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University Letter

October 31, 1997

Volume 35 No. 11

UNIVERSITY LETTER
University of North Dakota at Grand Forks
Vol. 35, Number 11, October 31, 1997

UNIVERSITY LETTER IS ALSO AVAILABLE ELECTRONICALLY in the Events and News section of UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address is: http://www.und.nodak.edu

The University Relations Office maintains an index for the University Letter.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

U Senate Will Meet Nov. 6

EVENTS TO NOTE

OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

BILLBOARD

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

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U SENATE WILL MEET NOV. 6

The University Senate will meet Thursday, Nov. 6, at 4:05 p.m. in Room 7, Gamble Hall.

AGENDA

  1. Announcements.
  2. Minutes of the previous meeting and business arising from the minutes.
  3. Question Period.

    CONSENT CALENDAR:

  4. Annual Report of the General Education Requirements Committee. John Bridewell, Chair. (Attachment 1)
  5. Annual Report of the Honorary Degrees Committee. Einar Einarson, Chair. (Attachment 2)
  6. Annual Report of the Honors Committee. Jane Berne, Chair. (Attachment 3)

    BUSINESS CALENDAR:

  7. Recommendation from the Task Force on Eligibility for Membership on the Senate (hereafter TFEMS) that the UND Constitution (II.1.b.) be changed so that lecturers with full-time appointments, who are employed primarily on the Grand Forks campus, will be members of the Council. Monte Phillips, Chair.
  8. Recommendation from the TFEMS that the UND Constitution (II.1.b.) be changed so that Clinical Instructors, Clinical Assistant Professors, Clinical Associate Professors and Clinical Professors with full-time appointments, who are employed primarily on the Grand Forks campus, will be members of the Council. Monte Phillips, Chair.
  9. Recommendation from the TFEMS that the UND Constitution (II.1.b.) be changed so that Program Directors, Coordinators, Assistant and Associate Deans, who concurrently hold faculty rank and who are employed primarily on the Grand Forks campus, will be members of the Council. Monte Phillips, Chair.
  10. Recommendation from the TFEMS that the UND Constitution (II.1.c.1.) be changed so that neither Program Directors nor Coordinators shall be ex-officio members of the Senate. Monte Phillips, Chair.
  11. Recommendation from the TFEMS that the UND Constitution (II.1.c.2.) be changed so that the total number of elected Council members of the Senate shall be two and one-half times the number of ex-officio members. Monte Phillips, Chair.
  12. Recommendation from the TFEMS that the UND Constitution (II.1.c.2.) and the Bylaws of the UND Senate (1. and 3.a.) be changed so that the Senate seats elected by the Council shall be distributed so that each college and professional school and the libraries shall have the right to elect two senators, with the exception of the College of Arts and Sciences which shall have the right to elect six senators, two each from the areas of Natural and Physical Sciences, Humanities, and Social Sciences. The remaining Council representatives shall be elected at large. Monte Phillips, Chair.
  13. Recommendation from the TFEMS that the Standing Rules of the UND Senate (7.) state that the Senate will publish attendance records at the end of each semester, both a summary by categories (ex-officio, elected Council members, students) and individual statistics. Monte Phillips, Chair.
  14. Recommendation from the Senate Executive Committee that the Bylaws of the UND Senate (Membership, 2.,3.,5.) be changed so that the Senate election procedures shall be completed before May 1 of each year. Al Fivizzani, Chair.
  15. Recommendation from the Senate Executive Committee that the Bylaws of the UND Senate (Committees, 1.) be changed so that the Senate Executive Committee shall consist of these members of the Senate: three faculty representatives, one to be elected each year for a two-year term; and one, a member of the Council of College Faculties (normally one serving the third year of a three-year term); the Vice President for Academic Affairs; one student, elected annually; and the Director of Admissions and Records. Al Fivizzani, Chair.
  16. Recommendation from the Senate Executive Committee to change the Standing Rules of the University of North Dakota Senate as follows (current Standing Rules, Attachment 4):
  • Agenda items brought for Senate action shall be divided into three separate "calendars."
    1. Senate calendar: announcements, review of minutes, and a question period; the question period shall not exceed 20 minutes.
    2. Consent calendar: non-controversial items such as committee reports that are read by title and voted upon without debate or discussion. One objection from any member removes the item from the consent calendar.
    3. Calendar of business: normal action items requiring the attention of the Senate; debatable. Al Fivizzani, Chair.

    -- Alice Poehls (Admissions and Records), Secretary of the Senate.

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    EVENTS TO NOTE

    COMPUTER SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM SET

    A Computer Science Colloquium will be held at 3 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 30, in 238 CAS II. Mark McCourt, North Dakota State University Department of Psychology, will present "The Perception of Lightness, Brightness and Transparency: Data, Theory and Controversy." In this talk, he will review his 15 years of research into the problem of achromatic brightness perception, present demonstrations of relevant visual phenomena, describe and critique extant theories, and describe a theory he developed which may help integrate the theoretical landscape. -- Bruce Maxwell, Computer Science.

    *******

    LEEPS LECTURE SET

    A LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary Sciences) Lecture will be presented by Allan Ashworth, Department of Geosciences, North Dakota State University in Fargo, at noon in 100 Leonard Hall on Friday, Oct. 31. He will discuss "Blue Ice Blues: How Stable is Antarctica?" Dr. Ashworth's visit is sponsored jointly by the Department of Biology and the Department of Geology and Geological Engineering.

    The LEEPS Lecture Series is supported by the Department of Geology and Geological Engineering, Office of Research and Program Development and the Advancing Science Excellence in North Dakota (ASEND) Program. All interested persons are welcome to attend. For additional information contact me. -- Will Gosnold, Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering.

    *******

    RICHARD WILLIAMS TO KEYNOTE SOLIDARITY DAYS

    Nationally-known black author and workshop presenter, Dr. Richard Williams, will be the keynote speaker during Solidarity Days at UND, Sunday and Monday, Nov. 2 and 3. Williams has won acclaim for his book, "They Stole It, But You Must Return It," which has African-American themes and focuses on how slavery has affected the concepts, attitudes and behaviors of blacks today.

    Williams will give a fireside chat on "Fatherhood and Motherhood" on Sunday, Nov. 2, at 3:30 p.m. in the Era Bell Thompson Cultural Center. On Monday, Nov. 3, he will present a talk, "Know Thyself," at 10 a.m. at the Era Bell Thompson Cultural Center, followed by a book signing at noon at the Bookstore in the Memorial Union. And at 4:30 p.m. he will deliver his keynote talk, "Moving Beyond Blackness," at the Chester Fritz Auditorium.

    Other Solidarity Days events include: Nov. 2, a church service at 1 p.m. at the International Centre; Nov. 3, "Understanding Diversity," a video and discussion, at 8:30 a.m. at the Era Bell Thompson Cultural Center by Matsimela Changa Diop, UND Assistant to the Vice President for Student Affairs, and "Building Coalitions" with student leaders at 1:30 p.m., Era Bell Thompson Cultural Center.

    Dr. Richard Williams

    Richard M. Williams graduated from high school from Pine Forge Academy in Pennsylvania. He attended Oakwood College, the University of Rochester, the State University of New York at Brockport, and the State University of New York at Buffalo. He has a bachelor's degree in psychology and religion, a master's degree in health science, and a doctorate degree in health education and health administration.

    Williams has worked as Executive Director of social service agencies, including half-way houses for delinquent youths, day care centers, nurseries, family counseling, and youth camps. He served as an Assistant Professor at the State University of New York for several years, where he taught courses in Nutrition, Consumer Health Education, Life Concepts, Health and the Media, Program Development and Evaluation, and Research Procedures.

    On television he has given health demonstrations, talks, and participated in discussion groups on national television shows such as Black Entertainment Network, Morton Downey Show, and the Oprah Winfrey Show discussing issues concerning the black family and black health. He has appeared on more than 70 different radio talk shows across the United States, and has appeared as key speaker at colleges across the United States and Caribbean. He was part of a team chosen and sent to Kenya to investigate the effectiveness of an AIDS treatment developed by African researchers. Williams has conducted workshops and seminars on nutrition, weight control, smoking cessation, stress reduction, family relationship building, and other life style behaviors, as well as conducts workshops for parents, teachers, churches, and students on effectively educating the African-American student. As a result of his book, "They Stole It But You Must Return It," he was chosen by the Black Book Guide as a nominee for the Black Author of the year.

    Williams speaks on issues affecting African-Americans, including problems facing the black male, problems facing the black female, effectively educating the black child, adopting positive health practices, and understanding and building positive relationships.

    Williams argues that African-Americans are the only foreign group for whom America aggressively prohibited the continuation of culture, mores, tradition, and other factors. He points out these factors support and maintain self-appreciation, self-determination and self-development. He believes that his denial, rather than any biological and intellectual differences, has caused an imbalance in the economical and educational progression.

    Williams also discusses how the experiences suffered by slaves have left some lasting effects on the health and health habits of blacks today. He addresses the need to improve the physical, economical, spiritual, and psychological health of African-Americans. He believes and advocates that a black agenda and an effective black network system are necessary for healthy growth and survival.

    -- M.C. Diop, Assistant to the Vice President for Student Affairs.

    *******

    GRADUATE COMMITTEE WILL MEET NOV. 3

    The Graduate Committee will meet Monday, Nov. 3, at 3:05 p.m. in 305 Twamley Hall. The agenda will include:

    1. Off Campus Master's Program, Mary Harris, Dean, College of Education and Human Development.
    2. Review of the subcommittee's report on the Psychology graduate program.
    3. Review of the subcommittee's report on the History graduate program.
    4. Review of the subcommittee's report on the Physics graduate program.
    5. Matters arising.

    -- Harvey Knull, Dean, Graduate School.

    *******

    VIRGINIA BIOCHEMIST TO SPEAK NOV. 3

    The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology invites interested individuals to attend a seminar by Peter J. Kennelly, Associate Professor of Biochemistry at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The talk, titled "Life Among the Primitives: Prokaryotic Protein Phosphatases," is an overview of the similarities between newly discovered prokaryotic phosphatases and eukaryotic ones. The seminar will be held Monday, Nov. 3, at 11 a.m. in Haugen Lecture Hall, Room 1360, in the Medical School. -- John Shabb, Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. *******

    BIOCHEMISTRY WILL HOLD SEMINAR

    The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology invites interested individuals to attend a seminar Monday, Nov. 3, at 11 a.m. in the Haugen Lecture Hall, Room 1360, Medical Science. Peter J. Kennelly, Associate Professor of Biochemistry at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, will present "Life Among the Primitives: Prokaryotic Protein Phosphatases," an overview of the similarities between newly discovered prokaryotic phosphatases and eukaryotic ones. -- John Shabb, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

    *******

    "ON TEACHING" WILL DISCUSS UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION

    The "On Teaching" lunch session Tuesday, Nov. 4, will discuss "Are We Giving Away the Farm (or Store)? -- The Future of Undergraduate Education," and will be facilitated by Cathy Buyarski (Student Academic Services) and Dan Rice (Instructional Development). The session will be held in the Memorial Room of the Memorial Union at noon; please call 777-3325 to register. -- Dan Rice, Director of Instructional Development.

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    LEEPS LECTURE SET FOR NOV. 4

    A LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary Sciences) Lecture will be presented by James C. Woodson, Vice President of Exploration, Samedan Oil Corporation, Ardmore, Okla., at 3 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 4, in 109 Leonard Hall. He will present "Opportunities in the Petroleum Industry."

    Woodson's visit is sponsored by the American Association of Petroleum Geologists Visiting Geologist Program.

    The LEEPS Lecture Series is supported by the Department of Geology and Geological Engineering, Office of Research and Program Development and the Advancing Science Excellence in North Dakota (ASEND) Program. All interested persons are welcome to attend. For additional information contact me at 777-2631. -- Will Gosnold, Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering.

    *******

    TELECONFERENCE WILL DISCUSS TEACHING THAT INVOLVES FAMILIES

    "Partners for Learning: Preparing Teachers to Involve Families," a U.S. Department of Education Satellite Teleconference, will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 5, in the Memorial Union Fred Orth Lecture Bowl. All are welcome; call me at 777-3949 for information. -- Bev Uhlenberg, Associate Professor of Teaching and Learning.

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    UND TO HOST GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE WORKSHOP

    UND will host a Regional Workshop on Global Climate Change Wednesday through Friday, Nov. 5-7. UND faculty, students, and staff are invited to attend. Those interested in the entire workshop are invited to register for the workshop ($45, includes a luncheon, banquet, and all materials; contact Dawn Botsford at Continuing Education, 777-4260). Those interested in particular sessions are invited to attend those at no charge. Check the agenda (http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/mtpe/northplains/Agenda.html) for session subject matter, dates, and times. All plenary sessions will be held in the Clifford Hall Auditorium.

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration, together with participation by the U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Agency (NOAA), is sponsoring the workshop on climate variability and climate change. The workshop is being hosted by the Upper Midwest Aerospace Consortium. This workshop will bring private citizens and industry from the region together with representatives of the federal research community and of state, local, and tribal government to identify and explore issues and regional impacts of climate variability and climate change. This workshop is one of several regional workshops being held around the country.

    For more information, contact me. -- Doug Olsen (Earth System Science Institute), Workshop Coordinator, 777-3453.

    *******

    PUBLIC LECTURE WILL DISCUSS POPULATION ISSUES

    Werner Fornos, President of the Population Institute, Washington, D.C., will present "Socio-Economic Underdevelopment" at the Integrated Studies Program meeting from 10:45 a.m. to noon Thursday, Nov. 6, at 125 O'Kelly Hall. Mr. Fornos will also discuss "Environmental Degradation and Global Climate Change" at a joint Geography-Sociology Forum Thursday, Nov. 6, from noon to 1 p.m. in 366 Clifford Hall. An expert in the field of population, Mr. Fornos is a dynamic, internationally acclaimed speaker whose tireless efforts have helped bring international attention to the issue of overpopulation. The lectures are sponsored by the Geography and Sociology Departments and are open to the public. -- Mohammad Hemmasi, Professor of Geography, and James Larson, Professor and Chair of Sociology.

    *******

    BIOCHEMISTRY ALUMNUS WILL LECTURE

    Gene C. Ness, Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of South Florida, College of Medicine, Tampa, will give a lecture, "Regulation of Cholesterol Metabolism by Triiodothyronine" Monday, Nov. 10, at 11 a.m. in the Clifford Haugen Lecture Hall (Room 1360), School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

    Dr. Ness, a native of Bemidji, Minn., holds his Ph.D. (with the late Dr. Ya-Pin Lee) from the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences. He carried out postdoctoral work with Dr. John Porter at the Veterans' Administration Hospital in Madison, Wis., and has been on the faculty of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of South Florida since 1986. He has published extensively in the area of regulation of enzymes of cholesterol metabolism. His work complements, and sometimes disputes, that of Nobel laureates Brown and Goldstein. He is the recipient of many research grant awards, and has served on a number of prestigious grant review panels and editorial boards. In 1988, the Florida Academy of Sciences selected Dr. Ness as the recipient of their Outstanding Scientist award. Everyone is welcome to attend this lecture. -- Robert Nordlie, Professor and Chair of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

    *******

    PAC-W WILL HOLD CELEBRATION TEA

    The President's Advisory Council On Women will host a Celebration Tea Thursday, Nov. 13, at 4 p.m. in the North Dakota Museum of Art. This tea is in honor of those individuals who would have been honored at the PAC-W Bread and Roses Banquet last spring for their efforts on behalf of women. The tickets are free and may be obtained from PAC-Council Members: Dorette Kerian (Computer Center), Loretta Heuer (Nursing), Tami Carmichael (Honors), Cindy Juntunen (Counseling), Charlie Minier (VPAA Office), Julie Erjavec (Law), Marcia O'Kelly (Law), Melissa Parker (HPER), Dan Rice (Instructional Development), Rhonda Schwartz (Law Library), Jan Zahrly (Management), Sara Hanhan (Teaching and Learning), and Donna Oltmanns (Women's Center). For further information, contact Sara Hanhan, Teaching and Learning, 777-3239, or Donna Oltmanns, Women's Center, 777-4300. -- President's Advisory Council on Women.

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    CAMPUS CONFIDENTIALITY TELECONFERENCE SET

    Please mark your calendars for Friday, Nov. 14, from noon to 1:30 p.m. for a teleconference in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl on campus confidentiality. It is sponsored by the Student Affairs Office, the Admissions and Records Office, and the North Dakota University System Student Affairs Council is considering financial assistance for the presentation.

    The title is "Campus Confidentiality on Trial: An Open or Closed Case?" Join the experts in grappling with controversial issues of privacy and protection versus publicity and punishment as higher education faces a mandate to open its student records and hearings. Distinguished educators will debate how members of the campus community should respond to new requirements. Panelists include: William Bracewell, Director of Judicial Programs at the University of Georgia; LeRoy Rooker, Director of the United States Department of Education Family Policy Compliance Office; Eileen Wagner, attorney in cases such as Brzonkala v. Virginia Tech; and Gary Pavela, Director of Judicial Programs at the University of Maryland - College Park. Panelists will examine the current system of campus confidentiality and suggest strategies for addressing potential conflicts between an individual's right to privacy and the public's need to know.

    This teleconference is being presented by the Higher Education Doctoral Program at Bowling Green State University in cooperation with the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA) and the Association for Student Judicial Affairs. It is coordinated by Donald D. Gehring, Director of the Higher Education Doctoral Program and produced by WBGU-TV.

    -- Lillian Elsinga, Associate Vice President for Student Affairs.

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    POLICE DEPARTMENT SPONSORS SAFETY TELECONFERENCE

    "Protecting Your Campus From Crime: Challenges and Solutions," a satellite teleconference, will be broadcast Monday, Nov. 17, from 1 to 3 p.m. in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl.

    For centuries, the college campus was perceived to be a safe haven, a place where students and faculty were free of the concerns of the larger environs in which they resided. Over the last decade, this perception has changed. Many individuals grew doubtful about campus safety at small, rural colleges as well as at large, urban universities. In the mid 80s the U.S. government responded by enacting campus crime legislation. Now, the government is poised to enact an even stricter law, the Accuracy and Campus Crime Reporting Act (ACCRA).

    Discussions will be held by experts from all fields of campus safety, including former housing directors, deans, directors of campus protection, assistant vice presidents of student development, and other campus officials.

    The University of North Dakota Police Department is sponsoring this event to further the safety of your campus. Any contributions toward this telecast would be appreciated.

    Please join us. -- University Police.

    *******

    NATIONAL INDIAN NURSING EDUCATION CONFERENCE SET

    The Eighth National Indian Nursing Education Conference is scheduled for Thursday through Sunday, April 16-19, 1998, at the Memorial Union. Hosts for the conference are the Quentin N. Burdick RAIN Program in the College of Nursing and the College of Nursing. The final schedule will be published as soon as it is completed. -- LaVonne Russell Hootman, Director, RAIN Program.

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    OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

    NOMINATIONS SOUGHT FOR OUTSTANDING INDIVIDUALS FOR HONORARY DEGREES

    Members of the University Council are invited to nominate outstanding individuals for an honorary degree. Qualifications include, but are not limited to the following State Board of Higher Education criteria:

    1. The candidate should have had an association with the State of North Dakota. This association may be by virtue of birth, of residence, of education, of service to the state, the Board, or one of the institutions governed by the Board.
    2. The candidate must have achieved a level of distinction which would merit comparable recognition in his or her profession or area of excellence.
    3. The renown of the candidate should reflect favorably on the Board, the institutions it governs, and the State of North Dakota.

    In order to avoid any embarrassment, NO SUGGESTION shall be made to any person to be so honored until the State Board of Higher Education has acted on the nomination.

    The deadline for submitting nominations is Tuesday, Nov. 25. Nominations require departmental and college review and must be accompanied by a factual dossier providing evidence that the nominee meets the criteria. Such factual compilation should include the following, in the order listed:

    1. a brief biography,
    2. a list of scholarly writings, research and publications,
    3. description of public service and achievements,
    4. list of offices and positions held, and
    5. other factual justification for consideration.

    On behalf of the Honorary Degrees Committee, nominations and all supporting materials may be sent to the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, Room 302, Twamley Hall. -- Marlene Strathe, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost.

    *******

    MEMBERS ELECTED TO GRADUATE COMMITTEE

    The Graduate Faculty has completed the election process, and four new members have been elected to the Graduate Committee with terms officially commencing Nov. 15. The new committee members, the electorates they represent, and their terms are: Graeme Dewar (Physics), Member-at-Large, 1997-2000; Mohammad Hemmasi (Geography), Social Sciences, 1997-2000; Elizabeth Meyers (Visual Arts), Fine Arts, 1997-2000; and John Hoover (Special Education), Education, 1997-2000. The newly elected members replace, respectively, Professors Mark Hoffmann, Jan Moen, Patrick Luber, and Mary Lou Fuller. -- Harvey Knull, Dean, Graduate School.

    *******

    POSTED GRADES SHOULD FOLLOW POLICY

    Electronic posting of grades using the student's NAID or social security number is inappropriate because it violates a student's right to privacy, as defined in the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, North Dakota State Board of Higher Education policy, and University policy. All faculty are reminded to use a randomly assigned number to post grades for students electronically or in traditional ways. -- Alice Poehls, Director of Admissions and Records.

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    SPRING REGISTRATION BEGINS NOV. 10

    Registration for the 1998 Spring term begins Monday, Nov. 10. Students will register and drop/add using the Touchtone Telephone System from Nov. 10 through Jan. 13. Students who have proper signatures for registration actions not permitted by the ALFI Touchtone Telephone System may add these courses at the Office of Admissions and Records, second floor, Twamley Hall, during normal office hours starting Nov. 13. Students may register on or after appointment times as printed on their registration forms. -- Veriena Garver, Admissions and Records Officer, Admissions and Records.

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    FACULTY AND STAFF ASKED TO SUBMIT PUBLICATIONS

    The Seventh Annual Elwyn B. Robinson Lecture is being planned in the East Asian Room of the Chester Fritz Library. A bibliography for the Lecture will be compiled. To assist in its preparation, all deans have received a letter requesting notification of all publications, to include books, chapters in books, and articles published by faculty and staff from September 1996 to August 1997. All faculty and staff are encouraged to submit citations of their publications to their respective deans or department chairs as soon as possible to enable them to meet the Library's deadline of Friday, Nov. 14.

    -- Frank D'Andraia, Director of Libraries.

    *******

    GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

    GLAXO THANKED FOR FLOOD DONATION

    When a truckload of scientific laboratory equipment, worth about $50,000, was unloaded recently at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences, basic science researchers looked "like kids at Christmas," recalls Dean David Wilson.

    The faculty members gathered Friday, Oct. 24, to formally thank the donor, Glaxo Wellcome, Inc., for equipment the company donated to replace that lost in last spring's flood. Equipment was given to the departments of microbiology and immunology, pharmacology and toxicology, and physiology, for shared use, as well as 10 researchers in those departments.

    Doug Schmoll, a sales representative of Glaxo Wellcome, Barnesville, Minn., was on hand to meet with the researchers at Friday's reception. Glaxo Wellcome is a pharmaceutical company based at Research Triangle Park, N.C.

    "We are very grateful to Glaxo Wellcome for its generous gift to our biomedical researchers," said Wilson. "Without this kind of support, our research program would not have been able to recover as quickly as it did from the effects of the flood."

    The lower level of the UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences, located at Fifth and North Columbia Road, filled with chest-high water during April's flooding. As a result, numerous laboratories were destroyed.

    -- H. David Wilson, Dean, School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

    *******

    ND NIH IDeA CENTER Q-GRANTS AVAILABLE

    The NIH IDeA Center will accept applications for quick grants (Q-grants) from researchers in health and behavioral sciences at UND, NDSU, and local medical research facilities. The Center's goal is to increase behavioral research grant proposals to the National Institutes of Health. Q-grants are available, both as small seed grants and consulting grants, to help investigators prepare NIH proposals.

    Two to three consulting grants will be awarded of up to $1,500 each to help bring in an outside consultant, especially someone with similar research interests and a successful NIH funding record. Researchers receiving consulting grants will be asked to submit an NIH proposal by Oct. 1, 1998. Review of consulting grant applications will begin Dec. 1.

    Four to five seed grants will be issued of up to $3,500 each to assist researchers with any type of preparation needed to submit an NIH proposal, including such costs as student support, summer salary for proposal writing, or equipment. Successful applicants will be asked to submit an NIH proposal by Oct. 1, 1998. Review of seed grant applications will begin Dec. 1.

    Proposal reviews will be done locally, allowing for a quick turn-around on grant applications. Proposals will be accepted after the listed deadlines if funds are still available. Instructions for application submission and review criteria can be obtained from the Center's web page (http://ironjello.psych.ndsu.nodak.edu/ndideacenter/), or by contacting me at wkapaun@plains.nodak.edu, or (701)231-8738.

    -- Wanda Kapaun, NIH IDeA Center Administrator, Department of Psychology, North Dakota State University.

    *******

    ORPD LISTS RESEARCH, GRANT OPPORTUNITIES

    Following are research and grant opportunities. For more information, contact the Office of Research and Program Development at 777-4278.

    CARTHAGE FOUNDATION

    Awards primarily support programs addressing public policy questions concerned with national and international issues. Eligible applicants are tax-exempt organizations such as research institutions, colleges, universities, and public affairs groups. Initial contact should be in the form of a letter, for which guidelines are available. Guidelines should be requested in writing. Contact: Richard M. Larry, Treasurer, One Oxford Centre, 301 Grant Street, Suite 3900, Pittsburgh, PA 15219-6401; or call 412/392-2900. Deadline: None.

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    AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES

    Ruth O'Brien Project Grants of up to $5,000 are awarded to individual(s) concerned with research and development in family and consumer science. Eligible applicants are individual AAFCS members, committees, sections, and units; and non-profit agencies or organizations whose purposes are consistent with the sponsor. Proposals may be submitted for efforts such as: basic research, community service projects, student or model programs, development of educational materials, leadership conferences, educational seminars, and workshops. Contact: Awards, Fellowships, and Grants Program, 703/706-4600, ext.122; fax 703/706-4663. Deadline: 1/16/98.

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    NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION

    Postdoctoral Fellowships in Science, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology Education (PFSMETE) prepare Ph.D. graduates in science, mathematics, engineering and technology (SMET) with the necessary skills to assume leadership roles in SMET education, and provide opportunities for outstanding Ph.D. graduates to develop expertise in a facet of science education research that would qualify them for a range of educational positions. Areas of support include cognitive processes in learning, knowledge transfer/curriculum development, uses of technology as teaching and learning tools, and student assessment/program evaluation. Contact: 703/ 306-1697; fax 703/306-0468; PFSMETE@nsf.gov; or http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DGE/pfse1.htm. Deadline: 1/15/98.

    The Science and Technology Centers: Integrative Partnership Program (STC) supports innovation in the integrative conduct of research, education and knowledge transfer. STCs should have a unifying research focus involving any area(s) of research supported by the Foundation. Emphasis is on building intellectual and physical infrastructure within and between disciplines. Proposals involving integrated partnerships (i.e., multi-institutional arrangements including other universities/colleges, national laboratories, private sector research laboratories, state and local government laboratories, and international collaborations) are encouraged. Applicants must submit a preproposal that outlines the planned Center activity. Only invited full proposals will be accepted. Research teams intending to submit a preproposal should submit a notice of intent addressed to the STC Program via e-mail to stc@nsf.gov by January 6, 1998. Contact: 703/306-1040; stc@nsf.gov or http://www.nsf.gov/od/osti/centers/stc.htm. Deadlines: 1/6/98 (notice of intent); 2/12/98 (preproposal); 9/3/98 (full proposal).

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    EDUCATIONAL TESTING SERVICE

    NAEP Visiting Scholar Program awards provide support for visiting scholars to utilize the National Assessment of Educational Progress database to pursue ten months of research on educational policy or measurement issues that affect the efficiency or usefulness of National Assessment of Educational Progress. Studies focusing on issues concerning the education of minority students are encouraged. Applicants must hold a doctoral degree and have previous related research experience. Stipends are based on the scholar's training and experience. Deadline: 1/15/98.

    The Postdoctoral Awards Program provides support for in-residence research in the following areas: psychology; education; sociology of education; psychometrics; statistics; computer science; linguistics; educational, occupational, or vocational testing; educational technology; minority issues; testing issues, including alternate forms of assessment for special populations; testing issues associated with new forms of assessment, or policy research. Applicants must hold a doctoral degree in one of the fields indicated. Deadline: 2/1/98.

    The Summer Program in Research for Graduate Students provides support to graduate students for a research internship in the fields of psychology; education; sociology of education; psychometrics; statistics; computer science; linguistics; educational, occupational, or vocational testing; educational technology; minority issues; testing issues; or policy research. Deadline: 2/1/98.

    The TOEFL Postdoctoral Fellowship Program provides one fellowship of $35,000 for twelve months to conduct research in the area of English as a second or foreign language or assessment with the sponsor's Language Learning and Assessment Group, on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) 2000 project. Applicants should hold a doctorate in second-language testing or a related field, such as applied linguistics. Deadline: 3/30/98.

    Contact for all the above: Linda DeLauro, 609/734-1806, fax 609/497-6032, ldelauro@ets.org.

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    AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION

    The American Heart Association and affiliates support research activities broadly related to cardiovascular function and diseases, stroke, or to related basic science, clinical, and public health problems. Predoctoral Fellowships provide $1,100/mod economics at academic or other appropriate institutions in Germany. The deadline for this last program is October 31 of each year. Contact: 202/296-2990; fax 202/833-8514; humboldt@umail.umd.edu; or http://www.avh.de.

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    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    The Graduate Education for Minorities (GEM) Program provides financial support for graduate students through employment for 2-3 summers at the Laboratory. Eligible applicants are minority engineering students enrolled in their senior year or who have received a bachelor's degree in an engineering discipline. The sponsor's basic research activities include high-energy physics, basic energy sciences, nuclear energy, nuclear and medium energy physics and chemistry, and basic life sciences, including biology and the medical use and effects of radiation, radioisotopes, and other nuclear tools. Environmental and energy research emphasizes energy transfer mechanisms at the edge of the continental shelf, the effects of energy pollution on air quality, new energy technologies, energy conservation, and reactor safety analyses and safeguards. Contact: Jeffrey W. Taylor, Office of Equal Opportunity, Building 185A, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973; 516/282-2703. Deadline: 12/1/97.

    The Science & Engineering Opportunities Program for Minorities & Women provides summer research work experience for a 12-week period to minority and women students at the Laboratory. Participants are mentored in an educational training program developed to give research experiences in various areas of chemistry, physics, computer science, engineering, biology, nuclear medicine, applied mathematics, high and low energy particle accelerators, and science writing. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents, at least eighteen years of age, and have completed their freshman, sophomore or junior year in college. Contact: Frances V. Ligon, Office of Equal Opportunity, 516/282-3709. Deadline: 3/31/98.

    The Summer Student Program provides approximately 60 10-week full-time summer appointments at the laboratory for undergraduate students at the junior or senior level. The program gives research experience in accelerators, biology, chemistry, energy, engineering, environment, mathematics, medicine, physics, and science writing. Eligible applicants are students majoring in applied mathematics, physical and life sciences, engineering and scientific journalism. Stipends and travel expenses are provided. Contact: Robert Thomas, Science Education Center, 516/282-4385, fax 516/282-5832, thomas@bnlc16.bnl.gov. Deadline: 1/31/98.

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    BUREAU OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS

    The Division of Disadvantaged Centers of Excellence program provides support for programs of excellence in health education for minority individuals in allopathic medicine, osteopathic medicine, dentistry, and pharmacy. Applicants must address all of the following: student recruitment; student performance; faculty recruitment; training and retention; information resources, curricula, and clinical education; and faculty and student research. Contact: Roland Garcia, 301/443-4493, rgarcia@hrsa.dhhs.gov. Deadline: 3/27/98.

    The Division of Disadvantaged--Minority Faculty Fellowship Program provides support to increase the number of underrepresented minority faculty members in health professions schools. Eligible applicants are schools of medicine. Fellowship support will not exceed one year. Contact: Lafayette Gilchrist, 888/333-4772; fax 301/309-0579; lgilchrist@hrsa.dhhs.gov. Deadline: 3/27/98.

    ------------

    -- Sally Eckert-Tilotta, Assistant to the Director of the Office of Research and Program Development.

    *******

    BILLBOARD

    COMMUNITY CONVERSATIONS WITH PRESIDENT BAKER SUMMARIZED

    Following is a summary of the Oct. 22 "Community Conversations" briefing in which President Baker discussed progress at the University and answered audience questions. This report is extracted from the "On the Shores of Lake Agassiz" notes compiled by Patsy Nies (Student Affairs). The next "Community Conversations" program is scheduled for Wednesday, Nov. 19, at 9 a.m. in the Memorial Union Ballroom.

    President Baker welcomed the group and began the session by answering questions. In response to a question concerning the dike by Smith Hall, Larry Zitzow (Plant Services) provided this update on flood recovery and related construction projects:

    Responding to a question about the status of the position of Vice President for Student Affairs, Baker stated that he is still working on the job title and description, and that he appreciated input from the audience.

    Regarding the "Bronson Property," Baker noted that the State Board of Higher Education has asked UND to "aggressively pursue" the development. The University is seeking resources to finance the $5 to 6 million it will cost to install infrastructure and has requested Community Development Block Grant funds from the city of Grand Forks. Baker emphasized that this would be a "University Village," rather than a "Dinkytown." The goal will be to help the community and university recruit and retain students, faculty and staff. Focus groups will be held with students, faculty and staff to aid the project. A developer will be hired, and the University will control what is in the Village through covenants with the developer.

    An audience member asked what will be done with the space in the Memorial Union formerly occupied by the bowling alley. Gordon Henry (Vice President for Student Affairs) replied that, in the short term, computer services may be offered there for 18 to 20 hours a day. He observed that students have lost most 24-hour study spots in Grand Forks since restaurants can't hire enough staff to remain open all night.

    In response to a question about the Sioux nickname, Baker stated that he is pleased with the BRIDGES group approach, noting that they are focusing on educational issues by providing information and holding discussions. Baker said that he was very concerned about fan behavior at the UND-NDSU football game. In the situation of intense rivalries, the University is concerned about how the passion of fans is manifested, regardless of team nicknames and mascots. He said he was pleased with the input he has received on the nickname issue and will continue the dialogue before making a decision.

    President Baker noted that UND's efforts to revise the North Dakota University System six-year plan has had some success; the document now mentions that the basis of an education is the liberal arts. Some other changes have been made, and UND has been asked to assign budget figures to various parts of the plan. This is due Nov. 7.

    The challenge of rebuilding enrollment figures continues. Baker said he hopes to have 11,000 students enrolled next fall and asked for assistance from everyone. Rob Carolin (Enrollment Services) reported on efforts and progress. Don Piper (Summer Session) noted that retention is equally important, and that a student-friendly environment needs to be nurtured. Baker challenged people to design a "caring symbol" that would appeal to today's visually oriented students. Peter Johnson (University Relations) was assigned to work on the project; anyone with ideas is asked to contact him.

    - - Jan Orvik, Editor, University Letter.

    *******

    SENATE FORUM DISCUSSION SUMMARIZED

    Following is a summary of points of discussion during the Oct. 16 Senate Forum on changes in timing of Senate elections, expanded membership of the Senate Executive Committee and recommendations of the Task Force on Senate Membership. These items will be acted upon at the November Senate meeting.

    1. Senate election procedures to be completed before May 1 of each year and selection of officers at the May Senate meeting.

      Change in the timing of Senate elections would allow for convening a functional Senate earlier in the academic year. New officers will be elected at the May meeting and would be in place over the summer to respond to issues in the absence of the full Senate and facilitate full Senate actions earlier in the academic year. Those against the change pointed out that spring elections would disenfranchise new faculty beginning their appointments at UND in the following fall semester. Additionally, a mechanism for replacement of elected Senators who resign or are not able to fulfill their terms must be determined.

    2. Expansion of the Senate Executive Committee membership to include the senior UND representative on the Council of College Faculties.

      Discussion was positive on this issue as a mechanism of developing a better interrelationship and coordinated action between the UND Senate Executive Committee and the Council of College Faculties which is viewed as the governance body representing the NDUS faculty to the State Board of Higher Education. The addition of the CCF representative would also diversify the Senate Executive Committee representation.

    3. Expand University Council to include full-time lecturers.

      This recommended change would diversify the Council to include the growing number of full-time lecturers. These new Council members (presently approximately 26) would participate in Senate elections and be eligible for election. The discussion also indicated the impact of this action on college and/or departmental governance and decision making. The addition of lecturers will not have a major impact on the total Council membership. However, departments that employ a number of full-time lecturers may be significantly impacted by this change.

    4. Expand University Council to include clinical faculty on campus.

      This recommendation would also serve to diversify the Council to include a significant number of faculty members (presently approximately 25) who primarily have clinical teaching responsibilities. The impact on College or departmental governance and decision making that was expressed in discussion of Item 3 may also be of significance on this action.

    5. Expand University Council to include Program Directors, Coordinators and Assistant/Associate Deans who hold faculty rank.

      This recommendation would also diversify the Council to include these three categories of University employees (presently six).

    6. Neither Program Directors nor Coordinators will be ex-officio members of the Senate.

      This recommendation would reduce the number of ex-officio members of the Senate by one. Directors and coordinators would be eligible for election to the Senate if recommendation five is accepted.

    7. The total number of elected Council members of the Senate will be two and one-half times the number of ex-officio members.

      Acceptance of this recommendation would formalize a ratio that approximates the present situation.

    8. Senate seats elected by the Council will be distributed so that each college, professional school and the libraries elect two senators with the exception of the College of Arts and Sciences which will elect six, two from each of the areas of Natural and Physical Sciences, Humanities, and Social Sciences. The remaining council representatives will be elected at large.

      This recommendation will promote greater diversity of Senate representation from across the campus. In increasing the number of college representatives, there will be a reduction in the percentage of Council members elected at large from 47 percent to 27 percent of the Senate membership. Concern was expressed that implementation of this change may bring about a disproportionate representation of some units which may result in the Senate being less representative of the faculty as a whole.

    9. Publish attendance records at the end of the semester, both a summary by categories of Senate membership (ex-officio, elected Council, students) and individual statistics.

      The intent of this recommendation is to promote better attendance at Senate meetings by reporting semester summaries of attendance for individuals and by categories of membership. This action will not eliminate the present practice of publishing attendance after monthly meetings. Voting results for individuals or by categories will not be compiled over the semester and published.

    -- Summarized by Albert Fivizzani (Biology), Chair, University Senate.

    *******

    LITERARY CONTEST ENTRIES SOUGHT

    The English Department announces the 1997 Gladys Boen Literary Contest. Three prizes of $50 each are offered for the best poem, short story, and essay by an undergraduate student currently enrolled in the university.

    Students should submit two copies of their work, and entries should be typed and double-spaced. Each manuscript must bear the writer's name, local address, and telephone number and should be 10 to 25 pages (fiction), five pages (poetry), or three to 10 pages (essay) in length. Students are encouraged to keep a copy of each submission; manuscripts cannot be returned.

    Deadline for entries is Monday, Nov. 3.

    Manuscripts should be sent to Boen Award, in care of Professor John Little, English Department, Box 7209. Work published in the UND publications "Dakota Harvest" and "North Country" will be considered automatically for the award, and the contest will be judged by English Department faculty. Winners will be announced during the Annual Awards Luncheon (date to be announced).

    The award was established in honor of Professor Gladys Boen who taught in the university from 1953 until 1972, when she retired. Previously, she taught at Concordia College in Moorhead, Minn., and at high schools in Dickinson, Stanley, Mott, Kenmare, and Ross, N.D. She was deputy county superintendent of schools in Grand Forks from 1939 to 1945. Professor Boen died in 1973.

    For further information, contact me. -- John Little, Professor of English, 777-2762.

    *******

    NOT JUST FOR ADVISORS

    S-U Grades

    Grades of S or U rather than the traditional grades A through F are used by the University under specified regulations. A grade of S grants credit toward graduation but does not affect a student's grade point average except when they repeat the course. A grade of U also does not affect the grade point average and does not grant credit toward graduation.

    A student of sophomore, junior or senior standing may elect to enroll in one or more courses per semester for S-U grading subject to the following regulations:

    1. A maximum of 30 semester hours of credit of elected S-U grades may be counted toward his or her baccalaureate degree.
    2. Courses in the major field may not be taken for an S-U grade.
    3. A student may take extra-departmental major requirements for an S-U grade with the approval of the major department chair and his/her Academic Dean.
    4. A course elected for S-U grade will not be included in the 30 hour residency requirement (i.e., all students must complete a minimum of 30 graded credits at the University of North Dakota to receive a bachelor's degree).
    5. Repeating a course by S-U registration will eliminate the effects of the earlier grade from a student's grade point average if the achieved result is an S. Repetition which results in a U will leave the effects of the earlier grade intact.

    The last day to change to/from S/U for this semester is Friday, Nov. 7.

    *******

    RESEARCH PARTICIPANTS SOUGHT

    Participants are needed for research projects dealing with language and memory. You must be over 55 years of age to participate. All projects take less than one hour, are conducted on the UND campus, and participants will make $5 to $10 for their time and effort. If interested please call me. -- F. Richard Ferraro, Psychology, 777-2414.

    *******

    WOMEN OUTNUMBER MEN IN NEW MEDICAL CLASS

    For the first time in the 92-year history of the School of Medicine and Health Sciences, women medical students in the freshman class surpass the number of male students, accounting for 51.7 percent of the class.

    The Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) Class of 2001 is composed of 58 new students, 30 of whom are women. This is a younger class than last year by exactly one year. The average age is 24.2 years; the youngest student in the class is 21 years old and the oldest is 40.

    Compared to former medical classes, fewer are health care professionals. The last colleges these students have attended are, largely, UND, Concordia College in Moorhead, Minn., and North Dakota State University. Twenty-two other colleges and universities have prepared other students in this class.

    Twenty-two students have earned their most recent degrees in biology, seven in psychology, and four in biochemistry. Other students have come to their medical education with degrees in chemistry, natural science, microbiology, zoology, American studies, anatomy and cell biology, anthropology, chemical engineering, clinical laboratory science, exercise physiology, German, history, physical therapy, podiatry, sociology, Spanish, and wildlife and fisheries. -- Judy DeMers, Associate Dean for Student Affairs and Admissions.

    *******

    UND WINS REGIONAL FLYING COMPETITION

    The University of North Dakota Flying Team, led by coach Al Skramstad, won the Region V National Intercollegiate Flying Association (NIFA) flying meet that wrapped up in Dubuque, Iowa, on Saturday. The UND team has now earned the right to seek an 11th national title at the spring national competition. The UND team has won the national title 10 of the past 13 years.

    Results of the three days of events in which nearly 50 collegiate aviators representing four colleges and universities from around the upper midwest competed were announced at the awards banquet Saturday night.

    The team scores are as follows: UND, 282; Mankato (Minn.) State University, 136; St. Cloud State (Minn.) University, 116; University of Dubuque (Iowa), 98. -- Al Skramstad, University Flying Team Coach.

    *******

    MEMORIAL UNION HOLIDAY HOURS

    The Memorial Union will be open Veteran's Day with limited services available as listed below:

    MONDAY, NOV. 10

    TUESDAY, NOV. 11

    *******

    COMPUTER CENTER HOLIDAY HOURS

    The Computer Center will close for the Veteran's Day holiday at midnight Monday, Nov. 10, and will reopen at midnight Tuesday, Nov. 11. -- Donna Bonderud, Production Control, Computer Center.

    *******

    1998 SUPPLY CATALOGS ARE AVAILABLE

    The University Bookstore's 1998 Supply Catalogs are now available. Please stop by and pick up your new catalog today. Quantities are limited, so hurry in. -- Patty Dorsher, University Bookstore.

    *******

    BOOKSTORE HOPES TO RESTORE COMPUTER REPAIR SERVICE

    The University Bookstore has been without Computer Repair Service since June 1 of this year; it is our every intention to open this service to the University community again as soon as possible. The demand has been great and we have endeavored to fill this position with the most qualified individual we can. Our hope is that we will be back up and running by the end of the fall semester. We apologize for any inconvenience this vacancy has caused and we will publish an announcement on the re-opening as soon as possible. -- Kristi Bruno, University Bookstore.

    *******

    CREDIT UNION OFFERS LOANS, CREDIT CARD

    A holiday bill paying special will be available until Dec. 31. Don't miss your chance to take advantage of our special loan rate. Pay 9.7 percent on a $1,000 loan for 11 months. Apply today!

    We can all agree on one thing -- a Credit Union credit card saves us money. The rate is 12.9 percent APR, no annual fee, no cash advance fee, no overlimit fee. Apply today!

    The 6.9 percent APR flood recovery loan will be discontinued Nov. 1. The Board of Directors will review the need for a new flood assistance loan in the spring of 1998. -- George Meister, Manager, University Federal Credit Union.

    *******

    ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

    GARRISON KEILLOR/ROLAND FLINT WILL PERFORM HERE

    The Garrison Keillor/Roland Flint North Dakota Quarterly Benefit has been rescheduled. On Sunday, Nov. 2, at 7 p.m., Garrison Keillor, writer, humorist and bard of National Public Radio's A Prairie Home Companion, will come to the Chester Fritz Auditorium to join his good friend, poet laureate Roland Flint, UND graduate and Park River, N.D., native, in the rescheduled benefit performance for NDQ, the state's oldest literary journal.

    They will share their works, insights, and stories at the benefit to raise funds for the North Dakota Quarterly.

    Keillor and Flint's show of humor, poetry and reminiscence has been warmly received in Baltimore and other cities where they have performed together. The event will take on special significance in Grand Forks, however, where record-breaking floods and citywide evacuation forced the postponement of April's performance.

    Tickets for the benefit are $10 for adults and $7.50 for students (including college) and senior citizens. A special $50 per person ticket is available for a post-show reception on stage with Garrison Keillor and Roland Flint. For tickets, contact the Chester Fritz Box Office at 777-4090 or 1-800-375-4068. -- Janna Mostad, UND Alumni Association.

    *******

    HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY PLANS HALLOWEEN BOOK SALE

    The Harley E. French Library of the Health Sciences will be having a Trick 'n Treat Book Sale on Halloween, Friday, Oct. 31, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. We will sell the good books that remain from our spring sale, as well as recent donations.

    This will be a good time to stock up on reading material for the winter ahead. Also, copies of the cookbook, "Taste of Your Own Medicine," will be on sale just in time for holiday gifts.

    The Library is located in the Karl Christian Wold Bio-Information Learning Resources Center which is attached to the south side of the medical school building. Call Cyndi Iverson, 777-2582, or Judy Rieke, 777-4129, for more information. -- Judith Rieke, Assistant Director and Collection Development Library, Library of the Health Sciences.

    *******

    WOMEN'S CENTER LISTS EVENTS

    The Wednesday, Nov. 5, Feast and Focus program at noon in the Women's Center, 305 Hamline Street, is "The Spiritual Life of Women." Is there a way women can have full spiritual lives in religious systems which seem patriarchal and exclusive? We will look at contemporary efforts to recover inclusive traditions.

    The Thursday, Nov. 6, For Women Only Rites of Passage program will be "Every Ending Is a Beginning." There are times in everyone's life when we discover that our relationships with certain people, be they friends, family, or lovers, need to end. Sometimes these endings are difficult to accept, and we have a hard time truly saying "good-bye." Join us today as we explore ways to release ourselves from relationships, giving us the closure we need in order to move on.

    Please join us. -- Donna Oltmanns, Coordinator, Women's Center.

    *******

    INTERNATIONAL CENTRE LISTS EVENTS

    The International Centre, 2908 University Ave., invites you to join them for the following events. Friday, Oct. 31, will be an International Cof-Tea Cup, which is an opportunity for UND students, faculty, staff, and the Greater Grand Forks community to enjoy international tea, coffee, and pastry while discussing world issues from 3 to 4:30 p.m. at the Centre.

    Also join us Friday, Oct. 31, to celebrate Halloween at the International Centre Haunted House, beginning at 7 p.m. All are welcome to enjoy this "haunty" event.

    On Thursday, Nov. 6, the Centre will hold an Educational Forum at 7 p.m. featuring people who have recently traveled outside North America.

    All are welcome. -- Sharon Rezac Andersen, Director, International Centre.

    *******

    MINNEAPOLIS GOSPEL SOUND WILL PERFORM

    Minneapolis Gospel Sound, a nationally known musical group, will perform at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 3, at the Chester Fritz Auditorium. Hailed as a magical group, the Gospel Sound has traveled throughout the country. The Sound will take you on a musical journey through African and American history, bringing an understanding and respect for diversity of the world.

    There is no admission fee for the program, which is open to the public. It is sponsored by the Multicultural Awareness Committee, a standing committee of Student Government. -- Ben Subedi, Advisor, Multicultural Awareness Committee.

    *******

    MUSEUM OF ART TO SHOW "DELICATESSEN"

    On Wednesday, Nov. 5, at 8 p.m., the North Dakota Museum of Art presents "Delicatessen," the third film in the Art Design Film Series. "Delicatessen" is a most unusual comedy about a bizarre and desperate Parisian butcher who discovers an inventive solution to a meat shortage. Directed by the acclaimed French filmmakers Jean-Pierre Jeunet and Marc Caro (who made City of Lost Children), this French movie is a visual feast for the eyes showing a futuristic urban landscape of a post-apocalyptic world. Admission is $3. -- Morgan Owens, North Dakota Museum of Art.

    *******

    ADULT ART WORKSHOP TO BEGIN AT MUSEUM

    The Valley Memories Workshop is designed for adults to make art in the friendly atmosphere of the North Dakota Museum of Art. Participants will tell their history in the Red River Valley as a work of art in a book-related format using found objects, drawing, and non-traditional media such as sewing. The group will incorporate sequential images and text to narrate a theme, much like artworks by Duane Michals and Kal Asmundson in the Museum's permanent collection. Over the next seven months, each participant will develop a small body of artwork. The first session is Tuesday, Nov. 4, from 9 to 10:30 a.m. Subsequent sessions will be held on the first and third Tuesday of the month. Enrollment is limited to 20 people per session and the fee is $5 per person per session. Call 777-4195 to register. -- Morgan Owens, North Dakota Museum of Art.

    *******

    MUSEUM CONCERT SERIES PRESENTS GRIEG TRIO

    One of Norway's musical treasures, the Grieg Trio, will perform in the Museum Concert Series Sunday, Nov. 2, at 2 p.m. at the North Dakota Museum of Art. Tickets are available at the door.

    Formed in 1987, the Grieg Trio gained international attention when it was selected by the Lillehammer Olympic Committee to promote Norwegian culture. The trio, which has performed at concert halls and festivals throughout the United States and Europe, also had the honor of playing at the 1995 Nobel Prize award ceremony in Oslo.

    The Grieg Trio has won numerous prizes and has recorded both Mendelssohn and Brahms trios on CD. They have bene praised for their "virtuosic mastery of their instruments." The New York Times liked their "precise, balanced, beautifully nuanced and shaped" performance, while the London Evening Standard admired their "authority, freshness and technical polish."

    At their Grand Forks performance they will play pieces by Dvorak, Shostakovich and Edvard Grieg. Dvorak's "Dumky," written in 1891, is a vivacious chamber music adaption of Russian folk songs. They will also play a piece by their namesake, composer Edvard Grieg, which had been forgotten until they performed it. Their concluding piece is Dmitri Shostakovich's Piano Trio No. 1 in C minor, a lyrical, melodic, rhapsodic work with great variations in tempo, key and theme, all contained within a classical sonata form.

    The Grieg Trio consists of Vebjorn Anvik, piano, Solve Siegerland, violin, and Ellen Margrete Flesjo, cello. Admission to the concert is $12 for adults, $5 for students, and children under 12 are admitted free. The Concert Series is supported by community sponsors and a grant from the Myra Foundation. -- Marsy Schroeder, North Dakota Museum of Art.

    *******

    CRAFT CENTER OFFERS HOLIDAY WORKSHOPS

    Holiday mini-craft workshops will be held each Friday through Nov. 21 from noon to 1 p.m. at the Craft Center on the third floor of the Memorial Union. The projects for Oct. 24 are a choice of Halloween pins or a Clothespin Santa at a cost of $1 per project. The project for Oct. 31 is a Swedish Heart Christmas decoration; the Nov. 7 project is a Pole Santa. Different projects will be featured each week. Get a start on replacing or adding to your handmade ornament collection. To register, call 777-3979. -- Bonnie Solberg, Coordinator, Craft Center.

    *******

    STUDIO ONE LISTS GUESTS

    Linda Magness, owner of the Red Geranium, an antique/gift store located in downtown Grand Forks, will be featured on the October 31 edition of "Studio One." For the past 18 years she has owned and operated antique specialty stores in Alaska, Alabama and Japan. The segment will feature a variety of antiques, including quilts, dishes, books and gardening utensils. Linda will discuss how to price antiques and give some tips on determining real antiques from imitations. She will also inform viewers about the growing popularity of collectibles and their relation to the antique world.

    Rebecca Moore, (Philosophy and Religion) has researched and written on the 1978 Peoples Temple suicides in Jonestown. Moore will also be a guest on the show. This mass suicide in 1978 killed over 900 men, women and children, including Moore's two sisters and a nephew. Moore believes that the media began shaping public opinion without both sides of the story and people in Jonestown were viewed as crazy cult members. Ultimately, the members felt they had no way out and engaged in a mass suicide by drinking cyanide laced Kool-Aid.

    "Studio One" is an award-winning one-hour weekly morning show featuring news, weather, sports, and interviews. The program airs live on channel 3 at 7 a.m. on Fridays, and is repeated at noon and 7 p.m. Rebroadcasts can be seen Saturdays at 10 a.m., and noon, as well as Monday through Wednesday at 7 p.m. "Studio One" also airs in Fargo, Bismarck/Mandan, Minot, and Minneapolis.

    *******

    CALENDAR OF EVENTS

    OCTOBER 1997

    (Please contact Mavis at the Office of University Relations, Box 7144, or call 777-4304, if you wish to make changes or have an event included.)

    Thurs., Oct. 30 -- COMPUTER SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM, "The Perception of Lightness, Brightness and Transparency: Data, Theory and Controversy," presented by Mark McCourt, North Dakota State University Department of Psychology, 238 CAS II, 3 p.m.

    Thurs., Oct. 30 -- DIABETES PROGRAM, "Diabetes: Control is Prevention," a live Center for Disease Control (CDC) satellite broadcast, Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, noon to 2 p.m.; call 746-4427 to register.

    Thurs., Oct. 30 -- ENGLISH LECTURE SERIES, "Commenting on Student Papers: 'Does Anyone Out There Understand What I'm Writing?'" 116 Merrifield Hall, 4 to 5:30 p.m.; principal speakers will be William Archibald, Jennifer Bottinelli, Cece Kidwell, Sherry O'Donnell, and Jason Zevenbergen (all from English Department).

    Thurs., Oct. 30 -- TABLE TENNIS TOURNAMENT with prizes to the two top players; other games will be available, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; all are welcome.

    Thurs., Oct. 30 -- FOR WOMEN ONLY, "Everyday Sacred," Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

    Fri., Oct. 31 -- LEEPS LECTURE, "Blue Ice Blues: How Stable is Antarctica?" presented by Allan Ashworth, Department of Geosciences, NDSU; 100 Leonard Hall, noon; LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary Sciences) lecture is supported by the Department of Geology and Geological Engineering, Office of Research and Program Development and the Advancing Science Excellence in North Dakota (ASEND) Program.

    Fri., Oct. 31 -- HALLOWEEN BOOK SALE, Harley E. French Library of the Health Sciences, Medical School building, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.; call Cyndi at 777-2582 or Judy at 777-4129 for more information.

    Fri., Oct. 31 -- INTERNATIONAL COF-TEA CUP, an opportunity for UND students, faculty, staff, and the Greater Grand Forks community to enjoy international tea, coffee, and pastry while discussing world issues, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 3 to 4:30 p.m.; all are welcome.

    Fri., Oct. 31 -- CELEBRATING HALLOWEEN, International Centre Haunted House, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; all are welcome to enjoy this "haunty" event; call 777-3273 for more information.

    Fri., Oct. 31 -- SWIMMING & DIVING, UND at University of Nebraska Invitational, Lincoln, Neb.

    Fri., Oct. 31 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND at South Dakota State University, Brookings, S.D., 7 p.m.

    Fri. and Sat., Oct. 31-Nov. 1 -- HOCKEY, UND at University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn., 7:35 p.m.

    NOVEMBER 1997

    Sat., Nov. 1 -- TEST, Graduate Record Examination (GRE), General and Subject Examinations; General Exam in Room 7, Gamble Hall, at 8 a.m.; Subject Exam at 2 p.m.

    Sat., Nov. 1 -- FOOTBALL, UND at South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, 1:30 p.m.

    Sat., Nov. 1 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND at Augustana College, Sioux Falls, S.D., 7 p.m.

    Sun., Nov. 2 -- NORTH DAKOTA QUARTERLY BENEFIT PERFORMANCE with Garrison Keillor, writer, humorist and star of National Public Radio's "A Prairie Home Companion," will join his good friend, Roland Flint, a former North Dakota native who has since been named poet laureate of Maryland, Chester Fritz Auditorium, 7 p.m.; call 777-4090 for ticket information.

    Sunn., Nov. 2 -- MUSEUM CONCERT, Norwegian-based Grieg Piano Trio were selected to play at the ceremony honoring Nobel Prize winners in Oslo, Norway, North Dakota Museum of Art; call 777-4195 for ticket information.

    Sun., Nov. 2 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND at Pella Windows, Pella, Iowa, 3 p.m.

    Mon., Nov. 3 -- GRADUATE COMMITTEE MEETING, 305 Twamley Hall, 3:05 p.m.

    Mon., Nov. 3 -- BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY SEMINAR, "Life Among the Primitives: Prokaryotic Protein Phosphatases," presented by Peter J. Kennelly, Associate Professor of Biochemistry at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Haugen Lecture Hall, Room 1360, Medical Science, 11 a.m.

    Mon., Nov. 3 -- WORKSHOP, "Writing Winning Proposals: Advice From Successful Grant Writers," Sioux Room, Memorial Union, 8:30 a.m. to noon; call the University Writing Program at 777-3600 to register or for more information.

    Mon., Nov. 3 -- CONCERT, Minneapolis Gospel Sound, a nationally known musical group will take you on a musical journey through African and American history, Chester Fritz Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.; free admission and open to the public.

    Mon., Nov. 3, through Thurs., Nov. 20 -- MASTER OF FINE ARTS EXHIBITION, Douglas Pfliger, Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center.

    Tues., Nov. 4 -- LEEPS Lecture, "Opportunities in the Petroleum Industry," presented by James C. Woodson, Vice President of Exploration, Samedan Oil Corporation, Ardmore, Okla., 109 Leonard Hall, 3 p.m.; call 777-2631 for more information.

    Tues., Nov. 4 -- COUNSELING COLLOQUIUM, 316 Montgomery Hall, 12:30 to 1:45 p.m.

    Tues., Nov. 4 -- VALLEY MEMORIES WORKSHOP is designed for adults to make art, North Dakota Museum of Art, 9 to 10:30 a.m.; enrollment is limited; call 777-4195 to register or for more information.

    Tues., Nov. 4 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND vs. Moorhead State University, Hyslop Sports Center, 7 p.m.

    Wed., Nov. 5 -- LESSONS AT LUNCH, "Dressing on a Budget," presented by Margaret Tweten, NDSU Extension Services, Leadership Inspiration Center, third floor, Memorial Union, noon to 1 p.m.; a collection of fun and informative sessions on various topics of interest to staff, faculty, and students held on alternate Wednesdays; all sessions are free; call 777-3926 to register.

    Wed., Nov. 5 -- ART DESIGN FILM SERIES, "Delicatessen," a most unusual comedy about a bizarre and desperate Parisian butcher who discovers an inventive solution to a meat shortage, North Dakota Museum of Art, 8 p.m.; admission is $3.

    Wed., Nov. 5 -- FEAST AND FOCUS, "The Spiritual Life of Women," Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

    Wed., Nov. 5 -- MUSICAL THEATRE, How To Succeed in Business Without Really Trying, Chester Fritz Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

    Wed. through Fri., Nov. 5-7 -- REGIONAL WORKSHOP ON GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE, Clifford Hall Auditorium; call Doug Olsen at 777-3453 for more information.

    Thurs., Nov. 6 -- UNIVERSITY SENATE MEETING, Room 7, Gamble Hall, 4:05 p.m.

    Thurs., Nov. 6 -- PUBLIC LECTURE, Werner Fornos, President of the Population Institute, Washington, D.C., will present "Socio-Economic Underdevelopment" at the Integrated Studies Program meeting from 10:45 to noon at 125 O'Kelly Hall; he will also discuss "Environmental Degradation and Global Climate Change" at a joint Geography-Sociology Forum from noon to 1 p.m. in 366 Clifford Hall; the lectures are open to the public.

    Thurs., Nov. 6 -- FOR WOMEN ONLY: Rites of Passage, "Every Ending Is A Beginning," Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

    Thurs., Nov. 6 -- EDUCATIONAL FORUM featuring people who have recently traveled outside North America, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; all are welcome; call 777-3273 for more information.

    Thurs., Nov. 6 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND vs. Brandon University, Hyslop Sports Center, 7:30 p.m.

    Fri., Nov. 7 -- LAST DAY TO DROP A FULL-TERM COURSE.

    Fri., Nov. 7 -- LAST DAY TO CHANGE TO/FROM S/U GRADING.

    Fri., Nov. 7 -- INTERNATIONAL COF-TEA CUP, an opportunity for UND students, faculty, staff, and the Greater Grand Forks community to enjoy international tea, coffee, and pastry while discussing world issues, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 3 to 4:30 p.m.; all are welcome.

    Fri., Nov. 7 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND vs. University of Northern Colorado, Hyslop Sports Center, 7 p.m.

    Fri. and Sat., Nov. 7-8 -- HOCKEY, UND at Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colo., 7:35 p.m.

    Sat., Nov. 8 -- TEST, PRAXIS Series Tests, Rooms 114 and 116 Witmer Hall, 7:30 a.m.

    Sat., Nov. 8 -- TEST, National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification (NCTRC), Room 7, Gamble Hall, 12:30 p.m.

    Sat., Nov. 8 -- FOOTBALL, UND vs. Augustana College, Memorial Stadium, 1 p.m.

    Sat., Nov. 8 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND vs. University of Nebraska at Omaha, Hyslop Sports Center, 7 p.m.

    Mon., Nov. 10 -- BIOCHEMISTRY LECTURE, "Regulation of Cholesterol Metabolism by Triiodothyronine," presented by Gene C. Ness, Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of South Florida, College of Medicine, Tampa, Clifford Haugen Lecture Hall, Room 1360, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, 11 a.m.

    Mon., Nov. 10 -- CONCERT, B.B. King, Chester Fritz Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

    Tues., Nov. 11 -- HOLIDAY, VETERANS DAY.

    Tues., Nov. 11 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND vs. North Dakota State University, Hyslop Sports Center, 7 p.m.

    Wed., Nov. 12 -- "FUTURE DAY: THE BUSINESS SEMINAR," a live broadcast seminar on future of business and the new global economy, Rural Technology Center, 9:15 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

    Wed., Nov. 12 -- FEAST AND FOCUS, "An Informal Conversation with Grand Forks Mayor, Pat Owens," Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

    Wed. and Thurs., Nov. 12-13 -- CONFLICT RESOLUTION SKILLS: Negotiation and Problem Solving in the Work Place, seminar offered by the UND Conflict Resolution Center, Memorial Union, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day; designed to teach participants how to handle conflicting situations in the work place; call the Center at 777-3664 or udcrc@badlands.nodak.edu for more information.

    Thurs., Nov. 13 -- CELEBRATION TEA, President's Advisory Council on Women will host the tea in honor of those individuals who would have been honored at the PAC-W Bread and Roses Banquet last spring for their efforts on behalf of women, North Dakota Museum of Art, 4 p.m.; call Sara at 777-3239 or Donna at 777-4300 for more information.

    Thurs., Nov. 13 -- FOR WOMEN ONLY, "Healing Circle," Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

    Thurs., Nov. 13 -- JAPANESE CULTURAL EVENT with students visiting Red River and Central High School providing an evening of Japanese culture, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 7 p.m.; all are welcome; call 777-3273 for more information.

    Thurs., Nov. 13 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND at Bemidji State University, Bemidji, Minn., 7 p.m.

    Fri., Nov. 14 -- TEST, Multi-State Professional Responsibility Examination (MPRE), Ballroom, Memorial Union, 12:30 p.m.

    Fri., Nov. 14 -- TELECONFERENCE, "Campus Confidentiality on Trial: An Open or Closed Case?" Memorial Union Lecture Bowl, noon to 1:30 p.m.; sponsored by the Student Affairs Office, the Admissions and Records Office, and the North Dakota University System Student Affairs Council.

    Fri., Nov. 14 -- INTERNATIONAL COF-TEA CUP, an opportunity for UND students, faculty, staff, and the Greater Grand Forks community to enjoy international tea, coffee, and pastry while discussing world issues, International Centre, 2908 University Ave., 3 to 4:30 p.m.; all are welcome.

    Fri., Nov. 14 -- GREEN AND WHITE DAY, President Baker has approved this day for employees to wear UND colors and jeans to show support for our Sioux athletes.

    Fri., Nov. 14 -- SWIMMING & DIVING (men's and women's), UND at South Dakota State University Dual, Brookings, S.D.

    Fri. and Sat., Nov. 14-15 -- HOCKEY, UND vs. University of Minnesota-Duluth, Engelstad Arena, 7:35 p.m.

    Fri. and Sat., Nov. 14-15 -- VOLLEYBALL, National Collegiate Athletic Association Regional Tournament.

    Sat., Nov. 15 -- KAYUMANGGI PHILIPPINE PERFORMING ARTS, Chester Fritz Auditorium, 7 p.m. (sponsored by International Centre).

    Sat., Nov. 15 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND vs. Dakota Wesleyan University, Hyslop Sports Center, 4 p.m.

    Sat., Nov. 15 -- BASKETBALL, WOMEN'S, UND vs. University of Minnesota-Duluth, Hyslop Sports Center, 6 p.m.

    Sat., Nov. 15 -- FOOTBALL, UND at University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, Colo., 1 p.m. (MST).

    Sun., Nov. 16 -- CONCERT, Ray Price, Chester Fritz Auditorium, 4 p.m.

    Mon., Nov. 17 -- SATELLITE TELECONFERENCE, "Protecting Your Campus From Crime: Challenges and Solutions," Memorial Union Lecture Bowl, 1 to 3 p.m.

    Tues., Nov. 18 -- FACULTY LECTURE SERIES, "Thoughtful Impressions in Clay: The Cable Years," presented by Donald Miller, professor of Visual Arts; location and time to be announced later.

    Tues., Nov. 18 -- COUNSELING COLLOQUIUM, 316 Montgomery Hall, 12:30 to 1:45 p.m.; topic will be announced in the University Letter.

    Tues., Nov. 18 -- BASKETBALL, MEN'S, UND at University of Minnesota-Morris, Morris, Minn., 7:30 p.m.

    *******

    REMINDER! The attachments referred to are not included in the electronic form of the University Letter. However, you will find the attachments with the paper copy.

    UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is also available electronically through UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The address is http://www.und.nodak.edu.

    All articles submitted for publication should be labeled "University Letter" and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu. Attachments to University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number. University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations, Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.

    UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

    *******


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