[University Letter logo]

University Letter

September 26, 1997

Volume 35 No. 6

 


UNIVERSITY LETTER
University of North Dakota at Grand Forks
Vol. 35, Number 6, September 26, 1997

UNIVERSITY LETTER IS ALSO AVAILABLE ELECTRONICALLY in the Events and News
section of UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The
address
is: http://www.und.nodak.edu

The University Relations Office maintains an index for the University
Letter.

------------------------
          TABLE OF CONTENTS

Baker Will Deliver State Of University Address Sept. 30
U Avenue To Be Closed For Skyway Work
Agenda Announced For U Senate Meeting
     EVENTS TO NOTE
WAC Session To Consider "Learning Disabilities And Student Writing
Workshop Will Focus On Helping Children After Disasters
Graduate Committee Agenda Announced
Lunch Talk Considers "History For NASA"
Electrical Engineering Initiates Colloquium Series
Geography Talk Dsicusses "Plants Across The Seas"
Curriculum Committee Meets Oct. 2
Oct. 2 Reception Honors Retiring Evelyn Merritt
International Centre Sets Oktoberfest, Homecoming Events
Participation Invited In Alumni Leadership Council Meeting
Oct. 3 Dedication Set For Remodeled McCannel Hall
"Using Internet" Is 'On Teaching' Topic
Oct. 9 Reception Honors Deb Glennen
Jeffrey Lang To Give First Talk In Resurrected Faculty Lecture Series

          TABLE OF CONTENTS - PART 2
     OF ACADEMIC INTEREST
11 Elected To Two-Year U Senate Terms
Academic Affairs Sponsors Administrative Intern Program
Proposals Invited For Student Tech Fee Funds
     GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS
Research, Grant Opportunities Listed
     BILLBOARD
Employee Assistance Program Adds Orientation
University Within University Announces New Programs

          TABLE OF CONTENTS - PART 3
     ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT
Art Museum Presents "Philippine Diaspora"
Women's Center Lists Events
Homecoming Party Offers Music, Dancing, And A Chance To
   Win A Trip To Europe
Master Chorale To Perform "Elijah" Oct. 11
Burtness Theatre Announces Season
     FYI
Craft Center Offers Mini-Craft Workshops
Local Grant Provides Free Landlord/Tenant Mediation
     CALENDAR OF EVENTS - SEPTEMBER

     CALENDAR OF EVENTS - OCTOBER - PART 4
------------------------
*******

BAKER WILL DELIVER STATE OF UNIVERSITY ADDRESS SEPT. 30

President Baker will deliver his State of the University Address at 9 a.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 30, in the Memorial Union Ballroom. Refreshments will be
available at 8:30 a.m. After the President's speech, there will be a final
showing of various flood videos for those who may not yet have seen them.
The
occasion will also be considered the first of the monthly
discussion/briefing
sessions with the president to be held in 1997-98 for faculty and staff
(modeled after the weekly flood meetings that were held this spring and
summer). -- Dave Vorland, Assistant to the President.
*******

U AVENUE TO BE CLOSED FOR SKYWAY WORK

A section of University Avenue will be temporarily closed to both
vehicular
and pedestrian traffic Thursday through Monday, Sept. 25-29, because of
construction on the Johnstone-Hancock Walkway.  The closed area is
bordered by
Princeton Street on the west, Fifth Avenue North on the north, Oxford
Street
on the east, and the area between Johnstone-Fulton Halls and Gamble Hall
on
the south.  Princeton Street, Fifth Avenue North and Oxford Street will
remain
accessible, as well the parking lot between Johnstone-Fulton and the
Alumni
Center.  Pedestrians are asked to walk around the construction site by one
of
two ways:  using the passage between Fulton and Chandler Halls on the
south or
the passage between Squires and Walsh Halls on the north.  This temporary
closing is intended to protect pedestrian and vehicular traffic from the
dangers inherent in this construction work. -- LeRoy Sondrol, Director of
Plant Services.
*******

AGENDA ANNOUNCED FOR U SENATE MEETING

The University Senate will meet at 4:05 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 2, in Gamble
Hall,
Room 7.  The agenda is:
     1.   Announcements
     2.   Minutes from the previous meeting and business arising from the
minutes.
     3.   Question Period

CONSENT CALENDAR    
     4.   Final report of the Task Force on Eligibility for Membership on
the University Senate.  Monte Phillips, chair.  (Attachment No. 1)
     5.   Annual report of the Continuing Education Committee.  Margaret
Zidon, chair.  (Attachment No. 2)
    6.   Annual report of the Faculty Research and Creative Activity
Committee.  Brian Paulsen, chair.  (Attachment No. 3)
     7.   Annual report of the Faculty Instructional Development
Committee. 
Ronald Schaefer, chair.  (Attachment No. 4)
     8.   Annual report of the Compensation Committee.  Tom Robinson,
chair. 
(Attachment No. 5)
     9.   Annual report of the Standing Committee on Faculty Rights.  Jim
Antes, senior member.  (Attachment No. 6)

BUSINESS CALENDAR
     10.  Election of the Senate chairperson.
     11.  Election of the Senate vice chairperson.
     12.  Election of a faculty representative to a two-year term on the
Senate Executive Committee to replace Al Fivizzani.
     13.  Election of a faculty representative to a three-year term to
replace Sara Hanhan on the NDUS Council of College Faculties.
     14.  Election of a student representative to the Senate Executive
Committee.
     15.  Election of two Senate faculty members to the Committee on
Committees.
     16.  Proposal from the Student Policy Committee to change Section
5-6,
Solicitation Policy, by adding the following (italics):
          A.   Solicitation shall be defined to include the sale or offer
for sale of any property or service and/or receipt of or request for any
gift
or contribution, or asking, appealing, enticing, pleading or seriously
requesting for membership or information.
     17.  Proposal from the Student Policy Committee to change Section 5-7
and add 5-7-C in the Code of Student Life as follows (Attachment No. 7):
          5-7, addition
          Policy on Petitions and Surveys
          5-7C, addition of Section C
          Surveys conducted by non-recognized organizations or student
organizations must include the purpose of the survey and the name of the
organization must be displayed prominently on the survey.  A copy may be
requested by the Coordinator of Student Organizations for verification of
the
name and organization.  The content of the survey shall not be censored.
     18.  Recommendation from the Senate Executive Committee that,
beginning
with the 1998-99 Senate elections, the University representatives on the
Council of College Faculties be elected by the University at the same time
and
in the same manner as members of the Senate are elected.
          
That the Secretary remove from the ballots names of Council members from
any
college already represented with two members on the Council of College
Faculties.

          That the first ballot shall be a nominating ballot.

          That the term of office being three years, with the term of one
member expiring each year.

          That the most recently retired CCF member serve as alternate to
the CCF.

-- Alice Poehls (Admissions and Records), Secretary, University Senate.
*******


EVENTS TO NOTE

WAC SESSION TO CONSIDER "LEARNING
DISABILITIES AND STUDENT WRITING"

The topic for the September meeting of the Writing Across the Curriculum
discussion group will be "Learning Disabilities and Student Writing:  What
Should Teachers Know?"  The group will meet Friday,Sept. 26, from noon to
1
p.m.  To get more information on the meeting or to sign up to attend,
please
call 7-3600 or respond by e-mail to hawthorn@badlands.nodak.edu. -- Joan
Hawthorne, WAC/WC Coordinator.
*******

WORKSHOP WILL FOCUS ON HELPING CHILDREN
AFTER DISASTERS

Children have been affected by the Red River Valley's most recent disaster
more than we know. A workshop presented by Don and Barbara Weaver,
"Putting
Back the Pieces: Working with Children After Disasters," will be held at
two
different times and locations on Friday, Sept. 26. One session is
scheduled
from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. at the Ramada Inn; the second from 6 to 10 p.m. in
the
Rural Technology Center, University Avenue and 42nd St. The workshop will
provide up-to-date information about working with children who have
experienced a disaster of any sort. Workshop leaders will describe the
phases
and stages of disasters and what changes occur in the behavior patterns of
both adults and children, and participants will practice specific skills
for
helping children cope and heal.

Don and Barbara Weaver, from Buffalo, N.Y., have years of experience in
disaster relief work with children of all ages. Their affiliation with the
United Methodist Commission On Relief has led them to working with
children
experiencing a variety of difficult situations.

The $15 workshop fee includes all handout materials, instruction and
refreshments. To register, contact Monique Clifford at 777-2663 or
1-800-342-8230. This workshop is sponsored by the United Methodist
Commission On Relief
(UMCOR) and the Division of Continuing Education. -- Monique Clifford,
Continuing Education.
*******

GRADUATE COMMITTEE AGENDA ANNOUNCED

The Graduate Committee will meet Monday, Sept. 29, at 3:05 p.m. in Twamley
Hall, Room 305.  The agenda is:

1.   Consideration of nominations to the Graduate Faculty.
2.   The subcommittee's report on the Clinical Laboratory Science graduate
program review.
3.   The subcommittee's report on the Psychology graduate program review.
4.   Matters arising.

-- Harvey Knull, Dean, Graduate School.
*******

LUNCH TALK CONSIDERS "HISTORY FOR NASA"

On Wednesday, Oct. 1, the Department of History and Phi Alpha Theta will
sponsor a talk by Tim Farrell on "Doing History for NASA."  A
question-and-answer period will follow his presentation.  Bring your
lunch, if you like;

all are invited to attend.  For more information, please contact me at
7-3380.
-- David Rowley, Associate Professor of History.
*******

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING INITIATES COLLOQUIUM SERIES

Dr. Nagy Bengiamin, professor of Electrical Engineering and department
chair,
will give the semester's first presentation, "Dear Student: Why Are You
Here?"
Wednesday, Oct. 1, at 4 p.m. in 324 Harrington Hall.

Engineering education is undergoing significant changes in response to
needs
of industry, students, and the global society. Students go through the
motion
of completing a strong educational program. They master many attributes,
of
which some are directly recognizable while others are hidden in the mill.
Clear recognition of these attributes brings learning to a higher
standard,
and it helps developing these attributes further. The question every
student
should be able to answer very clearly is, "Why am I here and what am I
receiving?"

The objective in this seminar is to discuss engineering learning
attributes
and how they relate to student career goals. Industry expectations and
engineers performance assessment will be addressed. Practices in
engineering
education which support effective learning will be emphasized. Students
should
be able to leave this seminar with a better understanding of the purpose
of
their education and what they must focus on to become what they hope for
themselves. The format of the seminar will be informal to allow student
and
faculty participation in an environment that facilitates self-reflection
and
opinion forming.

Please contact me at hsalehfa@sage.und.nodak.edu if you have  questions or
if
you would like to give a colloquium. -- Hossein Salehfar, Electrical
Engineering.
*******

GEOGRAPHY TALK DISCUSSES "PLANTS ACROSS THE SEAS"

Dr. Clarissa Kimber, professor emeritus of geography at Texas A&M
University,
will present a public lecture on "Plants Across the Seas" Thursday, Oct.
2, at
noon in Clifford Hall, Room 366.  Dr. Kimber's principal interests include
people-plant relations as in the domestication of plants, medicinal uses
of
plants, ethnomedical systems, and humanly assisted plant migrations. The
lecture is sponsored by the Department of Geography.  All interested
persons
are invited to attend. -- Mohammad Hemmasi, Professor of Geography.
*******

CURRICULUM COMMITTEE MEETS OCT. 9

The University Curriculum Committee will meet Thursday, Oct. 9, at 3 p.m.
in
Twamley Hall, Room 303, to review the request from the College of Arts and
Sciences to suspend the major in Russian Studies and minors in Russian and
Scandinavian Studies.  Anyone interested in the proposals is invited to
attend. -- Heidi Kippenhan (Admissions and Records), Secretary, University
Curriculum Committee.
*******

OCT. 2 RECEPTION HONORS RETIRING EVELYN MERRITT

The Department of Philosophy and Religion invites the University community
to
a farewell reception Thursday, Oct. 2, for Evelyn Merritt.  She is
retiring
after 11 years of service to UND as a secretary, first for the College of
Nursing and most recently for the Department of Philosophy and Religion.
She
plans to move to live nearer to her grandchildren.  The reception will run
from 3 to 4:30 p.m. in Merrifield Hall, Room 201.  Please join us to thank
Evelyn for her years of service and to wish her the best. -- Scott Lowe,
Chair, Philosophy and Religion.
*******

INTERNATIONAL CENTRE SETS 
OKTOBERFEST, HOMECOMING EVENTS

The International Centre, 2908 University Ave., invites you to join them
for
the following events:

"Celebrating German Culture" with "Oktoberfest" is set for 7 p.m.
Thursday,
Oct. 2.  This celebration will include food, music, attire, a history of
Oktoberfest, and a reading of a German-America proclamation.

Get together with an "International Cof-Tea Cup" Friday, Oct. 3, from 3 to
4:30 p.m.  This is a great opportunity for UND students, faculty, staff
and
Greater Grand Forks citizens to enjoy international tea, coffee and
pastries
while discussing world issues.

Our International Centre Homecoming Open House follows the parade on
Saturday,
Oct. 4.  The open house will feature international entertainment and food,
a
celebration of alumni, and tours of our new facilities.

All are invited to join in these events.  Also, mark your calendar for
Thursday, Oct. 9, are we offer a preview of the upcoming Feast of Nations. 
The popular Feast of Nations is set for 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 11, in the
Grand
Forks Civic Auditorium.  Tickets must be purchased in advance.  Make plans
now
to take in this international extravaganza! -- Sharon Rezac Andersen,
Director, International Centre.
*******

PARTICIPATION INVITED IN ALUMNI 
LEADERSHIP COUNCIL MEETING

Faculty and staff are invited to join alumni and friends from around the
world
for the annual National Alumni Leadership Council meeting Friday, Oct. 3.
The
theme is "The Future of Education:  Expanding With the Outside World."

The day's activities will begin with a continental breakfast and
registration
at 8:30 a.m. in the Memorial Union's Fireside Lounge. At 9 a.m. everyone
will
gather in the Fred Orth Lecture Bowl.  Opening remarks by UND Foundation
Executive Vice President Earl Strinden and UND President Kendall Baker
will be
followed by "NALC in Action," a review of this year's alumni partnerships
with
faculty, students and staff.  Larry Isaak, North Dakota University System
chancellor, will give the morning keynote address, "An Overview of Higher
Education in North Dakota."

A panel-and-audience participation will follow Isaak's remarks.  The
panelists
and discussion topics are:  Chuck Wood, "The Promise and Use of
Technology: 
Expanding the Horizons for UND and Higher Education"; Dr. John Altman,
"Higher
 and
provost; Gordon Henry, vice president for student affairs; Lyle
Beiswenger,
vice president for finance; H. David Wilson, dean of the School of
Medicine
and Health Sciences; and the academic deans and department chairs.  For a
copy
of the request forms, please contact your appropriate administrator.  The
deadline to have applications to your division administrator is Thursday,
Oct.
23.  Deans may have an earlier deadline to their offices; please check
with
your college administrator.  All proposals from division administrators
are
due in the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs on Monday,
Oct.
27. -- Marlene Strathe, Convener, Student Technology Fee Committee.
*******


GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

RESEARCH, GRANT OPPORTUNITIES LISTED

Following are research and grant opportunities. For more information,
contact
Research and Program Development at 777-4278.


NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION: 
REVISED GRANT PROPOSAL GUIDE (GPG)

ORPD now has a supply of the revised Grant Proposal Guide (NSF 98-2).
This
revision incorporates the revised NSF merit review criteria.  Other
sections
have also been revised for clarity and consistency with NSF policies,
practices and procedures.  The new merit criteria will be effective for
proposals submitted on or after October 1, 1997.  Therefore, this GPG will
be
effective October 1, 1997.  Previous versions should be discarded.  The
complete text of the GPG is also available at www.nsf.gov.  In the near
future
the GPG will be available on the NSF home page in both Microsoft Word and
HTML
formats.
------------

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION/OAK RIDGE 
ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES (ORAU)

The Graduate Research Fellowship Program 1998 supports graduate study in
science, mathematics, and engineering.  Fellowships are awarded for
graduate
study leading to research-based master's or doctoral degrees in the fields
of
science, mathematics, and engineering supported by NSF.  Separate
competitions
are conducted for Graduate Fellowships and Minority Graduate Fellowships,
each
with additional awards offered for women in engineering and computer and
information science.  The three-year fellowships provide $15,000 plus a
cost-of-education allowance of $9,500 per year.  Contact: ORAU,
423/241-4300;
fax 423/241-4513; nsfgrfp@orau.gov.  Deadline: 11/6/97.
------------

AMERICAN-SCANDINAVIAN FOUNDATION

Fellowships of up to $15,000 support a year-long stay in any Scandinavian
country, with  priority given to dissertation level students who must
spend
time at foreign institutions.  Grants of $1,000 to $3,000 are available in
all
fields for post-doctoral scholars, established professionals, and artists
who
can conduct research and establish collaborative professional ties during
visits.  Contact: 212/879-9779; fax 212/249-3444; grants@amscan.org;
www.amscan.org.
------------

AMERICAN CENTER OF ORIENTAL 
RESEARCH, AMMAN, JORDAN

The Center offers the following: The Kress Fellowship in the Art and
Archaeology of Jordan (pre-doctoral ), U. S. Information Agency
Fellowships
(predoctoral and post-doctoral), Near and Middle East Research and
Training
Program (NMERTP) Senior Research Grants (senior post-doctoral students),
National Endowment for the Humanities Post-Doctoral Research, Jennifer C.
Groot Fellowship (for beginners in archaeological fieldwork), Kenneth W.
Russell Fellowship (graduate studies), Harrell Family Fellowship (graduate
student), and Honorary Appointments (for senior, post-doctoral, and
research
fellows/scholars).  Fields of study include all areas of the humanities
and
social sciences.  Contact: 617/353-6571; fax 617/353-6575; or acor@bu.edu. 
Deadline: 1/1/98.
------------

FOUNDATION FOR PHYSICAL THERAPY

The foundation provides funds (up to $30,000 a year for a maximum of two
years) to support research activities in physical therapy with priority
given
to projects having practical application.  Proposed studies should add to
or
refine the body of theoretical, scientific, and clinical knowledge on
which
physical therapy practice is based using any of a variety of recognized
investigative methods (i.e., experimental, descriptive, correlational). 
Contact: Leslie Moran, 703/684-5984; fax 703/684-3218; or
foundation@apta.org. 
Deadline: 12/13/97 (letter of intent); 2/1/98 (proposal).
------------

NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL/FORD FOUNDATION

Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowships for Minorities Program and
Predoctoral and Dissertation Fellowships for Minorities awards will be
made in
research-based programs in the behavioral and social sciences, humanities,
engineering, mathematics, physical sciences, life sciences, education, or
for
interdisciplinary programs composed of two or more eligible disciplines. 
Deadlines: 1/5/98 (Postdoctoral); 11/15/97 (Predoctoral and Dissertation). 
Contact: Fellowship Office, National Research Council, 2101 Constitution
Avenue, Washington, DC 20418, infofell@nas.edu, or
http://fellowships.nas.edu. 
------------

PHI BETA KAPPA: MARY ISABEL SIBLEY FELLOWSHIP

This fellowship is offer for the study of French language and literature. 
Unmarried women ages 25-35 with a demonstrated ability to carry on
original
research, who hold a doctorate or have fulfilled all requirements except
the
dissertation, and who plan to devote full-time work to research during
1998-99
may apply.  Contact: 202/265-3808; fax 202/986-1601; or lsurles@pbk.org. 
Deadline: 1/15/98.
------------

VINCENT GAFFNEY FOUNDATION

The Gaffney Foundation provides grants for the health, welfare and feeding
of
needy children under age 18 and for projects intended to improve the
quality
of education for youth.  Contact: Laurie Pederson, American State Bank and
Trust, Williston, ND, 701/774-4100; fax 701/774-4175.  Deadline: None.
------------

TOM AND FRANCES LEACH FOUNDATION, INC.

The Leach Foundation was created to "promote the public welfare@ with
private
resources. It supports projects in the arts and humanities, education,
human
services, medical sciences and health, and the social sciences.  Contact:
Clement C. Weber, Executive Director, 701/255-0479.  Deadline is generally
September 15 of each year.
------------

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE)

Partnerships for Academic-Industrial Research (PAIR) in Support of
Energy-Relevant Fundamental Research.  The DOE is soliciting grant
applications for performance of basic research to support important,
long-term
national objectives in energy relevant research.  The purpose of this
program
is to promote research projects involving academic researchers, students,
and
industrial researchers.  Deadline: 11/5/97 (Preapplications); 1/14/98
(Formal
applications).  Contact:
http://www.er.doe.gov/production/grants/grants.html
or the following individuals in the appropriate division of interest: Dr.
Paul
H. Maupin, Chemical Sciences, 301/903-4355, paul.maupin@oer.doe.gov;
Dr. Gregory L. Dilworth, Energy Biosciences, 301/903-2873,
greg.dilworth@oer.doe.gov; Dr. Robert Price, Engineering, 301/903-3565,
bob.price@oer.doe.gov; Dr. Wolfgang Wawersik, Geosciences, 301/903-5829,
wolfgang.wawers@oer.doe.gov; Dr. Timothy Fitzsimmons, Materials Science,
301/903-9830 or tim.fitzsimmons@oer.doe.gov.

For information on the related funding opportunity entitled Energy and
Waste
Minimization Research Supportive of Technology Vision 2020: The Chemical
Industry contact: Office of Industrial Technologies, EE-20, U.S.
Department of
Energy, 1000 Independence Avenue S.W., Washington, DC, 20585;
http://www.oit.doe.gov/IOF/chemicals/.
------------

AMERICAN MUSIC CENTER

The Margaret Fairbank Jory Copying Assistance  Program assists U.S.
composers
with the expenses for copying parts (extraction and reproduction) for the
premier performance of large-scale works for four or more instrumental
and/or
vocal parts.  Funding for copying expenses is also available for a
professional CD recording when that recording is the premiere or for
purchasing computer software, and in some circumstances hardware, for
copying. 
Recent awards have averaged $750, although there is no set funding limit.
Applicants must be members of the American Music Center.  Contact:
212/366-5260; fax 212/366-5265; center@amc.net.  Deadline(s):  10/1/97,
2/1/98,
5/1/98, 10/1/98.
------------

W. K. KELLOGG FOUNDATION

The Foundation funds requests in the following programming areas:
1) Leadership--Emphasis is on helping new and established leaders develop
broad perspectives about local and national issues and problems; and
improving
leaders' ability to find creative solutions to problems that face
institutions
and communities.  2) Information Systems/Technology--Emphasis seeks to
increase and ensure equal access to information and electronic media,
including support for professions education and a concern for policy
issues
surrounding intellectual property rights and privacy.  Building the human
capacity to strengthen community on-line communication systems in health,
education, rural development, and the nonprofit sector is a priority.  
3) Capitalizing on Diversity, and  Family--Emphasis supports efforts that
help
society to maximize the human resource potential of diversity, and
capitalize
on the opportunities it presents.  4) Neighborhood and Community
Development--Emphasis supports efforts that seek effective means for
promoting
the sustainable development of families, neighborhoods, and communities. 
Contact: 616/968-1611; fax 616/968-0413; http://www.wkkf.org/.  Deadline:
None.
------------

INSTITUTE FOR HUMANE STUDIES
 
The Hayek Fund for Scholars provides grants of up to $1,000 to graduate
students and untenured faculty members for presenting papers at
professional
meetings. Applicants must be advanced graduate students or untenured
faculty
members in the social sciences, law, the humanities, or journalism and
have a
clearly demonstrated interest in the classical liberal tradition within
the
humane sciences.  Contact: Lori Lovejoy, Program Coordinator,
703/934-6920;
fax 703/352-7535; ihs@gmu.edu; http://osf1.gmu.edu/~ihs/.  Deadline: None.
------------

SEMICONDUCTOR RESEARCH CORPORATION (SRC)

SRC supports an integrated program of basic and applied research,
conducted by
faculty and graduate students, based on an assessment of semiconductor
industry needs.  The following programs are supported: Microstructure
Sciences, Design Sciences, Packaging Sciences, Manufacturing Systems
Sciences,
and Manufacturing Process Sciences.  The global research objective is to
support the development of a generic technology base that will enable
members
to: 1) exceed the projected trend in functionality at the chip level vs.
time;
2) exceed the projected trend in chip performance vs. time; 3) exceed the
projected trend to decrease cost/functional
element vs. time; 4) increase chip reliability; 5) reduce design costs per
chip; and 6) provide package technologies that support the chip
technologies. 
Unsolicited white papers are accepted; unsolicited proposals are not
accepted. 
Contact: 919/941-9400; fax 919/941-9450; gardner@src.org;
http://www.src.org/. 
Deadline: None.
------------

-- Carl Fox, Director of Research and Program Development.
*******


BILLBOARD

EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM ADDS ORIENTATION

An additional orientation to the Employee Assistance Program (EAP) is
being
provided to UND staff.  This session will present more details regarding
UND's
EAP program.  It is set for Wednesday, Oct. 1, from 3 to 4 p.m. in the
Memorial Union's Fred Orth Lecture Bowl. -- Cheryl Osowski, Personnel
Officer,
Personnel Services.
*******

UNIVERSITY WITHIN UNIVERSITY
ANNOUNCES NEW PROGRAMS

"Christmas Without Our Ornaments" will be presented by Dick Grosz and Judy
Haynes from the UND Counseling Center. Sessions are set for Monday, Nov.
17,
and again Thursday, Nov. 20. Both sessions will run from 11 a.m. go 1 p.m.
in
the Memorial Union's River Valley Room. Call Kara Hyde at 777-2128 to
register.

"Policies, Procedures, Forms and More!" The Controller's and Purchasing
Offices have teamed up to offer a training session for employees who are
new
to administrative processes. The session will be held Wednesday, Oct. 29,
from
8 a.m. to noon in the Memorial Union's River Valley Room. Topics to be
covered
include: TCCs, purchasing, bids, accounting policies and surplus property.
Contact Allison Peyton at 777-2968 to register.

-- Jo Coutts, Division of Continuing Education/University Within the
University.
*******


ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

ART MUSEUM PRESENTS "PHILIPPINE DIASPORA"

"Philippine Diaspora in Contemporary Art," an exhibition of 25 Filipino
artists now living in the United States, Canada, Indonesia and the
Philippines, will open Sunday, Sept. 28, at 2 p.m. in the North Dakota
Museum
of Art.  Several artists featured in the exhibition will give an informal
gallery talk at 3 p.m. on opening day.

1998 is the centennial of the Philippine revolution against three
centuries of
Spanish rule and also marks the 50th anniversary of Philippine
independence
from the United States.  The exhibition grew out of a decision by Filipino
artists working at the University of California at Irvine to organize an
exhibition which would reflect on the loss of their homeland -- brought
about
by economic destitution rather than oppressive political conditions --
which
resulted in dislocation and migration on a global scale.  The works
selected
are part of a continuing conversation between exiles, those who returned
home,
and those who stayed at home.  The exhibition, which continues through
Nov. 2,
contains work in many media.  Paintings, drawings, sculptures,
photographs,
LED sign boards, films and videos all explore themes of history, cultural
difference, identity and global migration.

Santiago Bose, who lives in the Philippines, will come to North Dakota to
create an installation of his talismanic rituals and ritualized drawings.
For
his video installation of a security officer's desk, Bose has manipulated
six
video monitors which flicker with a synthesis of images of Philippine
jungles,
farmers, festivals, and an ironic closed-circuit view of a Western art
gallery
and a business office.

Joseph Santarromana uses a computer to blend images of his face with
popular
culture icons like Mickey Mouse and Ferdinand Marcos in a process called
morphing.  This process embodies the migration of identities that is at
the
center of Filipino experience.  In another series, Santarromana's face is
mixed with computer-manipulated images of places he has been which drift
in
and out to create a surrealistic aura.  Years ago, one of those places was
the
North Dakota Museum of Art, where Santarromana installed Bill Viola's
video
exhibition.

Paul Robles also plays with identity in his photographic prints called "I
Was
Born a Pantomime Horse."  Friends and relatives are shown in poses holding
Filipino artifacts such as a mask, a ceremonial headdress, and a pig's
head. 
The photographs are dominated by an ambiguous mix of pride and unease.

Carlos Villa's "Artist's Feet" is a pair of small shoes cast out of paper
and
covered in feathers.  This piece became the conceptual and emotional pivot
of
the show as it links flight and fancy, dispossession and reclamation in
one
compact metaphor.

SANGGAWA ("working as one") is a collaborative group of Manila-based
painters. 
Their works are made of layered images that embody outraged and outrageous
satires.

The Philippines have supplied the entire world with domestic workers.
Imelda
Cajipe-Endaya's "Foreign Domestic Helper" is an eloquent, sparse
installation
about these migrant Filipino domestic laborers and the loss of their
homeland
and culture.  It is constructed from the cheapest of common objects:  an
iron,
a mop, pieces of cloth -- all emblems of domestic toil.

Lani Maestro's work "A Voice Remembers Nothing" is a video installation
invoking the names of those "disappeared" by the Marcos regime.

Maryrose Mendoza's sculpture "Punching Bag," a combination of a miniature
punching bag and a pin cushion covered in pins, cleverly steals the
punching
bag from the macho world and places it in the realm of women's work.  It
honors Mendoza's grandmother, who owned a tailoring shop.

Genara Banzon's "Pagmamalasakit:  The Quest for Greener Pastures" is a
physically large and almost shrine-like work.  It is an image of a girl on
a
makeshift bed surrounded with children's paper hats, airplanes and folk
icons. 
Tiny half-burned candles are at the foot of the bed.  Above is a cross
marked
with an image of a bleeding heart; surrounding the cross are images of
women
from American catalogs and magazines.

The Museum of Art is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, and
from 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.  There is no admission charge. --
Morgan
Owens, North Dakota Museum of Art.
*******

WOMEN'S CENTER LISTS EVENTS

The Wednesday, Oct. 1, "Feast and Focus" program at noon in the Women's
Center, 305 Hamline Street, is "Healing Circle." The Healing Circle is a
Native American Sioux tradition based on the belief that healing can only
occur in community and not alone. With our hectic schedules and tendency
to do
things ourselves, the concept of staying connected gets lost. Before we
know
it we can become isolated. So if you go, go, go and don't get support,
it's
likely you will forget how much it really matters. The Healing Circle will
end
with the ritual of passing on the light. The light or source exists for
all of
us at all times. We regulate the connections when we receive support and
are
conscious of it, but when it's taken away we miss it. Come and experience
the
healing within the community of the Women's Center.

The Thursday, Oct. 2, For Women Only program is "Honoring Self." It seems
sometimes that so much that is natural to the life cycle of women is
tinged
with shame. This program will briefly celebrate the three phases of
womanhood:
the maiden, the mother, and the crone (you need never have been a mother
nor
yet a crone to celebrate these!). Self-love -- it's never too late to
learn
how to achieve this. 

Please join us. -- Donna Oltmanns, Coordinator, Women's Center.
*******

HOMECOMING PARTY OFFERS MUSIC, D
ANCING, AND A CHANCE TO WIN A TRIP TO EUROPE

Win a trip to Europe at the UND Homecoming '97 Party on Saturday, Oct. 4! 
Don't miss your chance to win a fabulous seven-day trip to Europe in the
fall
of 1998.  This trip, which includes roundtrip airfare from Minneapolis,
hotel
accommodations, and continental breakfast each day, will be given away
Saturday night.  You must be present to win.

Everyone is invited to the Homecoming '97 Party at the Grand Forks Civic
Auditorium.  It's the grand finale of Homecoming festivities.  This year's
party will feature two dance bands, beginning with Dick King and the
Classic
Swing Band from 8 to 9:15 p.m., playing its most toe-tapping,
memory-making
tunes.  At 9:30 p.m., The Fantastic Convertibles, a Minneapolis-based
group,
will perform their repertoire of classic hits from the Fifties and
Sixties. 
The Fantastic Convertibles have appeared with such greats as Dion, Freddy
Cannon, Tommy Roe, the Drifters, the Chiffons, the Shirelles, Sha-na-na,
Bobby
Vee and many more.

The Homecoming '97 Party runs from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m.  Advance tickets can
be
purchased for $5 by calling the UND Alumni Association at 1-800-543-8764
or
777-2611.  Tickets will be $6 at the door.  No reservations are needed.
The
Party is hosted by a local Grand Forks All-Alumni Committee.  Its members
include George and Ellen McKinnon, Dick and Dolores King, John and Dawn
Botsford, Walt and Norma Swingen, Jack and Yvonne Widdel, Don and Jolly
Lindgren, Ken and Loretta Svedjan, Dr. Jim and Jolene Brosseau, and F.
John
and Sharon Marshall. -- Kirsten Carolin, Special Events Coordinator, UND
Alumni Association and Foundation.
*******

MASTER CHORALE TO PERFORM "ELIJAH" OCT. 11

"Elijah," a dramatic oratorio by Felix Mendelssohn, will be presented by
the
Grand Forks Master Chorale Saturday, Oct. 11, at 7:30 p.m. in Holy Family
Catholic Church, 1001 17th Ave. S.  The Chorale will be joined by the UND
Concert Choir and an orchestra composed of local musicians and members of
the
Fargo-Moorhead Symphony.  Directing will be Dr. James Rodde, associate
professor of music.  Mendelssohn's masterpiece tells the Biblical story of
the
prophet Elijah with music of great variety and beauty.  Elijah is
portrayed by
baritone David Adams, a UND senior music major.  Local audiences are
familiar
with Adams for previous solos in Handel's "Messiah" and Bach's "St. John
Passion."

The presentation of "Elijah" was originally scheduled for April 27 as the
concluding concert of the Master Chorale's past season.  Meeting this
summer,
Dr. Rodde and members of the organization agreed that the work had even
more
relevance after the flood and should be performed.  Because a number of
musicians from the spring orchestra are not available this fall, 20
members of
the Fargo-Moorhead Symphony have offered to play as a contribution to the
Grand Forks groups.

Tickets for the performance are $8 for general admission, $7 for seniors
and
$5 for students, and will be sold at the door. -- Ruth Marshall, Grand
Forks
Master Chorale.
*******

BURTNESS THEATRE ANNOUNCES SEASON

The Burtness Theatre proudly announces these four productions for its
1997-98
season.  "Kiss Me Kate," the famous Cole Porter musical, opens with season
with Oct. 15-19 performances.  William Luce's "The Belle of Amherst"
follows
Nov. 18-22.  The third production, on Feb. 24-28, will be Frank Galati's
adaptation of "The Grapes of Wrath."  Concluding the season on April 21-25
will be the popular Moliere comedy "Tartuffe."  Curtain time for all
performances is 7:30 p.m., except for the Sunday matinee performances at 2
p.m.  All tickets are $5, except for "Kiss Me Kate," for which tickets
will be
$10.  If you would like to make reservations for any of the performances,
or
if you are interested in purchasing season tickets or becoming a Burtness
Angel, please call the Burtness Theatre Box Office at 7-2085.

"Kiss Me Kate" opens the season with a bang.  Under the direction of Dr.
Mary
Cutler, this Cole Porter musical retells "The Taming of the Shrew" in a
madly
merry, musical way and outdoes even the Great Bard with such favorites as
"Another Openin', Another Show," "Too Darn Hot," "I Hate Men" and "Brush
Up
Your Shakespeare."

The acting talents of visiting assistant professor Frances Ford will be
featured in "The Belle of Amherst" as she skillfully brings to life her
70-minute version of this William Luce play.  In this richly human
dramatization,
we get to know the amazing and original mind of Emily Dickinson, a poet
who
wrote of the greatest pain and the deepest joy that a human can
experience. 
The small life of a small woman becomes enormous, and her happiness and
strengths become those of the audience as her poetry lights the stage.
Her
laughter and shrewd observations of human foibles make the evening a
delightful one.

Frank Galati's adaptation of John Steinbeck's famous novel, "The Grapes of
Wrath," takes the stage in late February with the classic tale of the Joad
family as they flee the dust bowl of Oklahoma in an attempt to find a
better
life in California.  Uprooted and swept along by forces they cannot
understand, the Joad family's struggles embody the indomitable spirit of
ordinary Americans.  Visiting assistant professor Bill Lacy directs this
powerful drama.

"Tartuffe" will close the '97-98 season at Burtness Theatre.  Moliere's
most
popular comedy skewers hypocritical morality.  We see the consequences of
believing what is laid before us instead of acknowledging the towering
pile of
evidence that so often proves otherwise.  Directed by Bruce Jacobsen, dean
of
the College of Fine Arts and Communication, this romping farce continues
to
have as much to say to us (and about us) as ever.

Please join us at UND's Burtness Theatre this season as we discover the
stories of some of theatre's most fascinating characters. -- Laurie Hinn,
Department of Theatre Arts.
*******


FYI

CRAFT CENTER OFFERS MINI-CRAFT WORKSHOPS

The Craft Center, located on the third floor of the Memorial Union, will
offer
holiday mini-craft workshops each Friday from noon to 1 p.m.  The projects
for
Oct. 3 are a "Puzzle Piece Snowman" pin and "Clothespin Snowman" ornament. 
The cost is $1 per project.  Different projects will be featured each
week. 
Get a start on replacing or adding to your handmade ornament collection.
To
register, just call 7-3979.  These projects may also be scheduled at other
times by special arrangement.  If you have a group that would like to do a
craft activity, call 7-3979. -- Bonnie Solberg, Craft Center Coordinator.
*******

LOCAL GRANT PROVIDES FREE LANDLORD/TENANT MEDIATION

A $15,000 grant from the North Dakota Community Foundation is funding a
program to help resolve flood-related landlord/tenant disputes. This fall
the
UND Conflict Resolution Center (CRC) will be using the grant money to
conduct
free landlord/tenant mediations.

While not new (the CRC has been practicing mediation for almost a decade),
mediation has gained increased acceptance as an effective tool for
resolving
seemingly intractable problems. According to Linda Hendrikson, Services
Coordinator for the CRC, "With landlord-tenant conflicts, it is important
to
remember that both parties are victims of this disaster." Hendrikson
explains
that, "In the chaos of the moment, the individuals often don't have the
perspective of the other."

Mediation is a confidential process in which people involved in a conflict
are
able to discuss the issues in a cooperative setting. It allows for
consultation from experts (i.e. attorneys, accountants, etc.) and enables
people to make informed voluntary decisions.

Dr. James Antes, CRC director, is optimistic about the help that mediation
can
offer the community. "Many of the landlord/tenant issues that have been
raised
appear to be amenable to mediation," said Antes.

To find out more about flood-related mediation services, contact Linda
Hendrikson, Services Coordinator, at 777-6390. Information about the
complete
range of services offered at the Conflict Resolution Center can be found
on
the Internet at http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/crc.

CRC Steps For Working Together To Solve Problems

1.   Agree on some basic ground rules for your discussion. Use courtesy
and
respect. Refrain from interrupting each other. Respect confidentiality. Be
honest.

2.   Talk and listen. Each person takes a turn at explaining his/her
perspective of the situation.

3.   Try to identify what the basic problems are. Use non-blaming
language.
Make a list of these problems and begin working on them one by one.

4.   For each basic problem, each person talks about his or her concerns.
Don't push for solutions yet, but spend time really exploring each problem
and
how everyone is affected by it. Make a list of each person's concerns.

5.   Now spend time brainstorming solutions for each problem. Get creative
and try not to evaluate any solutions until all ideas have come out.

6.   When all ideas have been generated, sort through them and decide
which
ones do the best job of meeting all the concerns that have been expressed.

7.   Final step: decide exactly which solutions will be selected and what
each person will do in executing them.

-- Linda Hendrikson, Conflict Resolution Center.
*******


CALENDAR OF EVENTS


SEPTEMBER 1997

(Please contact Mavis at the Office of University Relations, Box 7144, or
call
777-4304, if you wish to make changes or have an event included.)

Through Sat., Sept. 27 -- STATE EMPLOYEE RECOGNITION WEEK, Thurs., Sept.
25: a
two and one-half mile Walk/Run with Toby Baker and the vice presidents
starting in front of the Memorial Union; Fri., Sept. 26: A new twist on
Colors
Day by wearing the color of years of service: one to five years, black; 6
to
10 years, blue; 11 to 15 years, white; 16 to 20 years, purple; 21 to 25
years,
green; and 25 plus years, red; Sat., Sept. 27: One-day motor coach bus
trip to
the Mall of America; cost is $25, paid in advance, and reservations can be
made by calling Shelly at 777-3127; bus leaves at 6 a.m. and returns at
approximately midnight.

Thurs., Sept. 25 -- NORTH DAKOTA MUSEUM OF ART READERS SERIES, "The Ghost
of
Lake Agassiz," North Dakota Museum of Art, 7:30 p.m.; reading is by
authors
included in the small book of flood-related poems and essays written
between
April 19 and May 30; chapbooks will be available for $5 at the reading,
which
is free and open to the public.

Thurs., Sept. 25 -- WORKSHOP, "A Walk Through Employee and Employment
Accommodation: ADA Policies and Procedures," Memorial Room, Memorial
Union,
9:30 to 11:30 a.m.; an interactive discussion and review of the
University's
policies and procedures for accommodating employees with disabilities;
will
also include accommodation issues for emotional and mental illness;
pre-registration is not required but is recommended; contact Kara Hyde at
777-2128
or kara_hyde@mail.und.nodak.edu for registration information.

Thurs., Sept. 25 -- UNIVERSITY WITHIN THE UNIVERSITY CLASS, "Using Census
Data," Chester Fritz Library; contact Jim Carlson at 777-4641 to register.

Thurs., Sept. 25 -- FOR WOMEN ONLY, "The Gift of Fear," Women's Center,
305
Hamline St., noon.

Thurs., Sept. 25 -- INDIA CULTURAL EVENT with food, music, attire,
heritage,
literature and culture from India, International Centre, 2908 University
Ave.,
7 p.m.; all are welcome; call 777-3273 for more information.

Thurs. through Mon., Sept. 25-29 -- SECTION OF UNIVERSITY AVENUE
TEMPORARILY
CLOSED to both vehicular and pedestrian traffic because of construction on
the
Johnstone-Hancock Walkway.

Fri., Sept. 26 -- LAST DAY TO SUBMIT TUITION RESIDENCY APPLICATIONS FOR
FALL
SEMESTER.

Fri., Sept. 26 -- BIOLOGY SEMINAR, "Ecophysiological Model of Habitat
Value
for Fish," presented by William Neill of Texas A&M University, 141
Starcher
Hall, noon; all are invited to attend.

Fri., Sept. 26 -- WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM MEETING, "Learning
Disabilities and Student Writing: What Should Teachers Know?" noon to 1
p.m.;
call 777-3600 or e-mail hawthorn@badlands.nodak.edu for more information.

Fri., Sept. 26 -- LEEPS/KLOSTERMAN LECTURES presented by Mario Giovinetto,
University of Calgary, Alberta; at noon in Lonard Hall Lecture Bowl (Room
100), he will consider "Ice Sheets and Global Change"; at 3 p.m. in 109
Leonard Hall, he will present "The Trials and Tribulations of Collecting
and
Interpreting Data"; contact Will Gosnold at 777-2631 for more information.

Fri., Sept. 26 -- WORKSHOP, "A Flood of Emotions: Providing Support in the
Aftermath" for anyone interacting with students who may have been affected
by
this spring's flooding; primary focus will be on the role of academic
advisors
and providing appropriate referrals for support; Moorhead State
University;
registration is $5 per person to cover the cost of lunch; Student Academic
Services will provide van transportation for anyone interested in
attending;
contact Cathy Buyarski in Student Academic Services for more information;
sponsored by the North Central Region of the National Academic Advising
Association.

Fri., Sept. 26 -- WORKSHOP, "Putting Back the Pieces: Working with
Children
After Disasters," presented by Don and Barbara Weaver, from Buffalo, N.Y.,
who
have years of experience in disaster relief work with children of all
ages,
one session is scheduled from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. at the Ramada Inn; the
second
from 6 to 10 p.m. in the Rural Technology Center, University Avenue and
42nd
Street; the workshop will provide up-to-date information about working
with
children who have experienced a disaster of any sort; workshop fee is $15
which includes all handout materials, instruction and refreshments; call
Monique Clifford at 777-2663 or 1-800-342-8230 to register; workshop is
sponsored by the United Methodist Commisison On Relief (UMCOR) and the
Division of Continuing Education; call 777-2663 for more information.

Fri., Sept. 26 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND vs. Mankato State University, Hyslop
Sports
Center, 7 p.m.

Sat., Sept. 27 -- 18TH ANNUAL WRITERS CONFERENCE IN CHILDREN'S LITERATURE,
featured speakers will be Dian Curtis Regan, author of 40 books for young
readers; Ginger Knowlton, a literary agent with Curtis Brown, Ltd.;
Christy
Ottaviano, an editor at Henry Holt & Co.; and Jean Patrick, recipient of
the
1996 Emily Award sponsored by the UND Foundation; Chester Fritz Library;
conference registration fee is $60; contact Ursula Hovet at 777-3984 for
more
information.

Sat., Sept. 27 -- CHILDRENS THEATRE, Charlotte's Web, Chester Fritz
Auditorium, 2 p.m.

Sat., Sept. 27 -- FOOTBALL, UND at Morningside College, Sioux City, Iowa,
1:30
p.m.

Sat., Sept. 27 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND vs. St. Cloud State University, Hyslop
Sports Center, 7 p.m.

Sun., Sept. 28, through Sunday, Nov. 2 -- ART EXHIBITION, "Philippine
Diaspora
in Contemporary Art," an exhibition of 25 Filipino artists now living in
the
United States, Canada, Indonesia and the Philippines, North Dakota Museum
of
Art; several artists featured in the exhibition will give an informal
gallery
talk at 3 p.m. on opening day.

Mon., Sept. 29 -- TEST, National League for Nursing (Pharmacology), Room
200,
McCannel Hall, 10 a.m.

Mon., Sept. 29 -- GRADUATE COMMITTEE MEETING, 305 Twamley Hall, 3:05 p.m.

Mon., Sept. 29 -- LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP SERIES, "Experts in Leadership: A
Few
Good Authors," presented by Cynthia Thompson, Coordinator of Leadership
Development and Programming, Leadership Inspiration Center, third floor,
Memorial Union, 3 p.m.; sessions are free and open to the public; (series
continues every Monday through Oct. 27).

Mon., Tues. and Wed., Sept. 29-Oct. 1 -- MUSICAL, SPA "Keep the Faith,"
Chester Fritz Auditorium, 7 p.m.; all seats are $5; tickets go on sale
Monday,
Sept. 15; call 746-2411 for more information.

Mon., Sept. 29, through Fri., Oct. 10 -- ALUMNI INVITATIONAL, Gallery,
Hughes
Fine Arts Center.

Tues., Sept. 30 -- LAST DAY FOR INSTRUCTORS TO TURN IN REMOVAL OF
INCOMPLETES
FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS.

Tues., Sept. 30 -- LAST DAY TO SUBMIT A REMOVAL OF INCOMPLETE GRADE FORM
TO
THE OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS AND RECORDS FOR A CURRENTLY ENROLLED
UNDERGRADUATE
STUDENTS.

Tues., Sept. 30 -- STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY ADDRESS by President Kendall
Baker,
Ballroom, Memorial Union, 9 a.m.; refreshments will be available at 8:30
a.m.;
after the President's speech, there will be a final showing of various
flood
videos for those who may not yet have seen them.

Tues., Sept. 30 -- UNIVERSITY WITHIN THE UNIVERSITY CLASS, "A Walk Through
Employee and Employment Accommodation - ADA Policies and Procedures";
Affirmative Action Office; contact Kara at 777-2128 or
kara_hyde@mail.und.nodak.edu to register.

Tues., Sept. 30 -- COUNSELING COLLOQUIUM, 316 Montgomery Hall, 12:30 to
1:45
p.m.; topic will be announced in the University Letter.

Tues., Sept. 30 -- ENVIRONMENTAL TRAINING, "Lead Contractor Initial,"
Grand
Forks.



OCTOBER 1997

Through Fri., Oct. 10 -- ALUMNI INVITATIONAL, Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts
Center.

Wed., Oct. 1 -- HISTORY LUNCH TALK, "Doing History for NASA," presented by
Tim
Farrell, bring your lunch, if you like; call David Rowley at 777-3380 for
more
information.

Wed., Oct. 1 -- EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM, this orientation session will
present more details regarding UND's EAP program, Fred Orth Lecture Bowl,
Memorial Union, 3 to 4 p.m.

Wed., Oct. 1 -- ALL-CAMPUS VARIETY SHOW (SIOUX SEARCH), Ballroom, Memorial
Union, 7 p.m.

Wed., Oct. 1 -- FEAST AND FOCUS, "Healing Circle," a Native American Sioux
tradition based on the belief that healing can only occur in community and
not
alone; Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

Wed. through Fri., Oct. 1-3 -- ENVIRONMENTAL TRAINING, "Lead Contractor,"
(continued), Grand Forks.

Thurs., Oct. 2 -- UNIVERSITY SENATE MEETING, Room 7, Gamble Hall, 4:05
p.m.

Thurs., Oct. 2 -- GEOGRAPHY LECTURE, "Plants Across the Seas," presented
by
Dr. Clarissa Kimber, professor emeritus of Geography at Texas A&M
University,
366 Clifford Hall, noon; all are invited to attend.

Thurs., Oct. 2 -- UND CAREER FAIR, sponsored by Career Services and
Cooperative Education, Multi Purpose Gym, Hyslop Sports Center, open to
all
students and faculty between 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.; call Mark Thompson at
777-4178 for more information.

Thurs., Oct. 2 -- CELEBRATING GERMAN CULTURE with "Oktoberfest," a
celebration
of German Oktoberfest including food, music, attire, history of the event,
and
reading of the German-America Proclamation, International Centre, 2908
University Ave., 7 p.m.; all are welcome; call 777-3273 for more
informtion.

Thurs., Oct. 2 -- FAREWELL RECEPTION for Evelyn Merritt who is retiring
after
11 years of service to UND as a secretary, first for the College of
Nursing
and most recently for the Department of Philosophy and Religion; 201
Merrifield Hall, 3 to 4:30 p.m.

Thurs., Oct. 2 -- FOR WOMEN ONLY: Rites of Passage, " Honoring Self," this
program will briefly celebrate the three phases of womanhood: the maiden,
the
mother, and the crone); Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.


-------------------
Thurs. through Sat., Oct. 2-4 -- UND HOMECOMING, UND campus.
     OPEN HOUSES AND TOURS: 
     UND Aerospace: Center for Aerospaces I and II, Aerospace Training and
Research Center, Clifford Hall (Earth Systems Science Institute) and UND
Aerospace Flight Operations (Grand Forks International Airport), Friday, 9
a.m. to 4 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. to noon.
     UND Bookstore: Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday,
9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m; The Official Graduate Ring of UND now available.
     Chester Fritz Library: Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Saturday, 1 to 5
p.m.
     Wittenberg Lutheran Chapel: Thursday and Friday, 2 to 5 p.m.
     Energy and Environmental Research Center: Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
     Military Science ROTC Open House at the UND Armory: Friday, 1 to 4
p.m.,
Saturday, 9 a.m. to noon.
     J. Lloyd Stone Alumni Center: Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30
p.m., Saturday, 9 a.m. to noon.
     Ralph Engelstad Arena: Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
     Hyslop Sports Center: Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
     Chester Fritz Auditorium: Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
     Open Houses at Fraternities and Sororities: Saturday, 9 a.m. to noon.
     UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences: Friday, 10 a.m. to noon.
     Special Collections in the Chester Fritz Library: Monday, Tuesday and
Thursday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., Friday, 8 a.m. to
4:30 p.m.
     UND Aerospace Arthur P. Anderson Atmospherium Showtimes: Friday, 10
a.m.
and 1 p.m., Saturday, 11 a.m.

     THURSDAY, Oct. 2:
     8 a.m. to 5 p.m. -- Social Work Workshop and Distinguished Alumni
Award
Luncheon, Holiday Inn.
     9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. -- UND Career Fair, Multipurpose Gym, Hyslop
Sports
Center.
     Noon -- The Habitat House the UND Community Built Kick-Off Luncheon,
Christus Rex Lutheran Campus Center.
     6:30 p.m. -- UND FOUNDATION PRESIDENTS CLUB DINNER (Presidents Club,
Presidents Cabinet, UND Benefactors, and William Budge Society), 6:30 p.m.
social, 7 p.m. dinner, Ramada Inn.
     8 p.m. -- Homecoming King and Queen Coronation and Pep Rally,
Intramural
Fields, North Campus; Student Homecoming Concert/Dance to follow,
Ballroom,
Memorial Union. 
     
     FRIDAY, Oct. 3:
     8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. -- Alumni Registration and Information Desk,
second
floor, Memorial Union.
     8:30 a.m. -- Registration for UND National Alumni Leadership Council,
Fireside Lounge, Memorial Union.
     9 to 11 a.m. -- UND National Alumni Leadership Council Reverse
Mentoring, second floor, Memorial Union.
     9 a.m. to 3 p.m. -- Social Work Workshop, Holiday Inn.
     9 a.m. -- UND Aerospace Third Annual Alumni Conference, Room 210,
Clifford Hall.
     11:30 a.m. -- School of Communication Alumni Luncheon, 11:30 a.m.
social, noon luncheon, Ramada Inn; 1:30 p.m. tour of O'Kelly Hall.
     Noon -- KICK-OFF LUNCHEON, Ballroom, Memorial Union.
     Noon -- Seminar for Geology and Geological Engineering in honor of
the
1997 Arthur Gray Leonard Award Recipients, Room 100, Leonard Hall.
     1 p.m. -- Golf Outing for M.D. Class of 1987, Grand Forks Country
Club.
     1:30 to 4 p.m. -- UND National Alumni Leadership Council Sessions:
Keeping a University Viable in a Rapidly Changing World, second floor,
Memorial Union.
     2 p.m. -- Beta Theta Pi 1965-1975 Reunion Social, Westward Ho.
     2 to 4 p.m. -- Department of Mathematics (Tea and Pie), Room 325,
Witmer
Hall.
     3 p.m. -- CLASS OF 1957 CAMPUS TOUR AND TREE PLANTING CEREMONY,
Memorial
Union.
     3 to 5 p.m. -- School of Engineering and Mines Open House, Nyquist
Lounge, Upson II.
     3:30 p.m. -- Dedication of Newly Remodeled McCannel Hall (Student
Services Building), McCannel Hall.
     4 p.m. -- CLASS OF 1957 RECEPTION, Home Economics Building.
     4 p.m. -- Distinguished Alumni Lecture and Presentation of Chemistry
Scholarship Awards, Room 138, Abbott Hall.
     4 p.m. -- UND NATIONAL ALUMNI LEADERSHIP COUNCIL RECEPTION, J. Lloyd
Stone Alumni Center.
     5:30 p.m. -- Arthur Gray Leonard Award Banquet (Geology and
Geological
Engineering), 5:30 p.m. social, 6:30 p.m. dinner, Ramada Inn.
     5:30 p.m. -- 1957 Law School Banquet, 5:30 p.m. social, 6 p.m.
dinner,
Ramada Inn.
     5:30 to 8 p.m. -- Physical Therapy 30th Anniversary Social, Ramada
Inn.
     6 p.m. -- 1950s Men's Basketball Reunion, 6 p.m. social, 6:30 p.m.
dinner, Holiday Inn.
     6 p.m. -- Accounting Fall Banquet, 6 p.m. social, 7 p.m. dinner,
Ramada
Inn.
     6 p.m. -- Phi Delta Theta Alumni Banquet, 6 p.m. social, 7 p.m.
dinner/dance, Best Western Town House.
     6 p.m. -- Chemistry Department Scholarship Banquet, 6 p.m. social,
6:30
p.m. dinner, Coral Room, Ramada Inn.
     6 p.m. -- Space Studies 10-Year Actual and Virtual All-Alumni
Reunion,
Clifford Hall.
     6:30 p.m. -- SIOUX AWARDS BANQUET, 6:30 p.m. social, 7:15 p.m. dinner
and program, Westward Ho.
     6:30 p.m. -- 1987 Football Team Reunion, 6:30 p.m. social, 7 p.m.
dinner, Holiday Inn.
     7 p.m. -- Kappa Alpha Theta Social, Westward Ho.

     SATURDAY, OCT. 4:
     7 a.m. -- 10K HOMECOMING RUN/5K WALK, 7 a.m. registration, 8 a.m.
run/walk start, Engelstad Arena.
     7:30 a.m. -- Dean's Breakfast, School of Medicine and Health Sciences
Atrium.
     8 a.m. to 2 p.m. -- Alumni Registration and Information Desk, second
floor, Memorial Union.
     8 a.m. -- UND Aerospace Aviation Alumni Association Meeting and
Brunch,
Clifford Hall.
     8:30 a.m. -- Post-Graduate Review, School of Medicine and Health
Sciences.
     8:30 a.m. -- College of Nursing Alumni Brunch, 8:30 a.m. social, 9
a.m.
brunch, Holiday Inn.
     9 a.m. -- Gamma Phi Beta Alumni Breakfast, Gamma Phi Beta House.
     9 a.m. -- Passing the Torch to UND's Next Generation: Enrollment
Session, second floor, Memorial Union.
     9 a.m. -- College of Education and Human Development Brunch, 9 a.m.
social, 9:30 a.m. brunch, Ramada Inn.
     10 a.m. -- Continental Breakfast, Christus Rex Campus Center, 3012
University Ave.
     10 a.m. -- Hancock Hall 45th Anniversary Open House and Continental
Brunch, Hancock Hall.
     10:30 a.m. -- HOMECOMING PARADE, University Avenue.
     10:30 a.m. to noon -- NRHH/IHLUAC Housing Honoraries Homecoming
Reception, Swanson Hall Atrium.
     11 a.m. to 1 p.m. -- Alpha Chi Omega Alumnae Homecoming Brunch, 505
Cambridge St.
     11 a.m. -- CLASS OF 1957 REUNION LUNCHEON, 11 a.m. social, 11:30 a.m.
luncheon, Holiday Inn.
     11 a.m. -- International Centre Open House, 2908 University Ave.
     11 a.m. -- Kappa Alpha Theta Tailgate Party and House Tours, Kappa
Alpha
Theta House.
     11 a.m. -- Society of Women Engineers' Recognition Brunch, 11 a.m.
social, 11:30 a.m. brunch, Ramada Inn.
     Noon to 2 p.m. -- Physical Therapy Open House, School of Medicine and
Health Sciences.
     Noon to 2 p.m. -- M.D. Class of 1987 Tent Picnic, West side of
Memorial
Stadium.
     Noon -- PRESIDENT'S LUNCHEON, Ballroom, Memorial Union.
     Noon -- All Letterwinners' Tailgate Party, west side of Memorial
Stadium.
     Noon -- 1950s Men's Basketball Teams' Tailgate Party, west side of
Memorial Stadium.
     Noon -- 1987 Football Team Tailgate Party, west side of Memorial
Stadium.
     2 p.m. -- HOMECOMING FOOTBALL GAME, UND vs. Nebraska-Omaha, Memorial
Stadium.
     5 p.m. -- Geography Homecoming Reception, third floor lobby, Clifford
Hall.
     5 p.m. -- UND Aerospace All-Alumni Social, Best Western Town House.
     5:30 p.m. -- CLASS OF 1972 RECEPTION, J. Lloyd Stone Alumni Center.
     6 p.m. -- Physical Therapy 30th Anniversary Banquet, 6 p.m. social, 7
p.m. dinner, Ramada Inn.
     6 p.m. -- Alpha Tau Omega Alumni Banquet, 6 p.m. social, 7 p.m.
dinner
and dance, Holiday Inn.
     6 p.m. -- Kappa Alpha Theta All Class Reunion, 6 p.m. social, 7 p.m.
dinner, Westward Ho.
     6 p.m. -- Delta Tau Delta Alumni Banquet and Dance, 6 p.m. social, 7
p.m. dinner, Comfort Inn, East Grand Forks, Minn.
     6 p.m. -- Varsity Bards 45th Anniversary Banquet, 6 p.m. social, 6:30
p.m. dinner, Ramada Inn.
     6 p.m. -- Wilderness Pilots' Association 10 Year Reunion, 6 p.m.
social,
7 p.m. dinner, Best Western Town House.
     6 p.m. -- Social for M.D. Class of 1987, Coral Room, Ramada Inn.
     6:30 p.m. -- School of Medicine and Health Sciences All-Alumni
Banquet,
6:30 p.m. social, 7:30 p.m. dinner, Ramada Inn.
     6:30 p.m. -- Beta Theta Pi 75th Anniversary Banquet, 6:30 p.m.
social,
7:30 p.m. dinner, Westward Ho.
     6:30 p.m. -- Kappa Sigma Alumni Banquet and Dance, 6:30 p.m. social,
7:30 p.m. dinner, Westward Ho.
     6:30 p.m. -- Kappa Sigma Alumni Banquet and Dance, 6:30 p.m. social,
7:30 p.m. dinner, Holiday Inn.
     8 p.m. to 1 a.m. -- UND HOMECOMING PARTY, featuring Dick King and the
Classic Swing Band (8 to 9:15 p.m.) and the Fantastic Convertibles (9:30
to 1
a.m.), Civic Auditorium, 615 1st Ave. N; advance tickets can be purchased
for
$5 by calling the UND Alumni Association at 777-2611; no reservations are
needed.

     SUNDAY, OCT. 5:
     Morning Church Services with student congregations: 
Wittenberg Lutheran Chapel: 9:30 a.m. Bible Study, 10:30 a.m. Divine
Service.
Christus Rex Lutheran Campus Center: 10 a.m. muffins and juices served,
10:30
a.m. worship, noon dinner (no reservations needed).
St. Thomas Aquinas Newman Center: Sunday masses at 9:30 a.m., 11 a.m., and
4:45 p.m., location to be announced.
---------------

Fri., Oct. 3 -- ALUMNI LEADERSHIP COUNCIL MEETING, "The Future of
Education:
Expanding With the Outside World," Memorial Union; continental breakfast
and
registration at 8:30 a.m. in the Fireside Lounge; at 9 a.m. in the Fred
Orth
Lecture Bowl, UND Foundation Executive Vice President Earl Strinden and
President Kendall Baker will give opening remarks, followed by "NALC in
Action," a review of this year's alumni partnerships with faculty,
students
and staff. Larry Isaak, North Dakota University System chancellor, will
give
the morning keynote address, "An Overview of Higher Education in North
Dakota," followed by a panel-and-audience partipation of various topics.
The
kick-off luncheon will be in the Memorial Union Ballroom at noon with
Wally
Griffin, executive vice chair of the Jones Education Company, as the
keynote
speaker (tickets are $12.50).; call 777-2611 or e-mail
larter@badlands.nodak.edu for more information.

Fri., Oct. 3 -- MEETING, Institutional Review Board, 305 Twamley Hall, 4
p.m.,
to consider all research proposals submitted before Sept. 23.

Fri., Oct. 3 -- HOMECOMING CONTINUING LEGAL EDUCATION SEMINAR, "The
Protection
of Individual Rights and Business Interests in Indian Tribal Courts,"
Baker
Court Room, School of Law; contact Continuing Education at 777-2663 for
more
information.

Fri., Oct. 3 -- McCANNEL HALL DEDICATION, in front of McCannel Hall, 3:30
p.m.
(in the lobby, if the weather is inclement); everyone is welcome to
attend; a
reception and tours will follow the ceremony.

Fri., Oct. 3 -- OPEN HOUSE, the Regional Weather Information Center will
hold
a Fifth Anniversary Open House, 257 CAS I, 2 to 4 p.m.; please join us.

Fri., Oct. 3 -- INTERNATIONAL COF-TEA CUP, an opportunity for UND
students,
faculty, staff, and the Greater Grand Forks community to enjoy
international
tea, coffee, and pastry while discussing world issues, International
Centre,
2908 University Ave., 3 to 4:30 p.m.; all are welcome; call 777-3273 for
more
information.

Fri., Oct. 3 -- CRAFT CENTER WORKSHOP, "Puzzle Piece Snowman" pin and
"Clothespin Snowman" ornament; call 777-3979 to register; holiday
mini-craft
workshops will be held each Friday from noon to 1 p.m. in the Craft
Center,
Memorial Union.

Fri., Oct. 3 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND at University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha,
Neb., 7 p.m.

Sat., Oct. 4 -- TEST, Dental Admission Test (DAT), Room 114, Witmer Hall,
8
a.m.

Sat., Oct. 4 -- TEST, Law School Admission Test (LSAT), Room 7, Gamble
Hall,
8:30 a.m.

Sat., Oct. 4 -- INTERNATIONAL CENTRE HOMECOMING OPEN HOUSE following the
parade, International entertainment and food, celebration of alumni, and
tour
of the new facility, 2908 University Ave.; all are welcome.

Sat., Oct. 4 -- FOOTBALL, UND vs. University of Nebraska-Omaha
(HOMECOMING),
Memorial Stadium, 2 p.m.

Sat., Oct. 4 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND at University of Northern Colorado,
Greeley,
Colo., 7:30 p.m.

Mon., Oct. 6 -- LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP SERIES, "Leadership Through Tough
Times,"
presented by Earl Strinden, Executive Vice President, Alumni Association
and
UND Foundation, Leadership Inspiration Center, third floor, Memorial
Union, 3
p.m.; sessions are free and open to the public; (series continues every
Monday
through Oct. 27).

Mon., Oct. 6 -- UNIVERSITY WITHIN THE UNIVERSITY CLASS, "Power Point 1,"
Instructional and Learning Technologies, 8 Sayre Hall; contact Lynn at
777-4150 to register (also Thurs., Oct. 16).

Mon., Oct. 6 -- MUSICAL THEATRE, Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dream
Coat, Chester Fritz Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

Mon. through Fri., Oct. 6-10 -- UNIVERSITY WITHIN THE UNIVERSITY CLASS,
"Hazardous Materials, course #2942," Safety and Environmental Institute;
contact Norma at 777-3341 to register.

Mon. through Fri., Oct. 6-10 -- ENVIRONMENTAL TRAINING, "24/40 Hour
Hazwoper
Course," Grand Forks.

Tues., Oct. 7 -- COUNSELING COLLOQUIUM, 316 Montgomery Hall, 12:30 to 1:45
p.m.; topic will be announced in the University Letter.

Tues., Oct. 7 -- "ON TEACHING" LUNCH SESSION, "Using the Internet to
Enrich a
Course: A Demonstration," with Bette Olson (Nursing) as the facilitator;
Fred
Orth Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, noon (no food is permitted in this
room);
call 777-3325 to register.

Tues., Oct. 7 -- UNIVERSITY WITHIN THE UNIVERSITY CLASS, "Power Point 2,"
Instructional and Learning Technologies, 8 Sayre Hall; contact Lynn at
777-4150 to register (also Mon., Oct. 20).

Tues., Oct. 7 -- UNIVERSITY WITHIN THE UNIVERSITY CLASS, Supervisory
Series,
"You As a Manager"; attend six one-half day sessions; Office of Personnel
Management; contact Kara at 777-2128 or kara_hyde@mail.und.nodak.edu to
register; also Oct. 14, 21, 28, Nov. 4 and 18.

Tues., Oct. 7 -- CONCERT, Kathy Mattea, Chester Fritz Auditorium, 7:30
p.m.

Tues., Oct. 7 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND at North Dakota State University, Fargo,
N.D., 7 p.m.
*******


REMINDER! The attachments referred to are not included in the electronic
form of the University Letter. However, you will find the attachments
with the paper copy.
  
UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and
distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is
also available electronically through UNDInfo, the University's menu
system on the Internet. The address is http://www.und.nodak.edu.
  
All articles submitted for publication should be labeled "University
Letter" and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic
submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu. Attachments to
University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number.
University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations,
Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.
  
UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.
  
*******


  




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