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University Letter

November 7, 1997

Volume 35 No. 12

UNIVERSITY LETTER
University of North Dakota at Grand Forks
Vol. 35, Number 12, November 7, 1997

UNIVERSITY LETTER IS ALSO AVAILABLE ELECTRONICALLY in the Events and News section of UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address is: http://www.und.nodak.edu

The University Relations Office maintains an index for the University Letter.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Recycle Day Is Nov. 15

Don Miller To Give Second Talk In Faculty Lecture Series Nov. 18

Community Conversation With President Baker Set For Nov. 19

EVENTS TO NOTE

OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

BILLBOARD

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

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RECYCLE DAY IS NOV. 15

UND students are responding to Gov. Schafer's proclamation of "Recycle Day" Saturday, Nov. 15, by engaging in a recycling war. Student recycling representatives of the National Residence Hall Honorary and Plant Services hope to increase student awareness of the opportunities to recycle on campus by sponsoring this contest. The hall which recycles the most paper, glass, and plastic will be declared the winner on Nov. 18. The addition of glass and plastic recycling bins in all residence halls, Memorial Union, Gamble, Rural Technology Center, and Ryan Hall will also increase efforts. When recycling your glass and plastic containers, please make sure to remove the covers, empty and rinse thoroughly.

Check out the display case during the week of Nov. 10-17 in the Memorial Union created by ECO, (Environmental Conservation Organization). They welcome anyone interested in environmental issues to join them by contacting the Student Government Office. They generally meet each month at the Memorial Union.

Please think "Reuse or Recycle" before throwing anything away.

-- Janice Troitte, Recycling Coordinator.

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DON MILLER TO GIVE SECOND TALK IN FACULTY LECTURE SERIES NOV. 18

Visual Arts Professor Don Miller will deliver the second presentation in the newly resurrected Faculty Lecture Series. His talk, "Thoughtful Impressions in Clay: The Cable Years," will begin at 5 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 18, in the North Dakota Museum of Art. The lecture will be preceded by a reception at 4 p.m.

Other speakers in the series will include Jay Meek, Professor of English, "Paul Cezanne and the Durango Kid: The House of Poetry," Tuesday, Feb. 24, and Joanne Gabrynowicz, Professor of Space Studies, "Of Faith, Framers and Farmers: A Space Odyssey," Tuesday, April 7.

From 1954 to 1988, about 160 faculty members delivered talks about their work to colleagues, students and friends as part of the University's most venerable lecture series.

At a gathering of UND's Chester Fritz Distinguished Professors this summer, a decision was made to resurrect the Faculty Lecture Series. Its goal is to enhance UND's academic atmosphere by showcasing the scholarly lives of several faculty selected from across the campus.

The lectures aim to present, with some depth and rigor, the scholarly questions and goals of the faculty members. The series is funded through the UND President's Office.

Donald H. Miller

Donald H. Miller has been a member of the UND faculty since 1970. He was hired by the engineering dean to be the chair (and only faculty member) of the Department of Ceramics, which then was located in the basement of Babcock Hall. Ceramics students referred to their quarters as "the catacombs."

The ceramics program became part of the College of Fine Arts and found a new home with the construction of the Hughes Fine Arts Center. From Fargo, Miller received his baccalaureate degree from North Dakota State University, the Master of Arts from New Mexico Highlands University, and the Master of Fine Arts from Mills College.

An authority on the pottery of Margaret Kelly Cable, he co-wrote the book, "University of North Dakota Pottery The Cable Years." Miller was promoted to the rank of Professor of Visual Arts in 1987.

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COMMUNITY CONVERSATION WITH PRESIDENT BAKER SET FOR NOV. 19

The next scheduled University Community Conversations, commonly referred to as "The Nine O'Clocks," will be Wednesday, Nov. 19, and Dec. 17 in the Memorial Union Ballroom.

The UND Community Conversations will provide an opportunity for faculty, staff and students to learn more about what is happening at UND, and also to ask questions.

-- Jan Orvik, Editor, University Letter.

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EVENTS TO NOTE

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COLLOQUIUM SERIES SET

The Electrical Engineering Department invites the UND community to attend the second presentation in its Colloquium Series this semester. Waleed W. Smari from Syracuse University in New York will be our guest speaker Friday, Nov. 7, at noon in 324 Harrington Hall. Pizza and refreshments will be provided. Dr. Smari is a candidate for a faculty position in the Department of Electrical Engineering. An abstract of his presentation, "Models for Stochastic Scheduling of Tasks on Parallel Computing Systems," follows.

Task scheduling plays a vital part in determining the performance of a multiprocessor computer system. Scheduling can be used to exploit the underlying hardware in a multiprocessor system so that any parallelism inherent in an application program can be fully utilized and overhead can be minimized. These considerations become incorporated into the problem of deciding when and where to execute tasks within a multiprocessor system.

What exactly constitutes a scheduling problem is not always well defined. It can range from simple sequencing of events to a complex process which includes the allocation of a variety of resources and the timing of numerous different types of operations.

This presentation will address the development of scheduling strategies that can contribute to the efficient use of multiple-processor systems. The aim is to optimize some performance measures in the presence of system/task constraints. This can be attained on the basis of a deterministic or a stochastic model. Optimum stochastic scheduling strategies for selected parallel processor models will be discussed. The presentation will also include a general classification of various scheduling models.

Please contact me at hsalehfa@sage.und.nodak.edu or at extension 777-4432 if you have questions or if you would like to give a colloquium. -- Hossein Salehfar, Electrical Engineering.

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GRADUATE COMMITTEE WILL MEET MONDAY

The Graduate Committee will meet Monday, Nov. 10, at 3:05 p.m. in 305 Twamley Hall. The agenda will include:

  1. Consideration of a request by the Public Administration Department to:
    1. Delete PSCI 537, Administration of the Public Bureaucracy.
    2. Add PSCI 536, Public Personnel Administration; PSCI 538, Public Budgeting and Financial Management; and PSCI 533, Administrative Ethics in the Public Sector.
  2. Consideration of a request by the Public Administration Department to offer a Health Administration track in the MPA program adding PSCI 551, Health Administration and Organization; PSCI 552, Health Policy; and ECON 575, Seminar in Health Economics.
  3. Review of the subcommittee's report on the Physics graduate program.
  4. Discussion on collaborative research.
  5. Matters arising.

-- Harvey Knull, Dean, Graduate School.

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BIOCHEMISTRY ALUMNUS WILL LECTURE

Gene C. Ness, Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of South Florida, College of Medicine, Tampa, will give a lecture, "Regulation of Cholesterol Metabolism by Triiodothyronine" Monday, Nov. 10, at 11 a.m. in the Clifford Haugen Lecture Hall (Room 1360), School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

Dr. Ness, a native of Bemidji, Minn., holds his Ph.D. (with the late Dr. Ya-Pin Lee) from the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences. He carried out postdoctoral work with Dr. John Porter at the Veterans Administration Hospital in Madison, Wis., and has been on the faculty of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of South Florida since 1986. He has published extensively in the area of regulation of enzymes of cholesterol metabolism. His work complements, and sometimes disputes, that of Nobel laureates Brown and Goldstein. He is the recipient of many research grant awards, and has served on a number of prestigious grant review panels and editorial boards. In 1988, the Florida Academy of Sciences selected Dr. Ness as the recipient of their Outstanding Scientist award. Everyone is welcome to attend this lecture.

-- Robert Nordlie, Professor and Chair of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

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LOTUS MEDITATION CENTER WILL HOLD TALK

Rebecca Moore (Philosophy and Religion) will present "The Practice of Christian Mysticism" at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 10, in the Lotus Meditation Center, 2908 University Ave. -- Tamar Read, Professor Emeritus of Music.

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FORUM WILL DISCUSS PROMOTION AND TENURE

Faculty members are invited to attend a forum on promotion and tenure at UND from noon to 1 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 12, in the Memorial Room of the Memorial Union. Panelists scheduled are Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Marlene Strathe, Graduate Dean Harvey Knull, and Dean of the College of Nursing Elizabeth Nichols. There will be a question and answer period after the panelists speak. The forums are sponsored by the President's Advisory Council on Women (PAC-W). For more information, ontact Jan Zahrly, Management, 777-4697. -- Melissa Parker, HPER, 777-3887.

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HISTORY DEPARTMENT WILL HOLD "HISTORY FOR LUNCH" SPECIAL

At noon Wednesday, Nov. 12, in 217 Merrifield Hall, the History Department and Phi Alpha Theta will sponsor a talk by Walter Ellis (History) titled "Demetrius I Poliorcetes and the Politics of the Early Hellenistic World." There will be a question and discussion period following Dr. Ellis's presentation, which is open to all. Bring your lunch. For more information please contact me. -- David Rowley, Associate Professor of History, 777-3380.

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GEOGRAPHY WILL HOLD FORUM

A Geography Forum will be presented by John Anderton (Geography) at noon Thursday, Nov. 13, in 364 Clifford Hall. His presentation is "Lake Superior's South Shore - The Land of Hiawatha." Dr. Anderton plans to teach this material in his Geography 462 Summer Session class. All students interested in taking this course should attend this slide presentation. All interested persons are welcome to attend. -- Department of Geography.

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PAC-W WILL HOLD CELEBRATION TEA

The President's Advisory Council On Women will host a Celebration Tea Thursday, Nov. 13, at 4 p.m. in the North Dakota Museum of Art. This tea is in honor of those individuals who would have been honored at the PAC-W Bread and Roses Banquet last spring for their efforts on behalf of women. The tickets are free and may be obtained from PAC-Council Members: Dorette Kerian (Computer Center), Loretta Heuer (Nursing), Tami Carmichael (Honors), Cindy Juntunen (Counseling), Charlie Minier (VPAA Office), Julie Erjavec (Law), Marcia O'Kelly (Law), Melissa Parker (HPER), Dan Rice (Instructional Development), Rhonda Schwartz (Law Library), Jan Zahrly (Management), Sara Hanhan (Teaching and Learning), and Donna Oltmanns (Women's Center). For further information, contact Sara Hanhan, Teaching and Learning, 777-3239, or Donna Oltmanns, Women's Center, 777-4300. -- President's Advisory Council on Women.

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BIOCHEMISTRY WILL HOLD SPECIAL LECTURES

The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology will hold its Robert Massee Lecture at 10 a.m. Friday, Nov. 14, in the Reed Keller Auditorium, Medical Science. Ronald Lindahl, Chairman and Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, the University of South Dakota School of Medicine at Vermillion, will present "Alcohol Dehydrogenase, Aldehyde Dehydrogenase and Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Why Drinking and Sex are Not Good for You." This will be a rather general lecture intended for the general public as well as for medical students, graduate students, faculty and staff.

He will present a second lecture, "Mammalian Alcohol Dehydrogenase: From Alcohol to X-Rays," from 2 to 3 p.m. Friday, Nov. 14, at the Human Nutrition Laboratory Library. This lecture is more scientifically intensive than the Robert Massee Lecture, and is intended primarily for scientists and graduate students.

Ronald Lindahl received his Ph.D. in Genetics and Biochemistry from Wayne State University and carried out postdoctoral studies at Argonne National Laboratory in Chicago. He was Assistant Professor of Biology and Biochemistry at the University of Alabama, and assumed his present position as Professor and Chairman of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of South Dakota School of Medicine in 1989. Dr. Lindahl has served as a member and as Chair of NIH Study Sections dealing with alcoholism and alcohol abuse and has been the recipient of funding for many years for his ongoing studies in the area of alcohol metabolism. He works at the level of basic enzymology, enzyme mechanisms, enzyme structure, and regulation at the gene level. He is an internationally recognized authority on the enzymes alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase.

Everyone is welcome to attend these lectures. -- Robert Nordlie, Professor and Chair of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

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CAMPUS CONFIDENTIALITY TELECONFERENCE SET

Please mark your calendars for Friday, Nov. 14, from noon to 1:30 p.m. for a teleconference in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl on campus confidentiality. It is sponsored by the Student Affairs Office, and the Admissions and Records Office; the North Dakota University System Student Affairs Council is considering financial assistance for the presentation.

The title is "Campus Confidentiality on Trial: An Open or Closed Case?" Join the experts in grappling with controversial issues of privacy and protection versus publicity and punishment as higher education faces a mandate to open its student records and hearings. Distinguished educators will debate how members of the campus community should respond to new requirements. Panelists include: William Bracewell, Director of Judicial Programs at the University of Georgia; LeRoy Rooker, Director of the United States Department of Education Family Policy Compliance Office; Eileen Wagner, attorney in cases such as Brzonkala v. Virginia Tech; and Gary Pavela, Director of Judicial Programs at the University of Maryland - College Park. Panelists will examine the current system of campus confidentiality and suggest strategies for addressing potential conflicts between an individual's right to privacy and the public's need to know.

This teleconference is being presented by the Higher Education Doctoral Program at Bowling Green State University in cooperation with the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA) and the Association for Student Judicial Affairs. It is coordinated by Donald D. Gehring, Director of the Higher Education Doctoral Program, and produced by WBGU-TV.

-- Lillian Elsinga, Associate Vice President for Student Affairs.

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COUNSELING SETS COLLOQUIUM

The Department of Counseling will hold a Topic Colloquium Tuesday, Nov. 18, from 12:30 to 1:45 p.m. in 316 Montgomery Hall. Dominic Barraclough, a fourth-year doctorate student in Counseling Psychology, will present "Values Clarification and Career Decision Making." -- Sue Jacobs, Coordinator, Counseling 565N: Topics in Counseling and Counseling Research and Practice.

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HEPATITIS DIAGNOSIS PROGRAM SET

"Hepatitis C Diagnosis, Clinical Management, and Prevention," a live satellite teleconference, will be held Saturday, Nov. 22, from 1 to 3 p.m. in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. The registration fee is $25. Deadline for registration with the Hepatitis Foundation International (HFI) was Nov. 1. The Center for Disease Control and the Public Health Training Network are co-sponsors, and the Grand Forks Health Department is co-hosting the program with UND. Registration forms are available from me.

-- Liz Tyree, College of Nursing, 777-4522.

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OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

SPRING REGISTRATION BEGINS NOV. 10

Registration for the 1998 spring term begins Monday, Nov. 10. Students will register and drop/add using the Touchtone Telephone System from Nov. 10 through Jan. 13. Students who have proper signatures for registration actions not permitted by the ALFI Touchtone Telephone System may add these courses at the Office of Admissions and Records, second floor, Twamley Hall, during normal office hours, starting Nov. 13. Students may register on or after appointment times as printed on their registration forms. -- Veriena Garver, Admissions and Records Officer, Admissions and Records.

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INTEGRATED STUDIES INFORMATION AVAILABLE

In its 11th year, the Integrated Studies Program continues to work on helping students develop the skills defined in the University general education goals: critical thinking, communication, creative thinking, recognizing relationships, and recognizing and evaluating choices. Work in those areas is organized around a broad semester theme, rather than around a specific discipline, and is carried out in a variety of ways, including (but not limited to) the following: discussions of texts and library research work, written work, guest presentations, field trips, and cooperative projects. The majority of class meetings are in a small group discussion format involving approximately 20 students and one faculty member.

The theme for spring 1998 is "How Do You Know?" and the program is offering credits in each of three general education categories: English Composition (3 credits, Communication), Introduction to Drama (2 credits, Arts and Humanities), Introduction to Philosophy (3 credits, Arts and Humanities), and Integrated Studies Lab Science (4 credits, Math, Science and Technology lab science). (NOTE: The science course has been approved by the General Education Requirements Committee for fulfillment of a four-credit lab science requirement.)

The faculty in the spring 1998 program will be Pat Sanborn (Philosophy and Humanities), Carl Barrentine (Biology and Humanities), and Elizabeth Hampsten (English).

The spring program will be limited to the first 60 students who reserve a place. If you have advisees or know of students who might be interested in more information on the spring program, please have them call the Integrated Studies office at 777-3622, or stop by the office at 134 O'Kelly Hall.

-- Yvonne Holter, Humanities and Integrated Studies.

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PEACE STUDIES NOMINATIONS SOUGHT

Each semester the Center for Peace Studies invites nominations for new members. Currently, 45 faculty from seven UND schools and colleges and 19 departments are members of the Center. The faculty supervise the interdisciplinary undergraduate program in the College of Arts and Sciences. Membership may, but does not necessarily include, teaching courses which are cross-listed between their department and Peace Studies (see page 131 in the 1997-99 Catalog).

The Peace Studies faculty recognizes its responsibilities to:

Any UND faculty or staff member interested in the Center for Peace Studies and its programs, including adjunct faculty status, may contact me. The deadline for nominations is Friday, Nov. 21. Candidates will be presented to the Peace Studies faculty at the Wednesday, Nov. 26, meeting which will be held in the new Peace Studies suite in 135 O'Kelly Hall at 3:30 p.m. -- Janet Kelly Moen (Sociology), Peace Studies Coordinator, phone 777-4414, Box 7136, e-mail jamoen@badlands.nodak.edu.

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FACULTY AND STAFF ASKED TO SUBMIT PUBLICATIONS

The Seventh Annual Elwyn B. Robinson Lecture is being planned in the East Asian Room of the Chester Fritz Library. A bibliography for the Lecture will be compiled. To assist in its preparation, all deans have received a letter requesting notification of all publications, to include books, chapters in books, and articles published by faculty and staff from September 1996 to August 1997. All faculty and staff are encouraged to submit citations of their publications to their respective deans or department chairs as soon as possible to enable them to meet the Library's deadline of Friday, Nov. 14.

-- Frank D'Andraia, Director of Libraries.

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DOCTORAL EXAMS SET FOR HATFIELD AND HENKE

The final examination for Thomas L. Hatfield, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Analytical Chemistry, is set for 1 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 13, in 101 Abbott Hall. The dissertation title is "Synthesis, Characterization and Electrochemical Investigations of Metal Complexes Derived From Pendent-Arm Macrocycles." David Pierce (Chemistry) is the committee chair.

The final examination for Kevin R. Henke, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Geology, is set for 3 p.m. Friday, Nov. 14, in the Leonard Hall Conference Room. The dissertation title is "Chemistry and Environmental Implications of Thio-RedR and 2, 4, 6-Trimercaptotriazine Compounds." Dexter Perkins (Geology) is the committee chair.

Members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend. -- Harvey Knull, Dean, Graduate School.

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GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

NOMINATIONS/APPLICATIONS INVITED FOR FACULTY RESEARCH AWARD

Nominations/applications are invited for the UND Foundation Thomas J. Clifford Faculty Achievement Award for Excellence in Research. The winner of this award will receive a plaque and a check for $2,000 at the 1998 Founders Day Banquet on Feb. 26.

The following information should be provided:

  1. A listing of publications of significant, original and high-quality research, scholarly, and creative contributions in nationally recognized professional journals that are refereed by peer reviewers and/or a listing of juried competitions and invited performances/exhibitions.
  2. Overall scholarly activities, such as service as a reviewer of research proposals for Federal agencies or other funding sources, service as a referee or editor for professional journals, and contributions to training students in research, scholarly, and creative endeavors;
  3. Potential for significant contributions to enhancing the effectiveness of the subject matter taught in the classroom.

Faculty, staff and students may make nominations, and faculty are invited to nominate themselves. Since the Committee will not engage in the gathering of documentation, each nomination or application must be accompanied by thorough evidence of the nominee's qualifications for the award. Five copies of each nomination and supporting documentation should be received at the Office of Research and Program Development no later than Monday, Jan. 12.

Since previous awardees are ineligible for nomination until five years have passed, Richard Crawford (1997), Arthur R. Buckley (1996), Sharon and Richard Wilsnack (1995), Michael Anderegg (1994), and Robert C. Nordlie (1993) may not be nominated this year.

The awardee will be selected by the same committee that selects the Fellows of the University Award for Departmental Excellence in Research. This committee includes the Director of the Office of Research and Program Development (Chair), the Dean of the Graduate School, the Chair of the Faculty Research Committee, one faculty member from the Graduate Committee, and one faculty member from the Faculty Research Committee.

If further information is desired, please call the Office of Research and Program Development at 777--4279.

-- Carl Fox, Director of Research and Program Development.

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NOMINATIONS INVITED FOR DEPARTMENTAL EXCELLENCE IN RESEARCH AWARD

Nominations for the Fellows of the University Award for Departmental Excellence in Research, recognizing research, scholarly, and creative productivity, are due at the Office of Research and Program Development Monday, Jan. 12. The winning department will receive a $1,500 award and a plaque at the 1998 Founders Day Banquet on Feb. 26.

Nominations should include information that will allow the Selection Committee to judge the quantity and quality of the research, scholarly, and creative activities of the department. At a minimum, such nominations should include a listing of published research or other creative or scholarly activities for the 1996-97 year. Additional information for that year, such as a brief synopsis of ongoing research activities, the number and type of active sponsored projects, dissertations or other research papers presented by students, performances or scholarly presentations by faculty, etc., should be included if they contribute to the overall picture of a department's research, scholarly, and creative activities. A statement of support from the dean is optional. To expedite the review process, five (5) copies of the nomination and supporting documentation should be submitted to ORPD.

Since previous awardees are ineligible for nomination until five years have passed, the Departments of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Biology, Geology and Geological Engineering, History, and Pharmacology and Toxicology may not be nominated this year.

If further information is desired, please call the Office of Research and Program Development at 777-4279.

-- Carl Fox, Director of Research and Program Development.

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EPSCoR SEEKS NEW FACULTY START-UP PROPOSALS

ND EPSCoR is inviting proposals from department chairs in Science, Engineering, and Mathematics which request start-up funds for faculty to be hired during 1998. The major goal of this program is to staff North Dakota research universities with new faculty who will be very competitive for NSF CAREER awards.

Chairs intending to apply should submit an abstract, including a brief description of the desired qualifications of a successful candidate, to the ND EPSCoR office by noon Friday, Nov. 14. These abstracts will be used to assist in the selection of a review panel for the proposals. Full proposals are due in the ND EPSCoR office by noon Wednesday, Dec. 19.

For the complete RFP's on this program, please consult the ND EPSCoR web site at: http://www.ndsu.nodak.edu/epscor/ or contact the ND EPSCoR Office at 777-2492 or 231-8400. -- David Givers, ND EPSCoR, NDSU.

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UNDERGRADUATE SUMMER RESEARCH OPPORTUNITY AVAILABLE

Advanced Undergraduate Research Awards (AURA), formerly known as REU, provides undergraduate students the opportunity to participate in faculty-mentored research. The goal is to encourage undergraduate students to attend graduate school and to pursue a career in science, engineering or mathematics research.

AURA award winners become members of a faculty-led research project. Participants work for eight to 10 weeks during the summer at the University of North Dakota or North Dakota State University.

Students can earn up to $2,500. Depending on availability of funds, up to 10 awards will be made on each research campus. Applications are due by Wednesday, Nov. 26. AURA is sponsored by and application forms are available from the ND Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (ND EPSCoR), 415 Twamley Hall, UND (9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.) or 214 Ladd Hall, NDSU. ND EPSCoR is a North Dakota University System program. Visit the homepage at http://www.ndsu.nodak.edu/epscor

For more information contact me. -- David Givers, Program Officer, givers@badlands.nodak.edu.

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INFRASTRUCTURE IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM PROPOSALS SOUGHT

ND EPSCoR is soliciting proposals from interested researchers in Science, Engineering, and Mathematics. This proposal request is for individual, tenure track faculty members who plan to initiate a research program in one or more areas normally supported by the National Science Foundation.

Proposals are due in the ND EPSCoR office by noon Jan. 12.

Following the review process, awards will be made on or about March 16. Award recipients will be funded in installments and will be required to submit proposals on the ND EPSCoR funded project to NSF in order to continue receiving support from ND EPSCoR.

For the complete RFP's on this program, please consult the ND EPSCoR web site at: http://www.ndsu.nodak.edu/epscor/ or contact the ND EPSCoR Office at 777-2492 or 231-8400. -- David Givers, ND EPSCoR, NDSU.

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PROPOSALS SOUGHT FOR HIGH-PERFORMANCE APPLICATIONS IN VISUALIZATION, STORAGE AND COMPUTING (HAVOC)

Faculty and staff are invited to submit proposals of no more than five pages (plus cv's) to Office of Research and Program Development or the NDSU Office of Research Administration on "high-performance high-speed network applications." Successful proposers will be co-investigators on the State's Connections proposal to NSF. The connections program provides funding for a high-bandwidth connection to the vBNS (very high-speed Broadband Network Service), also referred to as the "research internet." If the NSF connections proposal is successful, the vBNS will be brought to the NDSU and UND campuses and to the desktops and laboratories of researchers.

Interested faculty and staff should propose research projects that will extensively utilize or be greatly enhanced by the vBNS connection. Collaborations between and among UND and NDSU faculty and faculty at other research institutions are strongly encouraged.

No match from departments and colleges is required; however, match commitments (signatures required) will be considered positively in the selection process.

Proposals should have a title, PI list (cv's attached for each), description, budget, and signatures. Proposals must be received by Friday, Nov. 21.

Proposals must be for research applications, and involvement of industry, public school systems, and other state entities is highly encouraged.

Such things as:

and other "killer applications" research is solicited.

A total of $100,000 is available at each campus to directly support researchers. The following are examples of items proposers might request:

-- Carl Fox, Director of Research and Program Development.

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ORPD LISTS RESEARCH, GRANT OPPORTUNITIES

Following are research and grant opportunities. For more information, contact the Office of Research and Program Development at 777-4278.

CHESTER H. JONES FOUNDATION

Competitors may submit up to ten poems for the National Poetry Competition. Each poem will be judged separately. Prizes range from $10 to $1,000. All poems must be written in the English language, must be the unaided work of the competitor and must not have been previously published or broadcast. The entry fee is $2 for the first poem, $1 for all others. Persons who enter the competition must live, work or study in the U.S.A. or be an American or Canadian Citizen. Send a SASE to the Foundation for further information and an entry form. Contact: P.O. Box 498, Chardon, OH 44024. Deadline: 3/31/98.

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CHARLES A. DANA FOUNDATION

The Foundation makes major grants for collaborative research on diseases and disorders of the brain carried out by consortia of scientists from medical centers with outstanding strength in neuroscience. The goal is to advance diagnosis, treatment, or prevention within a specific timeframe. To date, consortia have been created to address 1) memory loss in older persons, 2) the genetic basis of manic-depressive illness, 3) language-based learning disorders, 4) therapy for HIV dementia, and 5) neuroimaging leadership training. The formation of most new consortia is initiated by the Foundation itself. Individuals and institutions proposing other opportunities for application of recent advances in neuroscience should describe their idea in a brief letter to the Foundation. Funds for such initiatives are very limited and grantees are often required to share project costs or raise matching funds. Contact: 212/223-4040; danainfo@danany.dana.org; http://www.dana.org/. Deadline: None.

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CORO MIDWESTERN CENTER

The Coro Fellows Program in Public Affairs is a 9-month experiential, graduate-level program, beginning in September and ending in early June. Each Fellow completes a series of at least six assignments. These include internships with government agencies, political campaigns, community-based organizations, labor unions, media organizations, and businesses. The assignments provide the opportunity to obtain first-hand experience with many diverse individuals and organizations which help shape public policy. Tuition is $3,500. Living stipends of up to $6,000 are available in St. Louis. Candidates may be from any discipline. Twelve Fellows are selected for each of Coro's centers: St. Louis, New York City, San Francisco, and Los Angeles. Contact: Andrew Thorp, Director, Fellows Program; 314/621-3040; 314/621-1874; athorp@inlink.com or coro@inlink.com; http://www.coro.org/. Deadline: 2/11/98.

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AMERICAN ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY (AAS)

Visiting academic research fellowships of 1-12 months will be awarded for research and writing using the AAS library's resources which offer broad research opportunities in American history and culture through 1876. Long-term, postdoctoral fellowships provide support for 4-12 months' residence for scholars beyond the doctorate. Senior and mid-career scholars are encouraged to apply. Short-term fellowships provide support for 1-3 months' residence for doctoral candidates engaged in dissertation research as well as scholars holding the Ph.D. Special short-term grants support scholars working in the history of the book in American culture, in the American 18th century, on or with American prints, and on or with newspaper and magazines. Contact: 508/752-5813; fax 508/754-9069; cfs@mwa.org; gopher://mark.mwa.org. Deadline: 1/15/98.

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NATIONAL HEART, LUNG AND BLOOD INSTITUTE

The Biomedical Research Training Program for Underrepresented Minorities offers undergraduate and graduate students the opportunity to receive training (12-24 months) in fundamental sciences and clinical disciplines in the biomedical research field. Applicants must be juniors, seniors or graduate students enrolled full-time in an accredited institution; have a major in biological, physical, behavior, mathematical, computer, engineering or statistical sciences; have completed at least 18 hours in science-related course work relevant to biomedical, behavioral, or statistical research; have a GPA of 3.3 or better; and be U.S. citizens or non-citizen nationals or resident aliens eligible for citizenship within 4 years. Contact: Regina Anderson, 301/496-1763; or fax 301/402-2322. Deadline: 12/15/97.

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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (HRSA)

The Fall 1997 HRSA Preview, which includes information on HRSA programs, deadlines, contact information, etc., is now available. Programs are listed in the following areas: HIV/AIDS, Health Professions, Rural Health, Maternal and Child Health, Primary Health Care, Scholarships for Disadvantaged Students, Faculty Loan Repayment, Nurse Education Loan Repayment. The Preview is available at http://www.hrsa.dhhs.gov, 1/888/333-HRSA or hrsa.gac@ix.netcom.com. Application materials for some HRSA programs may also be downloaded. The Preview can be downloaded in Adobe Acrobat format from http://www.hrsa.dhhs.gov/preview.htm. You may also register on-line to receive specific grant application materials.

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JOHN M. OLIN FOUNDATION, INC.

Grants generally ranging from $15,000 to $105,000 support programs in the areas of Public Policy Research, Strategic and International Studies, American Institutions, and Law and the Legal System. Programs supported strengthen political, economic, and cultural institutions that reflect the democratic processes by encouraging the study of connections between economic and political freedoms, and the cultural heritage that sustains them. The Foundation funds research, institutional support, fellowships, professorships, lectures and lecture series, books, scholarly journals, journals of opinion, conferences and seminars, and, on occasion, television and radio programs. Proposals should take the form of a letter, for which guidelines are available. Contact: 330 Madison Avenue, 22nd Floor, New York, NY 10017; 212/661-2670. Deadline: None.

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH

Innovative Approaches to Disability Prevention through Behavior Change (RFA OD-98-002) This is a four-year research grant program to test interventions designed to achieve long-term health behavior change. The health behaviors of interest--tobacco use, insufficient exercise, poor diet, and alcohol abuse--are among the top ten causes for morbidity and premature mortality. The RFA solicits intervention studies aimed at either comparing alternative theories related to mechanisms involved in behavior change, or assessing the utility of a particular theoretical model for changing two or more health-related behaviors, rather than simply demonstrating the efficacy of a single behavior change program. Grants for the study of theory-based interventions that target initiation and maintenance of behavioral change are encouraged. A major goal of this solicitation is to stimulate research that addresses the difficult problems of long-term behavior change, so selected theories must be directed toward both behavior change and maintenance of this change over the long-term. Partnerships between behavior change experts, intervention specialists, and appropriate health professionals are essential. Contact: Susan D. Solomon, Ph.D.; 301/496-0979; fax 301480-8905; ssolomon@nih.gov; deadlines: 4/1/98 (letter of intent), 5/21/98 (application).

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NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE (NIDA)

The Exploratory/Developmental Grant Applications (PA-98-004) program announcement is to notify the extramural research community that the National Institutes on Drug Abuse (NIDA) accepts exploratory/developmental grant applications that fall within its program interests. The objective of the exploratory/developmental mechanism (R21) is to encourage applications from individuals who are interested in testing innovative or conceptually creative ideas that are scientifically sound and may advance our understanding of drug abuse and addiction. Another objective is to encourage necessary initial development to provide a basis for important future research in a particular field. Any research objective within NIDA's programmatic interest is acceptable under this announcement. Contact: Harold Gordon, Ph.D.; 301/443-6710, fax 301/594-6847; gf6s@nih.gov. Deadline(s): 2/1/98, 6/1/98,10/1/98.

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BF GOODRICH COLLEGIATE INVENTORS PROGRAM

The BF Goodrich Collegiate Inventors Program is open to any student enrolled full time in a college or university in the U.S. The invention, idea or process submitted must be original, and must be the result of work completed by a student(s) with his/her faculty advisor. Participation in the All-Collegiate Category is open to graduate, postgraduate and undergraduate students. Up to 3 winners are recognized in both this category and the Undergraduate Category. Judging criteria include originality, adequacy, completeness, usefulness and presentation. Contact: Paul Kunce, Program Coordinator; 800/968-4332; fax 330/762-6313; pkunce@invent.org; or www.invent.org. Deadline: 6/2/98.

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WINTERTHUR MUSEUM, GARDEN, AND LIBRARY

Winterthur Research Fellowships (1-6 months, $1,000-$2,000) and NEH Fellowships at Winterthur (up to $30,000, 4-12 months) are offered to academic, museum, and independent scholars, and to support dissertation research in America's artistic, cultural, social, and intellectual history at Winterthur Museum, Garden, and Library in Delaware. Resources include approximately half a million imprints, manuscripts, visual materials, and printed ephemera supporting interdisciplinary study of American life into the early 20th century, and a museum collection of 89,000 objects made or used in American up to 1860. Contact: 302/888-4649; fax 302/888-4870; pelli@udel.edu. Deadline: 1/15/98.

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES

The Institute of American Cultures Fellowship Program: American Indian Studies provides postdoctoral or visiting scholar support for up to one year of research on American Indian Studies. Fellows participate in a teaching or research program at the Center. Contact: 310/825-7315; fax 310/206-7060. Deadline: 12/31/97.

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UNIVERSITY OF IOWA

Obermann National Fellowships for Faculty Research are awarded in area studies, social sciences, and the humanities to allow faculty and professionals to participate in a 2-week summer research seminar. The 1998 topic is "Sovereignty and Colonialism in Puerto Rico, Cuba, Guam, the Phillipines and Hawaii, and Their Impact on the United States." Contact: 319/335-4034; fax 319/335-4077; lorna-olson@uiowa.edu.

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NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES (NEH)

Challenge Grants help institutions/organizations secure long-term support for, and improvement in, programs, activities, and resources in the humanities. The preferred use of grant funds is for augmentation or establishment of endowment funds that produce income to support humanities programs and activities such as faculty development, cataloguing of collections, fellowships, lecture series, visiting scholars, publishing subventions, hiring consultants, maintenance of facilities, endowed positions, acquisitions, and preservation/conservation programs. Contact: Stephen Ross, Director; 202/606-8309; fax 202/606-8579; challenge@neh.fed.us or sross@neh.fed.us; http://www.neh.fed.us/; e-forms at http://www.neh.fed.us/html/pdf_form.html. Deadline: 3/1/98 (draft proposal); 5/1/98 (formal application).

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OTTO BREMER FOUNDATION

Areas of interest of the Foundation are community affairs, education, health, human services, religion, rural poverty, racism and other forms of discrimination. The following types of grants are made: project/program, capital, general operating, seed money, challenge/matching. Applicants are encouraged to make initial contact by telephone or written inquiry and to contact Foundation Staff for assistance in the development of a proposal. Contact: 612/227-8036; fax 612/227-2522. Deadline: None.

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-- Sally Eckert-Tilotta, Assistant to the Director of the Office of Research and Program Development. *******

BILLBOARD

EMPLOYEES MAY TAKE UND COURSES AT LOW COST

For just $4.17 per credit hour, UND employees may enroll in one university course per semester. You may take up to three academic courses each calendar year, and are granted work release time upon arrangement with your supervisor. You must have successfully completed your probationary period. You can continue your education, earn a degree, or improve your skills. Staff members can work toward a degree; faculty may take courses for credit.

You can choose from hundreds of courses, ranging from management and sciences to languages and music, from exercise and ceramics to first aid and financial management. Here's how to enroll:

  1. Pick up admissions materials, registration materials and a tuition waiver form at the Office of Admissions, 205 Twamley Hall (phone 777-3821) or at the Graduate School, 414 Twamley Hall (phone 777-2784).
  2. Choose the course you'd like to take. Prerequisites or other factors may affect registration.
  3. Fill out the forms and return them to Admissions (undergraduates) or the Graduate School, and have your supervisor/dean sign the tuition waiver forms.
  4. Return the completed waiver forms to Admissions.
  5. Register according to instructions in the Time Schedule of Classes.

If you are enrolling for the first time, you need to complete and return an "Application for Admission" form, available from the Admissions Office, 205 Twamley Hall, or the Graduate School, 414 Twamley Hall. There is a $25 matriculation fee for an employee who has not previously enrolled. You may need to file transcripts from schools that you have previously attended. Please note that some colleges have additional fees that cannot be waived. Take advantage of your $1,000 benefit. -- Diane Nelson, Director of Personnel, and Alice Poehls, Director of Admissions and Records.

*******

INTERNAL MEDICINE ANNOUNCES NEW APPOINTMENTS

Several appointments have been announced by the Department of Internal Medicine. The department, based in Fargo, is headed by CHARLES FOULKS, Professor and Chair, who oversees educational programs for third- and fourth-year medical students and resident-physicians training in internal medicine.

WILLIAM NEWMAN has been named Vice Chair of the department and Director of the third-year internal medicine clerkship. He is also Chief of the Division of Endocrinology for the department and a past recipient of the Professor of the Year Award, given by residents-in-training for outstanding teaching;

Chiefs of divisions with the Department of Internal Medicine are:

-- H. David Wilson, Dean of Medicine and Health Sciences.

*******

UND IS CAUSE MEMBER

The University has renewed its membership in CAUSE, the association for managing and using information resources in higher education. The membership in CAUSE is a campuswide benefit. Information on CAUSE and CAUSE services can be found on the CAUSE World http://www.cause.org/ For those without access to the Internet, you may call or fax the CAUSE office to order publications, to register for the CAUSE annual conference and Management Institute, and to get reports from the ID Survey.

I hope that you will put your membership to work for your institution by using CAUSE services often. We want to make a difference -- in your day-to-day work and in your institution's long-range plans. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, University Letter, for Linda Kelley, Staff Associate, Customer Services, CAUSE.

*******

SAM'S CLUB PURCHASES REQUIRE PO OR SOS FORMS

Purchases at Sam's Club require a purchase order or SOS form for admittance into the store. Pay from the receipt you receive, since no invoice will be sent. Please process for payment as soon as possible; Sam's Club does charge a late fee that will be passed on to the department. If the receipt has been misplaced, contact Janelle McGarry at the Purchasing Office, 777-3881. -- Linda Romuld, Director of Purchasing.

*******

FLEXCOMP OPEN ENROLLMENT SET

The open enrollment period for the FlexComp program for the Plan Year of Jan. 1, 1998, through Dec. 31, 1998, is Oct. 28 through Thursday, Nov. 30. During this time all benefitted employees will have the opportunity to enroll or re-enroll in this fringe benefit opportunity. This program helps employees pay for medical and dependent care expenses with pre-tax dollars instead of after-tax dollars.

If you have any questions or need enrollment forms, call me. -- Heidi Vogel, Payroll Office FlexComp Clerk, 777-4423.

*******

TIAA/CREF OFFERS DISABILITY REFUND

The University provides a disability insurance policy for all benefitted employees. Employees who currently participate in the TIAA/CREF retirement plan are covered by a TIAA/CREF Disability Group Policy. Premiums are charged to individual departments, based on the salaries of their TIAA/CREF employees. The University was notified in September that there would be a retroactive premium reduction effective July 1, 1997. This refund was credited back to departments on a prorated basis and will appear under TCC 357 Disability Insurance in your October Fund Summaries. If you have any questions, contact the Payroll Office (777-4226). -- Pat Hanson, Director of Payroll.

*******

SAFETY OFFICE OFFERS DEFENSIVE DRIVING COURSE

The Safety Office would like to share a paragraph from a letter received recently from Ken Kadrmas, State Fleet Risk Manager, in Bismarck:

"The North Dakota University System experienced a 35 percent decrease in motor vehicle collisions in the first quarter of fiscal year 1997-1998. State Fleet would like to commend all University directors, safety officers, motor pool personnel and drivers for an outstanding effort in accident reduction."

The UND Safety Office will hold free Defensive Driving Courses Wednesday, Nov. 12, from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in 211 Rural Technology Center, and Tuesday, Nov. 25, from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. in the same room. Registered employees may make arrangements for one family member to attend with them. This course is required in accordance with a memo received on Oct. 2, 1996, from Paul Feyereisen, State Fleet manager in Bismarck. The following criteria was given for any UND employee who is authorized to drive State Fleet vehicles:

  1. Any individual who operates a State Fleet vehicle daily.
  2. Any individual who operates a State Fleet vehicle at least once a month.
  3. Any individual who has received a traffic violation or had an accident while operating a State Fleet vehicle within the past calendar year.
  4. Any operator of seven-, 12-, or 15-passenger vans transporting four or more passengers at least once per month.

The course may reduce your North Dakota insurance premium and could possibly take away points from your driving record. Please call the Safety Office at 777-3341 by Nov. 10 or Nov. 21 to register. -- Norma Haley, Safety Office.

*******

LIST SEMINARS IN U2 CATALOG

List your seminars and workshops in next semester's "University Within the University" catalog.

If your department would like to have your seminars/workshops listed in the second semester University within the University catalog, please submit the following information to Jo Coutts, Box 9021 by Monday, Dec. 1:

If you are looking for a space for your workshop, you can call Kara Hyde at 777-2128 to see if there is meeting space available in the Rural Technology Center. -- Jo Coutts, University Within the University.

*******

U2 ACTIVITIES LISTED

November University Within the University activities are:

To register for any of the above seminars, contact Kara Hyde 7-2128 or kara_hyde@mail.und.nodak.edu.

-- Jo Coutts, University Within the University.

*******

CILT LISTS WORKSHOPS

The Center for Instructional and Learning Technologies (CILT) will offer the following workshop and studio sessions in November and December.

FACULTY WORKSHOP LABORATORY

Introduction to PowerPoint 97 -- Wednesday, Nov. 17, 1 to 4 p.m.; Thursday, Dec. 4, 9 a.m. to noon. In this introduction to the basic concepts of PowerPoint, you will create and electronically present a slide show that incorporates text, drawing objects, clip art and a graph.

Intermediate PowerPoint 97 -- Wednesday, Nov. 12, 9 to noon; Wednesday, Dec. 3, 9 a.m. to noon. This is an introduction to the customizing features of PowerPoint, in which you will create a graph, organizational chart, and background template. Visual elements are added from scanned photos. The completed presentation is saved to disk for output on 35 mm slides.

Advanced PowerPoint 97 -- Thursday, Nov 13, 9 a.m. to noon; Tuesday, Nov. 18, 1 to 4 p.m.; Monday, Dec. 8, 6 to 9 p.m. In this introduction to the interactive and multimedia features of PowerPoint, you will insert slides from files, object-link and embed with files and programs, and insert movies and sound.

Microsoft Publisher 97 -- Thursday, Nov. 20, 9 a.m. to noon. Create effective, high-impact publications, syllabi, newsletters, study guides, and reports. With this program, you can turn your ideas into professional-looking publications, in print and online.

NEW MEDIA STUDIO OFFERINGS

Macromedia Director 6.0 -- Session 1, Wednesday, Nov. 19, 1 to 5 p.m.; Session 2, Friday Nov. 21, 1 to 5 p.m.; Session 3, Monday, Nov. 24, 1 to 5 p.m.; Session 1, Monday, Dec. 1, 8 a.m. to noon; Session 2, Wednesday, Dec. 3, 8 a.m. to noon. Macromedia Director is a multimedia authoring tool that lets you create powerful interactive applications including presentations, kiosks, CD-ROM titles, and web-based animations. This 12-hour workshop series introduces new users to the principal features and capabilities of Director. Participants integrate text, graphics, animation, digital video, and sound to create an interactive multimedia application. Participants are asked to commit to attending all three sessions.

Adobe PageMill -- Thursday, Nov. 13, 1 to 3 p.m.; Monday, Nov. 17, 9 to 11 a.m.; Tuesday, Dec. 2, 10 a.m. to noon. This two-hour session will provide a step-by-step guide to creating a simple WWW site. This is a hands-on workshop that will allow participants to build a working web site for supplemental course communication using Adobe PageMill.

Slide and Flat-Copy Scanning -- Wednesday, Nov. 19, 9 to 10 a.m.; Thursday, Nov. 25, 1 to 2 p.m.; Thursday, Dec. 4, 9 to 10 a.m.; Friday, Dec. 5, 1 to 2 p.m. Images used in presentations can come from diverse sources. They might be illustrations, photographs, forms, or documents. If they are not in digital form, images require conversion with digitizing devices. This session will explore the best use of slide and flat-copy scanning as an input devices.

File Transfer Protocol -- Thursday, Nov. 20, 2 to 3 p.m.; Monday, Dec. 8, 10 to 11 a.m. FTP is the official file transfer mechanism of the Internet and therefore is supported by hundreds of thousands of machines. Clients can transfer files from their offices to our FTP server for imaging without ever having to leave the office.

CD-ROM Burning -- Thursday, Nov. 20, 2 to 3 p.m.; Monday, Dec. 8, noon to 1 p.m. CD-ROM Burner is a complete software package for testing and creating custom CDs. The CD Burner software simplifies the process of creating permanent archives of critical data, and mastering industry-standard CDS for universal interchangeability.

Digital Camera -- Tuesday, Nov. 18, 4 to 5 p.m.; Wednesday, Nov. 26, 10 to 11 a.m.; Thursday, Dec. 4, 10 to 11 a.m. This session is to familiarize you with the use of the DC50. With the DC50 you take pictures electronically, and connect the camera to your computer and download your pictures. Once the images are stored on your computer, you can create impressive documents and presentations using various software applications.

Introduction to Adobe Photoshop 4.0 -- Wednesday, Nov. 12, 1 to 3 p.m.; Tuesday, Dec. 9, 5 to 7 p.m. Photoshop is the industry-standard software for manipulating photographic images. This session will introduce the tools in the tool palette and provide a hands-on exercise in the basic features of this software.

To register for the above programs, please call 777-2129. -- Kathy Smart, Director, CILT.

*******

PSYCHOLOGY SEEKS RESEARCH SUBJECTS

A study examining how menopausal status and associated estrogen levels affect different cognitive functions (such as memory, attention, and word fluency) is currently under way in the Psychology Department. All women between the ages of 35 and 60 (approximately) are invited to take part in the study. A stipend of $10 is offered to all women who participate in the study. Participation will take between one and one-and-a-half hours.

The study has been approved by the Institutional Review Board of the University and is under the direction of Ric Ferraro. If you are interested or would like more information about the study please call Kristi Lokken at 787-5887 or 777-4348. You can also reply by e-mail to klokken@plains.nodak.edu. -- Kristi Lokken, Graduate Teaching Assistant, and F. Richard Ferraro, Psychology.

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RESEARCH PARTICIPANTS SOUGHT

Participants are needed for research projects dealing with language and memory. You must be over 55 years of age to participate. All projects take less than one hour, are conducted on the UND campus, and participants will make $5 to $10 for their time and effort. If interested please call me. -- F. Richard Ferraro, Psychology, 777-2414.

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CHESTER FRITZ LIBRARY:

The Chester Fritz Library hours of operation for Veterans Day are: Monday, Nov. 10, 8 a.m. to midnight; Tuesday, Nov. 11 (Veterans Day), 1 p.m. to midnight; Wednesday, Nov. 12, resume regular hours. -- Patricia Berntsen, Assistant Director, Chester Fritz Library.

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HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY:

The Harley E. French Library of the Health Sciences will be open regular hours on Veterans Day. The hours are 7:30 a.m. to midnight.

-- Judith Rieke, Assistant Director and Collection Development Librarian, Library of the Health Sciences.

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COMPUTER CENTER:

The Computer Center will close for the Veterans Day holiday at midnight Monday, Nov. 10, and will reopen at midnight Tuesday, Nov. 11. -- Donna Bonderud, Production Control, Computer Center.

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MEMORIAL UNION HOLIDAY HOURS

The Memorial Union will be open Veterans Day with limited services available as listed below:

MONDAY, NOV. 10

TUESDAY, NOV. 11

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FREE COUNSELING OFFERED

The UND Psychological Services Center is offering free confidential crisis counseling for flood-related issues. Please call 777-3691 for telephone or on-site appointments. -- Psychological Services Center.

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ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

NEW NORTH DAKOTA QUARTERLY AVAILABLE

The latest issue of North Dakota Quarterly is now available in the University Bookstore and the North Dakota Museum of Art. This is a special issue subtitled "Ernest Hemingway: New Interpretations." The new issue features work on Earnest Hemingway from "The Sun Also Rises" (by David Goodman) and the posthumous "The Garden of Eden" (by Jacqueline Brogan). Approaches to Hemingway are with theory ("Psychosomatics" by Erik Nakjavani) and without ("Misreadings" of Hemingway on gender by Robert Gajdusek). H.R. Stoneback uses biographic research to analyze Hemingway's role in the liberation of France in WW II. Other writers include Don Junkins, Richard Davison, and James Meredith.

The single issue is $12, and subscriptions for four attractive and absorbing issues remain at $25 a year.

-- Robert Lewis, Editor, North Dakota Quarterly.

*******

INTERNATIONAL CENTRE LISTS EVENTS

The International Centre, 2908 University Ave., invites you to join them for the following events.

On Friday, Nov. 7, there will be an International Cof-Tea Cup, which is an opportunity for UND students, faculty, staff, and the Greater Grand Forks community to enjoy international tea, coffee, and pastry while discussing world issues from 3 to 4:30 p.m.

At 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 13, the Centre will hold a French Cabaret with French poetry, literature, readings, music, and food.

All are welcome -- Sharon Rezac Andersen, Director, International Centre.

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WOMEN'S CENTER LISTS EVENTS

The Wednesday, Nov. 12, Feast and Focus program at noon in the Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., is "An Informal Conversation with Grand Forks Mayor Pat Owens."

The Thursday, Nov. 13, For Women Only program is "Healing Circle." The Healing Circle is a Native American Sioux tradition based on the belief that healing can only occur in community and not alone. With our hectic schedules and tendency to do things ourselves, the concept of staying connected gets lost. Before we know it we can become isolated. So if you go, go, go and don't get support, it's likely you will forget how much it really matters. The Healing Circle will end with the ritual of passing on the light. The light or source exists for all of us at all times. We regulate the connections when we receive support and are conscious of it, but when it's taken away we miss it. Come and experience the healing within the community of the Women's Center.

Please join us. -- Donna Oltmanns, Coordinator, Women's Center.

*******

WORKSHOP WILL DISCUSS CHRISTMAS WITHOUT ORNAMENTS

You are invited to a session, "Christmas Without Our Ornaments," Monday and Thursday, Nov. 17 and 20. Our holiday ornaments and traditions hold tremendous meaning and sentiment for us. The flood washed our "things" and our "places" away. Join us in one of these sessions to discover ways to celebrate a meaningful holiday season and to re-establish traditions.

Sessions will be held Monday, Nov. 17, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and Thursday, Nov. 20, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Memorial Union River Valley Room.

To register, contact Kara Hyde, University Within the University, at 777-2128, or kara_hyde@mail.und.nodak.edu. -- Jo Coutts, University Within the University.

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FRANCES FORD DEBUTS ON THE BURTNESS STAGE

The University of North Dakota's theatre arts department proudly presents "The Belle of Amherst," by William Luce. The one-woman show, starring guest artist Frances Ford, will run Wednesday through Saturday, Nov. 19-22. Performances will begin each evening at 7:30 p.m. at the Burtness Theatre. For reservations, please call the box office at 777-2587.

In a richly human dramatization, we get to know the amazing and original mind of Emily Dickinson, a poet who wrote of the greatest pain and the deepest joy that a human can experience but only left the Massachusetts college town of Amherst two or three times in her lifetime. The small life of a small woman becomes enormous, and her happiness and strengths become those of the audience as her poetry lights the stage. Her laughter and shrewd observations of human foibles make the evening a delightful one.

The play begins when the poet is 53, but her narrative begins in Emily's 15th year, when her hopes of being the Belle of Amherst were full. The play touches on many events throughout the poet's life. Miss Ford, known for her many roles in the American musical theatre, skillfully brings Miss Dickinson from the world of her girlhood to the quiet of her parlor, from the giddiness of youth to the wisdom of a woman in her fifties.

This 70-minute version of the Luce play was developed by Frances Ford as part of her Master of Fine Arts thesis at the University of Florida, and has already been seen by audiences at the Center of the Performing Arts in Gainesville, Fla., and at the Theatre of Memory in High Springs, Fla.

This production will introduce Miss Ford's acting to Grand Forks audiences and it is hoped will delight newcomers in the poetry and New England world of Emily Dickinson. Those who are familiar with the short, elliptical poems will find new delight in the words and images.

-- Laurie Hinn, Theatre Department Promotions Director.

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STUDIO ONE LISTS GUESTS

Dyan Rey, a yoga instructor, and Lloyd Blackwell, a T'ai Chi instructor, will be featured on a segment during the Friday, Nov. 7, broadcast of "Studio One." Rey and Blackwell teach classes involving meditation and how it can help people cope with stress. Their programs are taught at the Lotus Meditation Center in the UND International Centre.

Sue Goebel, a women's health nurse practitioner with Valley Health and a UND School of Nursing professor, will also be featured on "Studio One." She will discuss three different subjects that share a common bond: proxemics, body language and ethnography. Proxemics, a science involving four distinct zones in which humans operate, relates with the need for personal space and how that space can be invaded. Body language is a form of communication important to relationships. Movement and gestures are more meaningful in most conversations than the actual words. Goebel will talk about how body language is used between men and women. Goebel will also speak about ethnography, the study of handwriting.

"Studio One" is an award-winning live one-hour weekly morning show featuring news, weather, sports, and interviews. The program airs on Channel 3 in Grand Forks live on Friday at 7 a.m., and is repeated at noon, and 7 p.m. Rebroadcasts can be seen Saturdays at 10 a.m. and noon, as well as Monday through Wednesday at 7 p.m. "Studio One" also airs in Fargo, Bismarck/Mandan, Minot, and Minneapolis. -- Kevin Machayya, Studio One Marketing Team.

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CRAFT CENTER ANNOUNCES GINGERBREAD WORKSHOPS

The ever-popular annual "Gingerbread" House workshops are scheduled for Saturday, Nov. 22, or Sunday, Dec. 7, from 1:30 to 3 p.m. at the University Craft Center. Cost is $6 per kit, which builds one house using graham crackers, milk cartons, frosting, and candies. Adults are invited to bring a child to build these together. Please call the Craft Center at 777-3979 to register and indicate which day and how many kits you would like.

-- Bonnie Solberg, Craft Center Coordinator.

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HOLIDAY MINI-CRAFT WORKSHOPS SCHEDULED

Holiday mini-craft workshops will be held each Friday from noon to 1 p.m. at the Craft Center through Nov. 21. The Craft Center is located on the third floor of the Memorial Union. The Nov. 7 project is a Pole Santa. Projects for Nov. 14 are a muslin angel and/or a paper angel; projects for Nov. 21 are stencilled greeting cards and/or gift wraps. Different projects will be featured each week at a cost of $1 per project. Get a start on replacing or adding to your handmade ornament collection. To register, call 777-3979.

-- Bonnie Solberg, Craft Center Coordinator.

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APPLICATIONS ACCEPTED FOR HOLIDAY CRAFT SHOW AND SALE

Applications are now being accepted for exhibitors in the 19th Annual Holiday Craft Show and Sale which will be held Friday, Dec. 5, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Memorial Union Ballroom. It is sponsored by the University Craft Center and the Memorial Union. Original hand-crafted work is eligible. Students are encouraged to participate. For an application form and further information, please call 777-3979. -- Bonnie Solberg, Craft Center Coordinator.

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MET OPERA AUDITIONS SET FOR NOV. 15

The 34th annual North Dakota Auditions, conducted under the auspices of the Metropolitan Opera National Council, will be held Saturday, Nov. 15, beginning at 11 a.m. in the Josephine Campbell Recital Hall of the Hughes Fine Arts Center on campus. The auditions will be followed by a public master class conducted by Vernon Yenne, Professor of Voice at Wichita State University and a past president of the National Association of Teachers of Singing. Admission to both events is free and open to the public.

--G. Paul Larson (Economics), Director, North Dakota District of the Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions.

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GREEN AND WHITE DAYS LISTED

President Kendall Baker has declared Friday, Nov. 14, a Green and White Day. Interested employees may green and white with their casual wear in celebration of athletic events (hockey vs. Minnesota-Duluth, football at Northern Colorado, men's and women's basketball vs. Minnesota-Duluth, volleyball -- NCAA regional tournament). Other Green and White Days during the coming months are: Dec. 2 (hockey vs. St. Cloud State, men's and women's basketball vs. Moorhead State, football -- NCAA finals); Jan. 16 (hockey vs. Michigan Tech, men's and women's basketball at South Dakota State and Augustana); Feb. 13 (hockey vs. Minnesota Gophers, men's and women's basketball vs. Augustana and South Dakota State); March 6 (hockey vs. Wisconsin, men's and women's basketball, NCAA regionals); April 17 (Baseball vs. Morningside and University of South Dakota). -- Jan Orvik, Editor, University Letter.

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS

NOVEMBER 1997

(Please contact Mavis at the Office of University Relations, Box 7144, or call 777-4304, if you wish to make changes or have an event included.)

Through Thurs., Nov. 20 -- MASTER OF FINE ARTS EXHIBITION, Douglas Pfliger, Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center.

Thurs., Nov. 6 -- UNIVERSITY SENATE MEETING, Room 7, Gamble Hall, 4:05 p.m.

Thurs., Nov. 6 -- PUBLIC LECTURE, Werner Fornos, President of the Population Institute, Washington, D.C., will present "Socio-Economic Underdevelopment" at the Integrated Studies Program meeting from 10:45 to noon at 125 O'Kelly Hall; he will also discuss "Environmental Degradation and Global Climate Change" at a joint Geography-Sociology Forum from noon to 1 p.m. in 366 Clifford Hall; the lectures are open to the public.

Thurs., Nov. 6 -- FOR WOMEN ONLY: Rites of Passage, "Every Ending Is A Beginning," Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

Thurs., Nov. 6 -- EDUCATIONAL FORUM featuring people who have recently traveled outside North America, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; all are welcome; call 777-3273 for more information.

Thurs., Nov. 6 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND vs. Brandon University, Hyslop Sports Center, 7:30 p.m.

Fri., Nov. 7 -- LAST DAY TO DROP A FULL-TERM COURSE.

Fri., Nov. 7 -- LAST DAY TO CHANGE TO/FROM S/U GRADING.

Fri., Nov. 7 -- ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COLLOQUIUM, "Models for Stochastic Scheduling of Tasks on Parallel Computing Systems," presented by Waleed W. Smari from Syracuse University in New York, 324 Harrington Hall, noon; Smari is a candidate for a faculty position in the Department of Electrical Engineering.

Fri., Nov. 7 -- INTERNATIONAL COF-TEA CUP, an opportunity for UND students, faculty, staff, and the Greater Grand Forks community to enjoy international tea, coffee, and pastry while discussing world issues, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 3 to 4:30 p.m.; all are welcome.

Fri., Nov. 7 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND vs. University of Northern Colorado, Hyslop Sports Center, 7 p.m.

Fri. and Sat., Nov. 7-8 -- HOCKEY, UND at Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colo., 7:35 p.m.

Sat., Nov. 8 -- TEST, PRAXIS Series Tests, Rooms 114 and 116 Witmer Hall, 7:30 a.m.

Sat., Nov. 8 -- TEST, National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification (NCTRC), Room 7, Gamble Hall, 12:30 p.m.

Sat., Nov. 8 -- FOOTBALL, UND vs. Augustana College, Memorial Stadium, 1 p.m.

Sat., Nov. 8 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND vs. University of Nebraska at Omaha, Hyslop Sports Center, 7 p.m.

Mon., Nov. 10 -- GRADUATE COMMITTEE MEETING, 305 Twamley Hall, 3:05 p.m.

Mon., Nov. 10 -- BIOCHEMISTRY LECTURE, "Regulation of Cholesterol Metabolism by Triiodothyronine," presented by Gene C. Ness, Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of South Florida, College of Medicine, Tampa, Clifford Haugen Lecture Hall, Room 1360, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, 11 a.m.

Mon., Nov. 10 -- LECTURE, "The Practice of Christian Mysticism," presented by Rebecca Moore (Philosophy and Religion), Lotus Meditation Center, 2908 University Ave., 7:30 p.m.

Mon., Nov. 10 -- CONCERT, B.B. King, Chester Fritz Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

Tues., Nov. 11 -- HOLIDAY, VETERANS DAY.

Tues., Nov. 11 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND vs. North Dakota State University, Hyslop Sports Center, 7 p.m.

Wed., Nov. 12 -- "FUTURE DAY: THE BUSINESS SEMINAR," a live broadcast seminar on future of business and the new global economy, Rural Technology Center, 9:15 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Wed., Nov. 12 -- FORUM ON PROMOTION AND TENURE AT UND, Memorial Room, Memorial Union, noon to 1 p.m.; call 777-4697 for more information.

Wed., Nov. 12 -- HISTORY FOR LUNCH SPECIAL, "Demetrius I Poliorcetes and the Politics of the Early Hellensitic World," presented by Walter Ellis (History), 217 Merrifield Hall, noon; bring your lunch; call 777-3380 for information.

Wed., Nov. 12 -- FEAST AND FOCUS, "An Informal Conversation with Grand Forks Mayor Pat Owens," Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

Wed. and Thurs., Nov. 12-13 -- CONFLICT RESOLUTION SKILLS: Negotiation and Problem Solving in the Work Place, seminar offered by the UND Conflict Resolution Center, Memorial Union, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day; designed to teach participants how to handle conflicting situations in the work place; call the Center at 777-3664 or udcrc@badlands.nodak.edu for more information.

Thurs., Nov. 13 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for Thomas L. Hatfield, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Analytical Chemistry, 101 Abbott Hall, 1 p.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Thurs., Nov. 13 -- CELEBRATION TEA, President's Advisory Council on Women will host the tea in honor of those individuals who would have been honored at the PAC-W Bread and Roses Banquet last spring for their efforts on behalf of women, North Dakota Museum of Art, 4 p.m.; call Sara at 777-3239 or Donna at 777-4300 for more information.

Thurs., Nov. 13 -- GEOGRAPHY FORUM, "Lake Superior's South Shore - The Land of Hiawatha," presented by John Anderton (Geography), 364 Clifford Hall, noon; all interested persons are welcome to attend.

Thurs., Nov. 13 -- FOR WOMEN ONLY, "Healing Circle," Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

Thurs., Nov. 13 -- FRENCH CABARET, with French poetry, literature, readings, music and food, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; all are welcome; call 777-3273 for more information.

Thurs., Nov. 13 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND at Bemidji State University, Bemidji, Minn., 7 p.m.

Fri., Nov. 14 -- TEST, Multi-State Professional Responsibility Examination (MPRE), Ballroom, Memorial Union, 12:30 p.m.

Fri., Nov. 14 -- BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY ROBERT MASSEE LECTURE at 10 a.m. in the Reed Keller Auditorium, Medical Science, "Alcohol Dehydrogenase, Aldehyde Dehydrogenase and Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Why Drinking and Sex are Not Good for You," presented by Ronald Lindahl, Chairman and Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, the University of South Dakota School of Medicine at Vermillion; Lindahl will present a second lecture, "Mammalian Alcohol Dehydrogenase: From Alcohol to X-Rays," from 2 to 3 p.m. at the Human Nutrition Laboratory Library.

Fri., Nov. 14 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for Kevin R. Henke, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in Geology, Leonard Hall Conference Room, 3 p.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

Fri., Nov. 14 -- TELECONFERENCE, "Campus Confidentiality on Trial: An Open or Closed Case?" Memorial Union Lecture Bowl, noon to 1:30 p.m.; sponsored by the Student Affairs Office, the Admissions and Records Office, and the North Dakota University System Student Affairs Council.

Fri., Nov. 14 -- INTERNATIONAL COF-TEA CUP, an opportunity for UND students, faculty, staff, and the Greater Grand Forks community to enjoy international tea, coffee, and pastry while discussing world issues, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 3 to 4:30 p.m.; all are welcome.

Fri., Nov. 14 -- GREEN AND WHITE DAY, President Baker has approved this day for employees to wear UND colors and jeans to show support for our Sioux athletes.

Fri., Nov. 14 -- SWIMMING & DIVING (men's and women's), UND at South Dakota State University Dual, Brookings, S.D.

Fri. and Sat., Nov. 14-15 -- HOCKEY, UND vs. University of Minnesota-Duluth, Engelstad Arena, 7:35 p.m.

Fri. and Sat., Nov. 14-15 -- VOLLEYBALL, National Collegiate Athletic Association Regional Tournament.

Sat., Nov. 15 -- KAYUMANGGI PHILIPPINE PERFORMING ARTS, Chester Fritz Auditorium, 7 p.m. (sponsored by International Centre).

Sat., Nov 15 --NORTH DAKOTA METROPOLITAN OPERA NATIONAL COUNCIL AUDITIONS followed by a public vocal master class conducted by Vernon Yenne of Wichita State University, Josephine Campbell Recital Hall, 11 a.m. and 3 p.m.; admission is free and open to the public; call 777-3360 for more information.

Sat., Nov. 15 -- RECYCLE DAY, student recycling representatives of the National Residence Hall Honorary and Plant Services hope to increase student awareness to recycle on campus.

Sat., Nov. 15 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND vs. Dakota Wesleyan University, Hyslop Sports Center, 4 p.m.

Sat., Nov. 15 -- BASKETBALL, WOMEN'S, UND vs. University of Minnesota-Duluth, Hyslop Sports Center, 6 p.m.

Sat., Nov. 15 -- FOOTBALL, UND at University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, Colo., 1 p.m. (MST).

Sun., Nov. 16 -- CONCERT, Ray Price, Chester Fritz Auditorium, 4 p.m.

Mon., Nov. 17 -- SATELLITE TELECONFERENCE, "Protecting Your Campus From Crime: Challenges and Solutions," Memorial Union Lecture Bowl, 1 to 3 p.m.

Mon., Nov. 17 -- WORKSHOP, "Christmas Without Our Ornaments," Memorial Union River Valley Room, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. (also Thurs., Nov. 20); call 777-2128 to register.

Tues., Nov. 18 -- FACULTY LECTURE SERIES, "Thoughtful Impressions in Clay: The Cable Years," presented by Donald Miller, professor of Visual Arts; North Dakota Museum of Art, 5 p.m.; the lecture will be preceded by a reception at 4 p.m.

Tues., Nov. 18 -- COUNSELING COLLOQUIUM, "Values Clarification and Career Decision Making," presented by Dominic Barraclough, a fourth-year doctorate student in Counseling Psychology, 316 Montgomery Hall, 12:30 to 1:45 p.m.

Tues., Nov. 18 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND at University of Minnesota-Morris, Morris, Minn., 7:30 p.m.

Tues. through Sat., Nov. 18-22 -- THEATRE, "The Belle of Amherst" will feature the acting talents of Visiting Assistant Professor Frances Ford, as she brings to life her 70-minute version of this William Luce play, Burtness Theatre, 7:30 p.m.; tickets are $5; call 777-2085 for tickets.

Wed., Nov. 19 -- UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY CONVERSATIONS, President Baker will provide an opportunity for faculty, staff and students to learn more about what is happening at UND, Ballroom, Memorial Union, 9 a.m.

Wed., Nov. 19 -- LESSONS AT LUNCH, "Creative Gift Wrapping," presented by Bonnie Solberg, Coordinator, Craft Center/Sign and Design Studio, Leadership Inspiration Center, third floor, Memorial Union, noon to 1 p.m.; a collection of fun and informative sessions on various topics of interest to staff, faculty, and students held on alternate Wednesdays; all sessions are free; call 777-3926 to register.

Wed., Nov. 19 -- FEAST AND FOCUS, "Truth Telling In Women's Lives," program based on Harriet Lerner's book, Dance of Deception, Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

Wed. through Sat., Nov. 19-22 -- THEATRE, "The Belle of Amherst," by William Luce; guest artist Frances Ford will star as part of her Master of Fine Arts thesis at the University of Florida, Burtness Theatre, 7:30 p.m.; call 777-2587 for ticket information.

Thurs., Nov. 20 -- LAST DAY TO FILE PRELIMINARY APPROVAL OF THESIS OR DISSERTATION IN THE GRADUATE SCHOOL.

Thurs., Nov. 20 -- TEST, College-Level Examination Program (CLEP), Room 200, McCannel Hall, 8:30 a.m.

Thurs., Nov. 20 -- WORKSHOP, "Christmas Without Our Ornaments," Memorial Union River Valley Room, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; call 777-2128 to register.

Thurs., Nov. 20 -- FOR WOMEN ONLY: Rites of Passage," Harvesting the Self," Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

Thurs., Nov. 20 -- CELEBRATING GEOGRAPHY AWARENESS WEEK, UND Geography faculty will highlight current events and facilitate a discussion focused on world geography, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; all are welcome; call 777-3273 for more information.

Fri., Nov. 21 -- INTERNATIONAL COF-TEA CUP, an opportunity for UND students, faculty, staff, and the Greater Grand Forks community to enjoy international tea, coffee, and pastry while discussing world issues, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 3 to 4:30 p.m.; all are welcome.

Fri., Nov. 21 -- BASKETBALL, WOMEN'S, UND vs. Bellarmine College (Kentucky), Hyslop Sports Center, 6:30 p.m.

Fri. and Sat., Nov. 21-22 -- HOCKEY, UND vs. Denver University, Engelstad Arena, 7:35 p.m.

Fri. through Sun., Nov. 21-23 -- SWIMMING & DIVING, UND at University of Minnesota Invitational, Minneapolis, Minn.

Sat., Nov. 22 -- LIVE SATELLITE TELECONFERENCE, "Hepatitis C Diagnosis, Clinical Management, and Prevention," Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.; registration fee is $25; deadline for registration with the Hepatitis Foundation International (HFI) was Nov. 1; call 777-4522 for information.

Sat., Nov. 22 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND vs. University of Mary, Hyslop Sports Center, 6 p.m.

Sat., Nov. 22 -- FOOTBALL, National Collegiate Athletic Association First Round Playoffs.

Sat., Nov. 22 -- VOLLEYBALL, National Collegiate Athletic Association Quarterfinals.

Mon., Nov. 24, through Thurs., Dec. 11 -- MASTER OF FINE ARTS EXHIBITION, Angie Garberina, Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center.

Tues., Nov. 25 -- INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARD deadline for proposals requiring full board review for Fri., Dec. 5, meeting.

Tues., Nov. 25 -- COUNSELING COLLOQUIUM, 316 Montgomery Hall, 12:30 to 1:45 p.m.; topic will be announced in the University Letter.

Tues., Nov. 25 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND vs. Mayville State University, Hyslop Sports Center, 8 p.m.

Tues., Nov. 25 -- BASKETBALL, WOMEN'S, UND vs. Mayville State University, Hyslop Sports Center, 6 p.m.

Wed., Nov. 26 -- DENIM DAY, wear your casual clothes, pin your button on, and know that your dollar goes to charity.

Thurs., Nov. 27 -- HOLIDAY, THANKSGIVING DAY.

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REMINDER! The attachments referred to are not included in the electronic form of the University Letter. However, you will find the attachments with the paper copy.

UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is also available electronically through UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address is http://www.und.nodak.edu.

All articles submitted for publication should be labeled "University Letter" and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu. Attachments to University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number. University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations, Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.

UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

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