[University Letter logo]

University Letter

October 10, 1997

Volume 35 No. 8



UNIVERSITY LETTER
University of North Dakota at Grand Forks
Vol. 35, Number 8, October 10, 1997

UNIVERSITY LETTER IS ALSO AVAILABLE ELECTRONICALLY in the Events and News
section of UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The
address
is: http://www.und.nodak.edu

The University Relations Office maintains an index for the University
Letter.

------------------------
          TABLE OF CONTENTS
"Nine-O'Clock" Briefings Set
     EVENTS TO NOTE
Talk Will Focus On Alchemy Of Mysticism
Paula Poundstone Headlines Special "Thank You, Students" Program
Biology Sets Seminar
Pre-Med Day Set For Oct. 11
Graduate Committee Will Meet Monday
History Lecture Rescheduled
Women's Center To Host Clothesline Project
College/Career Fair Set For Oct. 14
English Lecture Series Will Feature Jay Meek
Norwegian Ambassador Will Visit City
U Senate Will Hold Discussion Forum
Biology Announces Wheeler Lecture
Curriculum Committee Sets Meeting
Theatre Arts Will Host Sam Abel
Opera Critic Will Speak At Women Studies Salon
Christus Rex Lists Events
Scholarly Writing Workshops Set
Faculty, Grad Students Invited To Reception
     OF ACADEMIC INTEREST
Unsatisfactory Progress Reports Due Oct. 17
Faculty Invited To Use SGID To Improve Teaching
Applicants Sought For Ostfoldakademiet Professorships
Doctoral Exams Set For Westby, Varnson
Student Nominations Sought For Academic Team
     GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS
EPSCoR Seeks Faculty Mentors
Research, Grant Opportunities Listed
     UNIVERSITY SENATE
University Senate Report
     BILLBOARD
Native American Opportunity Day Set
CILT Offers Faculty Workshops
Phi Beta Kappa Members Sought
1997-98 UND Directory Sales Begin Monday
UNDInfo Logs 2,300 "Hits" Per Day
Flu Shots Available
Volunteers Sought For Iron Study
Printing Center Will Not Provide Cheshire Labeling
Majority Of '97 Medicine Grads Chose Primary Care Field
College Republicans Seeks Advisor
Rotary Will Provide Christmas Decorations
Free Counseling Offered
Items For Sale To Public On Bid
Green And White Days Listed
Apple Computer Rebates Available From Bookstore
     ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT
Breast Cancer Walk/Run Set For Oct. 19
Craft Center Will Hold Mini-Craft Workshops
Master Chorale Announces New Season
International Centre Lists Events
Museum Coffee Bar Has New Hours
Minneapolis Gospel Sound Will Perform
Museum Concert Series Begins Oct. 12
Craft Expert, Financial Planner Are Studio One Guests
     CALENDAR OF EVENTS
*******
------------------------

"NINE-O'CLOCK" BRIEFINGS SET

Times for the "nine-o'clock" briefings, University Community
Conversations, by
President Baker have been set as follows: Wednesday, Oct. 22, Wednesday,
Nov.
19, and Wednesday, Dec. 17.  All briefings will be held at 9 a.m. in the
Memorial Union Ballroom.  University Community Conversations will provide
an
opportunity for faculty, staff and students to learn more about what is
happening at UND, and also will provide an opportunity for members of the
University Community to ask questions. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, University
Letter.
*******


EVENTS TO NOTE

TALK WILL FOCUS ON ALCHEMY OF MYSTICISM

The English Department and the President's Advisory Council on Women are 
cosponsoring "The Alchemy of Mysticism," a talk by Professor Jo Ann
McNamara
of Hunter College in New York, on Thursday, Oct. 9, from 4 to 5 p.m. at
the
North Dakota Museum of Art. A reception will be held after the talk  in
the
Museum.

Prof. McNamara is a well-known medievalist and an exciting speaker who has
written extensively on women's roles. Her talk will discuss the
spirituality
of female mystics in the Middle Ages. Although they were excluded from the
universities and from the priesthood, women such as Hildegard von Bingen
produced visionary literature so powerful and moving that even the male
theologians came to learn from it.

This talk was originally scheduled for April 22, until its cancellation
was
forced by a well-known local act of God. We're glad to have been able to
reschedule Prof. McNamara's visit, and invite all interested listeners to
attend the talk and meet Prof. McNamara during the reception. -- Joyce
Coleman, Assistant Professor of English.
*******

PAULA POUNDSTONE HEADLINES SPECIAL
"THANK YOU, STUDENTS" PROGRAM


To thank students, faculty and staff for their help during the Flood of
1997,
the University will present popular comedian Paula Poundstone in a free
performance at 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 10, at the Hyslop Sports Center. The
"Evening with Paula Poundstone" is open to the general community, but the
doors will open to UND students first, starting at 6 p.m. Students will
need a
current UND ID to get first-choice seats. The first 1,500 students will
get
free UND pennants.

"This special event is for purposes of thanking our students, faculty and
staff for all they did for UND and Grand Forks last spring and in the
summer
that followed. Come and bring your friends and neighbors to this free
celebration that is open to all," said UND President Kendall Baker in his
Sept. 30 State of the University address.

Earlier in the day, students will be treated to a free concert on the
front
lawn of UND's Memorial Union. The Winnipeg-based band "Bliss" will perform
at
about 3 p.m. "Bliss" is donating its fee as a tribute to UND students.

The "Thank You" Day is sponsored by the Office of the President, Student
Academic Services and the Office of University Relations, with special
assistance from Greek Life and Telesis. -- Cathy Buyarski, Director,
Student
Academic Services.
*******

BIOLOGY SETS SEMINAR

Michael Scanlon, University of Georgia, Athens, will present a seminar
titled
"The Narrow Sheath Genes are Required for Pattern Formation in the Maize
Leaf," at noon Friday, Oct. 10, in 141 Starcher Hall. -- William Sheridan,
Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor of Biology.
*******

PRE-MED DAY SET FOR OCT. 11

College and high school students who are interested in a career in
Medicine
are invited to the annual Pre-Med Day event, set for Saturday, Oct. 11, at
the
School of Medicine and Health Sciences. It is free and open to the public.

The event is designed to provide insight into the process of applying to
medical school and the life of a physician. Organized by the UNDSMHS
Student
Council and Undergraduate Medical Association, the event is meant to help
people who are thinking about applying or have decided to apply to medical
school and need more specific information on the admissions process.

Presentations will include an overview of how the medical degree (M.D.)
curriculum is evolving at UND, the pre-med curriculum, and a slide show of
student activities and events. A panel of currently enrolled medical
students
will answer questions and a mock interview will be staged to allow
audience
members to witness how admissions interviews are conducted. A panel of
local
doctors will discuss the topic, "Life as a Physician."

For more information, contact the Office of Student Affairs and Admissions
at
the School of Medicine and Health Sciences, P.O. Box 9037, Grand Forks, ND
58202-9037, or call 777-4221.

-- Judy DeMers, Associate Director for Student Affairs and Admissions.
*******

GRADUATE COMMITTEE WILL MEET MONDAY

The Graduate Committee will meet at 3:05 p.m. Monday, Oct. 13, in 305
Twamley
Hall. The agenda will include:

1.  Review of the subcommittee's report on the Physics graduate program.
2.  Matter arising. 

-- Harvey Knull, Dean, Graduate School.
*******

HISTORY LECTURE RESCHEDULED

The History Department is pleased to announce that its Robert Wilkins
Lecture,
which had to be postponed because of the flood, has been rescheduled for
Monday, Oct. 13, at 8 p.m. in the Fred Orth Lecture Bowl of the Memorial
Union. The speaker will be JoAnn Kay McNamara of Hunter College and the
Graduate Center of the City University of New York. Her topic will be
"Chastity and Gender."  A short reception will follow the lecture. All are
welcome to attend the lecture and reception.
-- Edmund Clingan, Department of History.
*******

WOMEN'S CENTER TO HOST CLOTHESLINE PROJECT

The Women's Center will host the North Dakota Clothesline Project Monday
through Friday, Oct. 13-17, from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. in the River Valley Room
of
the Memorial Union.

The Clothesline Project is a visual display of shirts with written
messages
and illustrations that graphically demonstrate the impact of violence
against
individuals. These shirts are designed by survivors of violence, their
families and/or friends. The purpose is to educate the public, mourn those
who
have died as a result of this violence, and to bear witness to victims'
courage to survive and heal.

The Clothesline Project honors survivors as well as children who have been
affected by intimate violence. A survivor is any person who has
experienced
personal violence and lived to tell about it. The term victim is reserved
for
those who did not survive. Any person who has experienced domestic
violence or
sexual assault at any time in their life is encouraged to come forward and
design a shirt. Victim's families and friends are also invited to
participate.
If you or someone you know would like to decorate a shirt to be added to
the
Clothesline Project, please call Kay or Donna at the Women's Center,
777-4300,
for more information. -- Donna Oltmanns, Coordinator, Women's Center.
*******

COLLEGE/CAREER FAIR SET FOR OCT. 14

The Grand Forks College/Career Fair is set for Tuesday, Oct. 14, from 9 to
11:30 a.m. The fair will be held at the North Dakota National Guard
Armory.
Area high schools (including North Dakota and Minnesota) will be
attending.
For more information, please call me at 777-4229. -- Idona Mikkelsen,
Enrollment Services.
*******

ENGLISH LECTURE SERIES WILL FEATURE JAY MEEK

Poet Jay Meek (English) will give a reading from his work in the Asian
Room of
the Chester Fritz Library (fourth floor) at 4 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 15.
This
reading celebrates the publication of two new collections of his poems:
Headlands: New and Selected Poems, and Good Lives.  The first event in
this
year's English Lecture Series, the reading is free and open to the public. 
Refreshments will be served, and books will be available for purchase.

A faculty member in the English Department, Meek has published six books
of
poems with Carnegie Mellon Press.  He has received grants from the Bush
Foundation, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, and the
National
Endowment for the Arts.  His short story, "Floods," will appear in the
next
issue of The Ohio Review. -- Martha Meek, Coordinator, English Lecture
Series.
*******

NORWEGIAN AMBASSADOR WILL VISIT CITY

On Thursday, Oct. 16, Norway's Ambassador to the United States, Thomas
Vraalsen, will visit Grand Forks.  He will arrive around 11 a.m. and will
proceed to the Sons of Norway Lodge, 1401 9th Ave. So., for a press
conference, after which he will attend a noon luncheon.

The ambassador would like to meet with the Norwegian students for a few
minutes before the press conference, so they are encouraged to be at the
Sons
of Norway Lodge at 11:00 a.m.  The ambassador is most interested in our
two
exchange programs with Norway as well as the Norwegian language major and
the
Scandinavian Studies minor.  His interest in UND's academic links to
Norway is
one of the reasons he is coming to Grand Forks.

The other is that Grand Forks and the counties surrounding Grand Forks on
both
sides of the river have the highest density of Americans of Norwegian
descent
anywhere in North America.  During the coverage of the flood, the
predominance
of Norwegian names among those who were fighting the flood and who were
involved in the cleanup and recovery left a lasting impression upon
Norwegians.  Ambassador Vraalsen stated that on behalf of the govenment of
Norway he would like to offer words of encouragement and support to the
Norwegian-Americans of this area as well as to applaud their efforts. --
Curt
Stofferahn, Associate Profesor of Sociology.
*******

U SENATE WILL HOLD DISCUSSION FORUM

The University Senate will hold open forum, non-procedural discussion
meetings
on the third Thursday of each month to discuss topics of pertinence to
upcoming Senate deliberations or of general campus-wide interest.  The
first
of these discussion meetings is scheduled for Thursday, Oct. 16, at 4 p.m.
in
Room 7, Gamble Hall.  All members of the University community are invited
to
participate.  Topics for discussion on Oct. 16 include:

1.   Proposed Senate bylaw changes that Senate membership elections be
conducted in April rather than September to facilitate Senate
deliberations
earlier in the academic year and that the membership of the Senate
Executive
Committee be expanded by one to include the senior UND elected
representative
on the Council of College Faculties.

2.   Proposed changes in University Council membership to include:  full
time
lecturers, clinical faculty, program directors, coordinators, assistant
and
associate Deans who also hold faculty rank.

3.   Proposed changes in Senate membership to include two elected members
from each college or professional school or libraries with the exception
of
the College of Arts and Sciences which will elect two members from each of
its
three subdivisions:  natural and physical sciences, humanities and social
sciences. The remainder of the elected Senate members will be elected at
large
and elected Council members shall be two and one-half times the number of
ex-officio members.  Neither program directors nor coordinators shall be
ex-officio members of the Senate.

4.   Initial discussion of the deliberations of the General Education Task
Force led by Arts and Sciences Dean John Ettling, GER Task Force.

Complete documents outlining the proposed changes in items 1-3 will be
available at the meeting. -- Al Fivizzani (Biology), Chair, University
Senate.
*******

BIOLOGY ANNOUNCES WHEELER LECTURE

Alan R. Templeton, Department of Biology, Washington University, St.
Louis,
Missouri, is the George C. Wheeler Distinguished Lecturer for Fall 1997.
He
will be giving the George Wheeler Lecture series at 7:30 p.m. Thursday,
Oct.
16, in 141 Starcher Hall.  His lecture is titled "Smokey the Bear versus
Collared Lizards: Landscape Management in the Ozarks."  He is also giving
a
talk at noon Friday, Oct. 17, in 141 Starcher Hall, titled "What is a
Species?"  Please join us. -- William Sheridan, Chester Fritz
Distinguished
Professor of Biology.
*******

CURRICULUM COMMITTEE SETS MEETING

The University Curriculum Committee will meet Thursday, Oct. 16, at 3 p.m.
in
303 Twamley Hall to review the request from the College of Business and
Public
Administration for termination of the minor in Energy/Electronic
Technology
Systems, the minor in Graphic Communication Technology, and the minor in
Manufacturing Technology Systems. Anyone interested in the proposals is
invited to attend. -- Heidi Kippenhan (Admissions and Records), Secretary,
University Curriculum Committee.
*******

THEATRE ARTS WILL HOST SAM ABEL

In conjunction with the Theatre Arts production of Cole Porter's "Kiss Me,
Kate," performing Wednesday through Saturday, Oct. 15-18 at 7:30 p.m. and
Sunday, Oct. 19, at 2 p.m. at the Burtness Theatre, the department is
holding
post-show discussions, a scholarly symposium, and a public lecture on the
topic of gender in the musical drama and in the arts.  Featured at these
sessions will be Sam Abel, Professor of Theatre at the University of
Vermont. 
Events include:

*    "Opera in the Flesh," at 4 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 16, as part of the
Women
Studies Salon at the Women's Center.  Dr. Abel will discuss his recent
opus,
"Opera in the Flesh," which is on reserve at the Chester Fritz Library
under
"Salon."

*    "The Persistence of Memory: Shifting Gender Images in Musical
Theatre,"
a public lecture, at 1 p.m. Friday in the Burtness Theatre.

*    "Post-Show Discussion," discussing gender issues in the UND
production
of "Kiss Me, Kate," after the Friday and Saturday, Oct. 17 and 18, 7:30
p.m.
performances at Burtness Theatre.

*    "Perspectives on Gender in the Arts," a panel symposium featuring Dr.
Abel, Susan Koprince (English), Carol Sedgwick (Music), Kathleen Dixon
(English), and Kathy Coudle-King, at 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 18, at Burtness
Theatre.

To reserve tickets for the play, call the Burtness Theatre Box Office at
777-2587. -- Mary Cutler, Assistant Professor of Theatre Arts.
*******

OPERA CRITIC WILL SPEAK AT WOMEN STUDIES SALON    

Opera and musical theatre critic Sam Abel will join the Women Studies
Salon on
Thursday, Oct. 16, to speak on "The Paradox of the Fat Lady: Opera and
Gender." The author of Opera in the Flesh: Sexuality in Operatic
Performance,
is in Grand Forks for the Department of Theatre Arts "Theatrical Event."
Abel,
a professor at the University of Vermont, will be at the Women's Center,
305
Hamline, from 4 to 5 p.m. Selected readings, "The Paradox of the Fat Lady"
and
"Opera, Seduction, and Desire," are on reserve at the Chester Fritz
Library.
Additional copies are available at the Women's Center and outside the
offices
of 201 Merrifield Hall. Everyone is welcome at the Salon. For more
information, call me at 777-2705 -- Rebecca Moore, Assistant Professor of
Philosophy and Religion.
*******

CHRISTUS REX LISTS EVENTS

The Christus Rex Lutheran Center will present "What Kids Need to Survive:
A
Community Conversation on Asset Building," from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday,
Oct.
23, in 210 Clifford Hall.  The presenter will be James Vollbracht from
Search
Institute.  Everyone is welcome to attend the program, which is free to
the
public.

On Friday, Oct. 24, Vollbracht will present "A Call to Action Workshop on
Asset Building" at Christus Rex, 3012 University Avenue.  Registration
begins
at 8 a.m.; the program will run from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.  Registration
is
required; forms and fee schedule are available at Christus Rex.  These
programs are sponsored by The Center for Faithful Leadership of Christus
Rex,
with support from Lutheran Brotherhood #8127, Minnkota Power Cooperative,
and
Altru Health Systems.  Call 775-5581 for more information. -- Christus Rex
Lutheran Center.
*******

SCHOLARLY WRITING WORKSHOPS SET

Two workshops on scholarly writing will be available to UND faculty later
this
month.  The first, "Writing a Textbook," will be led by Professor Franklin
Silverman of Marquette University, and is set for Friday, Oct. 24, from 3
to 6
p.m. in the Sioux Room of the Memorial Union.  The second, "Successful
Scholarly Writing," will be led by Professor Gerald Stone, Southern
Illinois
University.  It will be held from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, Oct. 25, in the
Sioux Room of the Memorial Union.  Both workshop leaders are
well-published
authors.  The workshops are jointly sponsored by the Offices of
Instructional
Development and Research, Research and Program Development, and the
University
Writing Program.  They are available to faculty without charge.  For more
information, or to register for either or both workshops, call the Office
of
Instructional Development at 777-3325 by Wednesday, Oct. 15. -- Dan Rice,
Director of Instructional Development.
*******

FACULTY, GRAD STUDENTS INVITED TO RECEPTION

The Text and Academic Authors Association invites all faculty and graduate
students to a wine and cheese reception in recognition of the TAA
workshops on
campus Friday and Saturday, Oct. 24 and 25.  The all-faculty reception is
from
4 to 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 24, at the J. Lloyd Stone Alumni House. -- Ronald
Pynn, Professor of Political Science.
*******


OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

UNSATISFACTORY PROGRESS REPORTS DUE OCT. 17

"Unsatisfactory Progress Report" forms are due in the Office of Admissions
and
Records by noon, Friday, Oct. 17. Please adhere to the following
procedures to
assure that accurate and adequate information is transmitted to students.
1.   The departmental office picks up forms at 9 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 7, and
transmits them to teaching faculty through routine procedures.

2.   Faculty complete a form for each class section.

     NOTE: Forms for ALL sections are to be completed and returned. If no
students are deficient, the blank sheet MUST be signed and returned. It is
considered verification that the instructor considers no students to be
deficient at this time.

3.   If the form includes names of students who have never attended class,
MARK THEM AS FAILING. This information should initiate action by the
student
to correct any error in registration prior to the last day to drop
(Friday,
Nov. 7).

4.   If a student is attending a class and the name is not listed on the
deficiency form, it is an indication that the student's registration is in
error. The student should not be allowed to continue attending the class,
but
should be directed to the Office of Admissions and Records to correct the
problem.

5.   The "Unsatisfactory Progress Report" forms are to be completed by all
faculty members and returned to the Office of Admissions and Records no
LATER
THAN NOON ON FRIDAY, OCT. 17. Adherence to this schedule is essential
since
computer processing is done over the weekend. "Unsatisfactory progress
reports" will be mailed to students on Oct. 21.

6.   DO NOT SEND THROUGH THE MAIL. Please return forms directly to the
Office
of Admissions and Records, 201 Twamley Hall.

-- Veriena Garver, Admissions and Records Officer, Office of Admissions
and
Records.
*******

FACULTY INVITED TO USE SGID TO IMPROVE TEACHING

Faculty are encouraged to make use of the SGID (Small Group Instructional
Diagnosis) student feedback process for the improvement of instruction.
SGID
is a confidential peer consultation service which generates helpful
student
feedback from individual classes. The process is best used at
mid-semester,
which enables the instructor the opportunity to make "mid-course"
improvements
in the class. SGID documentation may be included by the faculty member in
the
promotion file as evidence of attention to effective teaching. To schedule
an
SGID or for more information about the process, contact the Office of
Instructional Development at 777-3325. -- Dan Rice, Director, Office of
Instructional Development.
*******

APPLICANTS SOUGHT FOR OSTFOLDAKADEMIET PROFESSORSHIPS

Applications are now being taken for Ostfoldakademiet Professorships for
fall
semester 1998 and for spring semester 1999. All UND faculty are eligible
to
apply.

Ostfoldakademiet is a one-year program for Norwegian high school graduates
who 
take courses in Moss and then complete their education at UND. A number of
UND
students also spend a year abroad studying there. The professor will teach
two
courses, preferably courses that are or could be approved for GER credit.
It
is hoped that one of the two courses will be upper division.
Ostfoldakademiet's schedule closely follows UND's, except that there is a
January mini-semester for which applications are also sought.

To apply, send a resume and proposals (including syllabi) for the two
courses
to Tom Rand, Associate Dean, Arts and Sciences, Box 8038, UND.
Applications
are due Saturday, Nov. 1. Please include a letter from your dean,
supporting
your application.

For further information you might speak with former Ostfoldakademiet
Professors Scott Lowe, Religion (1997), Curt Stofferahn, Sociology (1996),
Janet Kelly Moen, Sociology (1995), or with David Marshall at
International
Programs. Krista Lauritzen, rector of Ostfoldakademiet, will be on campus
from
Oct. 8 to 12 and can also answer any questions about the position. To make
an
appointment with her, phone International Programs at 777-3301. -- Tom
Rand
(Arts and Sciences) for the Ostfoldakademiet Professorship Selection
Committee.
*******

DOCTORAL EXAMS SET FOR WESTBY, VARNSON

The final examination for Margaret Donovan Westby, a candidate for the
Doctor
of Philosophy degree with a major in Clinical Psychology, has been set for
10
a.m. Friday, Oct. 17, in 210 Corwin-Larimore Hall.  F. Richard Ferraro
(Psychology), is the chairperson for the committee.  The dissertation
title is
"Frontal Lobe Deficits in Domestic Violence Offenders."  

The final examination for Stacie Varnson, a candidate for the Doctor of
Philosophy degree with a major in Educational Administration, has been set
for
8 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 21, in 305 Twamley Hall.  Daniel Rice, of the
Educational
Administration Department, is the chairperson for the committee.  The
dissertation title is "An Examination of the Role of the Mission Statement
in
Administrative Decision Making at Selected Doctoral Granting
Universities."

All members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend. -- Harvey
Knull,
Dean, Graduate School.
*******

STUDENT NOMINATIONS SOUGHT FOR ACADEMIC TEAM

"USA Today" is seeking nominations of the best and brightest students for
their 1998 All-USA Academic Team.  Sixty students will be featured in a
two-page feature in "USA Today."  Twenty members of the first team will
receive $2,500 cash prizes and will be the guests of "USA Today" at an
awards
luncheon.  Any full-time undergraduate student is eligible for nomination;
U.S. citizenship is not required.  Nominations must be postmarked by
Saturday,
Nov. 29.  Nomination forms are available from the Office of University
Relations, 411 Twamley Hall, or 777-2731. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, for USA
Today.
*******


GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

EPSCoR SEEKS FACULTY MENTORS

ND EPSCoR is soliciting science, engineering, and mathematics (SEM)
faculty
from North Dakota State University (NDSU) and University of North Dakota
(UND) to participate as mentors in three of its Science Outreach and
Recruitment (SOAR) programs:

* Science Bound: Open to graduating high school seniors and incoming
college freshmen;

* Advanced Undergraduate Research Awards (AURA):  Open to all
undergraduates;

* Research Opportunity Awards (REU):  Awarded to faculty at all North
Dakota
colleges and universities except UND and NDSU. The due date has been
extended
to Monday, Oct..  Student applications will be available October 31.

Mentor application forms were sent to faculty through campus mail.  For
more information, visit the EPSCoR homepage at
http:/www.ndsu.nodak.edu/epscor
or contact me at (701) 231-7516 or givers@badlands.nodak.edu.-- David
Givers,
ND EPSCoR.
*******

RESEARCH, GRANT OPPORTUNITIES LISTED

Following are research and grant opportunities. For more information,
contact
the Office of Research and Program Development at 777-4278.

AMERICAN COUNCIL ON EDUCATION

The goal of the new ACE Fellows Program is to provide comprehensive
leadership
development for senior faculty and administrators.  Features include:
flexible
off-campus learning experience; strategic learning that benefits the
nominating institution; participating in a national institutional network
and
seminars; mentor-intern relationships.  Deadline: 11/3/97.  Contact:
202/939-9420; fax 202/785-8056; Maggie_Margiotta@ACE.NCHE.EDU.
------------

WOMEN'S STUDIO WORKSHOP

Women's Studio Workshop staff coordinate grants, fellowships, internships,
and
exhibition opportunities for visual artists in state-of-the-art
printmaking,
papermaking and photography studios.  Deadline: 11/15/97.  Contact:
914/658-9133; fax 914/658-9130; wsw@mhv.net;
http://www.webmark.com/wsw/wswhome.htm.
------------

INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN (IFUW)

Main interests of the Federation are status of women, education, human
rights,
and environment.  Fellowships, training grants, and research grants are
awarded biennially to IFUW members to undertake original research or
obtain
further training in the humanities, social sciences and natural sciences. 
Deadline: 11/22/97.  Contact: 8 rue de l'Ancien-Port, CH 1201 Geneva,
Switzerland; 4122/731-23-80; fax 4122/738-04-40.
------------

NATIONAL MEDICAL FELLOWSHIPS, INC.

This agency provides assistance to minority medical students
underrepresented
in medicine.  Grants support first and second year medical school study
toward
an M.D. or D.O. degree.  Special awards are made to third and fourth year
students.  Contact: 212/714-1007; fax 212/239-9718.  Deadline: 11/17/97,
2/16/98.
------------

NATIONAL CONSORTIUM FOR GRADUATE DEGREES FOR 
MINORITIES IN ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE, INC.

The purpose of the Consortium is to increase the number of minorities with
graduate degrees in engineering and science.  Funds are provided for
fellowships, internships, and conferences/seminars.  Awards are made at
the
master's and doctorate levels in engineering and at the doctorate level in
science.  Contact: 219/287-1097; fax 219/287-1486; gem.1@nd.edu,
http://www.nd.edu/~gem/.
------------

NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY ORGANIZATION

Advanced Research Fellowships promote study and research leading to
publication on  various aspects of common interests, traditions and
outlook of
NATO countries.  Research supported is primarily in the fields of
political
science, law, and economics in relation to security and defense. 
Collaborative Research Grants promote collaboration on a research project
between teams in at least two NATO countries.  Advanced Study Institutes
Programme grants are made to organize Advanced Study Institutes which are
high-level instructional courses, often multidisciplinary in nature.
Science
Fellowships support postgraduate research training or sabbatical leave in
another NATO country or cooperation partner.  Deadlines vary.   Contact:
32.2/707-4231; fax 32.2/707-4232; telex 23-867 (NATOHQ);
http://www.nato.int/science/.
------------
GERMAN MARSHALL FUND OF THE UNITED STATES

Research Fellowships are awarded to postdoctoral scholars whose research
projects may contribute to a better understanding of significant
contemporary
political, economic and social developments in the U.S. and Europe.  The
maximum award is $32,000.  Deadline: 11/15/97.  Contact: 202/745-3950; fax
202/265-1662; info@gmfus.org.
------------

HARVARD TRAVELLERS CLUB PERMANENT FUND

The Fund is interested in various scientific fields.  Small research
grants
(up to $500) are awarded to foster research and/or exploration involving
travel.  Preference is given to applicants working on advanced degrees.
No
scholarships are awarded for study at educational institutions.  Contact:
George P. Bates, Trustee; 617/821-0400.
------------

HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL

The purpose of Chandler Traveling Fellowships in Business History-Economic
History is to facilitate library and archival research in business history
and
institutional economic history, broadly defined.  Topics such as labor
relations and government regulation will be considered if the approach is
mainly institutional.  Grants of $1,000-$3,000 are made to graduate
students
or non-tenured faculty in history, economics, business administration, or
a
related discipline (e.g., sociology, government, law) whose research
requires
travel to the Boston Cambridge area.  Deadline: 12/1/97.  Contact:
617/495-6483; fax 617/496-5994; esampson@hbs.edu; http://www.hbs.edu/.
------------

DELTA PI EPSILON RESEARCH FOUNDATION

The purpose of the National Research Awards Program is to encourage and
recognize graduate and independent research in business education.  An
award
is made annually for the outstanding doctoral and master's research study
in
business education and biennially for the outstanding independent research
study.  Contact: 618/453-3321; mandersn@siu.edu.  Deadline: 3/1/98.
------------

AMERICAN WATER WORKS ASSOCIATION

The Association is interested in all subjects relating to public drinking
water and treatment supply.  The Academic Achievement Award is made for
the
best graduate theses and dissertations on water supply subjects.  Larson
Aquatic Research Support Scholarships ($3,000-$5,000) provide support to
graduate students preparing for a career in corrosion control, treatment
and
distribution of domestic and industrial water supplies, aquatic chemistry,
analytical chemistry, or environmental chemistry.  The Abel Wolman
Doctoral
Fellowship (up to $15,000/yr.) is for advanced training and research in
the
field of water supply and treatment.  The Thomas R. Camp Scholarship
($5,000)
is awarded to students doing applied research in the drinking water field. 
The purpose of the Holly A. Cornell Scholarship ($5,000) is to encourage
female and minority students to pursue advanced training in the field of
water
supply and treatment.  Deadlines vary.  Contact: 303/794-7711; fax
303/794-8915.
------------

NATIONAL CENTER FOR RESEARCH RESOURCES

The purpose of the Minority Clinical Associate Physician Program (MCAP) is
to
provide up to 3 years of support for minority physicians or dentists to
promote development toward becoming independent clinical investigators. 
Applicants must have earned the M.D. or D.D.S. and completed a residency. 
Deadlines: 2/1/98, 6/1/98.  Contact: 301/435-0790; fax 301/480-3661;
HarrietG@ep.ncrr.nih.gov; http://www.ncrr.nih.gov/.
------------

THE DOW JONES NEWSPAPER FUND

The purpose of the Fund is to improve the quality of journalism education
and
the pool of applicants for jobs in the newspaper business.  It provides
internships and scholarships to college students, fellowships for high
school
journalism teachers and publications' advisers and training for college
journalism instructors.  Unsolicited proposals for grants are welcome as
long
as they directly relate to the foundation's mission of encouraging people
to
pursue careers in journalism and major program areas of the Fund.
Deadlines
vary.  Contact: 609/452-2820; fax 609/520-5804; newsfund@wsj.dowjones.com;
http://www.dowjones.com/newsfund.
------------

NATURAL SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING RESEARCH COUNCIL-CANADA

Visiting Fellowships at Canadian government laboratories are available to 
those who have received a doctoral degree in the natural sciences or
engineering from a recognized university.  Deadlines: 11/15/97,
3/15/98,7/15/98. The Web Site is http://www.nserc.ca/programs/visien.htm.

Areas of research under the Air Quality Research Branch are: air quality,
acid
rain, photochemical smog, toxic chemicals, air toxics, greenhouse gases,
stratospheric pollution, and solar radiation studies.  Contact:
416/739-4879;
fax 416/739-4224; don.mckay@ec.gc.ca.

Areas of research under the Environmental Adaptation Research Group are
research 
to improve understanding of socio-economic and ecosystem impacts of
atmospheric change and variability and to generate knowledge that will
help to
improve decision-making and facilitate adaptive response. Contact:
416/739-4271; fax: 416/739-4297; roger.street@ec.gc.ca.

Areas of research at the National Hydrology Research Institute are
hydrologic
modelling; remote sensing of hydrologic data; hydrology and ecology of
cold
regions; ice studies; groundwater and contaminants; biotechnological
remediation techniques; river, wetlands and lake ecology, including
nutrients,
dissolved oxygen and contaminants interactions; development and validation
of
ecological indicators of ecosystem integrity; aquatic ecotoxicology;
impacts
of land use on aquatic resources. Contact: 306/975-6099; fax 306/975-5143.

Areas of research under the Prairie and Northern Wildlife Research Centre
are: 
wildlife ecology and conservation, especially habitat selection and
population
dynamics of prairie waterfowl and Arctic-nesting geese, shorebirds, and
songbirds; ecology of, and impacts of forestry on, birds of boreal forest;
impacts of pesticides and other chemical contaminants on wildlife; ecology
of
prairie wetlands and their wildlife.  Contact: 306/975-4087; fax
306/975-4089.

Areas of research under the National Water Research Institute are:
Ecosystem
science: contaminant properties, fate and effects; exchange of toxic
contaminants between air, water, sediment and biota; acid/toxic rain
effects;
groundwater contamination and remediation; lake rehabilitation;
ecotoxicology;
large basin studies and modelling; climate change/UVB impacts on aquatic
ecosystems; analytical methods development; quality assurance and quality
control. Contact: 905/336-4503; fax: 905/336-6444.
------------

CONSERVATION AND RESEARCH FOUNDATION

The main interests of the Foundation are conservation and enlightened use
of
renewable natural resources, encouragement of related research in the
biological sciences and promotion of methods to limit human fertility.
The
following types of grants are provided: research, project/program, seed
money,
challenge/matching, general operating, grants-in-aid, and matching gifts. 
Deadline: None.  Contact: Box 5261, Connecticut College, New London, CT
06320-4196.

-- Carl Fox, Director of Research and Program Development.
*******


UNIVERSITY SENATE

UNIVERSITY SENATE REPORT
University Senate conducted its regular monthly meeting October 2 with
Chair
Sara Hanhan (Teaching and Learning) presiding. Business included annual
officer elections. In a mostly routine meeting, two proposed additions to
the
Code of Student Life, one about solicitations and the other about surveys,
drew the greatest reaction because of what some saw as the restrictive
nature,
if not questionable constitutionality, of the changes. Fifty-eight of the
current 79 Senate members attended. The October meeting was adjourned at
5:33
p.m. after a 4:10 p.m. call to order. Reports on proceedings follow.

Al Fivizzani Elected Chair, Mary Kweit
Vice Chair Of 1997-98 University Senate

Al Fivizzani (Biology) was elected chair and Mary Kweit (Political
Science)
vice chair of University Senate for 1997-98 at its Oct. 2 meeting.
Fivizzani
was vice chair in 1994-95. They succeed Sara Hanhan (Teaching and
Learning)
and Wayne Swisher (Communication Sciences and Disorders), respectively, in
those positions.

In other voting, D. Scott Lowe (Philosophy & Religion) was elected to a
two-year term on the Senate Executive Committee succeeding Fivizzani
(Biology);

Janet Kelly Moen (Sociology) was elected to a three-year term as one of
UND's
faculty representatives on the North Dakota University System Council of
College Faculties, succeeding Hanhan (Teaching and Learning);

Jonathan Sickler was elected as student representative to the Senate
Executive
Committee;

Betty Gard (Library) and Charlotte Humphries (Health, Physical Education
and
Recreation) were elected to the Senate Committee on Committees.

Student Code: Solicitation Change Soundly
Defeated, Survey Alteration Barely Passes

A proposed addition to the definition of "solicitation" in the Code of
Student
Life was almost unanimously defeated by University Senate, which voiced
uncertainties about its language and intent and questioned its
constitutionality. 

Approval was being sought for adding to the definition of campus
solicitation
the wording "asking, appealing, enticing, pleading or seriously requesting
for
membership or information." Among other concerns, senators wondered what
"seriously" meant as it defeated the requested addition by a vote of 48 to
2
with three abstentions.

Jan Zahrly (Management), a member of the Student Policy Committee that
submitted the proposed change to Senate, said it was initiated by students
and
its intent was to prevent harassment. In answer to queries about a more
specific origin behind the proposed addition to the definition, she said
"this
has been religious groups" approaching students "in many places and at
many
times." She had explained in initial questioning that students were
concerned
about organizations that they perceived as "seriously requesting
information
in a continuous, repetitive" way.

Joanne Gabrynowicz (Space Studies) said she understood the concern but
said
"this language is so oppressive." Lana Rakow (School of Communication)
said
she was "extremely concerned about inclusion of the language 'requesting .
. .
information'."  Al Berger (History) said he thought the kind of activity
addressed in the addition to the solicitation definition is
constitutionally
protected. Lynn Lindholm (Philosophy and Religion) suggested that students
be
educated on rights and ways of responding within such situations instead
of
adding to the solicitation definition.

On the other Code of Student Life proposal, senators questioned the need
for
adding "surveys" to the Code of Student Life section on petitions and the
expressed some doubts about the content of the section about the logistics
of
administering them. But enough -- barely -- senators apparently saw the
change
as merely innocuous and approved it by a 23-21 margin with three
abstentions.

The section added to the part of the Code on petitions states: "Surveys
conducted by non-recognized organization or student organizations on must
include the purpose of the survey, and the name of the organization must
be
displayed prominently on the survey. A copy may be requested by the
Coordinator of Student Organizations for verification of name and
organization. The content of the survey shall not be censored." (The
coordinator of student organizations is designated as the student affairs
vice
president's representative in the survey addition to the code.)

Zahrly, again representing the Student Policy Committee through which
students
also initiated this proposed addition to the student code, said concerns
centered around conforming to the UND Institutional Review Board's
conditions
regarding the use of human subjects in research, which includes surveys. A
memorandum of understanding between that board and the Vice President for
Student Affairs when student groups operating under supervision of that
area
are concerned was instrumental in the proposed addition of the survey
section
to the student code. 

Thomas Petros (Psychology) said he thought the change was fine, except
"the
vice president for student affairs should be schooled in the treatment of
human subjects (in terms of research and survey activities)." While Al
Berger
(History) saw the addition as a possible way "to shelf a controversial
proposal" being addressed through some surveys "intending to seek the
depth of
opposition to University policy," David Uherka (Mathematics) stated "it
doesn't seem to require anything."

Senate Will Hold Second, Informal
Meeting Each Month This Year

Another meeting each month, less formal than the regular one and intended
more
for discussion instead of final actions, will be held by University Senate
this year. That was among announcements at its Oct. 2 meeting on actions
since
last spring by the Senate Executive Committee, which met more often than
usual
over the past summer because the spring flood canceled the May meeting and
other end-of-school-year opportunities for conducting business.
 
The informational/discussion meetings, to which all Council members will
be
invited, will be conducted on the third Thursday of each month and will be
similar to Senate forums at which various issues of concern to the
University
community will be discussed. 

The first will be Oct. 16 at 4:05 p.m. in room 7, Gamble Hall.  Topics for
discussion will be the recommended constitutional and bylaw changes put
forth
by the Task Force on Senate Membership and by the Senate Executive
Committee
and a beginning discussion of the General Education Requirements.  Ideas
for
other meetings are being solicited from Senate members as well as from
other
Council members. 

Senate Changes Time Line, Procedures 
For Council of College Faculties Elections

Several recommendations from the University Senate Executive Committee
about
times and methods for election of UND members to the statewide Council of
College Faculties were approved by Senate at its Oct. 2 meeting. Included
was
that beginning with the 1998-99 Senate elections, the University
representatives on the Council of College Faculties will be elected by the
University at the same time and method as members of Senate. It was noted
that
changing the time of election of Senate members from the present September
time frame to April is on the docket. If approved, election of the Council
and
Senate members would be conducted in the spring.

Other Council of College Faculties election times and procedures changes
approved were removing from the ballots names of Council members from any
college already represented with two members on the Council of College
Faculties; making the first ballot a nominating ballot; making Council of
College Faculties terms of offices three years, with the term of one
member
expiring each year; and designating the most recently retired Council
member
as the alternate to the Council of College Faculties.

Announcements, Comments

UND President Kendall Baker, responding to an inquiry about how the
University
Restructuring and Reallocation Committee will identify programs for
review,
said the Committee is, indeed, being brought into the program review
process
and recommendations will be program evaluation based rather than
enrollment
based.

Actions of the Senate Executive Committee since the end of the spring
semester
that were announced at the Oct. 2 meeting, in addition to those already
noted
in this report, incluavid Wilson. -- Jim Penwarden (University Relations).
*******


BILLBOARD

NATIVE AMERICAN OPPORTUNITY DAY SET

Native American Opportunity Day will be held Wednesday, Oct. 15, from 9
a.m.
to 4 p.m., in the commons area on the main floor of the Memorial Union.
There
will be tables set up for various Native American programs on campus.
Please
stop by and pick up any information you may need.
If you would like further information please call Native American Programs
at
777-4291. -- Jerry Severson, Federal TRIO Programs.
*******

CILT OFFERS FACULTY WORKSHOPS

The Center for Instructional and Learning Technologies still has some
seats
available for its faculty training workshops this semester.  Following is
a
list of scheduled sessions:

Power Point 3, Tuesday, Oct. 14, 9 a.m. to noon; Power Point 1, Thursday,
Oct.
16, 1 to 4 p.m.; Power Point 2, Monday, Oct. 20, 6 to 9 p.m.; MS Publisher
97,
Tuesday, Oct. 21, 1 to 4 p.m.; Power Point 3, Wednesday, Oct. 22, 9 a.m.
to
noon; Power Point 1, Tuesday, Nov. 4, 9 a.m. to noon; Power Point 1,
Wednesay,
Nov. 5, 6 to 9 p.m.; Power Point 2, Wednesday, Nov. 12, 9 a.m. to noon;
Power
Point 3, Thursday, Nov. 13, 9 a.m. to noon; Power Point 1, Monday, Nov.
17, 1
to 4 p.m.; Power Point 3, Tuesday, Nov. 18, 1 to 4 p.m.; MS Publisher 97,
Thursday, Nov. 20, 9 a.m. to noon; Power point 2, Wednesday, Dec. 3, 9
a.m. to
noon; Power Point 1, Thursday, Dec. 4, 9 a.m. to noon; Power Point 3,
Monday,
Dec. 8, 6 to 9 p.m.  Please call 777-4150 to reserve a space. -- Lynn
Weiner,
Center for Instructional and Learning Technologies.
*******

PHI BETA KAPPA MEMBERS SOUGHT

Members of the UND faculty and staff who, while students here or
elsewhere,
were elected to membership in and were initiated into Phi Beta Kappa are
asked
to identify themselves to the UND chapter so they may participate in its
affairs.  Please inform me by phone at 777-4381 or by e-mail at
elericks@badlands.nodak.edu.  The UND chapter of Phi Beta Kappa soon will
begin its activities for the year; initiations will be held in early
December
and April.  This year's Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar will be Murray
Louis,
dancer, teacher, choreographer, and artistic director of the Nikolais and
Murray Louis Dance Company of New York City.  Mr. Murray has created over
100
works; published two books of essays, Inside Dance and On Dance; and
developed
a five-part film series titled Dance as an Art Form, which has become a
standard introduction series for education.  He will deliver a public
lecture
on April 6 and be engaged in classes and meetings across the campus April
6 &
7. -- Ellen Erickson (Arts and Sciences), Secretary-Treasurer, UND Chapter
of
Phi Beta Kappa.
*******

1997-98 UND DIRECTORY SALES BEGIN MONDAY

Copies of the new 1997-98 UND Directory will go on sale Monday afternoon,
Oct.
13, at the University Bookstore and at Wilkerson Hall. The 184-page book
lists
names, addresses, phone numbers, and, in many cases, e-mail addresses, of
faculty and staff, and names, phone numbers, and addresses of students.
The
book also contains much other information, including administrative,
academic
and student governance personnel, residence hall and fraternity and
sorority
housing information, an overview and capsule history of the University,
research and service agency information, the campus map, city map, events
calendars, organization chart, emergency and disaster reaction procedures,
campus and city bus schedules, political divisions and voting sites for
Grand
Forks, and mailing procedures. The Directory, on sale for $1.25 per copy,
is
edited by the Office of University Relations and is compiled with
information
from a variety of sources. -- Jim Penwarden, Director, Office of
University
Relations.
*******

UNDInfo LOGS 2,300 "HITS" PER DAY

UNDInfo, UND's home page on the World Wide Web, is averaging 2,300 "hits,"
or
accesses per day, up from the 1,500 we averaged in the spring semester.
About
half of the accesses come from off campus.   New features since the fall
semester began include student, faculty and staff searches, a "virtual
tour,"
listings of faculty home pages, placement of the academic catalog and
course
schedules online, an upgraded map, an "A to Z" index, and completely
redesigned menus.  The address is http://www.und.edu. -- Jan Orvik,
Co-Manager, UNDInfo.
*******

FLU SHOTS AVAILABLE

Student Health Services will offer flu shots for employees on Wednesday,
Oct.
29, from 2:30 to 5 p.m., and Thursday, Oct. 30, from 6 to 9 a.m., in the
McCannel Hall atrium.  The $10 fee will be billed directly to your
insurance
provider. Flu shots for students will be administered on Tuesday, Oct. 14,
from  4 to 7:30 p.m. in Wilkerson Hall, Room 50, and on Thursday, Oct. 23,
from 9 a.m. to noon in the McCannel Hall atrium.  Students will have to
pay
the $8 fee, or it will go on their University billing account. -- Merle
Charney, Director, Student Health Services.
*******

VOLUNTEERS SOUGHT FOR IRON STUDY

The USDA Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center is seeking men and
women
to take part in a study on iron absorption before and after taking iron
supplements.  You must be healthy, not taking any medication unless it is
birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy, and be over 21.
Smokers
are welcome to join the study.

You would take 50 mg of iron or a placebo daily for 12 weeks and eat four
breakfasts; two before starting the capsules and two breakfasts after
ending
the capsules.  These are unique breakfasts, consisting of a hamburger,
bun,
french fries, vanilla milk shake, and labeled iron.  Other than that, you
would eat your own food.  Your blood would be drawn before two of the
breakfasts and two weeks later.  Blood would also be drawn six weeks, 12
weeks, and 24 weeks after you finish taking the capsules. You would be
asked
to save a stool sample once a week for the first 14 weeks and then with
the
blood draws.

For your effort, you would receive $165 after taking the capsules and $45
for
each of the three blood draws for a total of $300.  You will also have the
satisfaction of knowing you will have helped increase scientific knowledge
of
the effects of iron supplementation. For more information, call Cody at
795-8396. -- Emily Nielsen, Community Studies Coordinator, USDA Human
Nutrition
Research Center.
*******

PRINTING CENTER WILL NOT PROVIDE CHESHIRE LABELING

The Printing Center will no longer provide cheshire labeling services.
Please
feel free to contact us at 777-2544 if you need information on other
alternatives. -- Richard Ganyo, Director, Printing Center.
*******

MAJORITY OF '97 MEDICINE GRADS CHOSE PRIMARY CARE FIELD

Sixty-five percent of the M.D. Class of '97 entered training in primary
this
past summer.  Thirty-nine of the 60 graduates selected residency programs
in
family medicine, pediatrics, internal medicine and combined
medicine-pediatrics.  Twenty-seven members, or 45 percent of the class,
elected to
pursue training in family medicine.  Of those, 13 will train in-state at
one
of the four family medicine residency programs in Grand Forks, Minot,
Bismarck
and Fargo.  Last year, 15 1996 graduates chose family medicine for further
training.

Internal medicine attracted six graduates, while five entered pediatrics
training.  Three have begun transitional one-year residency training, and
another two have entered transitional programs with spots secured for next
year in physical medicine and rehabilitation, and ophthalmology.
Obstetrics-gynecology and orthopedic surgery programs have each attracted
three
graduates; emergency medicine and pathology have each attracted two
graduates. 
Three graduates have not yet finalized their residency training plans.

Of those graduates, 23 will remain in North Dakota for training.  States
where
others will train include Minnesota, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin, Iowa,
Texas,
Utah, Arizona, Tennessee, Colorado, Oregon, Arkansas, Idaho, Nebraska, New
Mexico, Nevada and Illinois.  The School of Medicine and Health Sciences
offers training in family medicine, internal medicine, general surgery,
psychiatry and transitional programs in Grand Forks, Fargo, Minot and
Bismarck.  Medical students interested in one of the more than 20 other
fields
of medicine must go out-of-state for training. -- Roger Schauer, Director
of
Predoctoral Education in Family Medicine.
*******

COLLEGE REPUBLICANS SEEKS ADVISOR

College Republicans, a UND student organization, is seeking an advisor to
work
with the group throughout the year. College Republicans have been active
at
UND for many years. The organization promotes Republican ideals,
encourages
student involvement in all areas of political influence, and fosters
leadership in individuals.  For more information or to be involved, please
contact Diane Lochner at 777-8792. -- Ben Subedi, Coordinator of Student
Organizations.   
*******

ROTARY WILL PROVIDE CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS

Did you lose your holiday decorations in the spring flood or know someone
who
did?  The Combined Rotary Clubs of St. Paul realized that many citizens of 
Grand Forks and East Grand Forks lost decorations, and these clubs have
embarked on a major fundraising project to fill this void by providing
boxes
of decorations. The Greater Grand Forks Rotary Clubs will assist in this
project.  Distribution will occur at the end of November.  If you or
someone
you know has lost their decorations please provide the name, address and
phone
number by Nov. 1 to Jerry Bulisco, Campus Box 9040, or 234 Northridge
Hills
Court, Grand Forks, or call and leave a message at 746-1691, or send a fax
to
777-4583.  Please do not call the Student Affairs Office. Please specify
if
you desire a Chanukah or Kwaanza box; otherwise the box will be packed
with
Christmas decorations. -- Jerry Bulisco, Student Affairs Office.
*******

FREE COUNSELING OFFERED

The UND Psychological Services Center is offering free confidential crisis
counseling for flood-related issues. Please call 777-3691 for telephone or
on-site appointments. -- Psychological Services Center.
*******

ITEMS FOR SALE TO PUBLIC ON BID

The University is offering for sale to the public on a sealed, high-bid
basis
the following items: older computer equipment, metal desks, and several
other
miscellaneous items.  They may be seen at the Central Receiving Warehouse
at
the southwest corner of campus.  Bids will be taken between 8 a.m. and 3
p.m.,
Monday through Thursday, Oct. 13-16. -- Jess Carl, Storekeeper, Central
Receiving.
*******

GREEN AND WHITE DAYS LISTED

President Kendall Baker has declared Friday, Oct. 17, a Green & White Day.
Interested employees may green and white with their casual wear in
celebration
of athletic events (football vs. NDSU, volleyball at Morningside, cross
country at NCC at Fargo).  Other Green and White Days during the coming
months
are: Nov. 14 (hockey vs. Minnesota-Duluth, football at Northern Colorado,
men's and women's basketball vs. Minnesota-Duluth, volleyball -- NCAA
regional
tournament); Dec. 12 (hockey vs. St. Cloud State, men's and women's
basketball
vs. Moorhead State, football -- NCAA finals); Jan. 16 (hockey vs. Michigan
Tech, men's and women's basketball at South Dakota State and Augustana);
Feb.
13 (hockey vs. Minnesota Gophers, men's and women's basketball vs.
Augustana
and South Dakota State); March 6 (hockey vs. Wisconsin, men's and women's
basketball, NCAA regionals); April 17 (Baseball vs. Morningside and
University
of South Dakota). -- Jan Orvik, Editor, University Letter. 
*******

APPLE COMPUTER REBATES AVAILABLE FORM BOOKSTORE

An Apple representative and system engineer will be at the Memorial Union
Lecture Bowl Thursday, Oct. 9, from 3 to 5 p.m. to answer questions on the
computers.

The University Bookstore is pleased to announce that Apple has extended
rebates on several computers until Friday, Oct. 24.  Computers that
qualify
for a $300 rebate are: PowerMac 6500/250 (M6127LL/A, $1,945), or the
PowerMac
6500/275 (M6128LL/A, $2,253, currently in stock).  The PowerBook
1400CS/133
(M6169LL/A, $1,999, currently in stock) qualifies for a $200 rebate; the
PowerMac 5400/180 (M5686LL/A, $1,498, currently in stock) qualifies for a
$100
rebate.

These offers are good only while quantities last, and you must purchase
the
computer before Oct. 24.  Requestes for rebates must be postmarked by Nov.
10.
-- Kristi Bruno, University Bookstore).
*******


ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

BREAST CANCER WALK/RUN SET FOR OCT. 19

The UND chapter of the American Medical Women's Association will hold the
fourth annual Sharon Lambeth Breast Cancer Awareness Walk/Run Sunday, Oct.
19,
in University Park.  Runners will cover four miles; walkers will traverse
two
miles.  The cost is $10 if you prefer not to purchase a T-shirt, and $12
for
those choosing to purchase a shirt.  Registration begins at 1:15 p.m. with
the
run beginning at 2 p.m.  Prizes will be given to the winners; door prizes
will
also be awarded.  All proceeds go the Breast Cancer Coalition,  a local
project set up to provide mammograms to women with low incomes.

This event honors the memory of Sharon Lambeth,  an associate professor in
the
College of Nursing and victim of breast cancer. -- Kristina Bosch,
American
Medical Women's Association.
*******

CRAFT CENTER WILL HOLD MINI-CRAFT WORKSHOPS

Holiday mini-craft workshops will be held each Friday from noon to 1 p.m.
at
the Craft Center, Oct. 3 through Nov 21.  The Craft Center is located on
the
third floor of the Memorial Union.  

Projects for Oct. 10 are brown bag paper ornaments, which will be
continued
Oct. 17.  Choose from Santa, snowman, angel, stocking, mitten, tree or
Gingerbread ornament for tree or wall; cost is $1 per ornament. 

Different projects will be featured each week. Get a start on replacing or
adding to your handmade ornament collection. To register, call 777-3979.
These
projects may also be scheduled at other times by special arrangement. If
you
have a group that would like to do a craft activity, call 777-3979.
-- Bonnie Solberg, Coordinator, Craft Center.
*******

MASTER CHORALE ANNOUNCES NEW SEASON

The Grand Forks Master Chorale has season subscriptions available for a
series
of four local concerts in 1997-98.  The Chorale is a 40-member auditioned
group of singers from the region.  It is directed by James Rodde (Choral
Studies).  The Chorale will open its 15th season Saturday, Oct. 11, with a
performance of Mendelssohn's oratorio "Elijah."  The concert, postponed
from
its original April date, will be at Holy Family Catholic Church at 7:30
p.m. 
The Chorale will be joined by the UND Concert Choir and an orchestra
composed
of local musician's and members of the Fargo-Moorhead Symphony.

The 1997-98 season will include the traditional Christmas holiday concert
at 7
p.m. Sunday, Dec. 7, at United Lutheran Church.  A midwinter folk song
festival, Folk on the Red, will take place Sunday, Feb. 22, at 3 p.m.; and
the
annual Masterworks Concert will end the season at 7:30 Sunday, April 26.

Season tickets can be purchased at a cost of $30 for adults and $25 for
seniors by writing Box 7125, Department of Music.  For more information,
call
777-3376. -- Ruth Marshall, Master Chorale. 
*******

INTERNATIONAL CENTRE LISTS EVENTS

The International Centre, 2908 University Ave., invites you to join them
for
the following events.  On Friday, Oct. 10, from 3 to 4:30 p.m., there will
be
an International Cof-Tea Cup, which is an opportunity for students,
faculty,
staff, and the Greater Grand Forks community to enjoy international tea,
coffee and pastry while discussing world issues.  On Saturday, Oct. 11, at
6
p.m. in the Grand Forks Civic Auditorium, the annual Feast of Nations,
postponed from an earlier date in April, will take place.  This includes
an
international candlelight dinner, world vignettes, intercultural attire,
and
performances.  Tickets must be purchased in advance for the event; call
777-3273.  On Thursday, Oct. 16, the Centre will hold a social gathering
at 7
p.m., featuring pizza and dance, with international music and dance
lessons. 
Please join us. -- Sharon Rezac Andersen, Director, International Centre.
*******

MUSEUM COFFEE BAR HAS NEW HOURS

With Verena Fonder, formerly of LaBrasa, in charge of the North Dakota
Museum
of Art Coffee Bar, cuisine on campus has become international.  Our German
baker provides a variety of home-baked Mediterranean and German cakes,
including baklava, continental tarts and freshly baked cookies, which are
available all day.  French rolls are baked on the premises, and homemade
soups
are ready at 9:30 a.m.  The Museum Conference Room may be reserved for
groups
of up to 12 for luncheon meetings, or call ahead for take-out orders.  The
menu changes every two weeks; the Coffee Bar opens at 9:30 a.m. weekdays,
and
lunch is served beginning at 11 a.m. -- Marsy Schroeder, North Dakota
Museum
of Art.
*******

MINNEAPOLIS GOSPEL SOUND WILL PERFORM

Minneapolis Gospel Sound, a nationally known musical group, will perform
at
7:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 3, at the Chester Fritz Auditorium.  Hailed as a
magical group, the Gospel Sound has traveled throughout the country.  The
Sound will take you on a musical journey through African and American
history,
bringing an understanding and respect for diversity of the world.

There is no admission fee for the program, which is open to the public.
It is
sponsored by the Multicultural Awareness Committee, a standing committee
of
Student Government. -- Ben Subedi, Advisor, Multicultural Awareness
Committee.
*******

MUSEUM CONCERT SERIES BEGINS OCT. 12

Classical music will again grace the galleries of the North Dakota Museum
of
Art when the Miami String Quartet performs this year's first Museum
Concert at
2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 12.  Probably the best thing an ensemble can do for a
neglected work is to make listeners feel indignation over its failure to
find
a place in the standard repertory.  The Miami String Quartet performs that
service with both freshness and passion for the late Argentine composer
Alberto Ginastera with his Quartet No. 2 for Strings, and for Peteris
Vask's
1984 "Sommerweisen" Quartet No. 2.  Both will be performed at the Museum,
along with Beethoven.

The second performance in the series is by the Norwegian-based Grieg Piano
Trio on Sunday, Nov. 2.  The trio has toured the United States, Canada,
and
Europe, and were selected to play at the ceremony honoring Nobel Prize
winners
in Oslo, Norway.  They will play works by Shostakovich, Beethoven and
Dvorak.

Classical guitar will provide a change of pace Jan. 11 with a performance
by
David Burgess.  Praised by critics for his "polished technique and
flamboyant
style," Burgess had performed solo recitals throughout North and South
America, Europe and the Far East.  Burgess was a prot‚g‚ of the great
Andres
Segovia and has continued to perform concerts exploring the melodies and
rhythm of Latin music.

On Feb. 22, Jan-Erik Gustafsson, a Finish cellist who has won the Young
Concert Artists International Auditions and the Eurovision Young Musician
of
the Year competition, will perform on a 1718 Carl Giuseppe Testore cello
made
in Milan.

Lee Luvisi completes the season with his piano performance on March 8.
Over
the past nearly four decades, he has developed an enviable career both as
a
soloist and chamber musician, and is today one of the most highly
respected
artists on the American musical scene.

Season tickets for the five concerts are now available for $50 per general
admission ticket or for $25 per season for students.  Tickets at the door
are
$12 or $5 respectively.  Those interested in becoming a sponsor of the
Concert
Series may do so by donating $50 or more beyond the ticket price; their
names
will be listed in each program.  For more information, please call the
Museum
at 777-4195, or mail a check to Box 7305; include your name and address. 
Tickets will be mailed or held at the door.  The Museum Concert Series is
supported in part by funding from the Myra Foundation. -- Marsy Schroeder,
North Dakota Museum of Art. 
*******

CRAFT EXPERT, FINANCIAL PLANNER ARE STUDIO ONE GUESTS

Darlene Shea, co-owner of Shea's Nursery in Grand Forks, will demonstrate
her
Halloween craft ideas for children during the Friday, Oct. 10 broadcast of
"Studio One."  She will use a variety of supplies including popcorn, candy
corn, fake spiders, and red nail polish to create spooky decorations.  Her
focus will be on how inexpensive these crafts are to make and how much fun
kids will have doing them.

Neil Robinson, an investor representing the Edward D. Jones Co., will also
appear on the show to explain the basic principles of investing money.  He
says that compared to putting your money into a savings account or buying
a
Certificate of Deposit, a mutual fund can be much more prosperous.  He
will
explain three easy tips for beginner investors.

"Studio One" is an award-winning one-hour weekly morning show featuring
news,
weather, sports, and interviews.  The program airs on UND Channel 3 in
Grand
Forks live Friday at 7 a.m. and is repeated at noon and 7 p.m.
Rebroadcasts
can be seen Saturdays at 10 a.m. and noon, as well as Monday through
Wednesday
at 7 p.m.  The show also airs in Fargo, Bismarck/Mandan, Minot, and
Minneapolis. -- Monte Koshel, Studio One.
*******


CALENDAR OF EVENTS


OCTOBER 1997

(Please contact Mavis at the Office of University Relations, Box 7144, or
call
777-4304, if you wish to make changes or have an event included.)

Through Fri., Oct. 10 -- ALUMNI INVITATIONAL, Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts
Center.

Thurs., Oct. 9 -- "THE ALCHEMY OF MYSTICISM," presented by Jo Ann McNamara
of
Hunter College in New York, North Dakota Museum of Art, 4 to 5 p.m.;
reception
will follow her talk; originally scheduled for April 22; sponsored by the
English Department and the President's Advisory Council on Women.

Thurs., Oct. 9 -- FOR WOMEN ONLY, "Mamography Is A Lifesaver," in honor of
Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Bonnie Freeland (UND Student Health
Services),
will lead the discussion, Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

Thurs., Oct. 9 -- DEPRESSION SCREENING, University Counseling Center will
offer UND students the opportunity to learn about the signs and symptoms
of
depression, 200 McCannel Hall, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.; this is free; call
777-2127
for more information.

Thurs., Oct. 9 -- RECEPTION in honor of Deb Glennen, who recently was
appointed director of Disability Support Services, 190 McCannel Hall, 2:30
to
4:30 p.m.

Thurs., Oct. 9 -- FEAST OF NATIONS preparation, all are welcome to get a
preview of the upcoming Feast of Nations, International Centre, 2908
University Ave., 7 p.m.; call 777-3273 for more information.

Fri., Oct. 10 -- BIOLOGY SEMINAR, "The Narrow Sheath Genes Are Required
for
Pattern Formation in the Maize Leaf," presented by Michael Scanlon,
University
of California, Berkeley, 141 Starcher Hall, noon.

Fri., Oct. 10 -- INTERNATIONAL COF-TEA CUP, an opportunity for UND
students,
faculty, staff, and the Greater Grand Forks community to enjoy
international
tea, coffee, and pastry while discussing world issues, International
Centre,
2908 University Ave., 3 to 4:30 p.m.; all are welcome; call 777-3273 for
more
information.

Fri., Oct. 10 -- HOLIDAY MINI-CRAFT WORKSHOP, brown bag paper ornaments;
cost
is $1 per ornament, Craft Center, third floor of the Memorial Union, noon
to 1
p.m.; call 777-3979 to register.

Fri., Oct. 10 -- FREE CONCERT, "Bliss," a Winnipeg-based band will perform
on
the front lawn of the Memorial Union about 3 p.m.; "Bliss" is donating its
fee
as a tribute to UND students.

Fri., Oct. 10 -- EVENING WITH PAULA POUNDSTONE, this special event is for
thanking UND students, faculty and staff for all they did for UND and
Grand
Forks last spring and in the summer that followed, Hyslop Sports Center, 7
p.m.; doors open at 6 p.m. for students who need current UND ID to get
first-choice seats.

Fri., Oct. 10 -- PETRA, Chester Fritz Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

Sat., Oct. 11 -- PRE-MED DAY, School of Medicine and Health Sciences; for
college and high school students interested in a career of medicine, and
designed to provide insight into the process of applying to medical school
and
the life of a physician; free and open to the public; call 777-4221 for
more
information.

Sat., Oct. 11 -- FEAST OF NATIONS including international candlelight
dinner,
world vignettes, intercultural attire and performances, Grand Forks Civic
Auditorium, 615 1st Ave. N., 6 p.m.; tickets must be purchased in advance;
tickets purchased for the original program scheduled last April will be
honored.

Sat., Oct. 11 -- CONCERT, "Elijah," a dramatic oratorio by Felix
Mendelssohn,
will be presented by the Grand Forks Master Chorale, Holy Family Catholic
Church, 1001 17th Ave. S., 7:30 p.m.; the Chorale will be joined by the
UND
Concert Choir and an orchestra composed of local musicians and members of
the
Fargo-Moorhead Symphony; tickets are $8 for general admission, $7 for
seniors
and $5 for students, and will be sold at the door.

Sat., Oct. 11 -- FOOTBALL, UND at Mankato State University, Mankato,
Minn., 1
p.m.

Mon., Oct. 13 -- GRADUATE COMMITTEE MEETING, 305 Twamley Hall, 3:05 p.m.

Mon., Oct. 13 -- ROBERT WILKINS LECTURE, JoAnn Kay McNamara of Hunter
College
and the City University of New York's Graduate Center, will speak on
"Chastity
and Gender," Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, 8 p.m. (contact Edmund Clingan
at
777-6379 for more information).

Mon., Oct. 13 -- LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP SERIES, "Delegation: Work Smarter,
Not
Harder," presenter to be announced, Leadership Inspiration Center, third
floor, Memorial Union, 3 p.m.; sessions are free and open to the public;
(series continues every Monday through Oct. 27).

Mon. through Fri., Oct. 13-17 -- NORTH DAKOTA CLOTHESLINE PROJECT honors
survivors as well as children who have been affected by intimate violence;
it
is a visual display of shirts with written messages and illustrations that
graphically demonstrate the impact of violence against individuals, their
families and/or friends, River Valley Room, Memorial Union, 9 a.m. to 8
p.m.;
call the Women's Center at 777-4300 for more information.

Tues., Oct. 14 -- GRAND FORKS COLLEGE/CAREER FAIR, North Dakota National
Guard
Armory, 9 to 11:30 a.m.; area high schools from North Dakota and Minnesota
will attend; call 777-4229 for more information.

Tues., Oct. 14 -- COUNSELING COLLOQUIUM, 316 Montgomery Hall, 12:30 to
1:45
p.m.; topic will be announced in the University Letter.

Wed., Oct. 15 -- POETRY READING, Jay Meek (English) will give a reading
from
his two new collections of poems: Headlands: New and Selected Poems, and
Good
Lives, Asian Room, Chester Fritz Library, 4 p.m.; reading is free and open
to
the public; refreshments will be served, and books will be available for
purchase.

Wed., Oct. 15 -- NATIVE AMERICAN OPPORTUNITY DAY, main floor, Memorial
Union,
9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; call 777-4291 for more information.

Wed. through Sun., Oct. 15-19 -- THEATRE, "Kiss Me Kate," Burtness
Theatre,
7:30 p.m., with Sunday matinee performance at 2 p.m.; tickets are $10;
call
777-2085 for tickets; in conjunction with this production, the department
is
holding post-show discussions, a scholarly symposium, and a public lecture
on
the topic of gender in the musical drama and in the arts; featured will be
Sam
Abel, Professor of Theatre at the University of Vermont, opera and musical
theatre critic. Events include:
     Thurs., Oct. 16 -- Dr. Abel will discuss his recent opus, "Opera in
the
Flesh," which is on reserve at the Chester Fritz Library under "Salon," as
part of the Women Studies Salon, Women's Center, 4 p.m.
     Fri., Oct. 17 -- "The Persistence of Memory: Shifting Gender Images
in
Musical Theatre," a public lecture at 1 p.m. in Burtness Theatre.
     Fri. and Sat., Oct. 17-18 -- "Post-Show Discussion," discussing
gender
issues in the UND production of "Kiss Me Kate," after the 7:30 p.m.
performances at Burtness Theatre.
     Sat., Oct. 18 -- "Perspectives on Gender in the Arts," a panel
symposium
featuring Dr. Abel, Susan Koprince (English), Carol Sedgwick (Music),
Kathleen
Dixon (English), and Kathy Coudle-King at 3 p.m. in Burtness Theatre.
     
Thurs., Oct. 16 -- WOMEN STUDIES SALON, opera and musical theatre critic
and
professor at the University of Vermont, Sam Abel, will speak on "The
Paradox
of the Fat Lady: Opera and Gender," Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., 4 to
5
p.m.; call 777-2705 for more information.

Thurs., Oct. 16 -- TEST, College-Level Examination Program (CLEP), Room
200,
McCannel Hall, 8:30 a.m.

Thurs., Oct. 16 -- MEETING, State Board of Higher Education, Dickinson,
N.D.

Thurs., Oct. 16 -- DISCUSSION FORUM, the University Senate will hold open
forum, non-procedural discussion meetings on the third Thursday of each
month
to discuss topics of pertinence to upcoming Senate deliberations or of
general
campus-wide interest, Room 7, Gamble Hall, 4 p.m.; all members of the
University community are invited to participate.

Thurs., Oct. 16 -- UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM COMMITTEE MEETING, 303 Twamley
Hall,
3 p.m.

Thurs., Oct. 16 -- NORWEGIAN AMBASSADOR VISITS, Thomas Vraalsen, Norway's
Ambassador to the United States, will visit Grand Forks to meet with
Norwegian
students, discuss the exchange program, and see the city following the
flood,
Sons of Norway Lodge, 1409 9th Ave. S, 11 a.m.

Thurs., Oct. 16 -- BIOLOGY LECTURE, Alan R. Templeton, Department of
Biology,
Washington University, St. Louis, Mo., the George C. Wheeler Distinguished
Lecturer for Fall 1997, will present "Smokey the Bear versus Collared
Lizards:
Landscape Management in the Ozarks," 141 Starcher Hall, 7:30 p.m.;
Templeton
will also speak at noon Friday, Oct. 17.

Thurs., Oct. 16 -- SOCIAL GATHERING with pizza and dance, including
international music and dance lessons, International Centre, 2908
University
Ave., 7 p.m.; all are welcome; call 777-3273 for more information.

Fri., Oct. 17 -- UNSATISFACTORY PROGRESS REPORT FORMS DUE IN THE OFFICE OF
ADMISSIONS AND RECORDS BY NOON.

Fri., Oct. 17 -- BIOLOGY TALK by Alan R. Templeton, Department of Biology,
Washington University, St. Louis, Mo., will present "What is a Species?"
141
Starcher Hall, noon; Templeton is the George C. Wheeler Distinguished
Lecturer
for Fall 1997.

Fri., Oct. 17 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for Margaret Donovan Westby, a candidate
for
the Doctor of Philosophy degree with a major in Clinical Psychology, 210
Corwin-Larimore Hall, 10 a.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited
to
attend.

Fri., Oct. 17 -- INTERNATIONAL COF-TEA CUP, an opportunity for UND
students,
faculty, staff, and the Greater Grand Forks community to enjoy
international
tea, coffee, and pastry while discussing world issues, International
Centre,
2908 University Ave., 3 to 4:30 p.m.; all are welcome; call 777-3273 for
more
information.

Fri., Oct. 17 -- GREEN AND WHITE DAY, President Baker has approved this
day
for employees to wear UND colors and jeans to show support for our Sioux
athletes.

Fri., Oct. 17 -- SWIMMING & DIVING, Green/White Intrasquad, Hyslop Sports
Center.

Fri., Oct. 17 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND vs. University of South Dakota, Hyslop
Sports
Center, 5 p.m.

Sat., Oct. 18 -- TEST, American Dietetic Association (ADA), Room 116,
Witmer
Hall, 8 a.m.

Sat., Oct. 18 -- FOOTBALL, UND vs. North Dakota State University (HALL OF
FAME), Memorial Stadium, 2 p.m.

Sat., Oct. 18 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND vs. Morningside College, Hyslop Sports
Center, 7 p.m.

Sun., Oct. 19 -- FOURTH ANNUAL SHARON LAMBETH BREAST CANCER AWARENESS
WALK/RUN, University Park, registration begins at 1:15 p.m. and the run
begins
at 2 p.m.

Sun., Oct. 19 -- HOCKEY, UND vs. University of Manitoba, Engelstad Arena,
2
p.m.

Mon., Oct. 20 -- LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP SERIES, "Leadership in a Global
Village,"
presented by MaryAnne Lustgraaf, Memorial Union Director, Leadership
Inspiration Center, third floor, Memorial Union, 3 p.m.; sessions are free
and
open to the public; (series continues every Monday through Oct. 27).
*******



REMINDER! The attachments referred to are not included in the electronic
form of the University Letter. However, you will find the attachments
with the paper copy.
  
UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and
distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is
also available electronically through UNDInfo, the University's menu
system on the Internet. The address is http://www.und.nodak.edu.
  
All articles submitted for publication should be labeled "University
Letter" and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic
submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu. Attachments to
University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number.
University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations,
Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.
  
UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.
  
*******


  





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