University Letter

Volume 39, Number 14: November 30, 2001

Faculty Members Invited To Participate In December Commencement
“Green Jacket” Volunteers Sought For Winter Commencement Dec. 21

EVENTS TO NOTE
Biologist Presents “Big Winters And Little Fleas”
Flu Shot Clinics Offered
Holiday Art, Craft Fair Is Nov. 30
UND Observes World AIDS Day
Wind Ensemble, Central High Symphonic Band Present Concert Dec. 3
Graduate Committee Meets Monday
Pride Of The North, University Band Offer “Pops”Concert
Doctoral Examination Set For Ali Wehbe
If Your Life Feels Like A Three-Ring Circus, Check Out DeStress Fest
Consultant To Discuss UND Search For Research VP
Agenda Listed For Dec. 6 U Senate Meeting
International Centre Hosts Thursday Night Program
“Ventriloquizing Nation” Is Next English Lecture
Dec. 11 Seminar Explores Annuities, Endowments
Retired Faculty, Staff Invited To Holiday Open House
B.S. In Applied Physics Considered For Termination

ANNOUNCEMENTS
Law Library Lists Final Exam Hours
Studio One Lists Guests
State Fleet Lists New Rates
Credit Union Offers Holiday Specials
Items For Sale To Public By Bids
Statewide Patriotic Shirt Day Set For Nov. 30
Locally Developed Software To Be Showcased At Conference

IN THE NEWS

GRANTS AND RESEARCH
Research, Grant Opportunities Listed

Faculty Members Invited To Participate In December Commencement

UND faculty members are encouraged to march in academic regalia in the winter commencement ceremony on Friday, Dec. 21, at 2 p.m. in the Chester Fritz Auditorium. Faculty should assemble in the basement of the Auditorium no later than 1:30 p.m. University marshals will be on hand to direct participants to their places in the procession, which will begin at 2 p.m. Faculty members will be seated in a special section on the stage during the ceremony.

Please contact Tammy Anderson in the Office of the Vice President for Student and Outreach Services at 777-2724 by Wednesday, Dec. 19, or e-mail tammy_anderson@mail.und.nodak.edu if you plan to participate so that the appropriate number of seats can be reserved.

I encourage participation by faculty members to help make this a memorable occasion for our graduates, their families, and friends. - Charles Kupchella, President.

 

“Green Jacket” Volunteers Sought For Winter Commencement Dec. 21

Your help is requested for winter commencement Friday, Dec. 21, at the Chester Fritz Auditorium. “Green jacket” volunteers seat guests, help organize our graduates, and greet campus visitors who attend the ceremony.

Commencement begins at 2 p.m. and all volunteers are asked to report to the lobby of the Chester Fritz Auditorium by noon for a short briefing and to receive assignments. We anticipate that commencement will conclude by approximately 3:45 p.m.

Please contact Tammy J. Anderson in the Office of the Vice President for Student and Outreach Services at 777-2724 or e-mail her at tammy_anderson@mail.und.nodak.edu by Friday, Dec. 14, to let us know if you will be able to participate. Please feel free to call if you have any questions. – Fred Wittmann, Office of the Vice President for Student and outreach Services.

 

Events To Note

Biologist Presents “Big Winters And Little Fleas”
Omer Larson, Professor Emeritus of Biology, will present “Big Winters and Little Fleas: A Strategy for Survival” at noon Friday, Nov. 30, in 141 Starcher Hall. – Biology Department.

Flu Shot Clinics Offered
Student Health Services will offer a flu shot clinic for students on Wednesday, Nov. 28, from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. in the old bookstore space on first floor of the Memorial Union. A general flu shot clinic for students and employees will be held on Friday, Nov. 30, from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fireside Lounge on second floor of the Memorial Union, in conjunction with the annual Holiday Craft Fair.

The cost of the flu shot is $6 for students. Faculty and staff who are covered by Blue Cross/Blue Shield of North Dakota can obtain a flu shot without cost; charges will be billed to insurance. A fee of $10 will be charged to all other faculty and staff.
Watch for information about additional campus-wide flu shot clinics as vaccine becomes available. Contact Student Health Services at 777-4500 for additional details. - Jane Croecker, Student Health Services.

Holiday Art, Craft Fair Is Nov. 30
The 23rd Annual Holiday Art and Craft Fair is set for Friday, Nov. 30, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Memorial Union Ballroom. This event has become a holiday tradition to showcase the work of artists and crafters from around the region, including a number of UND students, faculty and staff. It also gives UND and the Greater Grand Forks communities an opportunity to discover an extra-special gift for the season’s giving or something to make your own celebrations a little more festive. This year’s fair will include wood carvings, clothing, quilts, pottery, birdhouses, folk art and much more. There will also be holiday decorations, ornaments, wreaths and gift baskets.

Admission is free and door prizes will be given throughout the day. A free shuttle bus also will run from the Barnes & Noble parking lot. The annual Holiday Art and Craft Fair is sponsored by the University Craft Center and the UND Memorial Union.

For more information, contact the University Craft Center at 777-3979. See you there!

UND Observes World AIDS Day
“I Care . . . Do you? Youth and AIDS in the 21st Century” is this year’s theme for World AIDS Day, which will be observed Saturday, Dec. 1. Approximately one in every 100 adults worldwide is infected with HIV. A focus on youth is vital because half of the people newly infected with HIV in the U.S. are under age 25. Young adults can be a powerful force in stemming the tide of the HIV/AIDS pandemic.

Student Health Services and the Multicultural Awareness Committee invite you to show you care by stopping at the World AIDS Day display in the Memorial Union. Take a minute to help assemble a giant red ribbon and pick up a red ribbon to wear on your lapel. Those who wish to write a personal message and hang it from the giant red ribbon are invited to do so. The ribbon will also be adorned with myths and facts about HIV and AIDS. Construction began on Tuesday, Nov. 26, at 11 a.m. and will run from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. each weekday through Monday, Dec. 3. The red ribbon will be on display throughout December. For more information, contact the Student Health Promotion Office at 777-4817.

Wind Ensemble, Central High Symphonic Band Present Concert Dec. 3
The UND Wind Ensemble and the Grand Forks Central High School Symphonic Band will present a concert Monday, Dec. 3, at 7:30 p.m. in the Central High School Auditorium. There is no admission charge for the concert.

The CHS Symphonic Band, under the direction of Christie Aleshire, will open the concert with Carl Strommen’s “Gigue Francaise.” The band will continue with Frank Ticheli’s moving tribute work to the victims of the Columbine tragedy, “An American Elegy,” followed by “Inglesina,” a symphonic march by Davide Delle Cese. They will close the first half of the concert with Carmen Dragon’s arrangement of “America, the Beautiful.”

The UND Wind Ensemble, conducted by James Popejoy, will open their portion of the program with “Festivo” by British composer Edward Gregson. Along with this work, the Wind Ensemble will also perform Alfred Reed’s monumental “Russian Christmas Music,” a new work by Roger Cichy titled “Colours,” and the exciting Spanish-flavored “Fandango” of Frank Perkins. The UND Wind Ensemble and the CHS Symphonic Band will join forces to close the concert with Leroy Anderson’s classic seasonal favorite, “Sleigh Ride.”

For additional information concerning this performance, please contact the UND Band Department at 777-2815.

Graduate Committee Meets Monday
The Graduate Committee will meet Monday, Dec. 3, from 3:05 to 5 p.m. in 305 Twamley Hall. The agenda will include:
1. Approval of minutes from Nov. 26 meeting.

2. Request from Geology to change Geology 515A Principles of Paleontology to Geology 515A Invertebrate Paleontology.

3. Formation of a subcommittee to review the Graduate Faculty Constitution.

4. Formation of a subcommittee for upcoming program reviews in Cvil Engineering and Education.

5. Matters arising.

- Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School.

Pride Of The North, University Band Offer “Pops” Concert
The Pride of the North Marching Band and the University Band will present a “pops” concert Tuesday, Dec. 4, at 7:30 p.m. in the Chester Fritz Auditorium. Tickets are $5 for adults and $3 for students, and are available at the door. All high school and middle school students will be admitted free of charge with the presentation of their student ID cards.

The University Band, conducted by Director of Bands James Popejoy, will open the concert with a new fanfare by Steven Reineke titled “Rise of the Firebird.” Using a traditional “pops” format, the band will continue with a series of medleys. First is “Moviemusik,” which combines several types of music often found in movie scores. Next they will perform a medley of marches written by John Philip Sousa. Titled “The Sousa Scramble,” Paul Murtha has successfully combined seven of the “March King’s” most popular pieces into one unique composition. Celebrating the history of one of the most important rock bands to fuse jazz elements into their music, the University Band will continue with a medley of tunes made famous by the rock group Chicago. They will close out their portion of the program with a dixieland arrangement of “Tiger Rag” and a seasonal favorite, “The Most Wonderful Time of the Year.”

The Pride of the North Marching Band, led by Associate Director of Bands Robert Brooks, will present a showcase concert of music from their fall season. The UND Drumline will open the second half of the concert, followed by performances of the traditional UND fight songs and “Alma Mater.” The band will continue with concert performances of some of their favorite show music, including “Karneval 9,” “La Suerte de Los Tontos,” “One More Time, Chick Corea,” and “Simple Gifts.” The University Band and the Pride of the North Band will combine at the end of the concert to perform an arrangement of the patriotic “Battle Hymn of the Republic” and Leroy Anderson’s classic, “Sleigh Ride.”

For additional information concerning this performance, please contact the UND Band Department at 777-2815.

Doctoral Examination Set For Ali Wehbe
The final examination for Ali Wehbe, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in electrical engineering, is set for 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 5, in the Conference Room of Upson II. The dissertation title is “Minimizing Power System Distribution Losses Using Direct Load Control.” Hossein Salehfar (Electrical Engineering) is the committee chair.

Members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend. – Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School.

If Your Life Feels Like A Three-Ring Circus, Check Out DeStress Fest
DeStress Fest will be held in the Memorial Union, old bookstore area, Wednesday and Thursday, Dec. 5 and 6, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. The program will include 15-minute deStressor sessions, the distribution of free deStressor kits, and general stress management information. Stress dots, massages, treats, and prizes will also be available. The 15-minute deStressor sessions will include such topics as clowning around (humor and stress), juggling act (time management), tame the stress lion (anti-stress stretches), walking a tightrope (general coping strategies), holiday acrobatics (holiday stress solutions), and float on a cloud (relaxation session). You can also enjoy a quiet, comfortable room filled with relaxing sounds. DeStress Fest is intended to help students, faculty, and staff obtain stress relief tips and strategies to help them cope with stress that is typical for this time of year (e.g., final exams, papers, the holidays etc.). This event is sponsored by Student Health Services and the Counseling Center. For additional information, contact the Student Health Promotions Office at 777-2097. – Jane Croecker, Student Health Services.

Consultant To Discuss UND Search For Research VP
David J. Skorton, M.D., vice president for research at the University of Iowa, will be on campus Thursday, Dec. 6, as a consultant to President Kupchella for the search for a vice president for research at the University of North Dakota.

You are invited to attend a meeting with Dr. Skorton from 10:30 to 11:25 a.m. to discuss the relationship between a vice president for research and the university research faculty. The meeting will be held in Swanson Hall, Room 16-18. Your participation is encouraged. - H. David Wilson (Medicine), Chair, Vice President for Research Search Committee.

Agenda Listed For Dec. 6 U Senate Meeting
The December meeting of the University Senate will be held Thursday, Dec. 6, at 4:05 p.m. in Room 7, Gamble Hall.
AGENDA
1. Announcements.

2. Minutes of the previous meeting and business arising from the minutes.

3. Question Period.

CONSENT CALENDAR:
4. Annual report of the Senate Library Committee, Kenneth Hansen, chair.

5. Annual report of the Legislative Affairs Committee, Steven Kelsch, chair.

6. Annual report of the Student Policy Committee, Rebecca Urlacher, chair.

BUSINESS CALENDAR:
7. Report from the Council of College Faculties. Jim Grijalva.

8. Recommendations from the Curriculum Committee for new program requests and newcourse requests. Lowell Stanlake, chair.

9. Candidates for Degrees in December 2001. Nancy Krogh, university registrar.

International Centre Hosts Thursday Night Program
The Office of International Programs at the International Centre, 2908 University Ave., will hold cultural programs at 7 p.m. Thursdays. The Dec. 6 program features holidays around the world. Thursday night cultural programs are open to all. Experience different cultures of the world, meet new friends from other nations, and learn about the variety the world offers. Events feature food prepared and served by international students. For more information, contact the International Centre at 777-4231.

“Ventriloquizing Nation” Is Next English Lecture
“Ventriloquizing Nation: Voice, Identity, and Radical Democracy in Charles Brockden Brown’s Wieland” is the next contribution to the English Department Lecture Series. The lecture will be given by Dr. Eric Wolfe on Thursday, Dec. 6, at 4 p.m. in 116 Merrifield Hall.

Dec. 11 Seminar Explores Annuities, Endowments
Retired faculty and staff: you have worked hard over the years and made wise investment decisions. Now the fluctuating stock market and the lowest interest rates in years make it difficult to maintain or increase your annual income. Gift annuities provide an answer! Join the UND Foundation for an informational seminar focusing on gift annuities and endowments on Tuesday, Dec. 11, at 1 p.m. in the J. Lloyd Stone Alumni Center. For more information or to RSVP, call the UND Alumni Association at 777-2611.

Retired Faculty, Staff Invited To Holiday Open House
The Alumni Association and Foundation invites retired faculty and staff to a holiday open house Tuesday, Dec. 11, from 2 to 4 p.m. at the J. Lloyd Stone Alumni Center. To RSVP or for transportation, please call the Alumni Association at 777-2611. – Stacy Nelson, Special Events Coordinator, Alumni Association.


B.S. In Applied Physics Considered For Termination
The University Curriculum Committee will meet Thursday, Dec. 13, at 3:30 p.m. in 305 Twamley Hall to review the request from the College of Arts and Sciences to terminate the Bachelor of Science with major in applied physics. Anyone interested in the proposal is invited to attend. – Connie Borboa (Registrar’s Office) for the University Curriculum Committee.

Announcements

Law Library Lists Final Exam Hours
The Law Library hours have been extended for finals: Friday, Dec. 7, 7:30 a.m. to midnight; Saturday, Dec. 8, 10 a.m. to midnight; Sunday, Dec. 9, 10 a.m. to midnight; Monday through Friday, Dec. 10-14, 7:30 a.m. to midnight; Saturday, Dec. 15, 7:30 a.m. to midnight; Sunday, Dec. 16, 10 a.m. to midnight; Monday through Thursday, Dec. 17-20, 7:30 a.m. to midnight; Friday, Dec. 21, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. (last day of exams).

Studio One Lists Guests
This week on Studio One, violence intervention advocate Laura Frisch will explain how her program helps sexual assault victims. Frisch will discuss the most common drugs that are being used in sexual assault cases and their side effects. She will also profile sexual assault perpetrators and explain how people can avoid vulnerable situations. Frisch works for the Community Violence Intervention Center and is assigned to UND to evaluate the occurrence of sexual assaults on campus and to help victims.

U.S. border cities are seeing a decline in the number of Canadians doing business in their communities. Studio One will explore the reasons behind this trend.

Studio One is an award-winning news and information program produced at the University of North Dakota Television Center. The program airs live at 5 p.m. on UND Channel 3 on Thursdays. Rebroadcasts can be seen at noon, 7 and 11 p.m. daily and on Saturdays at 10 a.m. Prairie Public Television airs Studio One on Saturday at 6 a.m. The program can also be seen in Fargo, Bismarck/Mandan, Minot, Minneapolis and Winnipeg, Manitoba.

State Fleet Lists New Rates
As of December 1, the North Dakota State Fleet has adjusted their motor pool rates as listed below. Please use these rates when calculating a trip using a motor pool vehicle. If there are any questions, please call Mary at 777-4123.

Vehicle Type Rate Per Mile
Compact Sedan 0.27
Compact Stationwagon 0.27
Minivan 0.38
Van, eight-passenger 0.49
Van, 12-passenger 0.49
Van, 15-passenger 0.49
Compact 4x4/Jeep 0.38
Suburban, six-passenger 0.50
Chevy S-10 Pickup 0.43
Cargo Van, Full-Size 0.52
Mini-Cargo Van 0.43

Credit Union Offers Holiday Specials
Catch the falling rates at University Federal Credit Union!

New vehicles: 5.90 percent APR up to 60 months.

Used vehicles (1995-2001): 6.50 percent APR up to 36 months; 7.25 percent APR up to 60 months.

New snowmobiles, ATV’s, boats: 6.90 percent APR up to 60 months.

Used snowmobiles, ATV’s, boats (1995-2001): 7.50 percent APR up to 36 months; 8.25 percent APR up to 60 months.

Call Carilynn at 777-3891 or Marney at 777-4422 to find out how fast and easily we can process your loan application.

Be sure to ask about our mechanical repair warranty program. We may be able to save you money and provide you with better coverage and a longer term.

If you are not in the market for a car but could use some extra cash during this holiday season, apply now for our holiday loan special: up to $1,000 at 9.75 percent APR for 11 months.

Credit Union office hours are Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Items For Sale To Public By Bids
The University is offering for sale to the public on a sealed high-bid basis the following items: older computer equipment, chest-type deep freeze, radial arm saw, and several other miscellaneous items. These may be seen at the Central Receiving warehouse on the southwest corner of the campus. Bids will be taken between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m. Monday through Thursday, Dec. 3-6. For more information, contact Lee Sundby, Central Receiving, 777-3125.

Statewide Patriotic Shirt Day Set For Nov. 30
With the approval and support of the Governor’s Office, a statewide patriotic shirt and casual day will be held Friday, Nov. 30. All statewide donations are designated for the disaster relief operation to help the American Red Cross respond to different disaster needs. The money will be presented to the Burleigh Morton County American Red Cross.

If you wear a patriotic shirt Friday, Nov. 30, please contribute a dollarto your usual Denim Day coordinator, who will collect the donations. If you write a check, please make the check payable to the American Red Cross.

The donations can then be sent to Brenda Schuler, COSE board member, Vocational and Technical Education, 600 E. Boulevard Ave., Dept. 270, Bismarck, N.D. 58505-0610.

Locally Developed Software To Be Showcased At Conference
HTML-eZ software, developed at the University of North Dakota, will be showcased in Boston this week at the Syllabus Fall 2001 conference on educational uses of information technology. Henry Borysewicz, director of UND’s AeroSpace Network, will make the presentation.

“HTML-eZ is a locally developed tool that allows instructors to create and maintain graphically rich, interactive Web sites on their own, without knowing any HTML or programming,” said Borysewicz. “It is an adaptable and evolving alternative to commercial products like WebCT or Blackboard. Instead of spending dollars on these commercial products, eZ has the potential to generate resources for UND and the region. HTML-eZ gives us an opportunity to become an educational software provider, rather than just a consumer.”

HTML-eZ was developed to facilitate teaching and communications via the Internet. The project name is derived from the acronym for Hyper Text Markup Language, the authoring language used to create documents on the World Wide Web. The software is being developed at the AeroSpace Network (ASN), a support division of the John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences. Dedicated to the advancement of innovative educational approaches and technologies, ASN’s unique combination of full-service broadcast and multimedia production facility coupled with software design and web development expertise have made it an incubator for distance learning projects throughout the region. The UND Aerospace Foundation, a public, non-profit corporation that serves as a link between industry and the Odegard School, has filed an application with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to protect the core intellectual property behind the project.

The Odegard School is working with the UND Center for Innovation to promote and license HTML-eZ. Maury Audet will co-present the software with Borysewicz. Audet is an entrepreneur and commercialization consultant with the Center for Innovation. “Although originally designed as an educational tool, the software has broad commercial applications,” said Audet. “We feel it has tremendous potential in the business sector as well.”

Syllabus Fall 2001 is a conference for faculty, administrators, and IT professionals who want to explore the latest applications of information technology in higher education institutions. It is being held held Nov. 28 through Dec. 2 at the Sheraton Ferncroft Resort in Boston. For more information, visit the Web site at www.syllabus.com.

In The News

JOHN D. ODEGARD SCHOOL OF AEROSPACE SCIENCES
Paul Snyder, assistant chief of extension programs, was presented with a Certificate of Designation by Fred Clark, FAA acting manager and John Vold, principal operating inspector for the Odegard School.

. . . The UND Flying Team captured the overall team championship in the Region V National Intercollegiate Flying Association’s (NIFA) Safety and Flight Evaluation Conference (SAFECON) held in Dubuque, Iowa. UND soared in both ground and flight event scores, defeating the other two participating flying teams with an overall score of 279. The team has won the regional conference championship since 1972, with the exception of fall 1975 and fall 1988, and has retained the National NIFA Conference title for 12 of the past 17 years. . . . A team of students from the Association for Computing Machinery, a student group from the Computer Science Department, won the DigiKey regional programming contest held in the Thief River Falls, Minn., headquarters for DigiKey. A total of six schools sent computer science teams. . . . Bruce Smith participated as a panel speaker on “The Solutions: New Methods, Old Values,” in Vancouver, Canada, for the British Columbia Aviation Council Conference. . . . Frank Argenziano and Becky Mann played a key role in the award of a one-year $411,000 FAA grant through the Center for General Aviation Research for ethanol research on general aviation aircraft. Mike Poellet also received a one year $82,000 grant from the FAA through the Center for offshore icing research. . . . Paul Kucera has been awarded a $72,000 grant from NASA for evaluation of NASA polarmetric radar observations collected during the Key Area Microphysics Project; the main objective of this project was to collect simultaneous dual-Doppler and polarimetric radar observations of tropical cloud systems to help evaluate and improve cloud models. . . . Henry Borysewicz represented UND at the 11th International Commercial Aviation Training Conference sponsored by the Western Institute for Computer-Assisted Teaching in Las Vegas, where he demonstrated various web-delivered teaching tools currently under development at Aerospace, including HTML-eZ, which was invented by Borysewicz, David Horne and Joseph Stevens. . . . The Aviation Department began its first on-campus classes for its master’s program in the fall semester. . . . The Regional Weather Information Center and the Department of Atmospheric Sciences have been awarded an eight-year cooperative agreement through the University of Minnesota, Army High-Performance Computer Research Center (AHPCRC) totaling $3.3 million. The award is part of an Army competitive program to develop advanced high-performance computing research in support of the Army’s modernization program. Mark Askelson and Paul Kucera (both Atmospheric Sciences) will serve as co-principal investigators in the research activities, and Leon Osborne will serve as the overall lead scientist of the AHPCRC atmospheric science research activities for the participating universities. . . . Stephen Johnson (Space Studies) presented “United States Military Space Policy” at a workshop at the University of Manitoba, Centre for Defence and Security Studies, “The Canadian-American Defence Relationship: Where Next?” in Gimli, Manitoba.

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Martha Potvin (Dean, Arts and Sciences) will receive the Faculty Merit Award for Service from the West Chester University of Pennsylvania in December during commencement ceremonies. While at West Chester University, Potvin was the chair of the biology department for three consecutive terms, and most recently served as the interim dean of graduate studies and extended education. She was a faculty member there for 16 years before coming to UND in July 2001. . . . Andre LeBugle (Languages, French) has published his eighth book, a collection of short stories titled “Un Don Mortel.” . . . Lana Rakow (Communication) has been presented with a presidential citation by the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communications for “Outstanding Service and Dedication as an AEJMC officer during 2000-2001.” Rakow served as chair of the Elected Standing Committee on Teaching Standards during 2000-2001 and has been selected to serve a second term as chair. Rakow also serves on the association’s executive committee.

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
The Department of Political Science and Public Administration faculty were active in teaching, research and service activities. Jason Jensen won one of the College’s awards for his research activity, and Steven Light won an award for teaching, research and service in the College. . . . Robert Kweit, master of public administration director, is currently serving as a consultant to the Grand Forks Park District, as well as the city of Jamestown, dealing with personnel and organizational issues. . . . Mary Kweit, chair and director of the Bureau of Governmental Affairs, has been responsible for several polls done for state and local agencies. . . . Mark Jendrysik is completing a book-length manuscript, which will be published by Lexington Press. . . . Paul Sum visited Shanghai, China, last spring on behalf of the department to start the process of investigating the establishment of an MPA in China in the near future. . . . The Department is working with the Space Studies and Criminal Justice Departments to include courses in the MPA program as part of their proposed Ph.D. program.

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
Sara Hanhan was honored with a Meritorious Service Award at the annual North Dakota Association for the Education of Young Children conference in Bismarck.

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND MINES
Dexter Perkins and Joseph Hartman (both Geology) have directed the creation of a revolutionary digital photo library called GeoDIL (an acronym for Geoscience Digital Image Library). GeoDIL is a collaborative effort between the Department of Geology and the John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences.

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND HEALTH SCIENCES
Judy DeMers (Student Affairs and Admissions) was honored as the 2001 NDPEA Chapter 41 Employee of the Year. She has been a public employee for 45 years of which the last 24 years have been with UND.

COLLEGE OF NURSING
Helen Melland and Cecilia Misialek Volden have co-published “A Nurturing Learning Environment - On- or Off-Line,” in Nursing Forum, Vol. 36, No. 2, April-June 2001. . . . Eleanor Yurkovich has published “Working with American Indians Toward Education Success” in the Journal of Nursing Education, Vol. 40, No. 6, September 2001.

CHESTER FRITZ LIBRARY
Featured on the cover of the College and Research Libraries News, October 2001, Vol. 62, No. 9 issue is Shou Lao, ancient Chinese Taoist god of longevity, depicted on one of several woven and painted scrolls displayed in the East Asian Room of the Chester Fritz Library. Shou Lao is portrayed in typical fashion with a prominent bald head, white eyebrows and whiskers, and a smiling face, leaning on a long staff. Pumpkin gourds, containing the water of life, hang from each of his sides. He is accompanied by a stag and an attendant carrying a bowl that contains a peach, the symbol of immortality. Chester Fritz, international financier in China from 1915 to 1941, donated a collection of artifacts acquired from his worldwide travels to UND in 1959.

CONFLICT RESOLUTION CENTER
Kristine Paranica and Thomas Fuchs presented their theories on Conflict Management for Business, combining adult education principles with transformational theories which work together to change the culture of the workplace and recognized conflict as a natural, normal part of life in Toronto, Canada. James Antes (Psychology) and Donna Turner Hudson (English) presented “Transformative Mediation Practice and Theory” as members of the Institute for the Study of Conflict Transformation.

Grants and Research

Research, Grant Opportunities Listed
Following are research and grant opportunities. For more information, contact the Office of Research and Program Development at 777-4278.

CENTER FOR CREDIT UNION RESEARCH
The Center for Credit Union Research is seeking established academic researchers to conduct research projects that provide independent analyses of key issues faced by the credit union movement and consumers of financial services. The purpose is to provide support for research and education of interest to credit unions, financial consumerism and policy makers. The broad research topics are: management, public policy, and consumer analysis. Topics that simultaneously provide material for academic publication and material that provides meaningful and compelling findings for credit union practitioners, financial consumers, and policy makers are preferred. Fields of interest include: management, human resources, marketing, accounting, finance, entrepreneurship, economics, consumer science, actuarial science, and statistics. Grants will be up to $25,000 for a duration of 1 year. Contact: 608/262-5002; http://www.wiscinfo.doit.wisc.edu/ccur/regrants.htm. Deadlines: 12/31/01, 3/31/02, 9/30/02, 6/30/02.
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SUBSTANCE ABUSE AND MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES ADMINISTRATION (SAMHSA)
Funds are available for cooperative agreements to support the creation or continuation of Addiction Technology Transfer Centers (ATTCs). This program solicits applications to: develop and maintain an interdisciplinary consortium of health care and related professionals, educators, organizations, and State and local governments knowledgeable about research-based, effective, culturally appropriate approaches to substance abuse treatment and recovery; shape systems of care by replicating and testing science and translating substance abuse treatment research into clinical practice; develop a workforce of competent health care and related professionals reflective of the treatment population and who are prepared to function in managed care settings; and upgrade standards of professional practice for addictions workers in various settings. The average award for an ATTC site is expected to range from $450,000-$550,000/year in total costs. Cooperative agreements will be awarded for a period of 5 years. Deadline: 1/3/02. Contact: National Clearinghouse, 800/729-6686; srohrer@samhsa.gov; http://www.samhsa.gov; or http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=2001_register&docid=01-10635-filed.
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NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES (NIDDK)

The intent of the Effects of HIV Infections on the Kidney initiative is to support research addressing the infections of Human Immunodeficiency Viruses and the effects of such infections on the kidney, patients undergoing treatment with dialysis, and/or patients with a renal allograft. Applications are solicited to support cellular and molecular studies that focus on the effects of HIV infection on renal structure and function. Studies that focus on the pathogenesis of the nephropathy associated with HIV infection and on the clinical course of the HIV infection in dialysis patients are encouraged. Studies could include: factors that modulate progression from initial infection and seropositive response to HIV to the development of ARC and/or AIDS; effects of blood transfusions, immunizations and vaccinations; effects of co-infection with the hepatitis virus; treatment of anemia and effects of HIV treatment modalities. The R01 award mechanism will be used. Duration may be 5 years; average grant size will be $160,000 for direct costs. Deadlines: 1/2/02, 5/1/02. Contact: Paul L. Kimmel, 301/594-7713; pk77g@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-96-063.html.
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NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES (NIGMS)

The Mechanisms Underlying Individual Variations in Drug Responses program is designed to stimulate research to identify critical candidate proteins and/or genes that play essential roles in determining individual variations in drug responses. The aim is to identify fundamental mechanisms that appear to play a role in individual variations in drug responses through biochemical, pharmacological, genetic, and/or genomic studies, and accelerate the pace of discovery in pharmacogenetics. Investigator-initiated research grant applications are invited in: identification of candidate proteins and/or their genes and their gene families, that play a role in determining individual variations in drug responses, and may have functionally significant, common genetic polymorphisms leading to different drug response phenotypes; development and characterization of appropriate in vivo and in vitro models (including human, animal, and non-mammalian species) and computer-based models, to identify human genetic polymorphisms and study their functional effects, both mono- and poly-genic, in determining individual variations in drug responses; and genetic and molecular epidemio-logic studies to identify candidate genes associated with variations in drug responses, involving families, patients, and/or human populations. Supplemental applications will be considered where specific and well-justified requests are made that expand the scope of an investigator’s existing support and are consistent with the goals of this initiative. The R01 award mechanism, Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR; R43, R44) and Small Business Technology Transfer Research (STTR; R41, R42) award mechanisms may be used. Contact: Rochelle M. Long, 301/594-1826; rl25b@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/phs398/phs398.html; or http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-99-016.html. Deadlines: 2/1/02, 3/1/02, 4/1/02, 6/1/02, 7/1/02, 8/1/02, 10/1/02, 11/1/02.
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NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HEALTH (NIMH)

The purpose of the Economic Evaluation in HIV and Mental Disorders Prevention initiative is to encourage research on cost-benefit, cost-effectiveness, and cost-utility analyses of primary and secondary preventive interventions that are universal, selective, or indicative. Support will be provided for research on economic evaluation of either planned or completed studies of preventive interventions aimed at HIV/STDs, Mental Disorders or Dual Diagnoses. Included should be studies to prevent the spread of HIV/STD, help people cope with disease, or obtain health care or treatment of HIV/STD-related problems. Preference will be given to research with implications for developing cost-effective preventive interventions that access hard-to-reach populations at high risk for HIV infection. Research is also needed to develop methods and techniques to assess cost and utility of prevention programs. The R01 award mechanism will be used. Deadlines: 1/2/02, 5/1/02, 9/1/02. Contact: Willo Pequegnat, 301/443-6100; wp9g@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-99-001.html.

The HIV: Viral Load in Brain and Neurobehavioral Correlates program solicits research applications to: identify effective ways to quantitate viral load within the central nervous system (CNS) during life; correlate quantity of virus within the CNS to the onset and course of neurobehavioral and neurological changes; identify specific biochemical or neurochemical alterations in neuronal function as a consequence of the presence of virus either directly or indirectly; and identify and test drugs that prevent or reverse neuronal dysfunction. Support will be provided to find a direct link between the presence of virus and HIV-induced motor/cognitive impairments. The R01, P01, K01, K02, K05, F30, F31, F32, and R03 award mechanisms will be used. Contact: Diane M. Rausch, 301/443-7281; dr89b@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-96-059.html. Deadlines: 1/2/02, 5/1/02 (AIDS Proposals); 4/5/02 (Fellowships).
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ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION

Humanities Fellowships--Gender and Globalization in Asia and the Pacific support research in-residence at the University of Hawaii Office for Women’s Research at Manoa, to explore gender and globalization in Asia and the Pacific. Projects should address the following questions: What is meant by globalization, and how are women active in, and acted upon by, the processes involved in globalization? Research areas include: women and economic transformation; migration/refugees/diaspora movements and communities; women’s health globally; militarism and global violence; domestic violence and victimization; gender, race and representation; reparation movements and interracial justice; and global connections of indigenous peoples. Deadlines: 12/31/01 (Fall 2002), 3/1/02 (Spring 2003). Contact: Humanities Fellowships, 212/869-8500; http://www.rockfound.org/Documents/460/brochure.doc.
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SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION

National Zoological Park Research Traineeships support summer research at the National Zoological Park in Washington, D.C. and the Center for Conservation and Research in Front Royal, VA. Traineeships are intended to provide opportunities for undergraduate or graduate students to be involved in animal behavior, reproductive physiology, nutrition, genetics, husbandry/exhibit interpretation, zoo animal medicine, veterinary pathology, public affairs, landscaping, animal records, horticulture, communications, video-production and photography. A stipend of $3,000 is provided for 12 weeks. Contact: Research Traineeship Program, 202/673-4955; http://www.si.edu/research+study. Deadline: 12/31/01.
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UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA AT EDMONTON
Grant Notley Memorial and Izaak Walton Killam Postdoctoral Fellowships support scholars to perform significant research at the University of Alberta relevant to the politics, economy, history, or society of Western Canada, and/or related areas. Eligible applicants should have Canadian citizenship and have received within the last 3 years, or who will shortly receive, their doctoral degree. Appointments are made for 2 years. Fellowship provide $38,000 (Cdn)/year as well as a one-time research grant of $4,000 and airfare. Deadline: 1/2/02. Contact: Research Grants Office, 780/492-5360; fax: 780/492-6446; http://www.ualberta.ca/~graduate/finaid/postdoc.htm#notley or http://gradfile.fgsro.ualberta.ca/finaid/postdoc.htm#Killam.
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WHITAKER FOUNDATION
Biomedical Engineering Research Grants support projects that apply or develop substantive engineering methods and techniques to solve important medical problems. Consistent with the interdisciplinary nature of biomedical engineering research, applicants with traditional engineering backgrounds should develop appropriate and credible collaborations with colleagues in the life sciences and medicine. The principal investigator must be a faculty member on a tenure track or more than 2 years beyond their doctorate and must have authority to initiate and carry out independent research and supervise graduate students. Applicants with a Ph.D. in engineering or science, or an equivalent degree, must have received the degree less than 8 years prior to applying. If the applicant received a medical degree, the general residency must have been completed less than 6 years before applying. Funding may be up to $240,000 with a duration of 3 years. Transitional funding of up to $80,000 will be considered for investigators who hold a biomedical engineering research grant. Deadlines: 12/1/01, 4/1/02, 8/1/02, 12/1/02 (Preliminary Proposals); 2/1/02, 6/1/02,10/1/02, 2/1/03 (Formal Proposals). Contact: Wolf W. von Maltzahn, 703/528-2430; WvonMaltzahn@whitaker.org; http://www.whitaker.org/grants/rganc.html.
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WEIZMANN INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE
Postdoctoral Fellowships provide support for postdoctoral candidates in the life sciences, physics, chemistry, mathematics, computer science, and science teaching. Eligible applicants are scientists from any country who have received a Ph.D. degree or equivalent within the past 3 years. Duration is one year, with a possible extension for a second year and third year. Deadlines: 1/1/02, 5/15/02. Contact: Nicole Friesem, Feinberg Graduate School, Telephone 972-8-934-3158; postdoc@weizmann.ac.il; http://www.weizmann.ac.il/feinberg/postdoc_fell.shtml.
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DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Personnel Preparation to Improve Services for Children with Disabilities--Projects of National Significance. Awards of up to $200,000/year for up to 36 months are available to support projects that address issues of national significance and develop, evaluate, and disseminate innovative models to serve as blueprints for systemic improvement in recruitment, preparation, induction, retention, or ongoing professional development of personnel who have responsibility for ensuring that children with disabilities achieve to high standards and become independent, productive citizens. Purposes are: to address State-identified needs of qualified personnel in special education, related services, early intervention, and regular education, to work with children with disabilities; and ensure that those personnel have skills and knowledge, derived from practices determined through research and experience to be successful, needed to serve those children. These personnel include early intervention personnel, regular and special education teachers, administrators, related service personnel, and paraprofessionals. Several priorities are listed in the announcement. Deadline: 1/25/02. Contact: 977/433-7827; edpubs@inet.ed.gov; http://www.ed.gov/pubs/edpubs.html; http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=2001_register&docid=01-25130-filed.
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NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION (NSF)
Integrated Research Challenges in Environmental Biology grants support large, explicitly integrated research projects that address major issues within or across the field of environmental biology. Environmental biology is broadly defined to include research fields of systematic biology, population biology, ecology, ecosystem studies, ecological and evolutionary physiology, and animal behavior. The competition especially seeks to enable the kinds of synergisms and intellectual leveraging that result from integrated and synoptic approaches to key questions from differing perspectives and scales. Proposals are expected to address a complex scientific problem best approached with a multifaceted, integrated research design. It is expected that the research design will have multiple components, typically involving multiple processes, organisms, and/or systems. Proposals must include plans for meaningful integration of research with education, outreach, or broad dissemination of research results. Proposals may involve experimentation and/or simulation modeling, but neither is a requirement. The maximum award size will be approximately $3M, with a funding period of 3-5 years. Deadline: 1/7/02. Contact: Program Officer, irec@nsf.gov; http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/1999/nsf9912/nsf9912.htm.

UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is also available electronically online at http://www.und.edu/dept/our/uletter.htm. All articles submitted for publication should be labeled “University Letter” and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu or Fax to 777-4616. Attachments to University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number. University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations, Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.
UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.