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University Letter

November 28, 1997

Volume 35, No. 15

UNIVERSITY LETTER
University of North Dakota at Grand Forks
Vol. 35, Number 15, November 28, 1997

UNIVERSITY LETTER IS ALSO AVAILABLE ELECTRONICALLY in the Events and News section of UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address is: http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/our/uletter.htm

The University Relations Office maintains an index for the University Letter.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

EVENTS TO NOTE

OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

UNIVERSITY SENATE

  • Agenda Listed For Dec. 4 U Senate Meeting
  • Forum To Discuss Tenure, Promotion

    GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

    MONEY MATTERS

    BILLBOARD

    ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

    FYI

    CALENDAR OF EVENTS

    ------------------------

    BOB BOYD WILL HEAD NEW VICE PRESIDENTIAL DIVISION

    The University has announced that it will restructure one of its major vice presidential divisions to better meet the needs of both traditional and non-traditional students and to bring new focus to UND's efforts to build partnerships with the private and public sectors. The reorganization, effective July 1, 1998, will involve the merging of the current Student Affairs Division with UND's Continuing Education Division and four other departments.

    In reporting the changes to the State Board of Higher Education at its meeting in Minot last week, President Kendall Baker also said that Robert Boyd, now Dean of the Division of Continuing Education, on July 1 will become the vice president responsible for the areas of student affairs and outreach. A new name for the restructured division will be developed by the units as part of the transition process. Boyd will replace Gordon Henry, UND's current Vice President for Student Affairs, who will retire June 30.

    Departments presently included in the Student Affairs Division are the Student Affairs Office (formerly Dean of Students), Career Services, Counseling Center, Memorial Union, Multicultural Student Services, Native American Programs, Student Financial Aid, and Student Health Services. Elements of the Division of Continuing Education include Extension Classes, Extended Degree Programs, Learning After Hours Program, Credit and Credit-Free Correspondence Study, Conference Services, the "University within a University" program (UND staff development), Work Force Development, Television Production Center, Summer Sessions, and the North Dakota Interactive Video Network.

    Other UND departments included in the consolidation are the Offices of Enrollment Services and University Relations, which now report to the President, and the Office of Admissions and KUND Radio, now in the Academic Affairs Division.

    Baker said the new organizational structure will allow UND to expand its long-time commitment to student learning outside the traditional classroom. It will also make UND more responsive to the needs of the new type of students who are increasingly demanding services from higher education: namely, degree and non-degree students studying on and off the campus through a variety of delivery modes for purposes of professional and personal enhancement and development.

    "It is clear that UND must be more responsive to the increasingly diverse educational needs of its prospective students," Baker said. "For example, UND knows that more of its future students will be older, will be seeking particular kinds of education, often related to their careers, and will be dealing with personal situations preventing them from being traditional, full-time, residential students."

    These trends are already evident, Baker said. Last year, for example, the Division of Continuing Education facilitated courses for more than 20,000 students not counted in UND's regular enrollment. The great majority of these students never set foot on the campus but instead attended classes in which UND faculty traveled to other cities to teach, or provided instruction via the Interactive Video Network, correspondence study, the Internet, or short-term conferences, seminars and workshops.

    Baker said the restructured division will also coordinate UND's student recruitment process, bringing together three units, Enrollment Services, Admissions, and Student Financial Aid, that now are separated administratively.

    In addition, the vice president will also become the President's senior advisor on public relationships, guiding UND's effort to generate public understanding and support and leading efforts to create and market mutually beneficial partnerships between UND and outside entities. Playing a role in that effort will be UND's Office of University Relations (UND's public information department), and KUND Radio, which joins the UND Television Center transferred last year to Boyd's supervision.

    Baker stated that the changed organizational structure will enable UND to leverage its financial and human resources in new ways, not an unimportant factor at this point in the evolution of the University and of the North Dakota University System.

    "I am particularly pleased with the qualifications of the person chosen to head up the restructured division," Baker said. "You could not write a better resume for the challenges that lie before us than the one Bob Boyd has compiled in nearly 20 years with UND. He has established himself as a bold and creative educator and administrator, on the cutting edge of virtually all of the trends and developments that are coming together as the University prepares for the 21st Century."

    A native of Rocklake, N.D., Boyd holds a bachelor's degree from Minot State University and master's and doctoral degrees from UND. He was a high school teacher and administrator before coming to UND, including service as principal of the Minot-Magic City Campus, the largest secondary school in North Dakota. He joined UND's Division of Continuing Education in 1978 and was promoted to dean the following year. The Division and Boyd himself have won numerous regional and national awards over the years for a creative and responsive approach to extending the educational mission of the University. On a systemwide level, the Division coordinates the state's widely hailed Interactive Video Network.

    During the flood emergency this spring, Boyd and his staff organized UND's successful telephone bank which fielded tens of thousands of phone calls from faculty, staff and students, as well as the "Virtual University" which operated electronically from the Rural Technology Center until the campus was able to reopen on May 8. He is chairman-elect of the Grand Forks Chamber of Commerce, writes and speaks on management topics, and is well known across the state as a skilled meeting and discussion facilitator.

    -- Kendall Baker, President.

    *******

    BAKER DISCUSSES FLOOD RECOVERY, PROGRESS

    At his Community Conversation briefing last Wednesday, President Baker discussed progress in flood recovery, new projects, efforts to recruit more students, Project Recovery for University employees, and achievements. Guest speakers were LeRoy Sondrol, Director of Plant Services; Bob Boyd, Dean of Continuing Education; Jerry Bulisco, Student Affairs; Jo Coutts, Coordinator, University within the University; Lillian Elsinga, Associate Vice President for Student Affairs; and Barry Brode, Director of Television Production Center.

    Baker opened the discussion by presenting aerial photographs of the flooded cities; they remained on display to allow participants to see their homes and the University at the height of the flooding. Baker emphasized the importance of communicating that the University and cities are recovering well, noting that some national news programs have depicted us as "a city on the edge with lost confidence."

    LeRoy Sondrol expressed his sorrow at the loss of Medical School Maintenance Supervisor Tom Lunski, who passed away of a heart attack two weeks ago. He was 46. Sondrol detailed the progress on flood recovery, noting that the University is progressing better than he would have thought possible six months ago. We have moved from an inoperable campus to about 85 percent full restoration. About $11 million has been spent on infrastructure such as steam tunnels, roads, etc., and the figure will likely rise to $14 million. Another $11 million has been spent to restore buildings. Most of the repairs have been within estimated amounts, thanks to the consulting firm Barton Malow. Sondrol emphasized that UND is the only public entity whose repairs have come in on or under estimates. He expects repairs to be complete by March 1998.

    Roads, sidewalks and parking lots have been repaired at a cost of $428,000, most of that provided by FEMA. Sondrol said the plan to attack restoration on four fronts -- Housing and Food, Research, Support and Academics -- has been successful, and each category has about the same percentage of finished projects. Currently, UND has 169 separate contracts with 56 different contractors. The Honors House has been demolished; mold and microbial growth had made the building unsafe.

    Sondrol had more good news: more than $12 million of new construction is now on track, and that Plant Services is now filling departmental requests for repairs and other jobs. Currently, Plant Services has 122 in-house projects that are not flood-related, compared to a normal average of 160 projects. On Jan. 1, the division will return to primarily performing regular maintenance and repairs, rather than flood abatement. The insulation in many steam tunnels and conduits was ruined, making the heating system less efficient, but Plant Services will heat all buildings on campus to full capacity, as well as Altru Hospital, Lake Agassiz School, and the School for the Blind. Contractors are installing glass in the Johnstone-Hancock skywalk, and the project should be complete by the end of February. The CAS skywalk is also progressing; that project should also be complete at the end of February. Abbott Hall remodeling and building should be finished by Jan. 1; the $4 million project is on track. The connecting link between Abbott and McCannel Halls has been delayed because the contractor agreed to charge the University less if we waited until spring for the construction.

    Preparations have been completed in case of flooding next year, Sondrol said. UND has installed or will install sewer shutoff valves in 26 buildings to forestall sewage backup. The Smith Hall dike has been raised to 52 feet, as have the city dikes. The city will dike the Bronson property next to the Coulee. The city is also working on storm sewers at the University and around town. Baker stated that Barton-Malow, a billion-dollar firm with 1,700 employees, held a luncheon for flood recovery teams, which was attended by local legislators. The Barton-Malow's president congratulated UND and noted that it was one of the finest team efforts with which the firm had ever been associated. They really appreciated being part of the University team and working with us, rather than for us.

    Bob Boyd discussed Project Recovery, an effort to help the campus reach out to the University community. Two months ago, President Baker brought together faculty experts who delineated the stages of disaster: first, heroism; second, congratulation of self and pride; and third, disillusionment. Boyd stated that President Baker wanted to help people with the third stage. To that end, Boyd and his team have divided the University community into 20 smaller groups. After consultation with a national expert, Boyd's team recruited people to do some training and form 20 teams. These teams will come to each of the units to conduct a training program and assist employees experiencing problems from the flood. Boyd has also formed a second team, "The Fun Group," headed by Jo Coutts.

    Baker expressed sorrow at the deaths of Tom Lunski and DuWayne Wacker, Professor of Accounting and Business Law and the University's Faculty Athletic Representative. He passed away of a heart attack at age 56 last week. Gordon Henry, Vice President for Student Affairs, delivered the eulogy for Wacker.

    Jerry Bulisco presented an award to Henry from the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators Region IV, which Henry had foregone receiving in order to present Wacker's eulogy.

    Terry Webb announced that UND residence halls were honored with awards for Student of the Year for the Region, and School of the Year; and that Residence Hall Director Mark Hudson also received an award. The UND bus taking the residence hall group to the conference from UND as well as Minot and NDSU encountered poor roads near Minneapolis and had an accident. Though no one was hurt, the bus was damaged beyond repair.

    Baker announced that the six-year plan has been presented to the Legislative Council and was well received, though resources are an issue. He felt that flood recovery efforts are moving along well and asked people to assist as much as they can, especially with enrollment, which is critical. In response to a question last month which asked why we don't have any commercials playing on television, President Baker announced that the first commercial aimed at Minnesotans has been produced and will air this and next month in the Twin Cities area. He emphasized that UND provides educational opportunities for everyone, including the community. The University within the University program (U2), which offers professional development opportunities, is part of that.

    Jo Coutts discussed the U2 program, as well as results of the Campus Needs Assessment, which netted 350 responses. There were requests for training in budget management, computer programs, and parenting and family issues. In response, the U2 program will offer these programs and team up with the Parent Education Resource Center (PERC) for family programming. Another Supervisory and Management training session will be conducted by Personnel each semester, and Cheryl Osowski (Personnel) will revamp the new employee orientation program.

    Lillian Elsinga presented a "Focus on Students" design for a sweatshirt which is being sold by Student Government to benefit the 10-year-old daughter of Donna Brown (Native American Programs), who has cancer.

    Barry Brode announced that the Television Production Center, which moved to the new Rural Technology Center nearly a year ago, has continued to produce "Studio One." The student-produced program has been named one of the top five in the nation, and the winner will be announced next month. He then showed an interview with Grand Forks Mayor Pat Owens.

    The next Community Conversations briefing is set for 9 a.m. Wednesday, Dec. 17, in the Memorial Union Ballroom.

    *******

    FACULTY INVITED TO MARCH IN COMMENCEMENT

    Continuing the tradition we began with our summer ceremony, we are inviting faculty to march in the winter commencement ceremony on Friday, Dec. 19. Participating faculty will march in full academic regalia and will be seated on the stage. The ceremony is scheduled for 2 p.m. in the Chester Fritz Auditorium. As in the past, we will be contacting department and college heads to determine the number of faculty who wish to participate. -- Kendall Baker, President.

    *******

    EVENTS TO NOTE

    "ON TEACHING" SESSION WILL MEET DEC. 2

    The "On Teaching" session Tuesday, Dec. 2, at noon in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl will feature the topic "On-Line Supplements to a Campus Course" and will be facilitated by Sanku Mallik (Chemistry). He will demonstrate what he does and has data from previous semesters on how students use the online resources. Please call 777-3325 to register. -- Dan Rice, Director of Instructional Development.

    *******

    PARENTING SERIES SET FOR TUESDAY, DEC. 2

    The 1997 Parenting Series, "Building Hope in Times of Stress, Burnout, and Fewer Resources," is set for Tuesday, Dec. 2, from noon to 1 p.m. and 7 to 8 p.m. in the South Ballroom of the Memorial Union. Speaker for the event will be Michael Pritchard, a former probation officer, educator and comedian who educates people using humor to touch on real life experiences. Pritchard leaves his audiences with renewed energy, more confidence and a positive outlook for the future.

    The session, sponsored by the Division of Continuing Education, the Department of Social Work, the College of Education and Human Development and the University within the University, is free and open to the public. Those attending the noon session may bring a brown bag lunch; the North Dakota Mill will donate pizza for the evening session at 6 p.m. For more information, call 777-2663.

    -- Dawn Botsford, Program Coordinator, Division of Continuing Education.

    *******

    RECEPTION WILL HONOR MARLYS HANSON

    Marlys Hanson will leave the UND Computer Center Dec. 5, completing over 15 years of programming, customer assistance and "other duties as assigned." Help us congratulate Marlys on her upcoming marriage and wish her well for her move to South Carolina. You're all invited to join us at an Open House Tuesday, Dec. 2, from 2 to 3:30 p.m., Computer Center Conference Room, 371 Upson II.

    -- Dorette Kerian, Manager, User Services, Computer Center.

    *******

    DOCTORAL EXAM SET FOR STEVEN W. KING

    The final examination for Steven W. King, a candidate for the Doctor of Arts degree with a major in History, is set for 3 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 2, in 217 Merrifield Hall. The dissertation title is "Church and State Relations in Seventh Century England: The Making of a Christian State." Walter Ellis (History) is the committee chair.

    Member of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend. -- Harvey Knull, Dean, Graduate School.

    *******

    HISTORY DEPARTMENT WILL HOLD "HISTORY FOR LUNCH"

    At noon Wednesday, Dec. 3, in 217 Merrifield Hall, the History Department and Phi Alpha Theta will sponsor a talk by Richard Shafer and Stephen Rendahl (both Communication) titled "North Dakota's Role in the Philippine Insurrection and the Anti-Imperialism Debate, 1899-1902." There will be a question and discussion period following their presentation, which is open to all. Bring your lunch. For more information, please contact me.

    -- David Rowley, Associate Professor of History, 777-3380.

    *******

    ENGLISH LECTURE SERIES PRESENTS JOHN LITTLE

    Fiction writer John Little will give a reading from his work on Wednesday, Dec. 3, at 4 p.m. in the Memorial Union's Fred Orth Lecture Bowl. He will read from his novel-in-progress, "Like a Fishhook." The event is free, and all are invited.

    An Associate Professor of English, John directs the department's Creative Writing Program. He is widely known for his "Whopper John Fish Tales," published in the Grand Forks Herald and other newspapers across the state.

    -- Martha Meek, Coordinator, English Lecture Series.

    *******

    RECEPTION WILL HONOR JOE HOOTMAN

    The School of Engineering and Mines will host a reception for Joe Hootman, Thursday, Dec. 4, from 9 to 10:30 a.m. at the Alumni Center. Dr. Hootman has been a faculty member in the Electrical Engineering Department since 1969 and is retiring Dec. 31. Please join us to wish him well in future pursuits. Everyone is welcome. -- Don Richard, Dean of Engineering and Mines.

    *******

    VACCINE TELECONFERENCE SET

    "Surveillance of Vaccine Preventable Diseases," by William Atkinson will be presented in a live interactive teleconference sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control Thursday, Dec. 4, in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. To register, call me. -- Liz Tyree, UND Nursing Center.

    *******

    HUMANITIES AND INTEGRATED STUDIES PLANS OPEN HOUSE

    Humanities and Integrated Studies invites everyone in the University community to an open house from 3 to 5 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 4, at the new office location in 134 O'Kelly Hall. Please join the faculty and staff for coffee and goodies as they unveil their new office and classroom space. -- Yvonne Holter, Humanities and Integrated Studies.

    *******

    PHYSICS COLLOQUIA SET

    Professor Carl Patton of Colorado State University will give two presentations on non-linear phenomena and magnetism. The first colloquium, a general science talk on solitons with examples drawn from ocean wave solitons, Rosby waves on Jupiter, etc., will be Thursday, Dec. 4, at 7 p.m. in 114 Witmer Hall. The second colloquium, titled "High Frequency Magnetic Excitations, Resonance, Spin Waves, and Solitons," is tutorial in nature and will be presented Friday, Dec. 5, at 4 p.m. in 130 Gamble Hall. This presentation will be broadcast to faculty and students at North Dakota State University over IVN. All interested persons are invited to both colloquia.

    Prof. Patton is well known for his research on fundamental excitations in magnetic materials and especially for his work using Brillouin light scattering to characterize certain of these excitations. He is currently chair-elect of the American Physical Society's Topical Group on Magnetism and Its Applications. -- Graeme Dewar, Physics.

    *******

    OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

    GRADE REPORT FORMS AVAILABLE DEC. 2

    The "Grade Report" forms will be available in the Office of Admissions and Records for pick-up by the department offices beginning at 9 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 2. The procedures to follow and deadlines will be noted in a memo attached to the report forms. If you need more information, please call 777-2711. -- Veriena Garver, Admissions and Records Officer.

    *******

    BOOKSTORE NEEDS TEXTBOOK ORDERS BY DEC. 5

    The University Bookstore wishes to thank all faculty who have turned in their textbook requisitions. For those faculty who are still making decisions, orders need to be received by Friday, Dec. 5, to allow the University Bookstore to buy those books back from students. Book buyback begins on Friday, Dec. 12.

    We wish to remind faculty of the importance students place on selling back their books. Without orders, the Bookstore cannot buy back books. Students use this money for everything from helping to buy next semester's books to paying for transportation back home for the holiday season. Please help them by turning in any outstanding book orders by Friday, Dec. 5. Thank you.

    -- Shannon Webber, University Bookstore.

    *******

    UNIVERSITY SENATE

    AGENDA LISTED FOR DEC. 4 U SENATE MEETING

    The University Senate will meet Thursday, Dec. 4, at 4:05 p.m. in Gamble Hall, Room 7. The agenda is:

    1. Announcements.
    2. Minutes of the previous meeting and business arising from the minutes.
    3. Question Period.

      CONSENT CALENDAR

    4. Annual report from the Library Committee, 1996-97. Charlotte Humphries, Chair. (Attachment No. 1)
    5. Annual report from the Student Policy Committee, Jeremie Tesky, Chair. (Attachment No. 2)
    6. Final report of the Tenure and Promotion Task Force. Albert Fivizzani, Chair. (Attachment No. 3)

      BUSINESS CALENDAR

    7. Candidates for degrees in December 1997. Alice Poehls. (Attachment No. 4)
    8. Recommendations from the Curriculum Committee for program terminations and suspensions, new program request, title change, new courses, and course deletions (for information only), and policy change for suspended courses. Renee Mabey, Co-Chair. (To be distributed under separate cover)
    9. Recommendation from the TFEMS that the UND Constitution (II.1.b) be changed so that Program Directors, Coordinators, Assistant and Associate Deans, who concurrently hold faculty rank and who are employed primarily on the Grand Forks campus, will be members of the Council (tabled 11-6-97). Monte Phillips, Chair.
    10. Recommendation from the TFEMS that the UND Constitution (II.1.c.1.) be changed so that neither Program Directors nor Coordinators shall be ex officio members of the Senate (tabled 11-6-97). Monte Phillips, Chair.
    11. Recommendation from the TFEMS that the UND Constitution (II.1.c.2) and the Bylaws of the UND Senate (1. and 3.a.) be changed so that the Senate seats elected by the Council shall be distributed so that each college and professional school and the libraries shall have the right to elect two senators, with the exception of the College of Arts and Sciences, which shall have the right to elect six senators, two each from the areas of Natural and Physical Sciences, Humanities, and Social Sciences. The remaining Council representatives shall be elected at large. Monte Phillips, Chair.
    12. Recommendation from the TFEMS that the Standing Rules of the UND Senate (7.) state that the Senate will publish attendance records at the end of each semester, both a summary by categories (ex officio, elected Council members, students) and individual statistics. Monte Phillips, Chair.
    13. Recommendation from the Senate Executive Committee that the Bylaws of the UND Senate (Membership, 2.,3.,5.) be changed so that the Senate election procedures shall be completed before May 1 of each year. Al Fivizzani, Chair.
    14. Recommendation from the Senate Executive Committee that the Bylaws of the UND Senate (Committees, 1.) be changed so that the Senate Executive Committee shall consist of these members of the Senate: three faculty representatives, one to be elected each year for a two-year term; and one, a member of the Council of College Faculties (normally one serving the third year of a three-year term); the Vice President for Academic Affairs; one student, elected annually; and the Director of Admissions and Records. Al Fivizzani, Chair.
    15. Recommendation from the Senate Executive Committee to change the Standing Rules of the University of North Dakota Senate as follows:
      • 9. Agenda items brought for Senate action shall be divided into three separate "calendars."
        1. Senate calendar: announcements, review of minutes, and a question period; the question period shall not exceed 20 minutes.
        2. Consent calendar: non-controversial items such as committee reports that are read by title and voted upon without debate or discussion. One objection from any member removes the item from the consent calendar.
        3. Calendar of business: normal action items requiring the attention of the Senate; debatable.

        Al Fivizzani, Chair.

      • Recommendation from the Task Force on Tenure and Promotion to modify the section of the Faculty Handbook on characteristics of faculty ranks to refer to both male and female faculty members (his or her) [Page 1 of Attachment No. 3]. Al Fivizzani, Chair.
      • Recommendation from the Task Force on Tenure and Promotion to incorporate references to the variability of tenure plans for university faculty as specified in State Board of Higher Education Policy 605.1 and Policy 605.3 into the tenure and promotion procedures at multiple places of the Faculty Handbook (Pages 2, 3, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 16 of Attachment No. 3). Al Fivizzani, Chair.
      • Recommendation from the Task Force on Tenure and Promotion to change the timing of the mandatory consideration for promotion from Assistant to Associate Professor from "the beginning of the fifth year in rank" to "the beginning of the sixth year in rank" (Page 3 of Attachment No. 3). Al Fivizzani, Chair.
      • Recommendation from the Task Force on Tenure and Promotion to include the statement, "a faculty member may, in writing, withdraw a consideration of a promotion at any administrative level of review" (Page 3 of Attachment No. 3). Al Fivizzani, Chair.
      • Recommendation from the Task Force on Tenure and Promotion to insert a clarification that "for persons hired at mid-year, the half year of service shall count as a full year toward promotion" (Page 3 of Attachment No. 3). Al Fivizzani, Chair.
      • Recommendation from the Task Force on Tenure and Promotion to synchronize the review processes for promotion and tenure decisions in the same academic year by inclusion of the following separate statements: "Promotion reviews (Page 4) and tenure reviews (Page 9) will take place in the fall semester. When a faculty member is being reviewed for tenure and promotion during the same academic year, recommendations at all levels are to be made simultaneously but on appropriate forms, and care is to be taken that appropriate forms are forwarded to the various advisory bodies. The faculty member being reviewed for promotion and tenure in the same academic year may submit the same supporting materials for both processes" (Attachment No. 3). Al Fivizzani, Chair.
      • Recommendation from the Task Force on Tenure and Promotion to establish a procedure to extend the probationary period for tenure review in cases of:
        1. childbirth or adoption
        2. significant elder or dependent care obligations
        3. disability or chronic illness
        4. circumstances beyond the control of the faculty member that significantly impede progress toward tenure (Page 10 and Pages 13-14, Attachment No. 3). Al Fivizzani, Chair.
        The wording of the new procedure reads: "Under certain circumstances, a faculty member may request a one-year extension to the probationary period. Such a request is normally based upon one of the following:
        1. responsibilities with respect to childbirth or adoption;
        2. significant elder or dependent care obligations
        3. disability or chronic illness
        4. circumstances beyond the control of the faculty member that significantly impede progress toward tenure.

        A request for extension based upon childbirth or adoption is normally approved. More than one request may be granted because of childbirth or adoption."

        A request for an extension of the probationary period will be submitted at any time but no later than the first month of the academic year in which the review for tenure is scheduled to occur.

        For requests for extension, the faculty member submits the request to the chair of the department who may consult with existing departmental governance bodies before approving or denying the request. Requests approved by the department are further reviewed by the academic dean and the Vice President for Academic Affairs, who grants or denies the request. Ordinarily a request for extension other than those for childbirth or adoption is not granted for more than one year.

        In the personnel action review process for a faculty member granted an extension, the standards of the review will not differ from those applied following the normal probationary period."

      • Recommendation from the Task Force on Tenure and Promotion that the criteria for evaluation of early tenure and/or promotion should not be different than those utilized for such reviews when conducted at the typical time in grade of academic rank or probationary tenure status (Attachment No. 3). Al Fivizzani, Chair.
      • Recommendation from the Task Force on Tenure and Promotion that sections of the UND Faculty Handbook outlining grievances and appeals of personnel decisions be reorganized to integrate new State Board of Higher Education policies prior to evaluation of UND campus procedures and processes of implementation of these policies. The present Handbook is organized with an integration of the former Board Policy 305 and UND implementation procedures. The new Board policy concerning appeals of personnel decisions has been reorganized and is written in a sequence that differs significantly from the present Handbook organization. Because of the substantial legal ramifications of implementation of the new SBHE policies on grievances and appeals, revision of these sections of the Handbook organization should be undertaken by an individual or individuals with legal expertise in the area of contract law. The present Task Force does not wish to delay discussion and action on the other recommendations included in this report while awaiting Handbook reorganization by qualified individuals (Attachment No. 3). Al Fivizzani, Chair.

    Alice Poehls (Admissions and Records), Secretary, University Senate.

    *******

    FORUM TO DISCUSS TENURE, PROMOTION

    The University Senate is sponsoring a series of non-procedural forums in which the University community may discuss issues for subsequent action at regular business meetings of the Senate. All members of the academic community are encouraged to participate. The next forum will discuss changes in procedures on tenure and promotion as recommended by the Senate Task Force on Tenure and Promotion. To allow for maximum participation before the holiday break, this forum is set for 4:05 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 11, in Gamble Hall, Room 7.

    The Task Force on Tenure and Promotion recommends implementation of the following changes in the procedures outlined in the Faculty Handbook, Section 5, on promotions, and in Section 8, on tenure.

    1. Modification of the section on characteristics of faculty ranks to refer to both male and female faculty members "his or her."
    2. Incorporation of references to the variability of tenure plans for university faculty as specified in State Board of Higher Education Policy 605.1 and Policy 605.3 into the tenure and promotion procedures at multiple places of the Handbook.
    3. Change in the timing of the mandatory consideration for promotion from Assistant to Associate Professor from "the beginning of the fifth year in rank" to "the beginning of the sixth year in rank."
    4. Inclusion of the statement, "a faculty member may, in writing, withdraw a consideration of a promotion at any administrative level of review."
    5. Insertion of a clarification that "for persons hired at mid-year, the half year of service shall count as a full year toward promotion."
    6. Synchronization of the review processes for promotion and tenure decisions in the same academic year by implementation of parallel, but separate, procedures utilizing the same supporting materials.
    7. Establishment for a procedure to extend the probationary period for tenure review in cases of
      1. childbirth or adoption
      2. significant elder or dependent care obligations
      3. disability or chronic illness
      4. circumstances beyond the control of the faculty member that significantly impede progress toward tenure.

    Copies of the proposed changes will be available at the forum.

    -- Albert Fivizzani (Biology), Chair, University Senate.

    *******

    GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

    SEPTEMBER GRANT RECIPIENTS LISTED

    The Office of Research and Program Development would like to congratulate the following UND faculty and staff who were listed as principal or co-principal investigators on awards received during the month of September 1997:

    -- Carl Fox, Director of Research and Program Development.

    *******

    ORPD Lists Research, Grant Opportunities

    Following are research and grant opportunities. For more information, contact the Office of Research and Program Development at 777-4278.

    DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

    Under the Hate Crime Statistics Improvement Program one cooperative agreement award provides $100,000 to a single organization, non- or for-profit, to develop and/or recommend methodologies and procedures that will improve the quality and accuracy of hate crime statistics, to improve the geographic coverage of hate crime statistics, and to recommend procedures that will result in reliable trend data. The study should be completed in one year. Contact: Charles R. Kindermann, Ph.D.; 202/616-3489. Deadline: 12/30/97.

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    DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    The Environmental Management Science Program (97-03) supports innovative, fundamental research to support facility decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) which include, but are not limited to, the characterization, monitoring, and certification of contaminated equipment and facilities; contaminant removal, contaminant control of various treatment processes; and the treatment, removal, and stabilization of DOE D&D-derived radioactive, hazardous chemical, and mixed wastes. Basic research is solicited in all areas of science with the potential for addressing problems in D&D of nuclear facilities. The scientific disciplines relevant to the program include, but are not limited to: bioremediation, chemistry (including analytical chemistry and instrumentation, surface chemistry, and separations chemistry); computational sciences (including research and development of digital control algorithms for robotics, communication procedures and software technology for remote control of processing equipment), engineering sciences (including control systems and optimization, diagnostics, transport processes, fracture mechanics, and bioengineering), materials science (including alternate materials processing routes for waste minimization, welding and joining, degradation mechanisms, including corrosion and irradiation damage in radioactive waste forms, and remote sensing and monitoring), and physics (including optical, surface, and fluid physics). Contact: Dr. Roland F. Hirsch; 301/903-5349; roland.hirsch@oer.doe.gov; 301/903-0567. Deadline(s): 12/16/97 (Preapplication); 3/17/98 (Formal Application).

    The Graduate Student Research Participation at National Energy Laboratories provides full-time educational research experience for graduate students at DOE facilities in the following disciplines: life, physical and social sciences; mathematics; engineering. Appointments are from 1-12 months. Contact: Libby Kittrell, 423/241-3319; http://www.orau.gov/orise/edu/uggrad/srpdoe1.htm. Deadline: 2 months before start date.

    Faculty Research Participation Programs provide 10-12 week summer, up to 12 months sabbatical, and part-time appointments at DOE and other research and development facilities for full-time permanent faculty members to conduct collaborative research in the following disciplines: computer sciences, engineering, environmental and life sciences, mathematics/statistics, medical and health sciences, physical and earth sciences. Contact: Same as above. Deadline: 1/20/98 for summer/sabbatical leave; 2 month before start date for part-time appointments.

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    SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COUNCIL

    International Migration: Dissertation Fellowships provide $15,000 for one year of full-time doctoral dissertation research for doctoral students of any nationality who are enrolled at a U.S. institution. Research may address various aspects of international migration. The sponsor seeks to foster innovative research that will advance theoretical understandings of immigration to the United States, the processes of settlement, and the outcomes for both immigrants and Americans. Proposals may address, but are not limited to, one or more of the following themes: the causes and process of international migration, and the types of immigrants and refugees who come to the United States; and the economic, sociocultural and/or political contexts, processes, and transformations of international migration. Applicants are encouraged to develop the theoretical implications of their research by adopting comparative international and/or historical perspectives that would consider the experiences of other countries and time periods and to adopt cross-disciplinary theoretical and methodological approaches to research and analysis. Contact: 212/377-2700 x604; fax 212/377-2727; Fuersich@ssrc.org. Deadline: 1/9/98.

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    THE ASSOCIATION FOR INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH

    The Improving Institutional Research in Postsecondary Education Institutions program provides research grants; NCES scholarships for institutional researchers, planners, and faculty members from higher education institutions and researchers from other education organizations; and NSF Data Institute scholarships for graduate students in the social sciences. The purpose of the program is to foster the use of federal databases to inform research on institutional research in postsecondary education, to foster use of federal databases by institutional researchers in postsecondary education decision-making, and to provide opportunities to institutional research professionals for professional development. Contact: Ann T. Macmillan, 850/644-4470; fax 850/644-8824; atm0087@mailer.fsu.edu; www.fsu.edu/~air/home.htm. Deadline: 1/15/98.

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    THE PROCTER AND GAMBLE COMPANY

    The University Exploratory Research Program solicits novel proposals in chemistry, the biological sciences, chemical engineering, and process technologies. The goal is to provide seed money for radically new concepts and emerging areas of mutual interest to university scientists and the Company's research staff. Examples of current interests are absorbent structures, antimicrobials, biotechnology, cell and molecular biology, colloid and surface chemistry, drug pharmacology, enzymology, fats and oils, films and laminates, immunology, materials science, medicinal chemistry, metabolic processes, metal ion control, lipid/mineral/vitamin nutrition, polymer science, redox processes, serum cholesterol control, transport processes, agitation/mixing technology, rheology, powder technology, crystallization, wave technology. Contact: fax 513/627-1153; extresprgim@pg.com. Deadline: 1/15/98.

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    NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION (NASA)/AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR ENGINEERING EDUCATION (ASEE)

    NASA-ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowships allow science and engineering faculty to conduct research at NASA research and development centers and nearby universities for 10-weeks during the summer. Special courses, seminars, workshops and lectures are included in the program. Contact: Tyler Cluverius, ASEE, 202/331-3509; fax 202/265-8504; projects@asee.org; http://www.asee.org. Deadline: 1/15/98.

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    APICS (EDUCATIONAL SOCIETY FOR RESOURCE MANAGEMENT)

    The Educational and Research Foundation offers grants to advance the identification, creation, and dissemination of knowledge and methodologies that encourage and support continual increases in the effective use of resources (people, material, processes, equipment, and time) in manufacturing and service industries. Grants may fund development of ideas to enhance existing products/services including: research monographs, case studies and training materials; major programs and workshops; educational games and software; and journal articles and conference proceedings, as by-products of the primary end-product. Funding must be focused towards, but not restricted to, graduate student research assistantships, limited investigative travel and lodging, and other direct costs of research. Contact: Michael H. Lythgoe, Director, 800/444-2742; 703/237-8344 x202; fax 703/237-8450; foundation@apics_hq.org; http://www.apics.org. Deadline: 1/15/98, 7/1/98.

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    CHARLES BABBAGE INSTITUTES

    The Adelle and Erwin Tomash Fellowship in the History of Information Processing provides a $10,000 stipend to a graduate student whose dissertation will address a topic in the history of computers and information processing. Topics may be chosen from the technical history of hardware or software, economic or business aspects of the information processing industry, or social, institutional, or legal contexts of computing. Contact: 612/624-5050; fax 612/625-8054. Deadline: 1/15/98.

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    ASSOCIATED WRITING PROGRAMS

    The Associated Writing Programs Award Series is an annual competition for book-length manuscripts in poetry, short fiction, and creative nonfiction; this year, the Award Series is joined by a new competition, the AWP/St. Martin's Press Young Writers' Award in the Novel. Award Series winners in poetry, short fiction, and nonfiction receive a $2,000 cash honorarium from AWP in addition to royalties and publication by participating presses. The winner of the AWP/St. Martin's Press Award in the Novel is published by St. Martin's Press and receives a $10,000 advance against royalties. All awards are open to authors writing in English regardless of their nationality or residence; the AWP/St. Martin's Press Young Writers' Award in the Novel is open to novelists 32 years old or younger. Contact: 703/993-4301; fax 703/993-4302; awp@gmu.edu; http://www.gmu.edu/departments/awp/. Deadline: Must be postmarked between Jan. 1 and Feb. 28 of 1998.

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    NATIONAL CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND QUALITY ASSURANCE/ NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES

    The goals and scope of the 1998 Chemical Mixtures in Environmental Health RFA are to encourage and support research on chemical mixtures that will take advantage of the latest advances in computational and information technologies and molecular biology techniques to focus on the mechanistic basis for chemical interactions in biological systems and related health effects and to develop better mathematical tools for risk assessment. Research will also be supported that focuses on exposure assessment, including environmental transport and fate. Research on the mechanistic basis for cellular and/or molecular perturbations and associated health effects by mixtures of chemicals and research on chemical interactions that exacerbate both cancer and non-cancer effects are encouraged. Examples of areas of research interest are available from ORPD or at http://es.epa.gov/neerqa/rfa/. Contact: Claudia Thompson, Program Administrator, NIEHS, 919/541-4638; fax 919/541-4937; thompso1@niehs.nih.gov; or Chris Saint, NCERQA, 202/564-6909; fax 202/565-2448; veirs.thomas@epamail.epa.gov. Deadline: 1/10/98 (Letter of Intent); 2/10/98 (Application Receipt).

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    NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION

    Mid-Career Methodological Opportunities. In order to facilitate the development of innovative methods and models for understanding complex social and behavioral science phenomena, the Division of Social, Behavioral, and Economic Research and the Division of Mathematical Sciences announce a joint competition for a limited number of mid-career research fellowships in the social, behavioral, economic, and statistical sciences. Awards made from this competition will cover release time and related expenses so that successful investigators can spend an extended period of time at a host location immersing themselves in an area of study outside their current areas of expertise. The host location may be a different institution from the investigator's home institution or a different department within the home institution. Although applications may be submitted from researchers at any level beyond the Ph.D., NSF especially encourages the submission of proposals from senior (post-tenure) researchers. Applicants are encouraged to coordinate proposed activities with a sabbatical leave or other forms of release time. Deadline: 3/1/98. Contact: Cheryl L. Eavey, Program Director; Methodology, Measurement, and Statistics; 703/306-1729; fax 703/306-0485; ceavey@nsf.gov; or James Gentle, Program Director; Statistics and Probability; 703/306-1883; fax 703/306-0555; jgentle@nsf.gov.

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    AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY

    The Phillips Fund Grants for North Native American Research supports research in North Native American linguistics and ethnohistory, i.e., the continental United States and Canada. Grants are not made for projects in archaeology, ethnography, psycholinguistics, or pedagogy. Applicants may be graduate students who have passed their qualifying examinations for either the master's or doctorate degrees; postdoctoral applicants are also eligible. American Philosophical Society grants are for research only. Grants are made to individuals; institutions are not eligible to apply. Telephone requests for forms cannot be honored. Questions concerning the eligibility of a project, or the use of funds are accepted at the telephone number and e-mail given below. Contact: Eleanor Roach, (215)440-3429, 104 South Fifth Street, Philadelphia, PA 19106-3387; eroach@dolphin.upenn.edu; http://www.amphilsoc.org/. Deadline: 3/1/98.

    -- Sally Eckert-Tilotta, Assistant to the Director Research and Program Development.

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    FEDERAL FUNDING NEWS

    The following are news items recently garnered from conversations with representatives from various federal funding agencies:

    The National Institutes of Health has decided to eliminate the First Independent Research Support & Transition (FIRST) Awards (R29), effective June 1, 1998. The purpose of the FIRST Awards is to provide a funding source specifically for new investigators. A mechanism is under development at NIH to provide a pool within the standard research grants (R01) that addresses the competitiveness concerns for new investigators. The funds available for the R01 grants are expected to be increased to accommodate the change.

    To encourage applications to the Small Grants for Exploratory Research (SGER) program, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has increased the maximum allowable amount for each grant. The SGER program funds small-scale, exploratory work in all areas of science, engineering, and education normally supported by NSF. Up to $100,000 may be requested for preliminary research on novel and untested ideas, ventures into emerging research areas, research requiring urgent access to specialized data, facilities, or equipment, or other efforts likely to catalyze innovative advances. Funds are available at the discretion of the program officer, without external review, in the various divisions at the Foundation. Contact those officers for more information and to discuss potential proposal topics.

    Federal grants and contracts are going to be paperless. Most federal agencies are in the process of instituting procedures that will allow for "total electronic" research management by the year 2000. Research opportunity announcements, proposals, awards, etc. will be transmitted almost exclusively via the internet.

    -- Sally Eckert-Tilotta, Assistant to the Director of Research and Program Development.

    *******

    MONEY MATTERS

    SOME TRAVEL AGENCIES WILL CHARGE FEES

    Effective immediately, Travel and Transport and Bon Voyage will assess a professional fee of $10 per ticket transaction. A transaction includes issuing, exchanging, changing, refunding, and voiding tickets. Effective Dec. 1, AAA Travel Agency will also assess this fee. At this time, the other local travel agencies are not planning to implement a fee.

    For those tickets purchased with the American Express Corporate card, this fee will be directly billed to UND. For those tickets purchased personally, by cash or personal credit card, the invoice and the passenger coupon will need to be attached to the Travel Expense Voucher when submitting for reimbursement.

    If you have any questions, please contact Bonnie, Controller's Office, by phone, 777-2966, or by e-mail, bonnie_nerby@mail.und.nodak.edu

    Please forward this information to the appropriate personnel within your department and insert a copy of this in your Administrative Manual for future reference.

    -- Lisa Heher, Controller's Office.

    *******

    BILLBOARD

    MULCITULRUAL STUDENTS SERVICES, ERA BELL THOMPSON CULTURAL CENTER SEEK NOMINATIONS FOR MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. AWARDS

    The Multicultural Students Services and the Era Bell Thompson Cultural Center seeks nominations from the UND community for the First Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Awards. Five awards will be presented Jan. 15 for the following categories of service to:

    Nominees can be community members, students, faculty, staff or administrators. Nomination forms can be obtained from M.C. Diop, Assistant to the Vice President for Student Affairs, P.O. Box 7092. The deadline for nominations is Dec. 12.

    -- M.C. Diop, Assistant to the Vice President for Student Affairs.

    *******

    "A" ZONE PARKING PERMITS EXPIRE DEC. 7

    "A" Zone parking permits expire Sunday, Dec. 7. "A" Zone parking permit applications were mailed out to all departments last week. All parking records are being updated this year, therefore, it will be necessary to provide the make, model and license number of all vehicles being registered. (Do not call the Traffic Office and ask them to look up vehicle information -- this must be provided by each applicant.)

    Deadlines to note are:

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    LEARNING CENTER SEEKS GSA

    The University Learning Center is currently accepting applications to fill one quarter-time Graduate Service Assistant position for the 1997-98 spring semester. All applicants must meet the eligibility requirements of the UND Graduate School.

    Duties of the Graduate Service Assistant include conducting study skills workshops, supervising the evening drop-in tutoring program, teaching sections of the A&S 250 course (Introduction to Effective Study -- a one-credit course on study skills), plus other duties as assigned. Graduate Service Assistants receive a tuition waiver and stipend.

    Please send cover letter and resume to: University Learning Center, GSA Position, UND Box 9042, Grand Forks, ND 58202.

    Applications must be received by 4:30 p.m. Monday, Dec. 15.

    If you have questions or need additional information, please call the University Learning Center, 777-4406, or visit our office in the Memorial Union, Room 201A.

    --Andy Freeman, Learning Specialist, University Learning Center.

    *******

    SWEATSHIRT SALES TO AID CANCER VICTIM

    Student Government is selling sweatshirts to raise money for 10-year-old Elizabeth Luger, daughter of Donna Brown (Native American Programs). Elizabeth was diagnosed with osteogenic sarcoma (bone cancer) in May. Elizabeth has been at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., receiving chemotherapy.

    Money raised will help Elizabeth and her family with lost wages, travel and medications. Sweatshirts are available and read "UND-Focus on Students." If you would like to see a graphic design, please see your department head. Sweatshirts are available in L, XL, and XXL, and are $20. You may order them by calling the Student Government Office at 777-4377. -- Becca George, Executive Secretary, Student Government.

    *******

    MEDICAL SCHOOL RECEIVES DONATION FROM AMA

    Representatives of the American Medical Association (AMA) and the First District Medical Society of Fargo presented checks totaling $34,000 for flood recovery to the School of Medicine and Health Sciences on Nov. 20.

    A gift of $24,000 was presented by visiting AMA representatives William Mahood, Chicago, and Michael Bigelow, Madison, Wis., during the Dean's Hour convocation. A $10,000 gift was presented by John Baird, Fargo, representing members of the First District Medical Society based in Fargo. The resolution to make the contribution was unanimously passed at the society's Oct. 21 meeting in Fargo, according to This hall will receive a pizza party sponsored by the Association of Residence Halls and pop donated from Hugo's and Wal-Mart. Congratulations to all the students who participated. -- Janice Troitte, Recycling Coordinator.

    *******

    ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

    FOURTH ANNUAL FESTIVAL OF TREES STARTS NOV. 28

    The Fourth Annual Festival of Trees begins Friday, Nov. 28, and continues through Sunday, Dec. 7, at the South Forks Mall. The Festival of Trees is the primary fund-raiser for the LISTEN Center, which caters to the social, recreational and developmental needs of the developmentally disabled in the Grand Forks area. The Festival of Trees is open to all, and there is no admission charge.

    In addition to the decorated trees, the South Forks Mallwill be decked out in the colors and icons of the Christmas season, including wreaths and other Christmas items. There will be craft display booths, visits from Santa Claus, and a special Toy Show by K-Mart on Saturday, Dec. 6, starting at 9 a.m. The Grand Forks Optimist Club will hold a child ID program from 9 a.m. to noon also on Saturday, Dec. 6. Other special attractions include children's activities and games, a special celebrity tree featuring items autographed by celebrities, holiday music, entertainment, door prizes, and more.

    A special portion of the Festival will be the Tree Auction set for Sunday, Dec. 7, from 2 to 4 p.m. The auction will feature the sale of the fully decorated Christmas trees to the highest bidders. UND First Lady Toby Baker will help the Curtis D. Johnson Auction Company sell some of the most beautiful trees in Grand Forks this year. Proceeds from the Festival auction will benefit the LISTEN Center.

    -- Peter Johnson (University Relations), for the LISTEN Center.

    *******

    INTERNATIONAL CENTRE LISTS EVENTS

    The International Centre, 2908 University Ave., invites you to join them for the following events.

    On Friday, Nov. 28, the Centre will hold an International Cof-Tea Cup, which is an opportunity for UND students, faculty, staff, and the Greater Grand Forks community to enjoy international tea, coffee, and pastry while discussing world issues, from 3 to 4:30 p.m. at the Centre.

    On Thursday, Dec. 4, the Centre will celebrate the New Independent States (former Soviet Union), including seven Republics. Borscht and other foods representing the Republics will be served. History, slides, artifacts, and music will be featured.

    All are welcome. -- Sharon Rezac Andersen, Director, International Centre.

    *******

    MUSEUM OF ART HOSTS ORNAMENT GALA

    Fargo musicians and recording artists Mike and Linda Coates will present holiday music at a Holiday Ornament Gala Tuesday, Dec. 2, at the North Dakota Museum of Art. The event will begin at 6 p.m. Co-hosted by the Museum and the American Diabetes Association, the event will be a fundraiser for the two organizations. Tickets are $25 for singles or $35 for couples, and include a hand-blown glass ball ornament designed by Moorhead artist Jon Offutt. Varied artisan ornaments from the Museum gift shop also will be on sale, as well as other pieces by Offutt. Complimentary champagne and hors d'oeuvres will be served.

    Classical guitarist Mike and vocalist Linda Coates have released seven compact discs under their own label, Barking Dog Records, and have performed at the Museum for the summer concert series. Their CDs and those of other regional recording artists will be on sale at the Gala. To reserve your tickets, call 746-4427.

    -- Barbara Crow, North Dakota Museum of Art.

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    WOMEN'S CENTER LISTS EVENTS

    The Women's Center Feast and Focus program for Wednesday, Dec. 3, will meet at noon in the Craft Center on the third floor of the Memorial Union. Join us for holiday treats and a fun craft project as we explore "Creative Gift Wrapping."

    We'll return to the Center at 405 Hamline St. Thursday, Dec. 4, for the For Women Only Rites of Passage program, "Once in a Blue Moon." December is a magical month, filled with religious celebrations, the winter solstice, and the end of the calendar year as well as the semester. This month will be hectic, but before things get too crazy, let's get in touch with our secret wishes. What do you want? What is your heart's desire? Do you know? Join us as we dare to dream. Wear blue!

    Please join us. -- Donna Oltmanns, Coordinator, Women's Center.

    *******

    CHAMBER'S ANNUAL HOLIDAY BALL IS DEC. 5

    The Grand Forks Chamber of Commerce kicks off the holiday season with the 12th Annual Holiday Ball, "Sounds of the Season," Friday, Dec. 5, at the Civic Auditorium. This annual fund raiser gala includes dinner, catered by GF Goodribs, dancing with Krochus and Krew, and a silent auction with a variety of items generously donated from Chamber members. Gaylor Photography will be available to take pictures in a pre-set festive background for you and that someone special. Non-chamber members, "Grand New Greater Grand Forks" community residents, and Chamber members are invited. Tickets are $40 each. Black tie is optional. Reservations are required. Call the Grand Forks Chamber today at 772-7271 to reserve your tickets and menu choices. -- Peter Johnson (University Relations) for Maren Swingen, Grand Forks Chamber of Commerce.

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    FYI

    NORTH DAKOTA MUSEUM OF ART CLOSED THURSDAY

    The North Dakota Museum of Art will be closed to the public Thursday, Nov. 27, for the Thanksgiving holiday. The Museum will reopen Friday, Nov. 28, with regular hours. The Museum Coffee Bar will be closed Thursday and Friday, Nov. 27 and 28, and will reopen Monday, Dec. 1. -- Morgan Owens, North Dakota Museum of Art.

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    UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE LISTS HOURS

    The University Bookstore will be open Friday, Nov. 28, from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., rather than the hours listed in last week's University Letter.

    -- Brian Cox, University Bookstore.

    *******

    SKATE WITH SIOUX WILL BE NOV. 30

    Skate with the Sioux, sponsored by the UND HIV Peer Educators Group, will be held at Engelstad Arena Sunday, Nov. 30. Children in grade school may skate from 4 to 5 p.m.; those age 12 and up may skate from 5 to 6 p.m. -- Jennifer Saltmarsh, UND HIV Peer Educators Group.

    *******

    CAR-STARTING SERVICE AVAILABLE

    A car-starting service will be available to all students and faculty beginning Monday, Dec. 8. This service will cover the same areas on campus that are presently covered by the UND Police Department.

    To utilize this service, call the Transportation Department at 777-4122 and ask to be put on the list for car-starting service. You will be asked your name, phone number and location of your car. Your name will be put on the list, and you will be given an approximate time to expect someone to be able to jump start your vehicle. You must be present at your vehicle at that time. The charge for this service will be $5 and will be billed to your UND Accounts Receivable.

    The service will be available Monday through Friday from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. on the following dates: Dec. 8-12; Jan. 7-9, 12-16, 20-23 and 26-30; Feb. 2-6, 9-13, 17-20 and 23-27; March 2-6 and 9-13. -- Jim Uhlir, Director, Auxiliary Services.

    *******

    TEMPORARY CASHIER POSITION AVAILABLE AT BOOKSTORE

    The University Bookstore has a Relief Cashier position available. This person will be responsible for daily reconciliation of cash registers, sales, and balancing and settlement of sales-related accounts. The position requires 10-key proficiency, accuracy, phone skills, cash-handling experience and computer spreadsheet skills. The candidate must be bondable. This is a temporary position for about 20 hours per week (flexible) beginning Dec. 15 and becoming 40 hours per week about Jan. 15 for a duration of six weeks. Applications are available at the Bookstore. -- Brian Cox, University Bookstore.

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    SPRING BOOK RUSH POSITIONS AVAILABLE AT BOOKSTORE

    The University Bookstore has positions available for spring book rush help Jan. 2-24, 1998. Applicants must be able to work flexible hours (15 to 20 hours per week). Duties include clerical and cashier functions and customer service in a retail environment. Applications are available at the Bookstore. -- Brian Cox, University Bookstore.

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    RWIC PROVIDES WEATHER FORECASTS

    The Regional Weather Information Center (RWIC) offers several ways to access weather information, which is available to everyone. During severe weather, a 48-hour forecast is available on our website. We encourage you to take advantage of the services listed below:

    -- Sheila Evans, Regional Weather Information Center.

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    COPY STOP CARRIES HOLIDAY STATIONERY

    Visit the Copy Stop on the main floor of the Memorial Union and check out our holiday stationery. We have eight different patterns that are perfect for your holiday letters. Regular hours are 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday. -- Sharon Schimke, Memorial Union.

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    REPORT ICY CONDITIONS TO PLANT SERVICES

    The weather has caused icy conditions on our parking lots, roads, and sidewalks. We will continue to salt and sand to reduce the slipperiness as much as possible. Please report any hazardous conditions to Plant Services, 777-2591. There are some things that you can do to help reduce the risk of falling on ice. Here are some helpful hints:

    1. Wear boots or overshoes with grip soles. Slick leather or rubber soles on dress shoes are unsafe on ice.
    2. Don't walk with your hands in your pockets. This reduces your balance if you slip on the ice.
    3. Take short to medium steps, or shuffle your feet in very icy areas.
    4. Don't carry or swing heavy loads, such as large boxes or cases, which could cause you to lose your balance when walking.
    5. When walking, curl your toes under and walk as flat-footed as possible.
    6. Don't step on uneven surfaces. Step well over or avoid curbs with ice on them.
    7. Give your full attention to walking. Don't distract yourself by getting your keys out of your pocket, digging in your pocketbook for items, etc., while walking on ice.

    -- Paul Clark, Associate Director of Plant Services.

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    CALENDAR OF EVENTS

    NOVEMBER 1997

    (Please contact Mavis at the Office of University Relations, Box 7144, or call 777-4304, if you wish to make changes or have an event included.)

    Through Thurs., Dec. 11 -- MASTER OF FINE ARTS EXHIBITION, Angie Garberina, lithographs and sculptures, Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center; reception Mon., Nov. 24, from 4 to 6 p.m.

    Thurs., Nov. 27 -- HOLIDAY, THANKSGIVING DAY.

    Thurs., Nov. 27 -- CELEBRATING A TRADITIONAL U.S.A. THANKSGIVING MEAL, all are welcome to this traditional meal with turkey and all the trimmings, including vegetarian foods, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; call 777-3273 for more information.

    Fri., Nov. 28 -- STUDENT HOLIDAY, THANKSGIVING RECESS.

    Fri., Nov. 28 -- INTERNATIONAL COF-TEA CUP, an opportunity for UND students, faculty, staff, and the Greater Grand Forks community to enjoy international tea, coffee, and pastry while discussing world issues, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 3 to 4:30 p.m.; all are welcome.

    Sat., Nov. 28, through Mon., Dec. 8 -- FOURTH ANNUAL FESTIVAL OF TREES, South Forks Mall; featuring fully decorated trees, craft booths, special celebrity trees, kids Christmas corner, visits from Santa, holiday music and Christmas goodies; sponsored by the LISTEN Center.

    Sat., Nov. 29 -- BASKETBALL, WOMEN'S, UND at Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Mich., 1 p.m.

    Sat., Nov. 29 -- FOOTBALL, National Collegiate Athletic Association Quarterfinals.

    Sun., Nov. 30 -- SKATE WITH THE SIOUX, Engelstad Arena, children in grade school may skate from 4 to 5 p.m.; those age 12 and up may skate from 5 to 6 p.m.

    DECEMBER 1997

    Through Sun., Dec. 7 -- FOURTH ANNUAL FESTIVAL OF TREES, South Forks Mall; this event is the primary fund-raiser for the LISTEN Center, which caters to the social, recreational and developmental needs of the developmentally disabled in the Grand Forks area; featuring fully decorated trees, craft booths, special celebrity trees, kids Christmas corner, visits from Santa, holiday music and Christmas goodies; open to all, no admission charge.

    Through Thurs., Dec. 11 -- MASTER OF FINE ARTS EXHIBITION, Angie Garberina, Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center.

    Mon., Dec. 1 -- DOCTORAL EXAM set for Pamela Jean Carlson, a candidate for the Ed.D. degree with a major in Teaching and Learning/Elementary, 104E Education Building, 10:30 a.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

    Mon., Dec. 1 -- DOCTORAL EXAM set for Lora L. Sloan, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Clinical Psychology, 210 Corwin-Larimore Hall, 12:30 p.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

    Mon., Dec. 1 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND vs. Mount Senario College (Wisconsin), Hyslop Sports Center, 7:30 p.m.

    Tues., Dec. 2 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for Steven W. King, a candidate for the Doctor of Arts degree with a major in History, 217 Merrifield Hall, 3 p.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

    Tues., Dec. 2 -- CONFLICT RESOLUTION SKILLS: Dynamics of Communication, seminar offered by the UND Conflict Resolution Center, Memorial Union, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; designed to teach participants effective skills to improve their communication; call the Center at 777-3664 or udcrc@badlands.nodak.edu for more information.

    Tues., Dec. 2 -- "ON TEACHING" SESSION, will feature the topic "On-Line Supplements to a Campus Course" and will be facilitated by Sanku Mallik (Chemistry), Memorial Union Lecture Bowl, noon; call 777-3325 to register.

    Tues., Dec. 2 -- PARENTING SERIES, "Building Hope in Times of Stress, Burnout, and Fewer Resources," presented by Michael Pritchard, former probation officer, educator and comedian, who educates people using humor to touch on real life experiences, South Ballroom, Memorial Union, noon to 1 p.m. and 7 to 8 p.m.; the series is free and open to the public; those attending the noon session may bring their own lunch; pizza will be served at 6 p.m., donated by the North Dakota Mill, preceding the evening session.

    Tues., Dec. 2 -- COUNSELING COLLOQUIUM, 316 Montgomery Hall, 12:30 to 1:45 p.m.; topic will be announced in the University Letter.

    Tues., Dec. 2 -- HOLIDAY ORNAMENT GALA -- Fargo musicians and recording artists Mike and linda Coates will present holiday music, North Dakota Museum of Art, 6 p.m.; co-hosted by the Museum and the American Diabetes Association, the event will be a fundraiser for the two organizations; tickets are $25 for singles and $35 for couples, and include a hand-blown glass ball ornament designed by Moorhead artist Jon Offutt; call 746-4427 to reserve your tickets.

    Tues., Dec. 2 -- RECEPTION honoring Marlys Hanson, who is leaving the Computer Center after completing over 15 years of programming and customer assistance, Computer Center Conference Room, 371 Upson II, 2 to 3:30 p.m.

    Tues., Dec. 2 -- UNIVERSITY PROGRAM COUNCIL MOVIE, "Men in Black," Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, 8 p.m.; free admission.

    Tues., Dec. 2 -- BASKETBALL, WOMEN'S, UND at University of Minnesota-Morris, Morris, Minn., time to be announced.

    Wed., Dec. 3 -- ENGLISH LECTURE SERIES, fiction writer John Little willl give a reading from his novel-in-progress, "Like a Fishhook"; Fred Orth Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, 4 p.m.; the event is free and all are invited.

    Wed., Dec. 3 -- HISTORY FOR LUNCH, "North Dakota's Role in the Philippine Insurrection and the Anti-Imperialism Debate, 1899-1902," will be presented by Richard Shafer and Stephen Rendahl (both Communication), 217 Merrifield Hall, noon; a question and discussion period will follow the presentation; bring your lunch; call 777-3380 for more information.

    Wed., Dec. 3 -- LESSONS AT LUNCH, "Everyday Etiquette," presented by Mae Marie Blackmore, Leadership Inspiration Center, third floor, Memorial Union, noon to 1 p.m.; a collection of fun and informative sessions on various topics of interest to staff, faculty, and students held on alternate Wednesdays; all sessions are free; call 777-3926 to register.

    Wed., Dec. 3 -- FEAST AND FOCUS, "Creative Gift Wrapping," Craft Center, third floor, Memorial Union, noon.

    Thurs., Dec. 4 -- LAST DAY TO SUBMIT FINAL COPY OF THESIS OR DISSERTATION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL.

    Thurs., Dec. 4 -- UNIVERSITY SENATE MEETING, Room 7, Gamble Hall, 4:05 p.m.

    Thurs., Dec. 4 -- VACCINE TELECONFERENCE, "Surveillance of Vaccine Preventable Diseases," by William Atkinson will be presented in a live interactive teleconference sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.; call Liz Tyree in Nursing to register.

    Thurs., Dec. 4 -- RETIREMENT RECEPTION honoring Joe Hootman, a faculty member in the Electrical Engineering Department since 1969, Alumni Center, 9 to 10:30 a.m.; everyone is welcome.

    Thurs., Dec. 4 -- OPEN HOUSE, Humanities and Integrated Studies invite everyone to visit their new office and classroom space, 134 O'Kelly Hall, 3 to 5 p.m.

    Thurs., Dec. 4 -- FOR WOMEN ONLY: Rites of Passage, "Once In A Blue Moon," Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

    Thurs., Dec. 4 -- CELEBRATING THE NEW INDEPENDENT STATES (former Soviet Union), including seven Republics; Borscht and other foods representing the Republics will be served, and history, slides, artifacts and music will be featured, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; all are welcome; call 777-3273 for more information.

    Thurs. and Fri., Dec. 4-5 -- PHYSICS COLLOQUIA, Professor Carl Patton of Colorado State University will give two presentations on non-linear phenomena and magnetism; Thursday, Dec. 4, at 7 p.m. in 114 Witmer Hall, Patton will present "High Frequency Magnetic Excitations, Resonance, Spin Waves, and Solitons"; Friday, Dec. 5, at 4 p.m. in 130 Gamble Hall, the presentation will be broadcast to faculty and students at NDSU over IVN; all interested persons are invited to both colloquia.

    Thurs. and Fri., Dec. 4-5 -- HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE, Aviator's Corner, UND Airport facilities, 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.; sale on imprinted clothing and giftware; refreshments served on Thursday.

    Thurs. through Sat., Dec. 4-6 -- OLDE ENGLISH CHRISTMASSE FEASTE, a regal 16th Century dinner, Chester Fritz Auditorium, 7 p.m.

    Fri., Dec. 5 -- MEETING, Institutional Review Board, 305 Twamley Hall, 4 p.m.

    Fri., Dec. 5 -- 19TH ANNUAL HOLIDAY CRAFT SHOW AND SALE, Memorial Union Ballroom, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

    Fri., Dec. 5 -- HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE, University Bookstore, Memorial Union, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. (note time change); store-wide discounts, prizes, refreshments, and more.

    Fri., Dec. 5 -- INTERNATIONAL COF-TEA CUP, an opportunity for UND students, faculty, staff, and the Greater Grand Forks community to enjoy international tea, coffee, and pastry while discussing world issues, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 3 to 4:30 p.m.; all are welcome.

    Fri. and Sat., Dec. 5-6 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND at University of California-Davis Tournament, Davis, Calif., time to be announced.

    Fri. and Sat., Dec. 5-6 -- HOCKEY, UND at University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis., 7:35 p.m.

    *******

    UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is also available electronically through UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address is http://www.und.nodak.edu.

    All articles submitted for publication should be labeled "University Letter" and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu. Attachments to University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number. University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations, Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.

    UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

    *******


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