tools to search, store, and deliver information in different media or languages. Multi-country, multi-team projects are required, and proposals to this program must involve at least one research team in the U.S. and one in another country. Contact: Stephen M. Griffin, 703/292-8930; sgriffin@nsf.gov; http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/1999/nsf996/nsf996.htm. Deadline: 12/15/01 (Letter of Intent); 1/15/02 (Proposal Target Date).
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ROCKEFELLER BROTHERS FUND, INC. (RBF)

The goal of the Charles E. Culpeper Biomedical Pilot Initiative is to encourage investigation of new ideas in the areas of RBF’s interest in health, particularly research in molecular genetics, bio-engineering, molecular pharmacology and health services research. Grants of up to $25,000 will be made on a one-time basis with the possibility for renewal for a second year. The purpose is to explore new and even untested hypotheses, thus preliminary information is not required. Applicants may include young investigators seeking to establish independent directions or established investigators pursuing new directions. Contact: Linda Jacobs, 212/812-4200; rock@rbf.org; http://www.rbf.org/biomed.html. Deadline: None.
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GERMAN ACADEMIC EXCHANGE SERVICE (GAES)

DAAD Short Term Guest Lectureships. Funds are provided to colleges and universities to invite German faculty members to teach in any department for 1-6 months. Funds may not be used to replace faculty on sabbatical. Awards are designed to help fill curricular gaps or act as a stimulus for teaching and research in the department concerned. Cost-sharing between the host institution and GAES is a general prerequisite with the host institution providing at least an honorarium of U.S. $1,500/month for the guest lecturer and GAES supplementing the remuneration schemes. Deadline: None. Contact: 212/758-3223; daadny@daad.org; http://www.daad.org/facs.htm.
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HEREDITARY DISEASE FOUNDATION

Research Grants provide up to $50,000 as seed money for research projects that will contribute to identifying and understanding the basic defect in Huntington’s disease. Areas of interest include trinucleotide expansions, animal models, gene therapy, neurobiology and development of the basal ganglia, cell survival and death, and intercellular signaling in striatal neurons. Contact: Allan J. Tobin, 310/575-9656; AllanTobin@hdfoundation.org; http://www.hdfoundation.org/funding/grants.htm. Deadline: 2/15/02.
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CHARLES STEWART MOTT FOUNDATION

The Grants Program supports projects in civil society, the environment, and poverty. Multi- and single-year proposals are considered, as are those for shorter periods. Priority is given to fresh ap-proaches to solving community problems; approaches that, if proven successful, can generate long-term support from other sources and/or that can be replicated in other communities when appropriate; public policy development as well as research and development activities to further existing programs as well as to explore new fields of interest; and approaches and activities that lead to systemic change. Support is generally provided for demonstration, action-oriented projects. Previous support has included funding for research and development activities to advance concepts to the demonstration stage or to explore new interests; support may also be provided for program-related investments, as direct technical or fundraising assistance, or to assist with the dissemination of findings. Deadline: None. Contact: Office of Proposal Entry, 810/238-5651; infocenter@mott.org; http://www.mott.org.
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SOCIETY FOR THE PSYCHOLOGICAL STUDY OF SOCIAL ISSUES (SPSSI)

Four Clara Mayo Grants of up to $1,000 each are available to support master’s theses or pre-dissertation research on aspects of sexism, racism, or prejudice. Studies of the application of theory or the design of interventions or treatments to address these problems are welcome. Eligible applicants are individuals who have matriculated in graduate programs in psychology, applied social science, and related disciplines, who seek support of their master’s thesis or pre-dissertation research. Preference is given to students enrolled in a terminal master’s program. Deadline: 3/31/02. Contact: Attn: Clara Mayo Grants, 202/216-933; spssi@umich.edu; http://www.spssi.org/mayo.html.

UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is also available electronically online at http://www.und.edu/dept/our/uletter.htm. All articles submitted for publication should be labeled “University Letter” and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu or Fax to 777-4616. Attachments to University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number. University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations, Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.
UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.
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