University Letter / November 21, 1997 / Page

Volume 35, Number 14: November 21, 1997

Faculty Invited To March In Commencement

Continuing the tradition we began with our summer ceremony, we are inviting faculty to march in the winter commencement ceremony on Friday, Dec. 19. Participating faculty will march in full academic regalia and will be seated on the stage. The ceremony is scheduled for 2 p.m. in the Chester Fritz Auditorium. As in the past, we will contact department and college heads to determine the number of faculty who wish to participate. -- Kendall Baker, President.
Faculty Invited To march In Commencement
1
DuWayne Wacker, Accounting Professor, Dies 1

Abbott Hall Work Nears Completion 2


EVENTS TO NOTE


Dean's Hour Lecture Will Discuss Residency Training
2
Computer Science Plans Colloquium
2
Faculty Candidate Will Present Lecture
3
Theology For Lunch Series Set
3
Counseling To Hold Topic Colloquium
3
Equipment For People With Disabilities To Be Demonstrated
3
Reception Will Honor Marlys Hanson
3
"On Teaching" Session Will Meet Dec. 2
3
History Department Will Hold "History For Lunch"
3
Reception Will Honor Joe Hootman
4
Physics Colloquia Set
4

OF ACADEMIC INTERESt


Doctoral Exams Set For Four Candidates
4
Campus Climate Survey Results Detailed
4
"In The News" Will Be Published Soon
5


GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS


ORPD Lists Research, Grant Opportunities
6


BILLBOARD


University Announces Death Of Student, Garrett Shooter
8
"A" Zone Parking Permits Expire Dec. 7
8
Holiday Hours Listed for Chester Fritz Library, Health Sciences


Library, Computer Center and Memorial Union

9
Campus Postal Services Outsources Mailings
9
Career Services Improves Web Site
10
Departments, Student Organizations Invited To Place Information Online
10
Sweatshirt Sales To Aid Cancer Victim
10
PAC-W Awardees Listed
10
Studio One Wins Awards
11
Job Service Disaster Assistance Program Benefits UND
12
Follow Guidelines For Safe Holiday Decorating
12
Applications Sought For Who's Who Program
12


MONEY MATTERS


Controller's Office To Purge Old General Ledger
12
FlexComp Open Enrollment Set
12
Supplemental Retirement Annuities Are For Everyone
13
Supplemental Insurance Available
13


ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT


Student Photography Exhibited In Local Banks
13
Studio One Lists Guests
14
Collegium Musicum Will Hold Concert
14
International Centre Lists Events
14
Music Ensemble Will Perform
14
Skate With Sioux Will Be Nov. 30
14
Welcome The Season With Song
14
Wind Ensemble, Band Plan Concert
15
Applications Accepted For Holiday Craft Show And Sale
15


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

15

DuWayne Wacker, Accounting Professor, Dies

DuWayne Wacker, Professor of Accounting and Business Law and UND's Faculty Athletic Representative, died of a heart attack Thursday, Nov. 13. He was 57. Wacker earned degrees from Minot State University and UND, and was a certified public accountant. He came to UND in 1966 to teach in the Accounting and Business Law Department.

Wacker was highly admired among faculty and students alike as a teacher and an advisor. During his 30 years at the University, his student evaluations were among the best in his Department and the University. Virtually 100 percent of his students rated him as excellent or superior overall. Teaching awards he received include Who's Who Among America's Teachers (1994), North Dakota Society of CPAs Outstanding Educator Award (1993), Beta Alpha Psi Outstanding Accounting Instructor (1993, 1986, 1981), and Teacher of the Year - UND Fraternities and Sororities (1989). Advising awards include the Memorial Union Outstanding Advisor Award (1993) and the UND Foundation-Lydia and Arthur Saiki Faculty Advisor Award (1991). In addition to serving as the University's Faculty Athletic Representative during the past three years, Wacker was active on athletic, University, college and departmental committees, as well as service to the community. He served on the Adult Education Committee at Bethel Lutheran Church and was a swimming official for UND swim meets.

DuWayne was a friend and colleague to all the other Accounting faculty. His passing leaves a giant vacancy for students, the Department, the College of Business and Public Administration and the University, as well as the Grand Forks community.

He is survived by his wife, Maureen; a son, Paul, Grand Forks; a daughter, Tricia, Las Vegas; and his mother, Lydia Wacker, Bismarck.

-- Jan Orvik, Editor, from information provided by Harold Wilde, Chair, Accounting and Business Law.
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University Letter / November 21, 1997 / Page


Events to Note

Abbott Hall Work Nears Completion

Sometimes lost in the news of the University's successful flood recovery effort is the fact that progress is being made on major pre-flood projects, such as the renovation of Abbott Hall, our Chemistry building. The expected completion of this project in December will provide students, faculty and researchers with state-of- the-art facilities, and will complete a two-phase, 15-year effort to expand and modernize a building that is home to one of UND's fundamental programs. Passing through these classrooms and laboratories are students headed for careers not only in Chemistry but also in Engineering, the Health Sciences and other disciplines. About 1,000 students take Chemistry each semester. The department's 14 faculty also teach about 50 undergraduate Chemistry majors and 25 graduate students, with about two-thirds of the latter studying and performing research in the department's highly regarded Ph.D. program.

The original building, named after Dr. George W. Abbott, who taught at UND from 1910 to 1952, opened in the fall of 1961. It was a no frills structure, constructed with an eye toward practicality and durability and featuring building systems that were considered to be advanced for their day. It gradually became evident that more space and more sophisticated environmental controls and systems were needed. Thus a two-phased approach was initiated to bring this solid, functional structure up to date. It was agreed the addition should be constructed first, in part to ensure sufficient class space while the original building was being remodeled. In 1982, the proposed addition was included on the State Board of Higher Education's priority list. In 1989, $3.3 million was appropriated by the Legislature for this purpose. The addition, carefully integrated with the original structure, was dedicated in 1992. Funding for the second phase of the project was approved by the 1995 Legislature. The $4,143,538 package to modernize the original structure included state bonding of $2,371,769 (with $871,769 to be paid from UND local sources) and a $1,771,769 National Science

Foundation Grant. Although classes were offered this fall in parts of the original Abbott Hall, work continued on final details, such as completion of the electrical and mechanical systems penthouse, painting, and window installation. A rededication ceremony will be scheduled in 1998.

-- From information in the UND Campus Report to the Board of Higher Education.


Dean's Hour Lecture Will Discuss Residency Training

The School of Medicine and Health Sciences Dean's Hour Presentation, "The Future of Residency Training: AMA's Position," will be given by Michael Bigelow, AMA Medical Student Section Chair, and William Mahood, Member of the AMA Board of Trustees, at noon Thursday, Nov. 20, in the Reed T. Keller Auditorium (1350), Wold Bio-Information Learning Resources Center. The talk will be followed by special donation presentations from AMA's Medical Student Section and Education and Research Foundation and North Dakota's First District Medical Society. -- Thomas Norris, Executive Associate Dean, Academic Affairs and Research, School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

Computer Science Plans Colloquium

Stephen Johnson (Space Studies) will present "The Psychology of Strategic Defense and the Early Development of Artificial Intelligence and Software Engineering" at 3:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 20, in 107 CAS I.

In the 1950s, the U.S. Air Force experimented with and developed new means to warn and defend the United States from Soviet bombers and ballistic missiles. Among the many initiatives were computer-based experiments in social and individual psychology that led to a version of the "system approach" on one hand, and the development of cognitive psychology and artificial intelligence on the other. Dr. Johnson will discuss these early psychology experiments, and how these created methods that became the early paradigms for artificial intelligence and software engineering.

-- Bruce Maxwell, Computer Science.

University Letter / November 21, 1997 / Page


Faculty Candidate Will Present Lecture

Roxanne A. Vaughan, National Institute on Drug Abuse, will present "Dopamine Transporter Structure-Function Properties: Antagonist Binding Domains and in vivo Phosphorylation," at 1 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 25, in 5510 Medical Science North.

Dr. Vaughan received her B.S. in Biology from Colorado State, M.A. in Zoology from the University of California at Davis, and Ph.D. in Zoology from Virginia Polytechnic Institute. This was followed by four years of postdoctoral work in Biological Chemistry at Johns Hopkins. Since 1990, she has been associated with the National Institute on Drug Abuse where she holds the position of Senior Staff Fellow. Dr. Vaughan has published 35 papers in the area of signal transduction and membrane receptors. Her recent work has been on the characterization of the dopamine transporter whose action is blocked by the psychotropic drugs cocaine and amphetamine. Dr. Vaughan is a candidate for the position of Assistant Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. All interested persons are invited to attend. -- David Lambeth, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

Equipment For People With Disabilities To Be Demonstrated

The North Dakota Interagency Project for Assistive Technology (IPAT) will hold an Equipment Expo Monday, Nov. 24, from 1 to 5 p.m., and Tuesday, Nov. 25, from 8 a.m. to noon, in the River Valley Room of the Memorial Union.

IPAT will display assistive equipment for people with disabilities, most of which is available in the IPAT Equipment Loan Library and can be used on a free trial basis. Staff members will be on hand to answer questions and give more in-depth demonstrations; special arrangements may be made to address specific needs. The Expo will offer an opportunity to see and handle equipment that is often not readily available, and is designed for everyone interested in gadgets, computers, and other technology used by people with disabilities. Please join us. -- Disability Support Services.

Reception Will Honor Marlys Hanson

Marlys Hanson will leave the UND Computer Center Dec. 5, completing over 15 years of programming, customer assistance and "other duties as assigned." Help us congratulate Marlys on her upcoming marriage and wish her well for her move to South Carolina. You're all invited to join us at an Open House Tuesday, Dec. 2, from 2 to 3:30 p.m., Computer Center Conference Room, 371 Upson II. -- Dorette Kerian, Manager, User Services, Computer Center.

Theology For Lunch Series Set

This year the Theology for Lunch Series is titled "Faith and Learning Along the River." Our speakers will share their stories from the flood, and what they have learned about themselves, others and God. On Tuesday, Nov. 25, the Campus Ministry Association members will speak. They are: Campus Pastor Mark Buchhop of Wittenberg Lutheran Chapel, Campus Director Frank Hutton from United Campus Ministry (FOCUS), Father Raymond Courtright of Newman Center, and Campus Pastor Tim Megorden and Campus Minister Kathy Fick of Christus Rex Lutheran Center. Please join us for these dates at Christus Rex Lutheran Center, 3012 University, at noon. -- Mark Buchhop, Campus Pastor at Wittenberg Lutheran Chapel.

"On Teaching" Session Will Meet Dec. 2

The "On Teaching" session Tuesday, Dec. 2, at noon in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl will feature the topic "On-Line Supplements to a Campus Course" and will be facilitated by Sanku Mallik (Chemistry). He will demonstrate what he does and has data from previous semesters on how students use the online resources. Please call 777-3325 to register. -- Dan Rice, Director of Instructional Development.

Counseling To Hold Topic Colloquium

The Department of Counseling will hold a Topic Colloquium Tuesday, Nov. 25, from 12:30 to 1:45 p.m. in 316 Montgomery Hall. Cindy Juntunen-Smith's research team (Counseling) will present "Career Issues Among American Indian Youth in the Northern Plains." -- Sue Jacobs, Coordinator, Coun. #565N: Topics in Counseling and Counseling Research and Practice.

History Department Will Hold "History For Lunch"

At noon Wednesday, Dec. 3, in 217 Merrifield Hall, the History Department and Phi Alpha Theta will sponsor a talk by Richard Shafer and Stephen Rendahl (both Communication) titled "North Dakota's Role in the Philippine Insurrection and the Anti-Imperialism Debate, 1899-1902." There will be a question and discussion period following their presentation, which is open to all. Bring your lunch. For more information, please contact me. -- David Rowley, Associate Professor of History, 777-3380.

University Letter / November 21, 1997 / Page


Reception Will Honor Joe Hootman

The School of Engineering and Mines will host a reception for Joe Hootman Thursday, Dec. 4, from 9 to 10:30 a.m. at the Alumni Center. Dr. Hootman has been a faculty member in the Electrical Engineering Department since 1969 and is retiring Dec. 31. Please join us to wish him well in future pursuits. Everyone is welcome. -- Don Richard, Dean of Engineering and Mines.

The final examination for Pamela Jean Carlson, a candidate for the Ed.D. degree with a major in Teaching and Learning/Elementary, is set for 10:30 a.m. Monday, Dec. 1, in 104E Education Building. The dissertation title is "The Integration of Educational Technology Into the Elementary School Curriculum." Deanna Strackbein (Teaching and Learning) is the committee chair.

The final examination for Lora L. Sloan, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Clinical Psychology, is set for 12:30 p.m. Monday, Dec. 1, in 210 Corwin-Larimore Hall. The dissertation title is "Processing Strategies and Recall Performance for Narrative Passages and Word Lists of Negative and Neutral Affective Valence in Depression." Thomas Petros (Psychology) is the committee chair.

Members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend. -- Harvey Knull, Dean, Graduate School.

Physics Colloquia Set

Professor Carl Patton of Colorado State University will give two presentations on non-linear phenomena and magnetism. The first colloquium, a general science talk on solitons with examples drawn from ocean wave solitons, Rosby waves on Jupiter, etc., will be Thursday, Dec. 4, at 7 p.m. in 114 Witmer Hall. The second colloquium, titled "High Frequency Magnetic Excitations, Resonance, Spin Waves, and Solitons," is tutorial in nature and will be presented Friday, Dec. 5, at 4 p.m. in 130 Gamble Hall. This presentation will be broadcast to faculty and students at North Dakota State University over IVN. All interested persons are invited to both colloquia.

Prof. Patton is well known for his research on fundamental excitations in magnetic materials and especially for his work using Brillouin light scattering to characterize certain of these excitations. He is currently chair-elect of the American Physical Society's Topical Group on Magnetism and Its Applications. -- Graeme Dewar, Physics.

Campus Climate Survey Results Detailed

Following is the Executive Summary of the President's Advisory Council on Diversity (PAC-D) report on the 1995-96 Campus Climate Survey.

Committee members are: Robert Kweit, Chair (Political Science and Public Administration), Mahir Ali (Computer Science), Patti Alleva (Law), Mary Lou Fuller (Teaching and Learning), Leigh Jeanotte (Native American Programs), Kasumi Hasegawa (Communications), Gordon Henry (Vice President for Student Affairs), Doug McDonald (Psychology), Sally Page (Affirmative Action), Marlene Strathe (Vice President of Academic Affairs and Provost).

The Executive Summary of the Campus Climate Surveys on Diversity Issues follows:

Background: The UND Diversity and Cultural Plan, adopted in February 1994, recommended that data be collected and analyzed as a baseline for gauging campus attitudes on matters of diversity and used as a basis for recommendations to improve the campus climate where necessary. The survey was coordinated by Tim Driscoll (Institutional Analysis and Sociology) in conjunction with PAC-D. The survey produced a great deal of data which are analyzed in detail in the attached report. This summary is meant to offer a quick overview of the findings.

In November 1995, surveys were mailed and received by 680 students. Minority groups were over-represented in the sample to obtain sufficient responses to be able to generalize results. Fifty-four percent or 366 students responded. In April 1996, 500 surveys were mailed to faculty and staff, 369 of which were returned for a 76 percent response rate. Detailed sampling procedure is



Of Academic

Interest


Doctoral Exams Set For Four Candidates

The final examination for Mingyu Zhang, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Pharmacology, is set for 3 p.m. Monday, Nov. 24, in Room 5510, Health Sciences Building. The dissertation title is "Transcriptional Regulation of a Novel Heat Shock Response and Its Association with Apoptosis in Nb2 Lymphoma Cells." Michael Blake (Pharmacology) is the committee chair.

The final examination for Mary E. Dalglish Bergstrom, a candidate for the Ed.D. degree with a major in Educational Administration, is set for 1:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 25, in 208 Education Building. The dissertation title is "Student Satisfaction With the Process of Transferring to the University of North Dakota." Gerald Bass (Educational Leadership) is the committee chair.

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University Letter / November 21, 1997 / Page


Campus Climate Survey Results, continued

Faculty/Staff Survey: The faculty/staff survey showed little difference in male/female attitudes concerning discrimination and sexism. Both groups saw relatively little problem. Since the sample was 92.7 percent white, it was impossible to draw conclusions concerning any specific ethnic group. There were only 28 minority respondents. Minority employees were more likely to witness or experience discrimination, racism, and lack of respect for their culture. Twenty percent of the white faculty/staff disagreed that UND needs more programs dealing with diversity.

Recommendations: The report contains several recommendations. A few major ones are highlighted: (1) Attempts should be made to further integrate diversity issues into the curriculum. Perhaps the establishment of a DAC (Diversity Across the Curriculum) Program modeled after the WAC program would be useful here. (2) Administrative leadership must demonstrate ongoing concern for diversity. Training, promotion policies, diversity recognition programs would be useful here. (3) Bridges should be built to minority communities. Outreach programs and the use of Interactive Video might help here. (4) Initiatives should be provided to promote intercultural understanding. Focus groups might be useful.

The complete report is being sent to all Vice Presidents and Deans and to Student Government for distribution. It is also available at www.und.nodak.edu/campus_climate. The committee welcomes your reactions and recommendations to maintain the many positive findings and to improve the areas of concern. Please address your comments to any member of PAC-D by Dec. 15, 1997. This report is one of many steps designed to keep UND a leader in the state and nation in facing diversity issues.

-- Rob Kweit (Political Science), Chair, President's Advisory Council on Diversity.

documented in the report. The data were compiled and analyzed during the last academic year, but the report was delayed because of the abrupt end to the last school year.

Student Survey: Overall, the campus climate is quite positive. For example, when respondents were categorized by gender, the committee noted that both women and men felt welcome and comfortable at UND. About three quarters of men and women were free of fears of harassment and did not feel they had been harassed. Not surprisingly, women, more than men saw the need for more discussion of women's issues and more women instructors, but in both instances less than 50 percent expressed those sentiments. Despite the very positive picture, there is some cause for concern. For example, about 11 percent of the females felt isolated and 15 percent of males felt so. While the percentages are relatively small, and the reasons for these feelings may or may not be a result of conditions at UND, if this percentage is extrapolated to the total student body, it represents about 1,000 to 1,500 students. Similarly, the percentage who feared harassment or felt that they had experienced sexual harassment was equally small, but there is still room for improvement if one considers that survey respondents are reasonably representative of the student body.

When the survey was analyzed along ethnic and racial lines, an overwhelming number of UND students, regardless of race or ethnicity, are positive about their UND experience. In general, Blacks/African Americans and Hispanic/Latinos had the highest levels of discomfort. Non-whites, much more than whites, would like to have more diversity, more opportunities for interaction, and more diversity programming. There were high levels of comfort with diverse students in classes and diverse instructors. Again, a small percentage were uncomfortable, including 11 percent of the Indians/Native Americans and 15 percent of the whites. When asked about the Sioux logo, 41 percent of the Indians/Native Americans and 30 percent of the African Americans found it to be insensitive. There are some areas where improvements are clearly needed. Between roughly one-quarter to one-half of African Americans, Native Americans, and Hispanics reported at least occasional discrimination. Almost one-quarter of the Native Americans and 17 percent of the African Americans believe that peers are not respectful of their backgrounds.

When views of international students were examined, a positive picture again emerged. Eighty-four percent felt always or frequently welcome. It is a concern, however, that about 25 percent of the international students always or frequently feel isolated.

"In the News" Will Be Published Soon

"In the News," a chronicle of scholarly and creative achievement which includes publications, posters, presentations, election into office and societies, and other achievements, will be published in an upcoming issue of University Letter soon. This information is used in University Letter, but it also serves as a record that our faculty and staff are active in scholarly research and creative activity. Please send submissions to me at Box 7144 or e-mail them to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu. — Jan Orvik, Editor, University Letter.

University Letter / November 21, 1997 / Page




program is not limited to publications in print, but can consider publication through microfiche or other media. Priority is given to requests for small grants for projects which have been initiated and can be completed and published within the award period. In addition, priority is given to projects which require publication assistance only and include specific plans for publication through, for example, university presses or professional scientific societies. Contact: 301/496-4621; fax 301/402-0421; sparks@nlm.nih.gov. Deadlines: 2/1/98, 6/1/98, 10/1/98.

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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operations Office (ID), under the authority of the Geothermal Energy Research, Development and Demonstration Act of 1974 (Pub. L. 93-410), is seeking applications for research, development and demonstration (field testing) in the area of Geothermal Reservoir Technology. The research is to be directed toward the domestic use and development of new technologies for exploration, identification of fractures, location of fracture permeability, and reservoir engineering and chemistry. Deadlines: 1/29/98, 5/28/98, 10/1/98, 1/28/99, 5/27/99, 9/30/99. Contact: POC Carol Bruns, (208) 526-1534; brunscl@inel.gov; http://www.inel.gov/doeid/solicit.html. (SOL DE-PS07-98ID13589, Commerce Business Daily, 11/7/97, PSA#1968.)

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH

The purpose of First Independent Research Support & Transition (FIRST) Awards (R29) is to provide a sufficient period of research support for newly independent, biomedical and behavioral science investigators to initiate their own research and demonstrate the merit of their own research ideas. These grants underwrite the first independent investigative efforts, provide a reasonable opportunity to demonstrate creativity, productivity, and promise for an independent research career and for the principle investigator (PI) help in the transition to traditional types of NIH research project grants. The award is not intended for mid-career individuals who may be in transition to another area of research. FIRST awards provide support for five years to permit the newly independent investigator to establish his or her own research program and make significant and innovative contributions to laboratory or clinical biomedical or behavioral research. The following Institutes offer FIRST awards: Aging, Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Cancer, Child Health and Human Development, Deafness and Communication Disorders, Dental Research, Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Drug Abuse, Environmental Health Sciences, Eye, General Medical Sciences, Heart, Lung,
Grants and

Fellowships


ORPD Lists Research, Grant Opportunities

Following are research and grant opportunities. For more information, contact the Office of Research and Program Development at 777-4278.

HITACHI FOUNDATION

The Role of Information Technology in Education funding initiative will support projects that use information technologies to improve and advance teaching and learning. The Request for Letters of Intent targets educational institutions and community-based organizations whose projects "evaluate the role of technology in teaching and learning; assess the successes and challenges of using technology in education; advance current teaching and learning; and identify critical gaps on using technology to strengthen teaching and learning." The foundation is looking for projects that demonstrate how technology is being used to make possible new methods and advancements in teaching and learning, including new ways to create products, gain knowledge and encourage people to collaborate in the educational process. The foundation is looking for specific and identifiable technological advances in teaching and learning. It will not fund projects where the main focus is to acquire computer equipment or accessories, capital improvements, planning grants, the provision of computer skills or replication grants. Preference will go to projects focusing on populations that have been underserved by traditional institutions and mechanisms. Collaborations also are encouraged, especially efforts between several schools or organizations. Deadline: 1/6/98 (Letter Intent); 3/10/98 (Formal Proposal). Contact: Send a self-addressed envelope to: The Role of Information Technology in Education, Hitachi Foundation, 1509 22nd St. NW, Washington DC 20037, or call the Fax-on-Demand system, (202) 457-0588, ext. 551.

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NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE

The Publication Grant Program provides short-term financial assistance for the preparation of book-length manuscripts and, in some cases, the publication of important scientific information needed by U.S. health professionals. The objectives of the program are to provide financial support for not-for-profit scientific publications, which will synthesize, increase the availability of, and facilitate utilization of biomedical information; and to assist in closing communication gaps in the application of scientific research findings to medical practice. The
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ORPD Lists Research, Grant Opportunities, continued

nent has four elements: Economic Benefits of Environmental Policies and Programs, Ecosystem Valuation, Economic Costs of Environmental Policies and Programs, and Relationship between Economic Growth and Environmental Quality. Awards may range from $60,000 to $125,000 per award per year. Survey research, field experiments, and multi-investigator projects may be considered for a higher funding level. EPA Contacts: Ms. Deborah Hanlon or Dr. Alan Carlin, 202/564-6836 or 202/260-5499; fax 202/565-2447 or 202/260-5732; hanlon.deborah@epamail.epa.gov or carlin.alan@epamail.epa.gov; http://es.inel.gov/ncerga/rfa/98valrfa.html. NSF Contacts: Dr. Rachelle Hollander, 703/306-1743, fax 703/306-0485, rholland@nsf.gov; or Dr. Jon Leland, 703/306-1757, fax 703/306-0485, jleland@nsf.gov. Deadline: 1/15/98.

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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

Areas of interest for the investigator-initiated grants program are Ecological Indicators, Drinking Water, Air Pollution Chemistry and Physics, Urban Air Toxics, Health Effects and Exposures to Particulate Matter and Associated Air Pollutants, and Decision-Making and Valuation for Environmental Policy (joint with the National Science Foundation). Contact: Vary with topic; contact ORPD or http://www.epa.gov/ncerqa for complete announcement, contact persons, and deadline dates. Deadlines: Vary with topic.

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NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION

The Transformations to Quality Organizations Program supports interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary research on quality. Research supported must be based on partnerships between researchers and firms or other organizations; it should reflect the integration of engineering and management and/or social science perspectives. It must use rigorous methodologies to answer important questions about quality transformations and must make a clear contribution to the literature in this area. Goals are to support research to develop theories, concepts, and methodologies for improved transformations to quality organizations, and to encourage the development of new tools or processes leading to quality improvements in organizations. Deadline: 2/17/98. Contact: James W. Dean, Jr., Program Director, 703/306-1757x7210; jdean@nsf.gov; http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/1998/nsf9815/nsf9815.htm.

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NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

The Canon National Parks Science Scholars Program awards scholarships for students in the biological, physical, social and cultural sciences to conduct dissertation
and Blood Institute, Mental Health, Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and Nursing Research. The FIRST award is also offered by the Library of Medicine, National Center for Human Genome Research, and the National Center for Research Resources. NIH may be eliminating FIRST Awards in 1998. Deadlines: 1/1/98. Contact: http://www.hin.gov/grants/fund/r29.htm or ORPD for contact persons at specific Institutes.

The Short-Term Courses in Research Ethics Program invites applications for grants to develop, conduct, and evaluate short-term courses on ethical issues in research, particularly those involving human participants. Courses should improve the skills of biomedical, behavioral, social science, and public health researchers in identifying and addressing the ethical, legal, and social implications of their research, especially when human subjects are involved. Grantees may develop, offer, and/or evaluate research ethics courses ranging from three days to six weeks in length. Research ethics courses must be offered at least once a year or be made available to the student on the Internet, video, or other distance-learning format. Deadlines: 2/6/98 or 5/22/98 (Letter of Intent); 3/6/98 or 6/24/98 (Formal Application). Contact: Milton J. Hernandez, Ph.D.; 301/496-3775; fax 301/402-0369; mh35c@nih.gov.

The Mentored Scientist Development Award in Research Ethics (MDSA) supports training in research ethics for health professionals working at academic and other health-related institutions in biomedical, behavioral, or public health research, particularly research involving human participants. Goals are to enhance the career of the applicant so he/she may become an independent investigator in applied research ethics and the candidate will become a resource on research ethics for the sponsoring institution and its scientific community. The award is designed for investigators who will refocus their research careers to the field of applied research ethics. Deadlines and Contact: Same as above.

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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY/NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION

The EPA/NSF Partnership for Environmental Research, Decision Making and Valuation for Environmental Policy Program includes four research areas: water and watersheds, technology for a sustainable environment, decision-making and valuation for environmental policy, and environmental statistics. The Decision-making and Valuation for Environmental Policy competition encourages research on improving decision-making and understanding diverse values in environmental policy and related public issues. The Determination of the Costs and Benefits of Environmental policies and Programs compo
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ORPD Lists Research, Grant Opportunities, continued

life. Contact: 212/750-6038; fax 212/371-4761; info@rsage.org; http://epn.org/sage.html. Deadline: None.

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MYRA FOUNDATION

Fields of interest are arts/cultural programs, secondary school/education, higher education, health care, health organizations, human services, youth services, aging centers and services, government/public administration. Funds are provided for building/renovation, equipment, and scholarships. Contact: Alan B. Warcup, President, P. O. Box 13536, Grand Forks, ND 58208-3536; 701/772-8111. Deadline: None.

-- Sally Eckert-Tilotta, Assistant to the Director of Research and Program Development.

research in the National Park System. Research questions for 1998 are: Biological Sciences—What is the relationship of fire regimes to landscape processes and patterns within parks and their surrounding areas? Physical Sciences—What waste treatment technologies have the least impact upon pristine ecosystems in the national parks? Social Sciences—What long-term impacts do NPS interpretive and/or outreach programs have on visitors, the general public, and key populations? Cultural Sciences—What techniques are most effective in preserving rock art in the National Park System? Deadline: 6/1/98.

Contact: Gary Machlis, Program Coordinator; 202/208-5391; gmachlis@uidaho.edu.

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HAGLEY MUSEUM AND LIBRARY

The Center for the History of Business, Technology, and Society sponsors several programs. Grants in Aid provide short-term fellowships supporting research in the museum/library collections by advanced scholars, degree/nondegree candidates, and independent researchers. H. B. du Pont Fellowships provide up to 6-month resident fellowships for advanced study at the Museum/Library. The Henry Berlin du Pont Dissertation Fellowship is for graduate students who have completed all course work for the doctoral degree and are working on their dissertation. The Hagley-Winterthur Fellowships, jointly sponsored with Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library, support research in arts and industries and the historical relationship between economic life and the arts. Deadlines: Vary. Contact: 302/658-2400; fax 302/655-3188; http://ww.hagley.lib.de.us/center.htm.

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RUSSELL SAGE FOUNDATION

The Foundation's grants are restricted to support for basic social science research within the following programs: 1) a program of research on the future of work concerned with the causes and consequences of the decline in demand for low-skill workers in advanced economies; 2) a program of research on current U.S. immigration that focuses on the adaptation of the second generation to American society; 3) a joint program with the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation that supports research on curricula designed to foster active literacy among disadvantaged students; and 4) a program on the social psychology of cultural contact that focuses on improving relations between racial and ethnic groups in schools, workplaces, and neighborhood settings. The Foundation also supports a special project on the analysis of the 1990 Census, a working group examining the political response to recent efforts to reform U.S. social policy, and the Behavioral Economics Roundtable, a forum for advancing the interdisciplinary analysis of economic



Billboard

University Announces Death Of Student, Garrett Shooter

It is with regret that the University must announce the death of Garrett H. Shooter, who died Oct. 31. Garrett was admitted into the University in the fall of 1997 and was enrolled in Arts and Sciences, majoring in Computer Science. — Lillian Elsinga, Associate Vice President for Student Affairs.

"A" Zone Parking Permits Expire Dec. 7

"A" Zone parking permits expire Sunday, Dec. 7. "A" Zone parking permit applications were mailed out to all departments last week. All parking records are being updated this year, therefore, it will be necessary to provide the make, model and license number of all vehicles being registered. Do not call the Traffic Office and ask them to look up vehicle information -- this must be provided by each applicant.

Deadlines to note are:

Friday, Nov. 21, deadline for selecting payroll deduction;

Wednesday, Nov. 26, request to purchase parking permit by campus mail must be received by the Traffic Division, Box 9035, no later than 4:30 p.m. Applicant must provide a self-addressed envelope indicating the campus address to mail the permit. After this time, all permits must be purchased at the Traffic Division, Auxiliary Services Building. Hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The Union Station in the Memorial Union sustained flood damage and has not yet reopened.

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University Letter / November 21, 1997 / Page


"A" Zone Parking Permits Expire, continued

handled by Campus Postal Services. If there is inclement weather, mail processing will be done by Campus Postal Services. There will be no additional charges to departments for outsourcing the University's mail.

In order to make this a successful venture, Campus Postal Services is requesting some departmental assistance. Departments can help by banding domestic letters that are to be charged to the same account number and by checking that the correct account number is on the first letter in a group of letters. Separating letters by Grand Forks, North Dakota, Minnesota, and other states is no longer needed, but separating foreign mail is required. Banding non-letter size mail in the same manner will also be helpful. The procedures mentioned above are similar to those currently followed by departments and will help make mail processing more efficient. Thank you for your cooperation in this matter. If there are any questions or concerns, feel free to contact me at 777-2279. -- Darin Lee, Campus Postal Services.

Sunday, Dec. 7, the 1996-97 "A" Zone parking permit expires. To avoid a $10 ticket, the new permit must be displayed by 8 a.m. Monday, Dec. 8. Your new "A" Zone parking permit can be displayed as soon as it is purchased.

Additional "A" Zone Parking Permit Applications are available at the Traffic Division. -- Kris Nelson, Administrator, Traffic Division.

Campus Postal Services Outsources Mailings

UND has contracted its mail processing to Kaye's Mailing Service of Fargo, which has guaranteed same day mail processing for the University. Kaye's Mailing Service provides barcoding to speed mail delivery by the Postal Service. All billing for postage to departments will be


Thanksgiving Holiday Hours Listed:

Nov. 27, closed; Friday, Nov. 28, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, Nov. 29, 1 to 5 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 30, 1 p.m. to midnight. -- April Byars, Administrative Assistant, Library of the Health Sciences.

Chester Fritz Library:

Thanksgiving hours of operation for the Chester Fritz Library are: Wednesday, Nov. 26, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Thursday, Nov. 27 (Thanksgiving), closed; Friday, Nov. 28, resume regular hours. -- Patricia Berntsen, Chester Fritz Library.

Computer Center:

The Computer Center will close for the Thanksgiving holiday at midnight Wednesday, Nov. 26, and will reopen at midnight Thursday, Nov. 27. -- Donna Bonderud, Production Control, Computer Center.

Health Sciences Library:

Thanksgiving hours for the Library of the Health Sciences are: Wednesday, Nov. 26, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday,


Memorial Union:

The hours for the Memorial Union over the Thanksgiving holiday are:

Wed. Nov. 26 Fri., Nov. 28 Sat., Nov. 29 Sun., Nov. 30

Lifetime Sports Center 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Noon to 5 p.m. Noon to 5 p.m.

Info Center 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Noon to 5 p.m. Noon to 5 p.m.

Service Center 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Noon to 5 p.m. Noon to 5 p.m.

Copy Stop 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Closed Closed Closed

Union Food Court 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed Closed

Bookstore 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Closed Closed

Administrative Office 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Closed Closed

Craft Center/Sign & 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Closed Closed Closed

Design Studio

Dining Center 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Closed Closed Closed

Barber Shop 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed Closed

University Learning 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Closed Closed

Center

Computer Learning Lab 8 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. 8 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. 11 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. Noon to 5:45 p.m.

Building Hours 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

-- Marsha Nelson, Facilities Coordinator, Memorial Union.


University Letter / November 21, 1997 / Page

Career Services Improves Web Site

Career Services is pleased to announce major changes to our home page on the Web. We invite faculty, students, and staff to check out our home page at: http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/career.

We are especially proud of the two sections containing information on employers who are interested in UND students. One section is for North Dakota employers and the second is a special employer section for our career partners.

In addition, please look at our new e-mail Special Events and Job Notification Service which will allow us to update students on the most current jobs, interview possibilities, and activities scheduled through our office. We welcome faculty and students to join our e-mail Notification System.

Faculty, please make this information available to students in your academic classes. We look forward to more students, faculty, and staff utilizing our website and web services.

-- Mark Thompson, Director, Career Services.

Sweatshirts are available in L, XL, and XXL, and are $20. You may order them by calling the Student Government Office at 777-4377. -- Becca George, Executive Secretary, Student Government.

PAC-W Awardees Listed

The President's Advisory Council for Women presented awards to people and organizations at UND for their work towards the advancement of women at their Celebration Tea Nov. 13. The awardees are listed below; a plaque and stipend were presented to each.

Sharon Rezac Andersen, Director, International Centre, has made advancement of the status of women a significant part of not only her work at the University, but also her life. For almost two decades she has worked tirelessly to promote equity, justice, and peace. In the late 1970s, she worked with a Church Women United delegation to initiate an international gathering for the Women's Decade, "Development, Equality, and Peace." In the 1980s, she was a United Nations representative to the Peace Conference in Czechoslovakia which formulated resolutions covering women in UN countries; she served as a member of the Church Women United Delegation to the Soviet Union; was selected as a scholar to participate in the Interfaith Study Tour to Nicaragua; and from 1984-86 was a Field Development Coordinator for Church Women United in New York City.

In 1986, she began work at the Women's Center, providing programming, advocacy, advisement, and referrals for student, staff, and faculty across the campus. She brought to the forefront of issues of importance to all of us in a pluralistic society.

John Ettling, Dean of Arts and Sciences, was honored for his strong support of women at UND, especially in the areas of curriculum and faculty development. Recognizing the importance of academic work on women's lives, Dean Ettling has supported and encouraged the efforts of the Women Studies Program, most notably in urging that the Program be included in the planning for a Center for Interdisciplinary Studies.

He established a salary floor for all ranks within the college. Though not primarily an equity stratagem, it has and will have important positive consequences for women faculty at all ranks.

Sharon C. Wilsnack, Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor of Neuroscience, is known internationally for her research on problem drinking and women. She has published and presented her research internationally and recently edited a book with her husband Richard on gender and alcohol.

Departments, Student Organizations Invited To Place Information Online

Departments, offices, and student organizations are invited to place entries on UNDInfo, the University's online menu system. It contains directories, calendars, academic information, job openings, news and more, and we'd like to add your information to the system, which is accessible worldwide. We'll train you in placing information online; the only requirement is a computer hooked to the Comptuer Center mainframe. There is no charge. Student organizations are more than welcome to place information about their groups online; their only additional requirement is an advisor's name so we have someone to contact when school is not in session. If you're interested, please call me at 777-3621 for more information. -- Jan Orvik (University Relations), Co-Manager, UNDInfo.

Sweatshirt Sales To Aid Cancer Victim

Student Government is selling sweatshirts to raise money for 10-year-old Elizabeth Luger, daughter of Donna Brown (Native American Programs). Elizabeth was diagnosed with osteogenic sarcoma (bone cancer) in May. Elizabeth has been at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., receiving chemotherapy.

Money raised will help Elizabeth and her family with lost wages, travel and medications. Sweatshirts are available and read "UND-Focus on Students." If you would like to see a graphic design, please see your department head.

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University Letter / November 21, 1997 / Page


PAC-W Awardees Listed, continued

and engineering by modeling and through exploration programs.

Advisors, Donald Naismith and Joyce Medalen and SWE student members Allison Sawrey and Denise Dvorak accepted the award.

-- Dorette Kerian (Computer Center), for the President's Advisory Council on Women (PAC-W).

Sharon has received numerous awards extolling her work and is a highly respected role model and advocate for women. Her honors include: a Fulbright graduate fellowship, Woodrow Wilson graduate fellowship, National Institute of Mental Health pre-doctoral research fellowship, Burlington Northern Foundation faculty scholar award for excellence in research and scholarly activity, Women Who Care Award from the UND Office of Women's programs, Who's Who in America's Colleges and Universities, Who's Who in American Men and Women of Science, and many more. Her ongoing excellence in research, teaching and community activities attest to her dedication and concern for women's health and well being.

Gayle Nelson, Director of Family and Child Care Services, has been uncompromisingly supportive of women and children and of families and teachers. The program she directs is focused on providing the very best quality early childhood care and education for children of UND student, staff, and faculty families, as well as for other families in the community.

She provides gentle but strong and leadership for those who work with or care about young children. With children and families at the heart of her thinking, she vhas improved conditions for the teachers at the Center, moved the Center's program to a year-round basis to more fully accommodate parent schedules, orchestrated the design of and move to a new building, and most of all, worked consistently and untiringly for the most responsive and humane environment possible for all those who enter the doors of the Children's Center.

The Society of Women Engineers have a history of excellence as shown in campus, regional and national awards. Since 1982 their awards have included SWE's `Best Student Section in the Nation' four years, `Best in the Region' eight years, and UND's `Outstanding Student Organization' three years.

The organization fosters leadership, organizational, and people skills in its members. Last school year this skill development was shown in the regional conference hosted by UND SWE which exceeded that offered by much larger organizations and universities. Their work with alumni, other SWE organizations, and women in professional positions give a network through which members can extend themselves personally and professionally.

Members go beyond their personal development in offering community programs. An example is the work they do with girls and young women in programs such as the Girl Scouts to encourage their participation in math, science

Studio One Wins Awards

"Studio One," the University's live one-hour weekly morning show featuring news, weather, sports, and interviews, continues to be one of the best college-produced television shows in the nation. According to the results of the Seventh Annual National Association for College Broadcaster Awards, the television show is a finalist in the TV Feature Story and TV News/Magazine Program categories.

UND's "Studio One" has been recognized as a finalist for the "NACB TV News/Magazine Program Award." Finalists in this category are recognized as the five best college produced television shows in the nation by NACB. In 1996, "Studio One" placed first in this category.

In addition to the program award, two students are currently finalists for the "TV Feature Story Award." Last season's Sports Reporter, Eric Hanson, is a finalist in this category with his story on the "Warroad Lakers." His story featured the demise of a strong amateur hockey league tradition in the town known as "Hockey Town USA". Josh Andersen, currently a Discovering/Feature Reporter and the Director for "Studio One," has also been acknowledged in this category with his story, "Stereo," which discussed the damaging effects of loud music in car stereos to people's hearing.

The awards are administered by NACB, a non-profit trade association for primarily student-staffed television and radio stations in the U.S. The competition is judged by a panel of judges comprised of leading individuals in the television/film industries representing a broad cross-section of programming affiliations.

"Studio One," an award winning one-hour show, is produced at the UND Television Center by more than 30 student interns. The program airs live on Channel 3 in Grand Forks on Friday at 7 a.m., and is repeated at noon, and 7 p.m. Rebroadcasts can be seen Saturdays at 10 a.m. and noon, as well as Monday through Wednesday at 7 p.m. "Studio One" also airs in Fargo, Bismarck/Mandan, Minot, and Minneapolis.

-- Barry Brode, Director, Studio One.

University Letter / November 21, 1997 / Page


Job Service Disaster Assistance Program Benefits UND

The Job Service Disaster Assistance Program has been a much needed shot in the arm to the University in providing funds to hire personnel for a maximum 1,040 hours for post-flood work.

Ray Holmberg, program administrator, said $440,000 was set aside for UND to hire employees in specific areas to complete a variety of work that developed as a result of the flood. For example, the Chester Fritz Library was able to hire employees to help re-catalog and re-shelve materials moved during the flood. Other UND departments which benefitted from the program include the Office of Admissions and Records, Campus Postal Service, Center for Innovation, College of Business and Public Administration, Division of Continuing Education, Department of Geology, Department of Theatre Arts, Department of Sociology, Harley French Library of the Health Sciences, Off-Campus Housing Office, Plant Services, UND Police, Student Financial Aid, Thormodsgard Law Library, Transportation, University Bookstore and the Office of Vice President for Finance.

UND departments were asked to submit proposals for the funding, and not all of the proposals were granted, said Holmberg. All told, 80 positions were filled though the Disaster Service Program. Some of those hired included students.

In most cases, the employees were funded to a maximum of $12,000 or for six months, whichever came first. In some cases, said Holmberg, exceptions were made to allow part-time employees to work into next spring to work up to a maximum of 1,040 hours.

The program was important to UND because the work needed to be done but it was difficult to compete with the marketplace created by the flood.

-- Jan Orvik, Editor, University Letter.

as registers or radiators. Do not place the tree so that it blocks a doorway, corridor or exit.

Inspect lights and other electrical decorations before you use them. If your tree is live, you must use only miniature lights. Look for frayed or bare wires, cracked sockets, loose connections, and damaged insulation. When you leave the office for home, be sure to unplug all of your decorative lighting.

After the holidays, the sooner you get rid of your Christmas tree and decorations the better. The longer it stays up the more of a fire hazard it becomes. -- Norma Haley, Safety Officer (per Max Allard, Fire Marshal).

Applications Sought For Who's Who Program

The application process for Who's Who Among Students in American Colleges and Universities is under way. Applications are due to the Administrative Office of the Memorial Union by 4:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 21. Applications should be delivered in person, not by inter-campus or U.S. mail. Students need not have been nominated in order to submit an application. A selection committee composed of staff, faculty and students will review the applications based on scholastic ability, leadership and participation in academic or co-curricular activities, service to UND, and potential for future achievements. -- Diane Lochner, Project Coordinator, Leadership Development.


Money Matters

Controller's Office To Purge Old General Ledger

We are required to purge the previous fiscal year's general ledger detail transactions on an annual basis. This purge will occur Friday, Nov. 21, and we are beginning to plan now for the FY 1997 purge (July 1, 1996, to June 30, 1997). After the purge is completed, you will not be able to do online inquiries of detail transactions on GL70 (04, 06, 08), GL7B, and GL53. Summary data will continue to be available for the four previous fiscal years. -- Allison Peyton, Accounts Payable Manager, Controller's Office.

Follow Guidelines For Safe Holiday Decorating

You can prevent most holiday fires by careful selection and safe handling of the Christmas tree. Here are some basic safety tips for maintaining a safe tree.

Artificial trees are acceptable for decorating purposes. Live trees must have prior approval from the UND Safety Office and must be treated to comply with fire codes. An attached tag must certify they have been treated with a fire retardant. If you plan to have a real tree on campus, please contact the Safety Office for instructions before purchasing it.

Select a location away from heat and drying sources, such

FlexComp Open Enrollment Set

The open enrollment period for the FlexComp program for the Plan Year of Jan. 1, 1998, through Dec. 31, 1998, is Oct. 28 through Thursday, Nov. 30. During this time all benefitted employees will have the opportunity to enroll or re-enroll in this fringe benefit opportunity. This program
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University Letter / November 21, 1997 / Page


FlexComp Open Enrollment Set, continued

ible, coinsurance, etc.) travel costs for treatment, as well as day-to-day financial obligations that often become difficult after a medical crisis.

Applying for these plans is voluntary. For just a small amount per day the AFLAC Supplemental plans may help afford you the assurance of financial security and stability whenever you have to use them. We will make an AFLAC representative available for all who would like information on how the programs work or have questions of any sort. By understanding your particular needs AFLAC can develop a plan just for you.

Please send your name, phone (both work and home), as well as office location, to me at Box 8012. -- Colleen Plutowski (Research and Program Development), AFLAC Representative.

helps employees pay for medical and dependent care expenses with pre-tax dollars instead of after-tax dollars.

If you have any questions or need enrollment forms, call me. -- Heidi Vogel, Payroll Office FlexComp Clerk, 777-4423.

Supplemental Retirement Annuities Are For Everyone

All UND staff and faculty are eligible to participate in tax sheltered annuity programs. In addition to your basic retirement program with TIAA-CREF or North Dakota Public Employees Retirement System, there are supplemental programs to which you can contribute through payroll deduction.

The following is a list of 403(b) plans that are currently available through payroll deduction: American Express Financial Advisors, American Life & Casualty, Equitable Life, Fidelity Investments, Franklin Life, Great West Life, Lutheran Brotherhood, National Western Life Ins., Northern Life Ins. Co., Northwestern Mutual, Protective Life, Putnam Fund, Variable Annuity Life Ins. Co., TIAA-CREF SRA. If interested in information on any of these companies, you may contact a local agent. TIAA-CREF SRA information can be obtained from the Payroll Office at 777-2157 or Box 7127. Prior to setting up a supplemental retirement annuity with an agent, please contact the Payroll Office to verify the remittance address. A list of companies including the remittance address is available at the Payroll Office. -- Katie Douthit, Payroll Office.


Arts and

Entertainment


Student Photography Exhibited In Local Banks

More than 30 black and white photographs by students currently taking "IT 322: Fundamentals of Photography" will be exhibited in the lobbies of five banks along Columbia Road from Nov. 17 to 21, as part of the activities of the National Homeless Awareness Week.

The work of about 15 students will be displayed in the Columbia Road offices of Norwest Bank, Community National Bank, First Bank, First American Bank, and Gate City Savings and Loan. The photographs, which in most cases are the students' first experiment with black and white photography, illustrate aspects of the life of homeless people in Grand Forks as well as other aspects referring to the concept of "homelessness." The exhibited photographs are part of this semester's first assignment for students taking the black and white photography course taught by Ute Sartorius in the Department of Industrial Technology. The course's goals are to introduce students to basic picture taking techniques as well as to darkroom procedures for developing and printing from 35mm film. More information about the course, as well as other examples of students' work, can be obtained from the course's web site at www.und.nodak.edu/dept/it/photo2.htm. -- Ute Sartorius, Industrial Technology.

Supplemental Insurance Available

The open enrollment period for all AFLAC FlexComp programs is Oct. 28, through Nov. 30. AFLAC has provided supplemental health insurance coverage to UND faculty and staff since 1976, which includes cancer, intensive care, hospital and disability plans. These programs are offered to those interested through payroll deduction at a savings of up to 50 percent. The plans, designed to fill the gaps in your existing Blue Cross/Blue Shield medical programs, pay in addition to any other coverage, and would not replace any coverage you now have. They are also eligible for use of pretax dollars under section 125 of the federal tax code.

Money from these programs is paid directly to you, regardless of any other health plan you now have. Your Blue Cross/Blue Shield group insurance pays the doctors and the hospital; these supplemental health plans pay you so that you can cover medical costs not covered (deduct
University Letter / November 21, 1997 / Page


Studio One Lists Guests

Live on Studio One Friday, Nov. 21, Dana Bowman, the first double amputee to re-enlist in the U.S. Army, will discuss the accident which resulted in his parachuting into his friend mid-air at a combined speed of 300 miles per hour. Along with this discussion he will share what exactly happened on Feb. 6, 1994, the day of the accident. In 1993 he joined the Golden Knights of the United States Army Parachute Team. Despite his limitations, he actively participates in jumping, scuba diving, hot air ballooning, biking and snow skiing.

Professional Chef Kim Holmes, owner of Sanders and co-owner of Lolas, both restaurants in Grand Forks, will prepare a turkey with fruit-soaked stuffing. Holmes has spent a year of formal training in Washington D.C. at the Hotel Lewis and also spent time in Europe perfecting his artistic cooking style in Switzerland and Italy. Holmes has been cooking professionally for the past 20 years.

"Studio One" is an award-winning one-hour weekly morning show featuring news, weather, sports and interviews. The program airs live on Channel 3 at 7 a.m. Fridays and is repeated at noon and 7 p.m. Rebroadcasts can be seen Saturdays at 10 a.m. and noon, as well as Monday through Wednesday at 7 p.m. "Studio One" also airs in Fargo, Bismarck/Mandan, Minot and Minneapolis.

-- Tami Peoples, Studio One Marketing Team.

International Centre Lists Events

The International Centre, 2908 University Ave., invites you to join them for the following events. On Friday, Nov. 21, at 4:30 p.m., the Centre will hold an International Cof-Tea Cup, which is an opportunity for students, faculty, staff, and the Greater Grand Forks community to enjoy international tea, coffee, and pastry while discussing world issues.

Thursday, Nov. 27, the Centre will celebrate a traditional U.S.A. Thanksgiving at 7 p.m. All are welcome to this traditional meal, including turkey with all the trimmings and vegetarian foods.

-- Sharon Rezac Andersen, Director, International Centre.

Music Ensemble Will Perform

The Percussion Ensemble and Brass/Sax Ensemble will perform at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 25, in the Josephine Campbell Recital Hall, Hughes Fine Arts Center. Student instrumentalists will present a concert of chamber music. Performing groups will include brass quartets, trombone choir, French horn choir, saxophone ensemble, and percussion ensemble. -- Randy Larson, Public Relations Assistant, Music.

Skate With Sioux Will Be Nov. 30

Skate with the Sioux, sponsored by the UND HIV Peer Educators Group, will be held at Engelstad Arena Sunday, Nov. 30. Children in grade school may skate from 4 to 5 p.m.; those age 12 and up may skate from 5 to 6 p.m. -- Jennifer Saltmarsh, UND HIV Peer Educators Group.

Collegium Musicum Will Hold Concert

Music from church and court in 16th Century Germany will be performed by the UND Collegium Musicum, directed by Gary Towne, at the Josephine Campbell Recital Hall Friday, Nov. 21, at 7:30 p.m. The program will present sacred and instrumental masterpieces of the high point of 16th Century German music.

The Renaissance Wind Band will present Intradas and Dances by Hans Leo Hassler, Melchior Franck and Johann Cristoph Demantius. There will be dances and songs for the lute, and the Collegium Singers will present the Mass and Motet "Dixit Maria," by Hassler. The ensembles will combine in a Chorale-Intrada on "A Mighty Fortress," by Michael Altenburg. The performance will be a showcase for UND's collection of historic instruments, and offers an opportunity to hear cornetto, shawm (the oboist's revenge), sackbut, and organ.

The UND Collegium Musicum specializes in authentic performance of rare and historic music. The group includes a vocal ensemble, and a Renaissance Wind Band. Now directed by Dr. Towne, the Collegium Musicum was founded by Tamar Read in the early 1960s as an outgrowth of her Music History class. The group has performed a broad range of music, including the American premieres of several major works. General admission is $4, $2 for students. -- Gary Towne, Associate Professor of Music.

Welcome The Season With Song

The annual Christmas concert of the Grand Forks Master Chorale will take place at United Lutheran Church, 324 Chestnut St., Sunday, Dec. 7, at 7:30 p.m. Several popular features of recent Chorale holiday concerts will be included in the program, including participation by the UND Varsity Bards and Allegro Women's Chorus. The program will conclude with the sound of nearly 1,000 voices as festive carols are performed by the choirs, audience and orchestra.

The program offers a rich sampling of Christmas music. Well-known old carols are mixed with seasonal music by composers of our time, including Minnesotan Steven Paulus and English composer and conductor John Rutter. The Chorale will also sing "Hodie Christus Natus Est" by the 16th Century composer Jan Sweelinck and "Magnificat" by the 20th Century Canadian Healy Willan.
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University Letter / November 21, 1997 / Page


Welcome The Season With Song, continued
Wind Ensemble, Band Plan Concert

The UND Wind Ensemble and University Band will present a concert at 2 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 7, in the Memorial Union Ballroom. This second performance of the 1997-1998 concert season will feature the music of international dance as well as a tribute to Native Americans. The spirited dance music from such countries as Hungary, Scotland, England, Norway, and Czechoslovakia will reveal its timeless energy and uplifting character. -- Randy Larson, Public Relations Assistant, Music.

The Bards and Allegro will join in an encore performance of the African carol "Betelehemu."

The centerpiece of the program is a portion of the "Christmas Oratorio" by Johann Sebastian Bach. This work tells the Christmas story in six parts, each written to be sung on a different day of the Christmas festival. Part III, to be performed by the Master Chorale and orchestra, is a jubilant section which tells of the shepherd's journey to Bethlehem.

The Master Chorale and Varsity Bards are directed by James Rodde and the Allegro Women's Chorus by Kathleen Rodde (both Music). Accompanists are Kathleen Rodde, Anne Koehler, Melissa Steele, organist Jane Lien, and an orchestra of local musicians.

Tickets are $10 for general admission, $8 for senior citizens and $5 for students, and may be purchased at the door.

-- Ruth Marshall, Grand Forks Master Chorale.

Applications Accepted For Holiday Craft Show And Sale

Applications are now being accepted for exhibitors in the 19th Annual Holiday Craft Show and Sale which will be held Friday, Dec. 5, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Memorial Union Ballroom. It is sponsored by the University Craft Center and the Memorial Union. Original hand-crafted work is eligible. Students are encouraged to participate. For an application form and further information, please call 777-3979. -- Bonnie Solberg, Craft Center Coordinator.



Sat., Nov. 22 -- LIVE SATELLITE TELECONFERENCE, "Hepatitis C Diagnosis, Clinical Management, and Prevention," Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.; registration fee is $25; deadline for registration with the Hepatitis Foundation International (HFI) was Nov. 1; call 777-4522 for information.

Sat., Nov. 22 -- GEOGRAPHY AWARENESS WEEK FIELD TRIP to Winnipeg, tour leader is Doug Munski; cost of the academic credit is $35 (U.S. currency); 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., departing from Clifford Hall; call Doug Munski at 777-4591 for more information.

Sat., Nov. 22 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND vs. University of Mary, Hyslop Sports Center, 6 p.m.

Sat., Nov. 22 -- FOOTBALL, National Collegiate Athletic Association First Round Playoffs.

Sat., Nov. 22 -- VOLLEYBALL, National Collegiate Athletic Association Quarterfinals.

Mon., Nov. 24 -- DOCTORAL EXAM set for Mingyu Zhang, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Pharmacology, Room 5510, Health Sciences Building, 3 p.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Mon and Tues., Nov. 24-25 -- EQUIPMENT EXPO, the North Dakota Interagency Project for Assistive Technology (IPAT) will have on display assistive equipment for people with disabilities, River Valley Room, Memorial Union, 1 to 5 p.m. Monday, Nov. 24, and 8 a.m. to noon Tuesday, Nov. 25.

Mon., Nov. 24, through Thurs., Dec. 11 -- MASTER OF FINE ARTS EXHIBITION, Angie Garberina, lithographs and sculptures, Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center; reception Mon., Nov. 24, from 4 to 6 p.m.

Tues., Nov. 25 -- INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARD deadline for proposals requiring full board review for Fri., Dec. 5, meeting.

Tues., Nov. 25 -- COUNSELING COLLOQUIUM, "Career Issues Among American Indian Youth in the Northern Plains," presented by Cindy Juntunen-Smith's research team (Counseling), 316 Montgomery Hall, 12:30 to 1:45 p.m.

Tues., Nov. 25 -- LECTURE, a faculty candidate in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Roxanne A. Vaughan, National Institute on Drug Abuse, will present "Dopamine Transporter Structure-Function Properties: Antagonist Binding Domains and in vivo Phosphorylation," 5510 Medical Science North, 1 p.m.

Tues., Nov. 25 -- THEOLOGY FOR LUNCH SERIES, "Faith and Learning Along the River," speakers will be the Campus Ministry Association members, Christus Rex Lutheran Center, 3012 University Ave., noon.

Tues., Nov. 25 -- DOCTORAL EXAM set for Mary E. Dalglish Bergstrom, a candidate for the Ed.D. degree with a major in Educational Administration, 208 Education Building, 1:30 p.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Tues., Nov. 25 -- CONCERT, Percussion Ensemble and Brass/Sax Ensemble will perform; student instrumentalists will present
Calendar

of Events


NOVEMBER 1997

(Please contact Mavis at the Office of University Relations, Box 7144, or call 777-4304, if you wish to make changes or have an event included.)

Fri., Nov. 21 -- CONCERT, music from church and court in 16th Century Germany will be performed by the UND Collegium Musicum, directed by Gary Towne, Josephine Campbell Recital Hall, 7:30 p.m.; general admission is $4 and $2 for students.

Fri., Nov. 21 -- INTERNATIONAL COF-TEA CUP, an opportunity for UND students, faculty, staff, and the Greater Grand Forks community to enjoy international tea, coffee, and pastry while discussing world issues, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 3 to 4:30 p.m.; all are welcome.

Fri., Nov. 21 -- BASKETBALL, WOMEN'S, UND vs. Bellarmine College (Kentucky), Hyslop Sports Center, 6:30 p.m.

Fri. and Sat., Nov. 21-22 -- HOCKEY, UND vs. Denver University, Engelstad Arena, 7:35 p.m.

Fri. through Sun., Nov. 21-23 -- SWIMMING & DIVING, UND at University of Minnesota Invitational, Minneapolis, Minn.

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University Letter / November 21, 1997 / Page



a concert of chamber music, Josephine Campbell Recital Hall, Hughes Fine Arts Center, 7:30 p.m.

Tues., Nov. 25 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND vs. Mayville State University, Hyslop Sports Center, 8 p.m.

Tues., Nov. 25 -- BASKETBALL, WOMEN'S, UND vs. Mayville State University, Hyslop Sports Center, 6 p.m.

Wed., Nov. 26 -- DENIM DAY, wear your casual clothes, pin your button on, and know that your dollar goes to charity.

Thurs., Nov. 27 -- HOLIDAY, THANKSGIVING DAY.

Thurs., Nov. 27 -- CELEBRATING A TRADITIONAL U.S.A. THANKSGIVING MEAL, all are welcome to this traditional meal with turkey and all the trimmings, including vegetarian foods, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; call 777-3273 for more information.

Fri., Nov. 28 -- STUDENT HOLIDAY, THANKSGIVING RECESS.

Fri., Nov. 28 -- INTERNATIONAL COF-TEA CUP, an opportunity for UND students, faculty, staff, and the Greater Grand Forks community to enjoy international tea, coffee, and pastry while discussing world issues, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 3 to 4:30 p.m.; all are welcome.

Sat., Nov. 28, through Mon., Dec. 8 -- FOURTH ANNUAL FESTIVAL OF TREES, South Forks Mall; featuring fully decorated trees, craft booths, special celebrity trees, kids Christmas corner, visits from Santa, holiday music and Christmas goodies; sponsored by the Listen Center.

Sat., Nov. 29 -- BASKETBALL, WOMEN'S, UND at Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Mich., 1 p.m.

Sat., Nov. 29 -- FOOTBALL, National Collegiate Athletic Association Quarterfinals.

Sun., Nov. 30 -- SKATE WITH THE SIOUX, Engelstad Arena, children in grade school may skate from 4 to 5 p.m.; those age 12 and up may skate from 5 to 6 p.m.

Mon., Dec. 1 -- DOCTORAL EXAM set for Lora L. Sloan, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Clinical Psychology, 210 Corwin-Larimore Hall, 12:30 p.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Mon., Dec. 1 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND vs. Mount Senario College (Wisconsin), Hyslop Sports Center, 7:30 p.m.

Tues., Dec. 2 -- CONFLICT RESOLUTION SKILLS: Dynamics of Communication, seminar offered by the UND Conflict Resolution Center, Memorial Union, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; designed to teach participants effective skills to improve their communication; call the Center at 777-3664 or udcrc@badlands.nodak.edu for more information.

Tues., Dec. 2 -- "ON TEACHING" SESSION, will feature the topic "On-Line Supplements to a Campus Course" and will be facilitated by Sanku Mallik (Chemistry), Memorial Union Lecture Bowl, noon; call 777-3325 to register.

Tues., Dec. 2 -- COUNSELING COLLOQUIUM, 316 Montgomery Hall, 12:30 to 1:45 p.m.; topic will be announced in the University Letter.

Tues., Dec. 2 -- RECEPTION honoring Marlys Hanson, who is leaving the Computer Center after completing over 15 years of programming and customer assistance, Computer Center Conference Room, 371 Upson II, 2 to 3:30 p.m.

Tues., Dec. 2 -- UNIVERSITY PROGRAM COUNCIL MOVIE, "Men in Black," Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, 8 p.m.; free admission.

Tues., Dec. 2 -- BASKETBALL, WOMEN'S, UND at University of Minnesota-Morris, Morris, Minn., time to be announced.

Wed., Dec. 3 -- HISTORY FOR LUNCH, "North Dakota's Role in the Philippine Insurrection and the Anti-Imperialism Debate, 1899-1902," will be presented by Richard Shafer and Stephen Rendahl (both Communication), 217 Merrifield Hall, noon; a question and discussion period will follow the presentation; bring your lunch; call 777-3380 for more information.

Wed., Dec. 3 -- LESSONS AT LUNCH, "Everyday Etiquette," presented by Mae Marie Blackmore, Leadership Inspiration Center, third floor, Memorial Union, noon to 1 p.m.; a collection of fun and informative sessions on various topics of interest to staff, faculty, and students held on alternate Wednesdays; all sessions are free; call 777-3926 to register.

Wed., Dec. 3 -- FEAST AND FOCUS, "Creative Gift Wrapping," Craft Center, third floor, Memorial Union, noon.

Thurs., Dec. 4 -- LAST DAY TO SUBMIT FINAL COPY OF THESIS OR DISSERTATION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL.

Thurs., Dec. 4 -- UNIVERSITY SENATE MEETING, Room 7, Gamble Hall, 4:05 p.m.

Thurs., Dec. 4 -- VACCINE TELECONFERENCE, "Surveillance of Vaccine Preventable Diseases," by William Atkinson will be presented in a live interactive teleconference sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.; call Liz Tyree in Nursing to register.

Thurs., Dec. 4 -- RETIREMENT RECEPTION honoring Joe Hootman, a faculty member in the Electrical Engineering Department since 1969, Alumni Center, 9 to 10:30 a.m.; everyone is welcome.

Thurs., Dec. 4 -- OPEN HOUSE, Humanities and Integrated Studies, 134 O'Kelly Hall, 3 to 5 p.m.

Thurs., Dec. 4 -- FOR WOMEN ONLY: Rites of Passage, "Once In A Blue Moon," Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

Thurs., Dec. 4 -- CELEBRATING THE NEW INDEPENDENT STATES (former Soviet Union), including seven Republics; Borscht and other foods representing the Republics will be served, and history, slides, artifacts and music will be featured, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; all are welcome; call 777-3273 for more information.

Thurs. and Fri., Dec. 4-5 -- PHYSICS COLLOQUIA, Professor Carl Patton of Colorado State University will give two presentations on non-linear phenomena and magnetism; Thursday, Dec. 4, at 7 p.m. in 114 Witmer Hall, Patton will present "High Frequency Magnetic Excitations, Resonance, Spin Waves, and Solitons"; Friday, Dec. 5, at 4 p.m. in 130 Gamble Hall, the presentation will be broadcast to faculty and students at NDSU over IVN; all interested persons are invited to both colloquia.

Thurs. through Sat., Dec. 4-6 -- OLDE ENGLISH CHRISTMASSE FEASTE, a regal 16th Century dinner, Chester Fritz Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Fri., Dec. 5 -- MEETING, Institutional Review Board, 305 Twamley Hall, 4 p.m.

Fri., Dec. 5 -- 19TH ANNUAL HOLIDAY CRAFT SHOW AND SALE, Memorial Union Ballroom, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

DECEMBER 1997

Through Thurs., Dec. 11 -- MASTER OF FINE ARTS EXHIBITION, Angie Garberina, Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center.

Mon., Dec. 1 -- DOCTORAL EXAM set for Pamela Jean Carlson, a candidate for the Ed.D. degree with a major in Teaching and Learning/Elementary, 104E Education Building, 10:30 a.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.


UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is also available electronically through UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address is http://www.und.nodak.edu. All articles submitted for publication should be labeled "University Letter" and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu. Attachments to University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number. University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations, Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.

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