[University Letter logo]

University Letter

October 17, 1997

Volume 35, No. 9

UNIVERSITY LETTER
University of North Dakota at Grand Forks
Vol. 35, Number 9, October 17, 1997

UNIVERSITY LETTER IS ALSO AVAILABLE ELECTRONICALLY in the Events and News section of UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address is: http://www.und.nodak.edu

The University Relations Office maintains an index for the University Letter.

------------------------

TABLE OF CONTENTS

EVENTS TO NOTE

OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

NOT JUST FOR ADVISERS

BILLBOARD

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

*******

------------------------

PRESIDENT REPORTS CAMPUS REACTIONS TO CHANCELLOR

In a memorandum to the campuses on August 15, North Dakota University System Chancellor Larry Isaak invited the Presidents to summarize reactions from faculty and staff to the then draft System Six Year Plan. The State Board of Higher Education also invited President Kendall Baker to suggest amendments to the plan to ensure that the document did not inadvertently through omission indicate that a change had occurred in the board's support for the traditional missions of the four-year institutions, and in particular the missions of the two comprehensive universities.

The following is excerpted from Dr. Baker's memorandum to Mr. Isaak of October

  1. "Let me say first that there is much support on this campus and in the larger community for much of the Six Year Plan, especially as it has evolved over the past weeks. The fact that the pan has been under a process of continuous revision as public consultation has taken place has been heartening to all involved.

    "As I indicated to the Board, the principal concern that has been expressed repeatedly on this campus is the worry that the Board has consciously decided to react to the criticisms of some of its stakeholders (for example, those in the business community who want the system to produce more narrowly trained technicians) by changing the fundamental nature of all of the institutions. My response -- and I heard no objection when I discussed it with Board members in September has been that while the Board expected all institutions to be more responsive to stakeholders, this was not to be at the expense of the traditional missions of the four-year schools and the comprehensive universities. In fact, as I have repeatedly emphasized, the Bush Study Group, although critical of the North Dakota University System for being too remote from the actual needs of business and other stakeholders, praised the NDUS institutions for the excellence of their efforts in the traditional modes of teaching, research and service. It would be well, however, to integrate some phrasing into the document that will ease concern on this matter, and as you can see from the following, I am in fact making several suggestions. Other presidents may be doing so as well.

    "There have been numerous other points that have been raised during this discussion. Some, such as concern over the seeming loss of autonomy of the faculty and even of the administrations of the individual institutions, is a moot point in that the subject is an inappropriate one with respect to the matters at hand. Other concerns, such as the priority that should be given to research, what the nature of research should be on individual campuses, and what role research proficiency should have in matters of reward and promotion, are mostly matters that must be addressed on individual campuses. The same can be said of many, many other issues. In fact, it can be argued that a systemwide planning document should be silent on many issues that are best left to the faculty and administrations of the individual campuses. The exact framework within which each academic program is constructed is certainly one of those. If the University of North Dakota, in the collective judgment of those best qualified to decide, wishes to draw heavily upon its liberal arts tradition in creating and nurturing its curriculum and in providing a distinctive educational experience for its students, it should be allowed to do so, everything else being equal. To the degree that the Board can highlight and provide reinforcement for this central role of the faculty and the individual campus administrations, the more success it will have, I believe, in enlisting the majority of the faculty as willing and enthusiastic partners in those areas that require collective action.

    "Here are a number of proposed amendments that would, I think, reduce certain anxieties among the faculty.

    -Jim Penwarden, Director, Office of University Relations, 10-13-97.

    *******

    "NINE-O'CLOCK" BRIEFINGS SET

    Times for the "nine-o'clock" briefings, University Community Conversations, by President Baker have been set as follows: Wednesday, Oct. 22, Wednesday, Nov. 19, and Wednesday, Dec. 17. All briefings will be held at 9 a.m. in the Memorial Union Ballroom. University Community Conversations will provide an opportunity for faculty, staff and students to learn more about what is happening at UND, and also will provide an opportunity for members of the University Community to ask questions. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, University Letter.

    *******

    NDUS SEEKS TRANSFER COORDINATOR

    The North Dakota University System has announced an internal position search for a Coordinator of Articulation and Transfer. This is a salary negotiable position (12-month basis) with the appointment being on a release-time basis and the coordinator located on one of the NDUS campuses. The position is under the supervision of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, Michael Hillman, and will lead and provide vision for the successful implementation of the State Board of Higher Education's initiatives to improve transfer for students enrolled in the North Dakota University System. The full position announcement can be obtained from the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs and the offices of any UND dean or director within the Academic Affairs Division. The application deadline date is Friday, Oct. 24. -- Marlene Strathe, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost.

    *******

    1997-98 UND DIRECTORY SALES BEGIN

    Copies of the new 1997-98 UND Directory are available at the University Bookstore and at Wilkerson Hall. The 184-page book lists names, addresses, phone numbers, and, in many cases, e-mail addresses, of faculty and staff, and names, phone numbers, and addresses of students. The book also contains much other information, including administrative, academic and student governance personnel, residence hall and fraternity and sorority housing information, an overview and capsule history of the University, research and service agency information, the campus map, city map, events calendars, organization chart, emergency and disaster reaction procedures, campus and city bus schedules, political divisions and voting sites for Grand Forks, and mailing procedures. The Directory, on sale for $1.25 per copy, is edited by the Office of University Relations and is compiled with information from a variety of sources. -- Jim Penwarden, Director, Office of University Relations.

    *******

    EVENTS TO NOTE

    BIOCHEMISTRY WILL HOLD SPECIAL LECTURE

    The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology will hold a special lecture at 11 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 16, in the Clifford Haugen Lecture Hall, Room 1360, Medical School Building. Christopher Mathews, chair of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Oregon State University at Corvallis, will present "Protein-Protein Interactions in DNA Precursor Biosynthesis."

    Dr. Mathews has investigated replication, nucleic acid enzymology metabolic channeling and macromolecular complexes. He regularly visits ribonucleotide reductase, dihydrofolate reductase, T4 bacteriophage replication and all aspects of nucleotide biosynthesis and its integration in DNA biosynthesis. He is in North Dakota to present the inaugural "George Graf Distinguished Lectureship" lecture at NDSU Friday, Oct. 17. Because he is a long-time friend of many of the faculty members at UND, it is appropriate that he is giving the warm-up lecture here (as well as the keynote lecture at NDSU) prior to the big UND-NDSU football game. Inquiries about this seminar should be addressed to Barry Milavetz at 777-4708 or 777-3937. -- Barry Milavetz, Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

    *******

    COMPUTER SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM SET

    On Thursday, Oct. 16, at 3 p.m. in 348 CAS II, Dexter Perkins (Geology and Geological Engineering) will discuss new educational methods in Geology. Dr. Perkins recently received an NSF Instructional and Laboratory Instrumentation [ILI] grant to develop and implement his ideas. For the colloquium Dr. Perkins will be talking about the content of his proposal and his progress so far. Faculty are invited to an informal gathering afterwards to talk with Dr. Perkins about the NSF ILI grant program. -- Bruce Maxwell, Computer Science.

    *******

    GRADUATE COMMITTEE WILL MEET MONDAY

    The Graduate Committee will meet Monday, Oct. 20, at 3:05 p.m. in 305 Twamley Hall. The agenda will include:

    1. Consideration of a request by the Space Studies Department to add a new course, SPST 595, Space Studies Capstone.
    2. Discussion of the Health Administration Track for the MPA.
    3. Discussion of Graduate Faculty elections.
    4. Discussion of graduate programs with University System Vice Chancellor Mike Hillman.
    5. Matters arising.

    -- Harvey Knull, Dean, Graduate School.

    *******

    JEFFREY LANG TO GIVE FIRST TALK IN FACULTY LECTURE SERIES

    Biologist Jeffrey Lang will deliver the first presentation in the newly resurrected Faculty Lecture Series. His talk, "The Puzzle of Sex in Reptiles," will begin at 5 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 21, in the North Dakota Museum of Art. The lecture will be preceded by a reception at 4 p.m.

    Other speakers in the series will include Donald Miller, Professor of Visual Arts, "Thoughtful Impressions in Clay: The Cable Years," Tuesday, Nov. 18; Jay Meek, Professor of English, "Paul Cezanne and the Durango Kid: The House of Poetry," Tuesday, Feb. 24; Joanne Gabrynowicz, Professor of Space Studies, "Of Faith, Framers and Farmers: A Space Odyssey," Tuesday, April 7.

    From 1954 to 1988, about 160 faculty members delivered talks about their work to colleagues, students and friends as part of the University's most venerable lecture series. At a gathering of UND's Chester Fritz Distinguished Professors this summer, a decision was made to resurrect the Faculty Lecture Series. Its goal is to enhance UND's academic atmosphere by showcasing the scholarly lives of several faculty selected from across the campus. The lectures aim to present, with some depth and rigor, the scholarly questions and goals of the individual faculty members. The series is funded through the UND President's Office.

    Jeffrey Lang

    A native of Massachusetts, Jeffrey Lang received his Bachelor of Science in zoology from the University of Michigan, his Master of Science in biology from UND, and the Ph.D. in ecology and behavioral biology from the University of Minnesota. Before joining the UND faculty in 1980, he was a Queen's Fellow in Marine Science at the University of Sydney, Australia, and a postdoctoral associate at the Bell Museum of Natural History, University of Minnesota. An expert in the behavior and physiology of vertebrates, particularly reptiles and amphibians, Lang is well known for his research on aspects of temperature and sex determination in crocodiles, alligators and turtles. In 1993, he was honored at the Founders Day Banquet with the UND Foundation/Lydia and Arthur Saiki/UND Student Government Faculty Advisor Award.

    Donald Miller

    Donald Miller has been a member of the UND faculty since 1970. He was hired by the engineering dean to be the chair (and only faculty member) of the Department of Ceramics, which then was located in the basement of Babcock Hall. Ceramics students referred to their quarters as "the catacombs." The ceramics program became part of the College of Fine Arts and found a new home with the construction of the Hughes Fine Arts Center. A native of Fargo, Miller received his baccalaureate degree from North Dakota State University, the Master of Arts from New Mexico Highlands University, and the Master of Fine Arts from Mills College. An authority on the pottery of Margaret Kelly Cable, he co-wrote the book, "University of North Dakota Pottery The Cable Years." Miller was promoted to the rank of Professor of Visual Arts in 1987.

    Jay Meek

    Jay Meek has published six books of poems with Carnegie Mellon University Press, including "Headlands: New and Selected Poems" (1997). He has co-edited several collections, including "Prairie Volcano: An Anthology of North Dakota Writing" (with Martha Meek) and "After the Storm: Poems on the Persian Gulf War" (with F.D. Reeve). His poems have been widely published and represented in collections such as Imagining Home and The Pushcart Prize. Before coming to UND in 1985, he was a visiting writer at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Sarah Lawrence College. He has received grants from the Bush Foundation, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. In 1996, as a participant in the artists' exchange program with Canada and Mexico, he was a writer-in-residence at Memorial University of Newfoundland.

    Joanne Gabrynowicz

    Exemplifying the multifaceted nature of her program, the accomplishments of Joanne Gabrynowicz span a wide range of issues and concerns. She received the Juris Doctor degree from the Benjamin Cardozo School of Law, studying constitutional law under the eminent Constitutional scholar Telford Taylor. She testified before the National Commission on Space and was a member of the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment Earth Observations Advisory Panel and the National Research Council Committee on Issues in the Transborder Flow of Scientific Data. She has received research fellowships from the NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Program and the USGS EROS Data Center/National Satellite Land Remote Sensing Data Archive. In 1997 she became the first woman to serve as Dean for the NASA Summer Space Academy.

    The Faculty Lecture Series

    The Faculty Lecture Series seeks to cultivate a stronger academic atmosphere on the University of North Dakota campus by showcasing the scholarly lives of several faculty selected across the disciplines. The Lectures aim to present with some depth and rigor the scholarly questions and goals of the individual faculty. In presenting the products of their scholarship, the Lecturers will share the enthusiasm and dedication that sustains their creative efforts.

    The Lectures and preceding social hours are intended to be recurring occasions for members of the University community to interact and strengthen their sense of unity. These periodic gatherings can help the public to recognize the university as a unique institution in society, an academic community with scholarly roles and contributions that go beyond, but at the same time enrich, its own educational programs.

    The 1997-98 Faculty Lecture Series will feature four presentations within the distinctive setting of the North Dakota Museum of Art. Faculty Lectures for the fall semester will be given on the Tuesdays of October 21 and November 18; the spring semester Faculty Lectures will be presented on the Tuesdays of February 24 and April 7.

    *******

    DEATH AND DISEASE IN OPERA TOPIC OF DEAN'S HOUR PRESENTATION

    Two musicians associated with the Greater Grand Forks Symphony Orchestra will present "Death and Disease in Opera" at the Dean's Hour Lecture Series Tuesday, Oct. 21, at noon in the Reed Keller Auditorium, School of Medicine and Health Sciences. The public is invited.

    Presenters are Gerald Gaul (Surgery) and Timm Rolek, Symphony conductor. The audience will hear excerpts of famous death scenes, the injury and/or autopsy results will be medically described, and the students will be asked to guess "how the musician died." Prizes will be given to the first student giving the correct diagnosis for each case.

    This program is the first in the series of Dean's Hour presentations for the 1997-98 academic year. Initiated in February 1995, the Dean's Hour Lecture Series is a forum for presenting ideas and issues related to the practice of medicine and health care. For more information, contact the Office of Academic Affairs and Research, UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences, 777-2515. -- Thomas Norris, Executive Associate Dean, Academic Affairs and Research, School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

    *******

    "ON TEACHING" SESSION SLATED FOR OCT. 22

    The "On Teaching" lunch session at noon Wednesday, Oct. 22, in the North Ballroom of the Memorial Union, will feature "Keeping the Lecture Alive and Lively II: A Follow-Up to the September Discussion," which will be facilitated by Ron Pynn (Political Science), Frank White (Sociology), and Beverly Uhlenberg (Teaching and Learning). Please call 777-3325 to register. -- Dan Rice, Director of Instructional Development.

    *******

    ENRICHMENT SERIES IN COMPUTER SCIENCE SET

    On Wednesday, Oct. 22, and Wednesday, Oct. 29, from 3 to 5 p.m. in the CAS II X-terminal Lab, Dr. Mahir Ali and Joe Grassel will be presenting "How to Program in X-Windows: A Hands-on Experience" as part of the Enrichment Series in Computer Science. All faculty and students are invited to attend (some programming experience will be helpful). The presentation on Oct. 23 will be an introduction to Motif and Widgets, and the presentation on the Nov. 6 will cover creating windows, handling events, and building graphical user interfaces.-- Bruce Maxwell, Computer Science.

    *******

    GEOGRAPHY WILL HOLD FORUM ON FLOOD

    The Department of Geography will hold its monthly forum at noon Thursday, Oct. 23, in 364 Clifford Hall. Paul Todhunter will present "A Geographer's Perspective on the BIG BIG Flood." -- Department of Geography.

    *******

    WAC GROUP WILL MEET OCT. 23

    The topic for the October meeting of the Writing Across the Curriculum discussion group will be "Fancy Phrases," "Neat Packages," and "Student Expertise." The group will meet Thursday, Oct. 23, from noon to 1 p.m. For more information on this meeting or to sign up to attend, please call 777-3600 or respond by e-mail to hawthorn@badlands.nodak.edu. -- Joan Hawthorne, Coordinator, Writing Across the Curriculum.

    *******

    ROBOTICS COLLOQUIUM SET

    On Friday, Oct. 24, at 4 p.m. in the Atmospherium in CAS I, Claude Touzet from Oak Ridge National Labs will discuss "Reinforcement Learning in Behavior-based Approaches". This talk is part of the Computer Science Colloquium Series, and is supported by an EPSCoR Department Development Award through NSF grant #OSR-9452892.

    Dr. Touzet's talk will focus on reinforcement learning techniques in robotics. Reinforcement Learning proposes the synthesis of robot behaviors, or agent behaviors, with the help of reinforcement functions. A reinforcement function uses a measure of the robot's performance to guide the learning. It is no longer necessary to write an algorithm generating the corresponding behaviors, something particularly interesting when such algorithms are not available (too complex, too expensive, etc.). Moreover, the synthesized behaviors integrate the local performance (i.e., the heterogeneity ) of the sensors, the motors, the noise of the environment, etc.

    This talk will present an overview of the approaches used for Reinforcement Learning: Hamming based generalization, genetic algorithms, DYNA (modeling of the 'real' world), fuzzy logic, neural networks, etc, as well as discussion of all real implementation problems, with the advantages and limitations clearly pointed out.

    In addition, the talk will summarize major research approaches over the last decade in the field of Reinforcement Learning, describing them in the context of robotic applications, like obstacle avoidance, wall following, etc. The aim is to demonstrate to the attendance that today reinforcement learning methods are a tool at the disposition of the agent developer and no more a research area involving lots of intuitions and personal experience. -- Bruce Maxwell, Computer Science.

    *******

    AMERICAN DIABETES ASSOCIATION HOLDS GRAND RE-OPENING

    The North Dakota Affiliate of the American Diabetes Association will hold its grand re-opening from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 24, at its new offices located at 315 N. Fourth St. The former offices of ADA were located in the Security Building which burned during the April 19 fire in downtown Grand Forks.

    The event is open to the public. Festivities planned during the grand re-opening include a Tex Mex style dinner and a tour of the office. Visitors will also have a chance to meet and visit with staff members at the North Dakota affiliate office.

    The new building has room for meetings, and the group plans to offer more in-house activities and classes for people with diabetes. Exercise equipment has been donated, and computers are available for the public. During the interim months after the flood, ADA was located at the Center for Innovation business incubator on the UND campus. The mission of the American Diabetes Association, North Dakota Affiliate, is to prevent and cure diabetes and improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, for Emily Buchanan, American Diabetes Association.

    *******

    FACULTY, GRAD STUDENTS INVITED TO RECEPTION

    The Text and Academic Authors Association invites all faculty and graduate students to a wine and cheese reception in recognition of the TAA workshops on campus Friday and Saturday, Oct. 24 and 25. The all-faculty reception is from 4 to 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 24, at the J. Lloyd Stone Alumni House. -- Ronald Pynn, Professor of Political Science.

    *******

    FAMILY WEEKEND SET FOR OCT. 24-25

    The UND Family Weekend will be held Friday and Saturday, Oct. 24 and 25. The schedule follows:

    Friday, Oct. 24: 4 to 10 p.m., Registration at Memorial Union, Dakota Lounge; 5 p.m., Movie Moment, Memorial Union, Fred Orth Lecture Bowl.

    Saturday, Oct. 25: 7:30 a.m., Run/walk with President and Toby Baker, Chester Fritz Auditorium entrance; 8 a.m., Registration continues at Memorial Union, Dakota Lounge; 8:30 a.m., Family Association Breakfast and Annual Meeting, Memorial Union, River Valley Room; 9:30 a.m., Opening Welcome, Memorial Union, Fred Orth Lecture Bowl; 9:45 a.m., Discovering UND Sessions; noon, Country Barbecue, Memorial Union, Terrace Dining Center (sponsored by the UND Family Association); 1 p.m., Football, UND vs. St. Cloud State University, Memorial Stadium; 7:30 p.m., Kaleidoscope of Entertainment, Memorial Union, Ballroom. -- Student Academic Services.

    *******

    MILITARY APPRECIATION DAY SET FOR OCT. 25

    Everyone is invited to Military Appreciation Day Saturday, Oct. 25, at UND Memorial Stadium.

    Come out and show your appreciation to our military friends for all they do and have done for our community. This is a chance to share a pre-game meal of brats, beans, hot dogs, salad, chips and beverage with the folks from the Air Force and National Guard. Live entertainment will be provided by the Night Wing Band, from the Air Force's Heartland of America Band.

    Tickets for the meal are $5 per person and food will be served at the military tents on the west side of the Memorial Stadium from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tickets must be purchased in advance at the Grand Forks (772-7271) and East Grand Forks (773-7481) Chambers of Commerce by Monday, Oct. 20. Tickets will not be sold the day of the event.

    At 1 p.m., UND's Fighting Sioux will play St. Cloud State University. Football tickets may be purchased through the UND Athletic Department. Special presentations will be made at halftime to recognize the military's efforts in helping the community battle this year's blizzards and the flood. Let's have a great turnout and show our military friends how much we appreciate having them in our community. -- DaLonna Bjorge, Student Affairs.

    *******

    OctSoberfest SET FOR OCT. 27

    Alcohol and drug educator John Fabjance will help the University of North Dakota celebrate OctSoberfest '97 Monday, Oct. 27, when he presents his "Mind Games" program at 7 p.m. in the UND Memorial Union Ballroom. Fabjance uses magic, comedy, pocket-picking to help spread his message.

    In the wake of recent student deaths by alcohol poisoning at MIT and Louisiana State University, Fabjance believes that drug and alcohol abuse education is more important than ever. But he said alcohol and drug abuse educators must focus on four key points to help change the drinking and drug consumption habits of the nation:

    Fabjance says that these four steps are an important part of any effective alcohol and drug education campaign. "Challenging the status quo is always difficult," said Fabjance. "But when more people realize the difference between 'information' and 'communication,' we can help young people to make better decisions -- decisions that can help them learn and grow, avoid unnecessary tragedies caused by alcohol and drugs." -- Karen Walton, OctSoberfest Coordinator, 777-2127.

    *******

    SATELLITE BROADCAST WILL DISCUSS DIABETES CONTROL, PREVENTION

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) will present a live, interactive, national satellite broadcast on diabetes from noon to 2 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 30, at the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. The event will be broadcast from Atlanta.

    To register for the broadcast, contact Grand Forks site facilitator Lynette Dickson at 746-4427. There is no registration fee.

    Susan Rook of CNN will moderate the broadcast. Participants will also include celebrities, diabetes experts, health care consumers, community leaders, health professionals, managed care representatives, and other diabetes advocates.

    This national broadcast serves to increase awareness of the impact of diabetes, highlight existing efforts to reduce the burden of diabetes, and mobilize communities to action to improve diabetes outcomes.

    Representing the North Dakota Affiliate of the American Diabetes Association, Dickson will facilitate discussion at the Grand Forks site. She is the licensed nutritionist on staff at the ADA. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, for Emily Buchanan, American Diabetes Association.

    *******

    WORKSHOP WILL FOCUS ON WRITING GRANT PROPOSALS

    "Writing Winning Proposals: Advice from Successful Grant Writers" is the topic of a half-day workshop to be offered Monday, Nov. 3, from 8:30 a.m. to noon in the Sioux Room, Memorial Union. Co-sponsored by the Office of Research and Program Development and the University Writing Program, the workshop is designed for faculty and staff grant writers who have some experience seeking external funding for their research but would like to improve the quality of their proposals.

    The workshop will feature a panel of UND researchers from a variety of fields who will offer their perspectives as both writers and readers of research grant proposals. Participants will also have the opportunity to read and critique sample grant proposals and/or drafts of proposals in progress.

    The deadline for registration is Wednesday, Oct. 29. For more information, contact the University Writing Program at 777-3600. -- Libby Rankin, University Writing Program.

    *******

    U SENATE SLATED TO MEET NOV. 6

    The University Senate will meet Thursday, Nov. 6, at 4:05 p.m., in Room 7, Gamble Hall. Agenda items for this meeting are due in the Office of Admissions and Records by 4 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 23. It is recommended that some detail be included in the agenda items submitted. -- Alice Poehls (Admissions and Records), Secretary, University Senate.

    *******

    OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

    POSTED GRADES SHOULD FOLLOW POLICY

    All electronic posting of grades using the student's NAID or social security number is inappropriate because it violates a student's right to privacy, as defined in the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, North Dakota State Board of Higher Education policy, and University policy. All faculty are reminded to use a randomly assigned number to post grades for students electronically or in traditional ways. -- Alice Poehls, Director of Admissions and Records.

    *******

    DEADLINES LISTED FOR FACULTY RESEARCH AWARDS

    Tuesday, Oct. 21, is the first deadline for submission of applications to the Faculty Research and Creative Activity Committee (FRCAC). The Committee will consider requests from faculty members to support: (1) research, creative activity or other types of scholarly endeavors; (2) requests to support travel associated with research activities or the presentation of scholarly papers; and (3) requests for funds to meet publication costs. Travel requests will be considered only for travel to be completed before Jan. 20, 1998. Requests for support to improve or supplement instructional activities will not be considered since applicants should request those funds from the Office of Instructional Development.

    The second deadline for submission of applications is Tuesday, Jan. 20, 1998. Travel applications will be considered at that time only for travel that will occur between Jan. 20, 1998, and April 14, 1998.

    The third deadline for submission of applications is Tuesday, April 14, 1998. Travel applications will be considered at that time only for travel that will occur between April 14, 1998, and Oct. 15, 1998. No research applications will be considered at that time.

    The Committee reminds applicants to carefully prepare their proposals and be specific and realistic in their budget requests. Although the FRCAC encourages submission of research/creative activity proposals and travel/publication requests, the Committee takes into consideration the most recent FRCAC award granted to each applicant. Priority will be given to beginning faculty and first-time applicants. Requests for research/creative activity awards may not exceed $2,500. The Committee has approximately $55,000 available to award during the 1997-98 academic year.

    Application forms for research/creative activity, travel or publication requests are available at ORPD, 105 Twamley Hall, 777-4279, or on ORPD's home page (on UNDInfo under "Research"). A properly signed original and seven copies of the application must be submitted to ORPD prior to the deadline. Applications that are not prepared in accordance with the directions on the forms will not be considered by the Committee.

    -- Harmon B. Abrahamson (Chemistry), Chair, Faculty Research and Creative Activity Committee.

    *******

    SPRING TIME SCHEDULE AVAILABLE OCT. 21

    The Time Schedule of Classes for Spring 1998, to be used by departments for advising purposes, will be available for pickup in the reception area of the Office of Admissions and Records beginning at 9 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 21. If you have questions, please call 777-2711. -- Veriena Garver, Admissions and Records Officer, Office of Admissions and Records.

    *******

    SCHOLARLY WRITING WORKSHOPS SET

    Two workshops on scholarly writing will be available to UND faculty later this month. The first, "Writing a Textbook," will be led by Professor Franklin Silverman of Marquette University, and is set for Friday, Oct. 24, from 3 to 6 p.m. in the Sioux Room of the Memorial Union. The second, "Successful Scholarly Writing," will be led by Professor Gerald Stone, Southern Illinois University. It will be held from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, Oct. 25, in the Sioux Room of the Memorial Union. Both workshop leaders are well-published authors. The workshops are jointly sponsored by the Offices of Instructional Development and Research, Research and Program Development, and the University Writing Program. They are available to faculty without charge. For more information, or to register for either or both workshops, call the Office of Instructional Development at 777-3325 by Wednesday, Oct. 15. -- Dan Rice, Director of Instructional Development.

    *******

    NOV. 7 IS LAST DAY TO DROP CLASS

    The last day to drop a full-term course or withdraw from school for the 1997 fall semester is Friday, Nov. 7. Students completely withdrawing from UND must use the UND "Withdrawal Form" which is available at the Office of Admissions and Records, 201 Twamley Hall; students are not to use the Registration Action Form for this process. -- Alice Poehls, Director of Admissions and Records.

    *******

    GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

    RESEARCH, GRANT OPPORTUNITIES LISTED

    Following are research and grant opportunities. For more information, contact the Office of Research and Program Development at 777-4278.

    ENVIRONMENTAL LAW INSTITUTE

    The Institute's main areas of interest are environmental law management and policy, including economic and scientific aspects and protection of natural areas. Funds are provided for scholarships, technical assistance, work-study programs and visiting scholars. Deadlines vary. Contact: 202/939-3823 or 202/939-3800; fax 202/939-3868; eli@eli.org; http://www.eli.org/.

    ------------

    CENTER FOR INDOOR AIR RESEARCH

    The Center is interested in scientific and technical research on the sources, transformation and fate of constituents affecting indoor air quality, factors governing human exposure to and retention of those constituents, effects of those constituents on health, including exposure-response relationships and on methods of preventing or abating indoor air contaminant concentrations. Current priorities include all sources except radon and asbestos. Deadlines vary. Contact: 410/684-3777; fax 410/684-3729; ciarinc@aol.com.

    ------------

    ALDEN B. DOW CREATIVITY CENTER

    The Center offers four fellowships (including travel, room and board) each summer to individuals in any field or profession, including the arts, humanities and sciences, who wish to pursue an innovative project or creative idea. The Fellow pursues his/her own project through independent, non-scheduled study. Deadline: 12/31/97. Contact: 517/837-4478; fax 517/837-4468; http://www.northwood.edu/abd.html.

    ------------

    DAAD (GERMAN ACADEMIC EXCHANGE SERVICE)

    The DAAD is a private, publicly funded, self-governing organization of institutions of higher education in Germany. Its function is to promote international academic relations, especially through the exchange of students and faculty. Although the head office is in Bonn, branch offices are located throughout the world, including New York. Scholars, professors and students representing all disciplines from almost every country in the world participate in its programs. Scholarships are awarded to foreign and German students, student trainees, junior academic staff, lecturers and professors. Contact: 212/758-3223; fax 212/755-5780; daadny@daad.org; http://www.daad.org/about.htm.

    ------------

    INSTITUTE OF AMERICAN CULTURES

    The Postdoctoral/Visiting Scholar Fellowship Program in Ethnic Studies, sponsored by the University of California's Institute of American Cultures, offers fellowships to scholars in support of research on African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans or Chicanas/os. Awards range from $23,000-$28,000/yr. plus health benefits and up to $3,000 in research support. Deadline: 12/31/97. Contact: 310/206-2557; http://www.gdnet.ucla.edu/iacweb/iachome.htm.

    ------------

    VIRGINIA FOUNDATION FOR THE HUMANITIES AND PUBLIC POLICY

    The Virginia Center for the Humanities conducts and funds humanities research, education, and public programs. Up to six semester-long, stipend-supported Fellowships ($1,500-$3,000/month) will be awarded for research and writing in the humanities. Research should illuminate contemporary issues or address topics of abiding cultural or civic interest. Projects may be in history, philosophy, literary criticism, anthropology, or other disciplines of the humanities, or may be interdisciplinary. They should result in books, articles, exhibits, curriculum materials, or other products. Fellowships are open to independent and affiliated scholars, professionals, and others working in the humanities or wishing to pursue projects in the humanities. Applicants need not have advanced degrees, though the Center does not support work toward a degree. Contact: 804/924-3296; fax 804/296-4714; rac3r@virginia.edu; http://www.virginia.edu/vfh/ctr/ctr1.html. Deadline: 12/01/97.

    ------------

    SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION

    Postdoctoral Fellowships (3-12 months; up to $27,000/yr) are available for scholars who have held the doctoral degree or equivalent for less than seven years as of 1/15/98. Fellowships ($350/wk.) allow students to conduct research for 10-week periods in association with Smithsonian research staff members; fellowship applicants must be formally enrolled in a graduate program of study, must have completed at least one semester, and must not yet have been advanced to candidacy in a doctoral program. Senior Fellowships (3-12 months; up to $27,000/yr.) are available for scholars who have held the doctoral degree or equivalent for more than seven years as of 1/15/98; applications for senior fellowships may be made up to two years in advance. Stipends for Senior Fellowships are variable, but the Smithsonian's stipend may be matched by other sources of funding such as sabbatical salary.

    Applicants for all programs must propose research in a field pursued at the Smithsonian and must offer a specific and detailed research proposal indicating why the Smithsonian is the appropriate place to conduct the studies proposed. Fellowships are only offered to support research within Smithsonian facilities or programs. At present the fields supported are: American history, American material and folk culture, and history of music and musical instruments; history of science and technology; history of art, design, crafts, and the decorative arts; anthropology, archaeology, linguistics, and ethnic studies; evolutionary, systematic, behavioral, environmental biology, and conservation; geological sciences and astrophysics; and materials characterization and conservation. Contact: 202/287-3271; siofg@ofg.si.edu; http://www.si.edu/youandsi/studies/ofg/ofgintro.htm. Deadline: 1/15/98.

    ------------

    NATIONAL CENTER FOR RESEARCH RESOURCES (NCRR)

    Minority Initiative: K-12 Teachers and High School Students. Support is provided for a program aimed at increasing the pool of underrepresented minority high school students who are interested in pursuing and academically prepared to pursue careers in biomedical/behavioral research and the health professions. The program will include K-12 inservice and preservice teachers and minority high school students. The project period is three years. Contact: Martin B. Blumsack; 301/435-1303; ncrr_k12@nih.gov. Deadlines: 2/1/98, 6/1/98.

    ------------

    ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION HUMANITIES FELLOWSHIPS

    Rockefeller Foundation Humanities Fellowships support scholars and writers engaged in research on transnational social and cultural issues, non-Western cultures, and the cultural heritage of the U.S. In 1998-99 awards will be made for resident fellowships at 28 host institutions (contact ORPD for a list of the institutions). Fellowships are intended to serve scholars who are testing disciplinary boundaries or moving into newer fields of inquiry. Applications are invited from programs in institutions as well as from individuals. Of special interest are programs addressing the social construction of race, gender, ethnicity and religion; the circulation and interpretation of cultures, including questions of pluralism and civil society; the consequences of diasporas, immigration and new forms of citizenship; and communal conflict and intergroup relations. Deadlines for individuals vary, depending on the host institution. Deadlines for institutions are 12/1/97 (preproposal) and 2/2/98 (completed proposal). Contact: Humanities Fellowships, Arts and Humanities Division, The Rockefeller Foundation, 420 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10018-2702.

    ------------

    AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS ASSOCIATION

    The Association is soliciting proposals for basic and clinical research. The request encourages the submission of clinical proposals utilizing ALC patient materials, but does not include clinical trials of therapies nor patient management research. Deadlines: 12/1/97 (preproposal); 3/2/98 (formal application). Contact: Ruth Papadatos, 818/340-7500; fax 818/340-2060; http://www.alsa.org.

    ------------

    AT&T BELL LABORATORIES

    The AT&T--Summer Internship/Employment Program provides summer employment on a well defined project in a research and development environment for outstanding B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. candidates as well as faculty. Eligible applicants are U.S. citizens or permanent residents who will be available for career employment within two years of participation in the program. Eligible disciplines are behavior science, communications sciences, computer engineering, computer science, economics, electrical engineering, human computer interaction, industrial engineering, information science, library information science, mathematics, operations research, product management, physics, software engineering, statistics, and systems engineering. Contact: Peggy Hungerford, 908/949-3896. Deadline: 3/20/1998.

    ------------

    MENNINGER CLINIC

    A one-year post-master's fellowship in clinical social work is offered to provide intensive training and supervision in clinical social work. Eligible applicants are graduates of accredited schools of social work who have related work experience. Deadline: 2/15/98. Two-year, in-residence fellowships are also available for clinical psychologists to train in psychotherapy, psychodiagnosis, continuum-of-care treatment, and child clinical psychology. Applicants must have a Ph.D. or Psy.D., with appropriate internship. Deadline: 1/15/98. Contact: Ellen J. Safier, Director; 913/350-5000; or Box 829, Topeka, KS 66601-0829.

    ------------

    WILLIAM R. WILEY ENVIRONMENTAL MOLECULAR SCIENCES LABORATORY

    The William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) is a national scientific user facility dedicated to collaborative, independent and proprietary research in the environmental molecular sciences. Time on the major instruments in EMSL is available to scientists world-wide for studies in the environmental molecular sciences or that address other national scientific research needs. Except for proprietary research, there is generally no charge for equipment/facility use. Access to EMSL for general research can be obtained by submitting a proposal to the appropriate Research Facility(s). Proposals may be considered at any time. Major facilities and capabilities operational at EMSL in FY1998 are High Field Magnetic Resonance Facility, High Field Mass Spectrometry Facility, Molecular Science Computing Facility, and equipment to support work in the areas of Nanostructural Materials, Interfacial Structures and Compositions, Reactions and Interfaces, and Gas-Phase Monitoring and Detection. Contact: Tina Foley, Office Coordinator, P.O. Box 999, K2-18, Richland, WA 99352; or tina.foley@pnl.gov . Phone: 509/375-6807 or see http://www.emsl.pnl.gov:2080/ for submission materials.

    ------------

    NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BROADCASTERS

    Twelve-month grants of up to $5,000 each are provided for broadcast research, especially on economic, business, social, or policy issues of importance to the U.S. commercial broadcast industry. The sponsor encourages proposals dealing with the economics of broadcasting in an environment of diminished regulation, increasing competition, and changing financial structures. Proposals dealing with cable, instructional, or public radio and television are specifically excluded. All academic personnel, graduate students, and senior undergraduates are eligible. Contact: Molly Fink, Research and Planning, 1771 N Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-2891; or 202/429-5389. Deadline: 1/26/98.

    -----------

    NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION

    The aim of the SBE Global Perspectives on Sociolegal Studies program is to support research on law and law-related processes and behaviors in light of the growing interdependence and interconnectedness of the world. Studies are encouraged on both global dimensions of sociolegal phenomena and sociolegal dimensions of global phenomena. Proposals are welcome that advance fundamental knowledge about legal interactions, processes, relations, and diffusions that extend beyond any single nation as well as about how local and national legal institutions, systems, and cultures affect or are affected by transnational or international phenomena. Proposals may locate the research within a single nation or between or across legal systems or regimes as long as they illuminate or are informed by global perspectives. Support may be requested for up to five years. Contact: Program Director, 703/306-1762; fax 703/306-0485; hhosch@nsf.gov. Deadline: 2/1/98.

    Small Grants for Exploratory Research (SGER) fund small-scale exploratory work in all fields of science, engineering, and education supported by NSF, through brief proposals without the usual external review. Such work includes preliminary research on untested and novel ideas, ventures into emerging research areas, research requiring urgent access to specialized data, facilities, or equipment, or similar exploratory efforts likely to catalyze innovative advances. Awards are normally for one year and may not exceed $50,000, with the amount depending on the particular program. Only one copy of a brief proposal is required. NSF program officers are not required to seek advice from external reviewers before making their recommendations; therefore, principal investigators are strongly encouraged to contact the appropriate program officer to see if the proposed research would be suitable for SGER support, or if a fully reviewable proposal should be submitted. Contact: ORPD for the NSF Grant Proposal Guide (GPG) (NSF 98-2); call 703/306-1130; or visit http://www.nsf.gov/. Deadline: None.

    -- Sally Eckert-Tilotta, Assistant to the Director of the Office of Research and Program Development.

    *******

    NOT JUST FOR ADVISERS

    BECOME REACQUAINTED WITH THE UNIVERSITY LEARNING CENTER

    The University Learning Center is located on the second floor of the Memorial Union, Room 201A. They provide academic skills assistance to students, including free group and drop-in tutoring, individual assistance with any learning concerns, a one-credit course (A&S 250) in study skills, study skills video program, assessment of test anxiety, learning styles, and reading comprehension, computer assisted instruction, along with study skills workshops and skills development seminars. For further information contact the University Learning Center at 777-4406.

    *******

    BILLBOARD

    INTERNET COURSE ON SBIR PROPOSALS OFFERED

    Dakota State University, Madison, S.D., in conjunction with Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) West is offering a graduate level Internet-based course on SBIR proposal writing in the spring of 1998. The course is designed for individuals who are interested in participating in the SBIR program to further research and develop an innovation or concept in their field of study. The course involves several case studies of successful SBIR projects and the development of a complete Phase I SBIR research proposal.

    The deadline for registration in the three-credit-hour course is Jan. 29. To register or for more information, visit Dakota State University's distance education web site at http://www.courses.dsu.edu.disted or call 1-800-641-4309. The cost of the course is $522 for non-South Dakota residents. Financial support through the US WEST Foundation is available to residents of the US WEST service area. For information related to financial support available for North Dakota participants, contact me at 777-3970. -- Chuck Pineo, SBIR Coordinator, Center for Innovation.

    *******

    BOOKSTORE HAS NEW EMPLOYEES

    Several personnel changes have occurred in the University Bookstore. Shannon Sporbert-Webber has been named the new Textbook Department Supervisor. Brian Cox is the new Business Manager for the store. We wish both of these staff members success in their new positions. -- Don Forbes, Store Manager, University Bookstore.

    *******

    OCT. 29 IS DENIM DAY

    Wednesday, Oct. 29, is Denim Day. Enjoy wearing your casual garb -- it only costs you a dollar to pin on that button. All proceeds go to charity, as always. -- Patsy Nies (Student Affairs), for the Denim Day Committee.

    *******

    U2 LISTS COURSES

    Coming events for the University within the University program (U2) are: WordPerfect 8, Monday, Thursday, Friday, Oct. 13, 16, 17, 361 Upson II, six-hour course, 2 to 4 p.m. each day.

    HTML, Thursday, Oct. 23, 361 Upson II, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.; Friday, Nov. 21, 361 Upson II, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.

    Having Christmas Without Our Ornaments, Monday, Nov. 17, and Wednesday, Nov. 20, River Valley Room, Memorial Union, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

    Office Ergonomics, Wednesday Oct. 22, 235 Rural Technology Center, 1 to 2 p.m. and 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.

    Principles of Ergonomics, Wednesday, Oct. 29, 235 Rural Technology Center, 9 to 10 a.m. and 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.

    Contact Kara Hyde at 777-2128 or kara_hyde@mail.und.nodak.edu to register for the above seminars.

    PowerPoint 1, Thursday, Oct. 16, 8 Sayre Hall, 1 to 4 p.m.

    PowerPoint 2, Monday, Oct. 20, 8 Sayre Hall, 6 to 9 p.m.

    PowerPoint 3, Wednesday, Oct. 22, 8 Sayre Hall, 9 a.m. to noon

    MS Publisher, Tuesday, Oct. 21, 8 Sayre Hall, 1 to 4 p.m.

    Contact Lynn Weiner at 777-4150 to register for the above seminars.

    Search Engines: Avoiding Road Kill on the Information SuperHighway, Tuesday, Oct. 14, and Thursday, Nov. 13, both in Room 108, Chester Fritz Library, at 3:30 p.m. ontact Joanne Evanoff at 777-4638 to register.

    Basic Mediation Seminar, Monday through Friday, Oct. 20-24, Memorial Union, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day. Contact the Conflict Resolution Center at 777-3665 to register.

    Policies, Procedures, Forms and More, Controller's Office Training, Wednesday, Oct. 29, River Valley Room, Memorial Union, 8 a.m. to noon. Contact Allison Peyton to register at 777-2968.

    Defensive Driving, Wednesday, Oct. 22, 211 Rural Technology Center, 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. Contact Norma at 777-3341 to register.

    -- Jo Coutts, University Within the University, Division of Continuing Education.

    *******

    FREE COUNSELING OFFERED

    The UND Psychological Services Center is offering free confidential crisis counseling for flood-related issues. Please call 777-3691 for telephone or on-site appointments. -- Psychological Services Center.

    *******

    GREEN AND WHITE DAYS LISTED

    President Kendall Baker has declared Friday, Oct. 17, a Green & White Day. Interested employees may green and white with their casual wear in celebration of athletic events (football vs. NDSU, volleyball at Morningside, cross country at NCC at Fargo). Other Green and White Days during the coming months are: Nov. 14 (hockey vs. Minnesota-Duluth, football at Northern Colorado, men's and women's basketball vs. Minnesota-Duluth, volleyball -- NCAA regional tournament); Dec. 12 (hockey vs. St. Cloud State, men's and women's basketball vs. Moorhead State, football -- NCAA finals); Jan. 16 (hockey vs. Michigan Tech, men's and women's basketball at South Dakota State and Augustana); Feb. 13 (hockey vs. Minnesota Gophers, men's and women's basketball vs. Augustana and South Dakota State); March 6 (hockey vs. Wisconsin, men's and women's basketball, NCAA regionals); April 17 (Baseball vs. Morningside and University of South Dakota). -- Jan Orvik, Editor, University Letter.

    *******

    ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

    FAMILY WEEKEND SET FOR OCT. 24-25

    The UND Family Weekend will be held Friday and Saturday, Oct. 24 and 25. The schedule follows:

    Friday, Oct. 24: 4 to 10 p.m., Registration at Memorial Union, Dakota Lounge; 5 p.m., Movie Moment, Memorial Union, Fred Orth Lecture Bowl.

    Saturday, Oct. 25: 7:30 a.m., Run/walk with President and Toby Baker, Chester Fritz Auditorium entrance; 8 a.m., Registration continues at Memorial Union, Dakota Lounge; 8:30 a.m., Family Association Breakfast and Annual Meeting, Memorial Union, River Valley Room; 9:30 a.m., Opening Welcome, Memorial Union, Fred Orth Lecture Bowl; 9:45 a.m., Discovering UND Sessions; noon, Country Barbecue, Memorial Union, Terrace Dining Center (sponsored by the UND Family Association); 1 p.m., Football, UND vs. St. Cloud State University, Memorial Stadium; 7:30 p.m., Kaleidoscope of Entertainment, Memorial Union, Ballroom. -- Student Academic Services.

    *******

    CRAFT EXPERT, FINANCIAL PLANNER ARE STUDIO ONE GUESTS

    Darlene Shea, co-owner of Shea's Nursery in Grand Forks, will demonstrate her Halloween craft ideas for children during the Friday, Oct. 10 broadcast of "Studio One." She will use a variety of supplies including popcorn, candy corn, fake spiders, and red nail polish to create spooky decorations. Her focus will be on how inexpensive these crafts are to make and how much fun kids will have doing them.

    Neil Robinson, an investor representing the Edward D. Jones Co., will also appear on the show to explain the basic principles of investing money. He says that compared to putting your money into a savings account or buying a Certificate of Deposit, a mutual fund can be much more prosperous. He will explain three easy tips for beginner investors.

    "Studio One" is an award-winning one-hour weekly morning show featuring news, weather, sports, and interviews. The program airs on UND Channel 3 in Grand Forks live Friday at 7 a.m. and is repeated at noon and 7 p.m. Rebroadcasts can be seen Saturdays at 10 a.m. and noon, as well as Monday through Wednesday at 7 p.m. The show also airs in Fargo, Bismarck/Mandan, Minot, and Minneapolis. -- Alison Sandsmark, UND Studio One Marketing Team.

    *******

    INTERNATIONAL CENTRE LISTS EVENTS

    The International Centre, 2908 University Ave., invites you to join them for the following events.

    Friday, Oct. 17, will be an International Cof-Tea Cup, which is an opportunity for students, faculty, staff, and the Greater Grand Forks community to enjoy international tea, coffee, and pastry while discussing world issues, from 3 to 4:30 p.m. at the Centre.

    On Thursday, Oct. 23, the Centre will hold a Poland Cultural Event at 7 p.m. Enjoy Polish food, music, artifacts, attire, and history. All are welcome. -- Sharon Rezac Andersen, Director, International Centre.

    *******

    BREAST CANCER WALK/RUN SET FOR OCT. 19

    The UND chapter of the American Medical Women's Association will hold the fourth annual Sharon Lambeth Breast Cancer Awareness Walk/Run Sunday, Oct. 19, in University Park. Runners will cover four miles; walkers will traverse two miles. The cost is $10 if you prefer not to purchase a T-shirt, and $12 for those choosing to purchase a shirt. Registration begins at 1:15 p.m. with the run beginning at 2 p.m. Prizes will be given to the winners; door prizes will also be awarded. All proceeds go the Breast Cancer Coalition, a local project set up to provide mammograms to women with low incomes.

    This event honors the memory of Sharon Lambeth, an associate professor in the College of Nursing and victim of breast cancer. -- Kristina Bosch, American Medical Women's Association.

    *******

    MUSEUM COFFEE BAR WILL BE CLOSED MONDAY, OCT. 20

    Thank you for your patience while we finish some electrical work in the Museum Coffee Bar. The Coffee Bar will be closed all day Monday, Oct. 20. Normal hours will resume Tuesday, Oct. 21: weekdays, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; lunch starting at 11 a.m.; closed weekends. -- Andrea Dobberman, North Dakota Museum of Art.

    *******

    MUSEUM WILL SHOW MANHATTAN

    The North Dakota Museum of Art will show Woody Allen's 1979 movie, "Manhattan," at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 22, in the Museum's main galleries. In this movie, Woody Allen tells the story of his search for the ideal relationship, a search that includes an ex-neurotic intellectual and a 17-year-old high school student. "Manhattan" is the second film of four in the Museum's Art Design film series with the theme of the director's depiction of the cityscape in this century. Admission is $3. -- Morgan Owens, North Dakota Museum of Art.

    *******

    WOMEN'S CENTER LISTS EVENTS

    The Wednesday, Oct. 22, Feast and Focus program at noon in the Women's Center, 305 Hamline Street, is "Relationships With Self and Others." Having just finished with the Clothesline Project which deals with unhealthy relationships, we thought it would be a good idea to invite Sue Goebel to lead us in a discussion of what it means to be in a healthy relationship with ourselves and with others.

    The Thursday, Oct. 23, For Women Only program is "Rites of Passage: Letting Go." If you are having trouble letting go of something, whether it be anger, pain, or sadness due to an act of violence against you or someone you love, we invite you to participate in this program which will use ritual to help us release these emotions.

    Please join us. -- Donna Oltmanns, Coordinator, Women's Center.

    *******

    CHRISTUS REX LISTS EVENTS

    The Christus Rex Lutheran Center will present "What Kids Need to Survive: A Community Conversation on Asset Building," from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 23, in 210 Clifford Hall. The presenter will be James Vollbracht from Search Institute. Everyone is welcome to attend the program, which is free to the public.

    On Friday, Oct. 24, Vollbracht will present "A Call to Action Workshop on Asset Building" at Christus Rex, 3012 University Avenue. Registration begins at 8 a.m.; the program will run from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Registration is required; forms and fee schedule are available at Christus Rex. These programs are sponsored by The Center for Faithful Leadership of Christus Rex, with support from Lutheran Brotherhood #8127, Minnkota Power Cooperative, and Altru Health Systems. Call 775-5581 for more information. -- Christus Rex Lutheran Center.

    *******

    CRAFT CENTER OFFERS PROJECTS

    Mini-crafts will continue Friday, Oct. 24, from noon to 1 p.m. at the Craft Center. Projects for Oct. 24 are a Clothespin Santa and/or a Halloween pin. Cost is $1 per project. Call 777-3979 to register. -- Bonnie Solberg, Coordinator, Craft Center.

    *******

    CALENDAR OF EVENTS

    OCTOBER 1997

    (Please contact Mavis at the Office of University Relations, Box 7144, or call 777-4304, if you wish to make changes or have an event included.)

    Through Fri., Oct. 17 -- NORTH DAKOTA CLOTHESLINE PROJECT honors survivors as well as children who have been affected by intimate violence; it is a visual display of shirts with written messages and illustrations that graphically demonstrate the impact of violence against individuals, their families and/or friends, River Valley Room, Memorial Union, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; call the Women's Center at 777-4300 for more information.

    Through Sun., Oct. 19 -- THEATRE, "Kiss Me Kate," Burtness Theatre, 7:30 p.m., with Sunday matinee performance at 2 p.m.; tickets are $10; call 777-2085 for tickets; in conjunction with this production, the department is holding post-show discussions, a scholarly symposium, and a public lecture on the topic of gender in the musical drama and in the arts; featured will be Sam Abel, Professor of Theatre at the University of Vermont, opera and musical theatre critic. Events include:

    Fri., Oct. 17 -- "The Persistence of Memory: Shifting Gender Images in Musical Theatre," a public lecture at 1 p.m. in Burtness Theatre.

    Fri. and Sat., Oct. 17-18 -- "Post-Show Discussion," discussing gender issues in the UND production of "Kiss Me Kate," after the 7:30 p.m. performances at Burtness Theatre.

    Sat., Oct. 18 -- "Perspectives on Gender in the Arts," a panel symposium featuring Dr. Abel, Susan Koprince (English), Carol Sedgwick (Music), Kathleen Dixon (English), and Kathy Coudle-King at 3 p.m. in Burtness Theatre.

    Thurs., Oct. 16 -- WOMEN STUDIES SALON, opera and musical theatre critic and professor at the University of Vermont, Sam Abel, will speak on "The Paradox of the Fat Lady: Opera and Gender," Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., 4 to 5 p.m.; call 777-2705 for more information.

    Thurs., Oct. 16 -- TEST, College-Level Examination Program (CLEP), Room 200, McCannel Hall, 8:30 a.m.

    Thurs., Oct. 16 -- MEETING, State Board of Higher Education, Dickinson, N.D.

    Thurs., Oct. 16 -- DISCUSSION FORUM, the University Senate will hold open forum, non-procedural discussion meetings on the third Thursday of each month to discuss topics of pertinence to upcoming Senate deliberations or of general campus-wide interest, Room 7, Gamble Hall, 4 p.m.; all members of the University community are invited to participate.

    Thurs., Oct. 16 -- BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY SPECIAL LECTURE, "Protein-Protein Interactions in DNA Precursor Biosynthesis," presented by Christopher Mathews, chair of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Oregon State University at Corvallis, Clifford Haugen Lecture Hall, Room 1360, Medical School Building; call 777-4708 or 777-3937 for more information.

    Thurs., Oct. 16 -- COMPUTER SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM, Dexter Perkins (Geology and Geological Engineering) will discuss new educational methods in Geology, 348 CAS II, 3 p.m.

    Thurs., Oct. 16 -- UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM COMMITTEE MEETING, 303 Twamley Hall, 3 p.m.

    Thurs., Oct. 16 -- NORWEGIAN AMBASSADOR VISITS, Thomas Vraalsen, Norway's Ambassador to the United States, will visit Grand Forks to meet with Norwegian students, discuss the exchange program, and see the city following the flood, Sons of Norway Lodge, 1409 9th Ave. S, 11 a.m.

    Thurs., Oct. 16 -- BIOLOGY LECTURE, Alan R. Templeton, Department of Biology, Washington University, St. Louis, Mo., the George C. Wheeler Distinguished Lecturer for Fall 1997, will present "Smokey the Bear versus Collared Lizards: Landscape Management in the Ozarks," 141 Starcher Hall, 7:30 p.m.; Templeton will also speak at noon Friday, Oct. 17.

    Thurs., Oct. 16 -- SOCIAL GATHERING with pizza and dance, including international music and dance lessons, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; all are welcome; call 777-3273 for more information.

    Fri., Oct. 17 -- UNSATISFACTORY PROGRESS REPORT FORMS DUE IN THE OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS AND RECORDS BY NOON.

    Fri., Oct. 17 -- BIOLOGY TALK by Alan R. Templeton, Department of Biology, Washington University, St. Louis, Mo., will present "What is a Species?" 141 Starcher Hall, noon; Templeton is the George C. Wheeler Distinguished Lecturer for Fall 1997.

    Fri., Oct. 17 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for Margaret Donovan Westby, a candidate for the Doctor of Philosophy degree with a major in Clinical Psychology, 210 Corwin-Larimore Hall, 10 a.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

    Fri., Oct. 17 -- INTERNATIONAL COF-TEA CUP, an opportunity for UND students, faculty, staff, and the Greater Grand Forks community to enjoy international tea, coffee, and pastry while discussing world issues, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 3 to 4:30 p.m.; all are welcome; call 777-3273 for more information.

    Fri., Oct. 17 -- GREEN AND WHITE DAY, President Baker has approved this day for employees to wear UND colors and jeans to show support for our Sioux athletes.

    Fri., Oct. 17 -- SWIMMING & DIVING, Green/White Intrasquad, Hyslop Sports Center.

    Fri., Oct. 17 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND vs. University of South Dakota, Hyslop Sports Center, 5 p.m.

    Sat., Oct. 18 -- TEST, American Dietetic Association (ADA), Room 116, Witmer Hall, 8 a.m.

    Sat., Oct. 18 -- FOOTBALL, UND vs. North Dakota State University (HALL OF FAME), Memorial Stadium, 2 p.m.

    Sat., Oct. 18 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND vs. Morningside College, Hyslop Sports Center, 7 p.m.

    Sun., Oct. 19 -- FOURTH ANNUAL SHARON LAMBETH BREAST CANCER AWARENESS WALK/RUN, University Park, registration begins at 1:15 p.m. and the run begins at 2 p.m.

    Sun., Oct. 19 -- HOCKEY, UND vs. University of Manitoba, Engelstad Arena, 2 p.m.

    Mon., Oct. 20 -- GRADUATE COMMITTEE MEETING, 305 Twamley Hall, 3:05 p.m.

    Mon., Oct. 20 -- LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP SERIES, "Leadership in a Global Village," presented by MaryAnne Lustgraaf, Memorial Union Director, Leadership Inspiration Center, third floor, Memorial Union, 3 p.m.; sessions are free and open to the public; (series continues every Monday through Oct. 27).

    Mon. through Fri., Oct. 20-24 -- BASIC MEDIATION SEMINAR, offered by the UND Conflict Resolution Center, Memorial Union, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day; designed to teach participants skills and an effective process for helping conflicting persons deal with their concerns; call the Center at 777-3664 or udcrc@badlands.nodak.edu for more information.

    Mon., Oct. 20, through Thurs., Oct. 30 -- BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS EXHIBITION, Karen Olson, Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center.

    Tues., Oct. 21 -- FACULTY LECTURE SERIES, Jeffrey Lang, professor of Biology, will deliver the first presentation in the newly resurrected Faculty Lecture Series at 5 p.m. in the North Dakota Museum of Art. He will discuss sex determination in alligators and turtles. The lecture will be preceded by a reception at 4 p.m.

    Tues., Oct. 21 -- DEAN'S HOUR LECTURE SERIES, two musicians associated with the Greater Grand Forks Symphony Orchestra will present "Death and Disease in Opera," the series is a forum for presenting ideas and issues related to the practice of medicine and health care; Reed Keller Auditorium, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, noon; the public is invited; call 777-2515 for more information.

    Tues., Oct. 21 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for Stacie Varnson, a candidate for the Doctor of Philosophy degree with a major in Educational Administration, 305 Twamley Hall, 8 a.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend.

    Tues., Oct. 21 -- COUNSELING COLLOQUIUM, 316 Montgomery Hall, 12:30 to 1:45 p.m.; topic will be announced in the University Letter.

    Tues., Oct. 21 -- FIRST DEADLINE for submission of applications to the Faculty Research and Creative Activity Committee (FRCAC); travel requests will be considered only for travel to be completed before Jan. 20.

    Tues., Oct. 21 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND vs. Augustana College, Hyslop Sports Center, 7 p.m.

    Wed., Oct. 22 -- UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY CONVERSATIONS, President Baker will provide an opportunity for faculty, staff and students to learn more about what is happening at UND, Ballroom, Memorial Union, 9 a.m.

    Wed., Oct. 22 -- COMPUTER SCIENCE ENRICHMENT SERIES, "How to Program in X-Windows: A Hands-on Experience," presented by Mahir Ali and Joe Grassel, presentation will be an introduction to Motif and Widgets; all faculty and students are invited to attend (some programming experience will be helpful), CAS II X-terminal Lab, 3 to 5 p.m. (also Wed., Oct. 29).

    Wed., Oct. 22 -- "ON TEACHING" LUNCH SESSION, "Keeping the Lecture Alive and Lively II: A Follow-Up to the September Discussion," facilitated by Ron Pynn (Political Science), Frank White (Sociology), and Beverly Uhlenberg (Teaching and Learning), North Ballroom, Memorial Union, noon; call 777-3325 to register.

    Wed., Oct. 22 -- LESSONS AT LUNCH, "Better Photography for Amateurs," presented by Loren Cariveau, Ritz Photo, Leadership Inspiration Center, third floor, Memorial Union, noon to 1 p.m.; a collection of fun and informative sessions on various topics of interest to staff, faculty, and students held on alternate Wednesdays; all sessions are free; call 777-3926 to register.

    Wed., Oct. 22 -- MOVIE, "Manhattan," Woody Allen tells the story of his search for the ideal relationship, a search that includes an ex-neurotic intellectual and a 17-year-old high school student; second film of four in the Museum's Art Design film series, North Dakota Museum of Art, 8 p.m.; admission is $3.

    Wed., Oct. 22 -- FEAST AND FOCUS, "Relationships With Self and Others," Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

    Thurs., Oct. 23 -- GEOGRAPHY FORUM, "A Geographer's Perspective on the BIG BIG Flood," presented by Paul Todhunter, 364 Clifford Hall, noon.

    Thurs., Oct. 23 -- WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM DISCUSSION GROUP, "Fancy Phrases," "Neat Packages," and "Student Expertise," noon to 1 p.m.; call 777-3600 to sign up to attend or for more information.

    Thurs., Oct. 23 -- FOR WOMEN ONLY: Rites of Passage, "Letting Go," Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

    Thurs., Oct. 23 -- POLAND CULTURAL EVENT, with Polish food, music, artifacts, attire, history, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; all are welcome; call 777-3273 for more information.

    Thurs.and Fri., Oct. 23-24 -- "WHAT KIDS NEED TO SURVIVE: A COMMUNITY CONVERSATION ON ASSET BUILDING," will be presented on Thursday by James Vollbracht from Search Institute, 210 Clifford Hall, 7 to 8:30 p.m.; Friday, Oct. 24, Vollbracht will present "A Call To Action Workshop on Asset Building," at Christus Rex Lutheran Center, 3012 University Ave., 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. with registration beginning at 8 a.m.; call 775-5581 for more information.

    Fri., Oct. 24 -- ROBOTICS COLLOQUIUM, "Reinforcement Learning in Behavior-based Approaches," presented by Claude Touzet from Oak Ridge National Labs, CAS I Atmospherium, 4 p.m.

    Fri., Oct. 24 -- INTERNATIONAL COF-TEA CUP, an opportunity for UND students, faculty, staff, and the Greater Grand Forks community to enjoy international tea, coffee, and pastry while discussing world issues, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 3 to 4:30 p.m.; all are welcome.

    Fri., Oct. 24 -- GRAND RE-OPENING, North Dakota Affiliate of the American Diabetes Association, 315 N Fourth St., 5 to 7 p.m.; open to the public.

    Fri., Oct. 24 -- SWIMMING & DIVING, UND at University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba.

    Fri., Oct. 24 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND at St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, Minn., 5 p.m.

    Fri. and Sat., Oct. 24-25 -- UND FAMILY WEEKEND, UND campus; Friday, Oct. 24: 4 to 10 p.m., Registration at Memorial Union, Dakota Lounge; 5 p.m., Movie Moment, Memorial Union, Fred Orth Lecture Bowl.

    Saturday, Oct. 25: 7:30 a.m., Run/walk with President and Toby Baker, Chester Fritz Auditorium entrance; 8 a.m., Registration continues at Memorial Union, Dakota Lounge; 8:30 a.m., Family Association Breakfast and Annual Meeting, Memorial Union, River Valley Room; 9:30 a.m., Opening Welcome, Memorial Union, Fred Orth Lecture Bowl; 9:45 a.m., Discovering UND Sessions; noon, Country Barbecue, Memorial Union, Terrace Dining Center (sponsored by the UND Family Association); 1 p.m., Football, UND vs. St. Cloud State University, Memorial Stadium; 7:30 p.m., Kaleidoscope of Entertainment, Memorial Union, Ballroom.

    Fri. and Sat., Oct. 24-25 -- SCHOLARLY WRITING WORKSHOP, "Writing a Textbook," will be led by Franklin Silverman of Marquette University, Sioux Room, Memorial Union, 3 to 6 p.m.; second, "Successful Scholarly Writing," will be led by Gerald Stone, Southern Illlinois University, Sioux Room, Memorial Union, 9 a.m. to noon; both workshop leaders are well-published authors; call 777-3325 to register or for more information.

    Fri. and Sat., Oct. 24-25 -- DSM-IV FOR MENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONALS, workshop presenter is Cindy Juntunen (Department of Counseling and a licensed psychologist); Town House Motor, Grand Forks; contact Continuing Education at 777-2663 for more information.

    Fri. and Sat., Oct. 24-25 -- WINE AND CHEESE RECEPTION, Text and Academic Authors Association invites all faculty and graduate students in recognition of the TAA workshops, J. Lloyd Stone Alumni House, 4 to 7 p.m.

    Sat., Oct. 25 -- TEST, American College Test (ACT), Main Floor, McCannel Hall, 8 a.m.

    Sat., Oct. 25 -- TEST, Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), Room 102, Witmer Hall, 8:30 a.m.

    Sat., Oct. 25 -- TEST, Optometry Admission Test (OAT), Room 114, Witmer Hall, 8 a.m.

    Sat., Oct. 25 -- MILITARY APPRECIATION DAY, UND Memorial Stadium.

    Sat., Oct. 25 -- FOOTBALL, UND vs. St. Cloud State University, Memorial Stadium, 1 p.m.

    Sat., Oct. 25 -- SWIMMING & DIVING, FAST Spook Swim Meet, Hyslop Sports Center.

    Sat., Oct. 25 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND at Mankato State University, Mankato, Minn., 5 p.m.

    Mon., Oct. 27 -- LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP SERIES, "Public Speaking: Conquering the #1 Fear," presented by Mary Haslerud Opp, School of Communication, Leadership Inspiration Center, third floor, Memorial Union, 3 p.m.; sessions are free and open to the public.

    Mon., Oct. 27 -- "MIND GAMES" PROGRAM, John Fabjance, alcohol and drug educationr, will help UND celebrate OctSoberfest '97, Ballroom, Memorial Union, 7 p.m.; Fabjance uses magic, comedy, pock-picking to help spread his message; call Karen at 777-2127 for more information.

    Tues., Oct. 28 -- COUNSELING COLLOQUIUM, 316 Montgomery Hall, 12:30 to 1:45 p.m.; topic will be announced in the University Letter.

    Tues., Oct. 28 -- INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARD deadline for proposals requiring full board review for Fri., Nov. 7, meeting.

    Tues., Oct. 28 -- CONCERT, Marty Stuart, Chester Fritz Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

    Tues., Oct. 28 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND vs. Northern State College, Hyslop Sports Center, 7 p.m.

    Tues. through Fri., Oct. 28-31 -- EDUCOM '97, nonprofit consortium of higher education institutions that facilitates the introduction, use, and access to, and management of, information resources in teaching, learning, scholarship, and research, annual conference is the pre-eminent international event for technology issues in higher education, hosted by the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis; check http://www.educom.edu for more information.

    *******

    UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is also available electronically through UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address is http://www.und.nodak.edu.

    All articles submitted for publication should be labeled "University Letter" and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu. Attachments to University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number. University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations, Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.

    UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

    *******


    Last Updated:Wednesday, September 4, 1996
    Maintained by:Webmaster
    Contact: Webmaster



    Go To Top To Home Page