[University Letter logo]

University Letter

September 5, 1997

Volume 35 No. 3



UNIVERSITY LETTER
University of North Dakota at Grand Forks
Vol. 35, Number 3, September 5, 1997

UNIVERSITY LETTER IS ALSO AVAILABLE ELECTRONICALLY in the Events and News
section of UNDInfo, the University's menu system on the Internet. The
address
is: http://www.und.nodak.edu

The University Relations Office maintains an index for the University
Letter.

************************
          TABLE OF CONTENTS

Directory Information Forms Distributed
     EVENTS TO NOTE
Graduate Committee Will Meet Sept. 8
OID Announces First Of "On Teaching" Sessions
"Lessons At Lunch" Series Begins
Lecturer Will Discuss Surgeon General's Report
First LEEPS Lecture Set For Sept. 11
Program Will Offer Immunization Update
Computer Science Colloquium Series Slated
Lecturer Will Discuss Media
45th Annual Communication Day Set
Disaster Expert Will Speak At Communication Day
Medical School Promotes In-State Practice
Library To Hold Annual Book Sale And Open House
Reception Will Honor Tom Robinson
Hepatitis Diagnosis Program Set
Garrison Keillor Performance Rescheduled
Diabetes Program Will Be Broadcast
     OF ACADEMIC INTEREST
Regulated Waste Policy Detailed
Nominations Sought For Graduate Faculty
Teaching Newsletter Available At Subsidized Rate
Doctoral Exam Set For Kapphahn
     GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS
NSF EPSCoR Seeks Grant Preproposals
Research, Grant Opportunities Listed
     BILLBOARD
Computer Dialin Procedures Changed
Departments, Student Organizations Invited To Place Information Online
Nominations Sought For ADA Committee
Free Counseling Offered
University Letter Survey Results Tallied
Defensive Driving Course Offered
     ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT
Women's Center Lists Events
Indonesian Percussion Group To Perform At Museum
Museum Coffee Bar Serves Lunch
Learn French At Walhalla
     CALENDAR OF EVENTS
************************

DIRECTORY INFORMATION FORMS DISTRIBUTED

Wednesday, Sept. 10, is the deadline for returning 1997-98 Directory
Information Forms to the President's Office. The forms were distributed
last
week. The form lists each person's information as it appeared in last
year's
directory. If you do not receive a form or your name did not appear in
last
year's directory, use the form attached to this week's University Letter.
Departments and areas are asked to make additional copies as needed to add
new
persons. EACH FORM MUST BE RETURNED. Home addresses and telephone numbers
will
not be used in the electronic directory. For more information contact
Mavis at
the Office of University Relations at 777-4304 or by e-mail to
mavis_ness@mail.und.nodak.edu. -- Jim Penwarden, Director, Office of
University Relations.
*******


EVENTS TO NOTE

GRADUATE COMMITTEE WILL MEET SEPT. 8

The Graduate Committee will meet Monday, Sept. 8, from 3:05 to 6 p.m in
305
Twamley Hall.  The agenda will include:

1. Consideration of a request by the Microbiology and Immunology
Department to
change the course description for Mbio 504, Microbial Physiology.

2.  Consideration of a request by the Geology Department to give graduate
credit for GEOL 425, Design Hydrology for Wetlands.

3.  Consideration of a request by the Civil Engineering Department to
change
the credits for CE 523, Applied Hydraulics, to "3, repeatable to 9."

4.  Review of the subcommittee's report on the Clinical Laboratory Science
graduate program.

5.  Review of the subcommittee's report on the History graduate program.

6.  Review of the subcommittee's report on the Physics graduate program.

7.  Matters arising.
-- Harvey Knull, Dean, Graduate School.
*******

OID ANNOUNCES FIRST OF "ON TEACHING" SESSIONS

The first session of the "On Teaching" box lunch sessions is scheduled for
Tuesday, Sept. 9, at noon in the Memorial Room of the Union. The session
is
titled, "Keeping the Lecture Alive and Lively," and will feature Ron Pynn
(Political Science), Bev Uhlenberg (Teaching and Learning), and Frank
White
(Sociology). To reserve a complimentary box lunch, please phone the Office
of
Instructional Development, 777-3325, no later than noon Tuesday, Sept. 2.
--
Dan Rice, Director of Instructional Development.
*******

"LESSONS AT LUNCH" SERIES BEGINS

A new series, sponsored by the Leadership Inspiration Center at the
Memorial
Union, and offered for the first time during the summer session, is being
offered again this fall for staff, faculty, and students at the University
of
North Dakota. 

"Lessons at Lunch" is a collection of eight fun and informative sessions
on
various topics, including etiquette, car care, and dressing well on a
budget. 
All sessions will be held from noon to 1 p.m. on alternate Wednesdays
beginning Sept. 10, and all sessions (except for Sept. 24) will be held in
the
Leadership Inspiration Center, located on the third floor of the Memorial
Union.  

Attached is a complete schedule of the series. All sessions are free,
although
registration is limited and on a first-come, first-serve basis. Call
777-3926
to register for any or all of the sessions. Please feel free to bring your
lunch, as it is not provided.  (Note: No food is allowed in Upson II).
Call
Cynthia at 777-4076 for more information. -- Cynthia Thompson, Coordinator
of
Leadership Development and Programming.
*******

LECTURER WILL DISCUSS SURGEON GENERAL'S REPORT

Carl Foster, Director of the Milwaukee Heart Institute, will present a
lecture
on the Surgeon General's Report on Physical Activity and Health Thursday,
Sept. 11, from noon to 1 p.m. in the Reed Keller Auditorium (Room 1350),
Wold
Bio-Information Learning Resource Center, Health Sciences Building. All
faculty, staff and students are welcome to attend. -- Serge von Duvillard,
Director of the Human Performance Laboratory, Kinesiology, 777-4351.
*******

FIRST LEEPS LECTURE SET FOR SEPT. 11

A LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary Sciences) Lecture will be
presented by Philip Bennett, University of Texas, Austin, at noon
Thursday,
Sept. 11, in the Leonard Hall Lecture Bowl (Room 100). Dr. Bennett is the
1997
Henry Darcy Lecturer, and will present "Water Microbes and Rocks: The
Geochemical Ecology of Contaminated Ground Water."

Funding for Dr. Bennett's visit to UND is provided through the Darcy
Lecture
Series of the National Ground Water Association and the Association of
Ground
Water Scientists and Engineers.

The LEEPS Lecture Series is supported by the Department of Geology and
Geological Engineering, Office of Research and Program Development and the
Advancing Science Excellence in North Dakota (ASEND) Program. All
interested
persons are welcome to attend. For additional information contact me. --
Scott
Korom, Geology and Geological Engineering.
*******

PROGRAM WILL OFFER IMMUNIZATION UPDATE

Immunization Update 1997, a live interactive program, will be held from
noon
to 2:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 11, in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. It
will
provide updates on new vaccines and vaccine combinations; polio vaccine
and
global eradication; rotavirus vaccine; new recommendations from the
Advisory
Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) for measles, hepatitis B,
pneumococcal, and influenza vaccines; and why and how to assess the
immunization levels in your practice. The program will be taught by
William
Atkinson and is sponsored by the Center for Disease Control (CDC);
continuing
education credit is available. The registration fee is $5. Contact the
Grand
Forks Public Health Department at 746-2525 to register. -- Liz Tyree,
Chair,
Family and Community Nursing.
*******

COMPUTER SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM SERIES SLATED

The University community is invited to attend the Computer Science
Colloquium
Series.  This year we will begin with a presentation by Henry Hexmoor on
"BotWorld: A Cognitively Engineered Multi-agent Environment," at 4 p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 11, in 106 CAS II.

Our work in multi-agent organizations focuses on methods for adaptation,
learning, and interfaces for interactions between human and computer
agents. 
Successful performance in such an organization relies on dynamic selection
of
cognitively appropriate interfaces, supplemented by routines, habits, and
skills.  Performance is further enhanced by mechanisms for timely sharing
and
exchange of information and instructional information exchange. 

Shortcomings exist in multi-agent organizations with central control of
information flow and explicit adaptations. Likewise, highly individualized
information sharing strategies and adaptations also produce less desirable
results. Individuals cannot often sense and act in globally optimal ways.
We
have adopted an approach utilizing a common architecture for a population
of
agents (Bots) that interact with each other and with human agents inside a
common environment that we call BotWorld.  Our agent architecture models
both
cognitive abilities of reasoning and maintaining knowledge as well as
mental
states and sub-cognitive processes involved in perceptual and motor
learning. 
Within this environment, communication mediator agents (CommBots)
facilitate
adaptive and timely dissemination of information about other agents and
the
data. We will present arguments for our approach to agent architecture
design
and inter-agent information sharing.   

The CS Colloquium Series presents a range of topics related to computing.
The
focus is on current research activities here at UND and beyond. The
Colloquium
takes place every other Thursday at 4 p.m., usually in 106 CAS II.

Faculty at UND are invited to present their research at the CS colloquium.
Appropriate subject matter is research involving technology, cognitive
science, computing, robotics, computer science, or other related fields.
If
you would like to give a colloquium, please contact me at
maxwell@cs.und.edu
to schedule a time. -- Bruce Maxwell, Computer Science.
*******

LECTURER WILL DISCUSS MEDIA

Mercedes Lynn de Uriarte will present "The Gerber Baby Heads South --
Constructed Identity Across the Century," from 2 to 3:15 p.m. Thursday,
Sept.
11, in 334 O'Kelly Hall. Her talk will consist of an interdisciplinary,
slide-illustrated exploration of the history and sociology of media as a
constructor
of identity, including both exported and domestic examples of cultural
illiteracy, ethnocentrism and censorship by exclusion. Beginning with the
late
1880s replacement of the western frontier by a commercial frontier, U.S.
print
media began addressing Latinos with mixed messages. On the one hand, they
wanted their business; on the other hand, they sometimes assigned them a
civic
position as outsiders.

The "Hispanic market," touted throughout the 1980s, continues the same
errors
begun when the "Mexican market" was addressed at the close of the 19th
century
with many of the same results, including imitation.

An Associate Professor of Journalism and Latin American Studies at the
University of Texas, Austin, de Uriarte is currently completing a book on
diversifying the news product. She received her Ph.D. and M.A. in American
Studies from Yale University. She has two B.A. degrees, one in American
Studies and one in Comparative Literature, from California State
University,
Fullerton. Raised in Mexico, she is bilingual and bicultural.

She worked for eight years at the Los Angeles Times as an assistant editor
of
the Opinion section. Assigned to open the editorial pages to commentary on
Latin American, U.S. Latino and minority issues, she held the highest
position
then by a Latina in mainstream journalism. She now writes a regularly
syndicated column distributed by Knight-Ridder and free-lance both on
international and on multicultural issues.

De Uriarte has served as a journalism education diversity consultant for
the
Ford Foundation and as a consultant on diversification of the news product
for
the Austin-American Statesman and other newsrooms. On matters related to
coverage of under-represented populations, she has also served as
consultant,
moderator and panelist to PBS, CBS and ABC affiliates in Texas.

At the University of Texas, she developed the first course in the nation
to
teach non-minority journalism students how to cover under-represented
communities. She also created a classroom laboratory publication, Tejas,
covering these issues. A special series in Tejas won the 1996 Robert R.
Kennedy Memorial Award for Outstanding Journalism. At the graduate level
she
teaches the sociology of media and research and analysis of international
and
third world media issues.

De Uriarte is a presenter at Communication Day, Friday, Sept. 12. Her talk
is
presented in conjunction with the School of Communication's course,
Communication and Diversity. Call me at 777-2670 for information. -- Lucy
Ganje, School of Communication.
*******

45TH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION DAY SET

The School of Communication's 45th Annual Communication Day Friday, Sept.
12,
in the UND Memorial Union, will bring together leading journalists from
North
Dakota, Minnesota and Manitoba to tell how they covered the 1997 Red River
Valley Flood, and also will bring together public relations practitioners
to
talk about the task of communicating in a crisis.

The day starts with registration at 10 a.m. and a panel on disaster
research,
"The Social Construction of a Disaster," at 10:30 a.m. in the Lecture
Bowl.
The panel will be moderated by Lana Rakow (Communication).

A kickoff lunch starts at noon in the River Valley Room and will be
followed
by the keynote address and question session featuring Dennis Wenger of
Texas
A&M University's Hazard Reduction and Recovery Center. Wenger is an
international expert on hazard and disaster relief. He has observed and
written about the role of communication in disasters around the globe. Dr.
Mercedes de Uriarte of the University of Texas will discuss the issues of
audience responses to hazard and disaster reporting and public
information.

Two concurrent panels, "Broadcasting in a Disaster," moderated by Raul
Tovares
(Communication), and "Analyzing Newspaper Coverage of the Red River Valley
Flood," will start at 2 p.m. The newspaper panel will include Nick Hirst,
editor, Winnipeg Free-Press; Joe Dill, The Forum of Fargo; Jim Durkin,
managing editor and maestro, The Grand Forks Herald; and Chuck Haga,
reporter
for the Minneapolis Star-Tribune. The panel is moderated by Richard Shafer
(Communication).

Two other concurrent panels, "Disaster Coverage of Minority Communities"
and
"Public Relations: Communicating in a Crisis," will start at 3:30 p.m. The
"Disaster Coverage of Minority Communities" panel will include Dr. Uriarte
and
Michele Kozel, Grand Forks Herald columnist, and will be moderated by Lucy
Ganje (Communication). The "Public Relations: Communicating in a Crisis"
panel
will bring together public relations practitioners to talk about the task
of
communicating in a crisis, especially one involving a 500-year flood, and
will
include, among others, Lt. Byron Sieber, Grand Forks Emergency Operations
Center spokesman; Angel Santiago, Public Affairs Officer, FEMA (Federal
Emergency Management Agency); Becky Koch, North Dakota State University
Extension Service Information Specialist; and will be moderated by Peter
Johnson (University Relations Coordinator and Communication). The public
relations panel is co-sponsored by North Dakota Professional
Communicators.

-- Richard Shafer, School of Communication.
*******

DISASTER EXPERT WILL SPEAK AT COMMUNICATION DAY

Dennis Wenger, senior scholar at Texas A&M University's Hazard Reduction
and
Recovery Center (HRRC), will give a keynote luncheon address as part of
the
School of Communication's annual Communication Day Friday, Sept. 12. The
address will look at how communities around the world have dealt with
disasters of the same magnitude as the Red River Valley Flood of 1997.

The Hazard Reduction and Recovery Center of Texas is one of 20 such hazard
and
disaster research centers in the United States, and one of the largest
with
over 60 researchers and support staff. The HRRC collaborates with the
United
Nations on assessing hazards and disasters worldwide.

According to Wenger, the HRRC studies the full range of technological and
natural disasters, involving floods, hurricanes, earthquakes, tornadoes,
and
drought. Research is directed to reduce the vulnerability of communities
tonatural and technological hazards by enhancing mitigation and
preparedness
activities. Such research, according to Wenger, can help communities like
the
Red River Valley recover by improving response and long-range recovery
activities.

Mercedes Lynn de Uriarte, an associate professor of Journalism, American
Studies and Latin American Studies at the University of Texas and a Yale
Ph.D., brings bilingual and bicultural insight to her work as
Communication
Day guest speaker. Mercedes was born and raised in Mexico.

Working nearly a decade for the Los Angeles Times, she held the highest
position by a Latino in mainstream journalism as assistant editor of the
Opinion section. As feature writer, she covered urban affairs, social
demographics, cultural patterns and community economics in Southern
California.

Mercedes developed the first course in the nation, winning the 1996 Robert
R.
Kennedy Memorial Award, to teach non-minority journalism students how to
cover
under-represented communities.

-- Richard Shafer, School of Communication.
*******

MEDICAL SCHOOL PROMOTES IN-STATE PRACTICE

The School of Medicine and Health Sciences will hold "Practice
Opportunities
in North Dakota," Friday, Sept. 12, at the Fargo Ramada Inn Plaza Suites
and
Conference Center, an event designed to encourage medical students and
residents-in-training to consider establishing their practices in North
Dakota. The base for the medical school's southeast campus is the site for
extensive training of medical students and residents, but students and
residents from the school's other three campuses in Grand Forks, Minot and
Bismarck, also are invited to participate.

The annual gathering brings together the school's third- and fourth-year
medical students and physician-residents, as well as their spouses, to
meet
representatives of North Dakota health care facilities. They may discuss
opportunities in communities where they may wish to establish their
practices
after completing training.

Leaders of health care facilities from throughout the state are invited to
participate by setting up booth exhibits which promote their facilities
and
home communities. -- Mary Amundson, Center for Rural Health.
*******

LIBRARY TO HOLD ANNUAL BOOK SALE AND OPEN HOUSE

The Chester Fritz Library will hold its annual book sale Wednesday, Sept.
17,
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. outside in front of the Library facing University
Avenue. In case of rain, the sale will be held Sept. 24. The Library is
accepting donations for the book sale at this time. Please contact Cynthia
Shabb at 777-4623 if you would like to donate books, journals, records, or
tapes for the sale. Donations need to be in to the Chester Fritz Library
by
Friday, Sept. 12. Free parking will be available at the Chester Fritz
Auditorium for those individuals not affiliated with UND. A free shuttle
service will be provided from the Auditorium to the Chester Fritz Library
from
9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

On Thursday, Sept. 18, there will be an Open House at the Chester Fritz
Library from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. to showcase services. Tours will be offered
and
entertainment is planned. -- Cynthia Shabb, Chief Bibliographer, Chester
Fritz
Library.
*******

RECEPTION WILL HONOR TOM ROBINSON

The Department of Mathematics will host a reception for Tom Robinson
Wednesday, Sept. 17, from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. at the Alumni Center. Dr.
Robinson
has been a faculty member of the department and the University since 1958
and
is retiring this year. Please join us to wish him will in future pursuits.
Everyone is welcome. -- Bruce Dearden, Mathematics.
*******

HEPATITIS DIAGNOSIS PROGRAM SET

"Hepatitis C Diagnosis, Clinical Management, and Prevention," a live
satellite
teleconference, will be held Saturday, Nov. 22, from 1 to 3 p.m., in the
Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. The registration fee is $25. Deadline for
registration with the Hepatitis Foundation International (HFI) is Nov. 1.
The
Center for Disease Control and the Public Health Training Network are
co-sponsors, and the Grand Forks Health Department is co-hosting the
program with
UND. Registration forms are available from me. -- Liz Tyree, College of
Nursing, 777-4522.
*******

GARRISON KEILLOR PERFORMANCE RESCHEDULED

Over a thousand patient Garrison Keillor fans and supporters of UND's
North
Dakota Quarterly are finally getting the word they have been waiting for.
Garrison Keillor, writer, humorist and star of National Public Radio's "A
Prairie Home Companion," will visit Grand Forks this fall to join his good
friend, Roland Flint, in a benefit performance for the state's oldest
literary
journal.

NDQ has just announced that the new date for the performance
at UND's Chester Fritz Auditorium is 7 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 2. The
announcement
could not come at a better time for the Quarterly.  The 75-year-old
journal
hit hard times two years ago when cutbacks in the higher education budget
left
it without university support. That spring, Roland Flint, a former North
Dakota native who has since been named poet laureate of Maryland, was in
Grand
Forks to accept an honorary doctorate from the University of North Dakota.
Keillor, a good friend, had arrived in Grand Forks to watch Flint receive
his
award.

Flint's concern for the journal's plight -- he is a long-time fan whose
poems
have appeared in the Quarterly -- led him to join forces with Keillor to
plan
a benefit performance.

Their show of humor, poetry and reminiscence has been warmly received in
Baltimore and other cities where they have performed together. The event
will
take on special significance in Grand Forks, however, where
record-breaking
floods and a citywide evacuation forced the postponement of last spring's
performance.

As the summer months rolled on, only a few ticket holders asked for
refunds;
most took it on faith that eventually Keillor and Flint would fulfill
their
promise. Yet work on a new book and a busy summer touring schedule made
rescheduling seem nearly impossible. Sadly, the staff of the Quarterly
prepared to return thousands of dollars in advance ticket sales that had
earlier appeared to ensure the journal's survival. It was beginning to
look
like another flood casualty.

Today, there is rejoicing in the tiny lower level offices of  North Dakota
Quarterly. In the next few days, thousands of letters will go out to
current
and prospective ticket holders inviting them to return to the Fritz on
Nov. 4
to enjoy an evening of poetry and laughter and, of course, to subscribe to
North Dakota's oldest and best-loved literary journal.

For information about the Keillor/Flint Performance, contact 
Janna Mostad, UND Alumni Association and Foundation, 777-2611,  FAX:
701-777-4859, or e-mail jmostad@prairie.nodak.edu.

For information about North Dakota Quarterly contact Jenny Ettling,
Business
Manager, North Dakota Quarterly, 787-6087  (phone and fax), or e-mail to
ndq@sage.und.nodak.edu.

To order tickets call the Chester Fritz Auditorium Box Office at
777-4090 or 1-800-375-4068.

-- Robert Lewis, Editor, North Dakota Quarterly. 
*******

DIABETES PROGRAM WILL BE BROADCAST

"Diabetes: Control is Prevention," a live Center for Disease Control (CDC)
satellite broadcast, will be held Thursday, Oct. 30, from noon to 2 p.m.
in
the Lecture Bowl of the Memorial Union.  The North Dakota Diabetes Control
Project, coordinated by Darian Schaubert, is a co-sponsor of the program. 
Each registrant will receive a participation packet.  Register by calling
the
Grand Forks Health Department at 746-2525. -- Liz Tyree, College of
Nursing. 
*******


OF ACADEMIC INTEREST

REGULATED WASTE POLICY DETAILED

To ensure that "regulated waste" is disposed of properly, the
Institutional
Biosafety Committee requires that all members of the University community
who
generate regulated waste have in place a disposal plan which is in
conformity
with federal regulations. Regulated waste as defined by the federal
government
includes, but is not limited to, human body fluids and tissues and items
contaminated with human body fluids or tissues such as needles, syringes,
and
scalpels, whether generated during medical procedures, research or
teaching.
Anyone who is generating regulated waste within the University who does
not
have a disposal plan in place or is unsure whether regulated waste is
being
generated by their activities or is being disposed of properly  must
contact
the Safety Office at 777-3341. -- Barry Milavetz, Chair Institutional
Biosafety Committee.
*******

NOMINATIONS SOUGHT FOR GRADUATE FACULTY

The Graduate School has issued the semi-annual call for nominations for
membership on the Graduate Faculty. A memorandum detailing the process,
and
including a copy of the nomination form, has been sent to the chairperson
of
each department/program offering a graduate degree. The deadline for
nominations to be received in the Graduate School is Monday, Sept. 8.
Final
action on the nominations is scheduled to be completed by Oct. 1. --
Harvey
Knull, Dean, Graduate School.
*******

TEACHING NEWSLETTER AVAILABLE AT SUBSIDIZED RATE

Faculty and departments may subscribe to the newsletter, "The Teaching
Professor," at a subsidized rate of $23 per year by contacting the Office
of
Instructional Development, (777-3325 or intracampus mail box 7104) by
Friday,
Sept. 5. This is an excellent monthly newsletter which focuses on teaching
issues in higher education. -- Dan Rice, Director of Instructional
Development.
*******

DOCTORAL EXAM SET FOR KAPPHAHN

The final examination for Mark A. Kapphahn, a candidate for the Ph.D.
degree
with a major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, is set for 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 17, in 1360 School of Medicine. The dissertation title is
"Determinants in the Carboxyl Terminus of the Type I-Alpha Regulatory
Sunbunit
of Camp-Dependent Protein Kinase That Influence Cyclic Nucleotide
Binding."
John Shabb (Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) is the committee chair.

Members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend. -- Harvey Knull,
Dean,
Graduate School.
*******


GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

NSF EPSCoR SEEKS GRANT PREPROPOSALS

The National Science Foundation is seeking grant preproposals by noon
Monday,
Oct. 6. Following are some questions and answers about the procedure.

1. What are NSF EPSCoR grants? (formerly called EPSCoR Standard
Grants-ESGs)
EPSCoR grants are non-renewable grants with 24-month duration and $500,000
maximum award amount. NSF anticipates awarding 10 to 15 EPSCoR grants
totaling
approximately $5.0 million during any fiscal year.

2. What are some of the characteristics of successful NSF EPSCoR grant
preproposals?

* Innovative science and technology projects that have great potential to
be
self-sustaining with a one-time investment

* Projects that cannot be initiated or supported through the regular NSF
grant
programs

* Focused on research and development linkages with industry in science
and
technology areas critical to technological developments in the state

* Focused on areas dealing with technology transfer

* Projects that link institutions or regions to develop significant
science
and technology capabilities

* Large-scale cooperative projects that develop an area to the level where
it
becomes competitive for a major NSF grant

3. What NSF EPSCoR grants have been awarded to North Dakota?
North Dakota has received three NSF EPSCoR grants:

* Resonance Raman Spectrometer (Polymers and Coatings, NDSU, $200,000
[1995])

* High Speed Computing (Computer Science, NDSU, $470,000 [1995-96])

* Great Plains Networking for Earth Systems Science (North Dakota in
partnership with five other Great Plains EPSCoR states, [1997])

4. What kinds of initiatives are discouraged?

* Projects that can compete for funding under regular NSF grant programs

* Workshops, seminars and training programs

* Educational projects normally funded through DUE/EHR

* Clinical, medical or disease related projects that are not within the
purview of NSF

* Single investigator basic research projects

5. What are the requirements for an NSF EPSCoR grant preproposal?

* A completed NSF cover sheet (Form 1207). It is important to identify the
relevant NSF Research Division(s)/Program Code abbreviation(s) on the
cover
sheet. These are listed in the Grant Proposal Guide (NSF 95-27).

* A 200 word summary of the proposed project

* A five (5) page "Project Description" section that describes: "(1) the
proposed activity; (2) the plan to obtain sustaining non-EPSCoR support,
including programmatic milestones and a timetable for meeting project
objectives; and (3) the project's relationship to state or institutional
R&D
objectives. Proposals that do not conform to these guidelines will not be
accepted for review." This section includes text and any visual materials.

* Year 1, Year 2, and Cumulative budgets prepared on the EPSCoR Budget
Form
(available from either North Dakota EPSCoR office)

* A budget justification

* Format and font size for the preproposal needs to adhere to NSF
guidelines.
See directions on page 3 of the Grant Proposal Guide, NSF 95-27, available
in
your institution's research office and on the World Wide Web by accessing:
http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/1997/nsf9751/nsf9751.htm

6. What about the budget, matching dollars, and official signatures?

* Submit Year 1, Year 2, and Cumulative budgets prepared on the EPSCoR
budget
form. Include a budget justification

* Although matching is not required, projects with
institutional/state/private
sector hard-dollar matches may influence external reviewers. It is the
PI's
responsibility to negotiate such matches with departmental chairs or
deans. An
accompanying letter from the appropriate administrator acknowledging the
match
is prudent to avoid future misunderstandings. If your preproposal is
selected
for submittal to NSF, the budget will be reviewed and signatures requested
at
that time.

7. How will ND EPSCoR select the two or three preproposals submitted to
NSF
EPSCoR?

* ND EPSCoR will select two or three preproposals for submittal to NSF
EPSCoR
through a merit review process. ND EPSCoR will submit North Dakota
preproposals by FASTLANE to the NSF EPSCoR office by 5 p.m. Oct. 14.

8. What happens if a North Dakota preproposal is selected?

* Based on reviewer comments, the PI may need to make narrative and budget
revisions before a selected preproposal is submitted to NSF.

* Before a selected preproposal is submitted to NSF, the PI will need to
obtain institutional sign-offs on the proposal and budget.

* NSF EPSCoR will conduct a review of preproposals submitted by EPSCoR
states
and then invite those states with meritorious proposals to submit a full
proposal by Feb. 17, 1998.

* If NSF awards the full proposal, the expected start date is Oct. 1,
1998.

9. Where can I get more information?

* On the World Wide Web by accessing these sites:

http://www.nsf.gov/
http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/EPSCOR/start.htm
http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/1997/nsf9751/nsf9751.htm
http://www.ndsu.nodak.edu/epscor/

-- Philip Boudjek, ND EPSCoR, Fargo.
*******

RESEARCH, GRANT OPPORTUNITIES LISTED

Following are research and grant opportunities. For more information,
contact
Research and Program Development at 777-4278.

INSTITUTE OF INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERS

The Institute supports the following awards for students who wish to
pursue an
industrial engineering education.  United Parcel Service Scholarship for
Minority Students; United Parcel Service Scholarship for Female Students;
the
Gilbreth Memorial Fellowship and the E. J. Sierleja Memorial Fellowship
for
graduate industrial engineering education; the Dwight D. Garner
Scholarship
Fund and the A. O. Putnam Memorial Scholarship for undergraduate students. 
Deadline: 2/15/98.  Contact: 404/449-0461; fax 404/263-8532;
wleake@www.iienet.org, or http://www.iienet.org.
- - - - - - - - - - - -


AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN 
EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION AWARDS

The Annie Jump Cannon Award in Astronomy honors a woman astronomer
pursuing
significant postdoctoral research in astronomy.  The AAUW Recognition
Award
for Emerging Scholars recognizes the early professional achievements of a
nontenured woman scholar.  Deadline: 2/10/98.  Contact: 319/337-1716; fax
202/872-1425; foundation@mail.aauw.org;
http://www.aauw.org/3000/fdnfelgra.html.
- - - - - - - - - - - -


AMERICAN POLITICAL SCIENCE 
ASSOCIATION (APSA)

Congressional Fellowships provide $28,000 for political scientists,
journalists and communications specialists to work as congressional aides
for
nine months.  Deadline: 12/1/97.  The Minority Fellows Program is designed
to
increase the number of minority Ph.D.'s in political science and encourage
institutions to provide financial assistance to them and the Minority
Identification Project is a collaboration of undergraduate programs and
graduate schools in political science to interest minority undergraduate
students in graduate study and to help further diversify the political
science
profession.  Deadline: 11/1/97.  The Ralph Bunche Summer Institute
introduces
African-American students to graduate study and encourages application to
Ph.D. programs.  Deadline: 2/1/98.  The APSA Research Grant Program
supports
research in all fields of political science.  Proposals will be accepted
beginning 12/1/97.  Deadline: 2/1/98.  Contact: 202/483-2512; fax
202/483-2657; apsa@apsanet.org; http://www.apsanet.org.
- - - - - - - - - - - -


DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE MULTIDISCIPLINARY 
RESEARCH PROGRAM OF THE UNIVERSITY 
RESEARCH INITIATIVE (MURI)

The Multidisciplinary Research Program supports university teams whose
research efforts intersect more than one traditional science and
engineering
discipline. Through this MURI competition, the DoD expects to make awards
in
the thirteen specific research topics listed below.  Awards will be made
by
the Army Research Office, the Office of Naval Research, and the Air Force
Office of Scientific Research.  

1) Engineering of Nanostructures and Devices; 2) Computational Tools for
Design, Analysis and Optimization of Nanometer Scale Devices and
Operation; 3)
Nanoscience:  Size and Distribution Control of Self-Assembled
Semiconductor
Nanostructures for Multispectral Detector Arrays; 4) Nanoelectronics:  Low
Power, High Performance Components and Circuits; 5) Carbon Clusters and
Nanotubes Biomimetics; 6) Olfactory Sensing; 7) Adaptive Optoelectronic
Eye;
8) Biological Detection Systems for Electromagnetic Spectral Signatures;
9)
Biomimetic Robotics Compact Power Sources; 10) Micro Thermal Engines; 11)
Explosive-Driven Power Generation for Directed-Energy Munitions; 12)
Compact
Power Sources:  Heterojunction Power Switching Mobile Wireless
Communications;
13) Digital Communication Devices Based on Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos. 
Deadline: 10/28/97.  Contact: ORPD for the complete announcement.
- - - - - - - - - - - -


NEC FOUNDATION OF AMERICA

Areas of interest of the NEC Foundation are science and technology
education,
secondary schools and technology to assist people with disabilities.
Funds
are provided for awards/prizes, conferences/seminars, demonstration,
general
operating, project/program, research, seed money, and training.  Deadline:
11/1/97; 5/1/98.
Contact: 516/753-7021; fax 516/753-7096; reidenbb@ccgate/ml.nec.com;
http:www.nec.com/web/company/foundation/index.html.
- - - - - - - - - - - -


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

The Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) invites
grant
preapplications for projects that improve postsecondary education
opportunities.  FIPSE is particularly interested in projects that meet one
or
more of the following priorities.

* Projects to support new ways of ensuring equal access to postsecondary
education, and to improve rates of retention and program completion,
especially for low-income and under-represented minority students.

* Projects to improve campus climates for learning by creating an
environment
that is safe, welcoming, and conducive to academic growth for all
students.

* Projects to support innovative reforms of undergraduate, graduate, and
professional curricula that improve not only what students learn, but how
they
learn.

* Projects to make more productive use of resources to improve teaching
and
learning; and to increase learning productivity.

* Projects to support the professional development of faculty by assessing
and
rewarding effective teaching; promoting new and more effective teaching
methods; and improving the preparation of graduate students who will be
future
faculty members.

* Projects to promote innovative school-college partnerships and to
improve
the preparation of K-12 teachers.

* Projects to disseminate innovative postsecondary educational programs
which
have already been locally developed, implemented, and evaluated.

Deadline for transmittal of preapplications is 10/24/97.  Call
202/708-5750
for more information; 202/358-3041 or e-mail FIPSE@ED.GOV for
applications.
- - - - - - - - - - - -


WILBUR FOUNDATION

The Wilbur Foundation provides funding in the field of humanities,
especially
history, literature, religion, and philosophy, for projects to enhance or
preserve the "permanent things" of society.  Contact:   Gary R. Ricks,
Chief
Executive Officer, P.O. Box 3370, Santa Barbara, CA 93130-3370.  Deadline:
12/31/1997.
- - - - - - - - - - - -


AMERICAN DIGESTIVE HEALTH FOUNDATION

Members of the American Gastroenterological Association, the American
Society
for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, and the American Association for the Study
of
Liver Diseases may apply for or sponsor someone for the following awards.
The
Miles and Shirley Fiterman Foundation Awards for Clinical Research
($30,000
each): the Hugh R. Butt Award in Hepatology or Nutrition and the Joseph B.
Kirsner Award in Gastroenterology.  The Miles and Shirley Fiterman
Foundation
Awards for Basic Research ($30,000) provide supplemental support to
ongoing
projects.  The Jan Albrecht Commitment to Clinical Research Award in Liver
Diseases provides $25,000/yr. for two years for junior investigators
performing clinical research in liver-related areas.  Deadline: 1/9/98. 
Contact: Candance L. Blank, Research Awards Program Assistant,
301/654-2635;
fax 301/654-1140; http://www.gastro.org; http://www.asge.org.
- - - - - - - - - - - -


NASA: CLASSROOM OF THE FUTURE (COTF)

The Classroom of the Future, NASA's principle research and development
program
for K-12 educational technologies, is seeking researchers in the following
areas: computer science, psychology, education, educational technology,
and
alternative assessment.  COTF combines NASA-developed scientific data,
advanced instrumentation, and expertise to create curriculum materials and
services which include distance learning opportunities, model inservice
and
preservice teacher education programs, multimedia materials,
internet-accessible tools and resources, as well as reports, monographs,
and papers. 
The NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship Program provides $10,000 for research.
The
COTF Postdoctoral Research Program provides $35,000/yr. for research under
the
guidance of COTF staff.  The COTF Doctoral Internship Program provides
$12,000
for a six-month internship under COTF staff.  Deadline: 3/2/98.  The COTF
Summer Program for Graduate Students provides $3,000 for students who have
completed 40 or more graduate credits in a doctoral program to participate
in
ongoing COTF research projects under the supervision of COTF staff.
Deadline:
12/15/97.  Contact: Steven McGee, 304/243-4308 or mcgee@cotf.edu.
- - - - - - - - - - - -


NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS (NEA)

The Urban Forum, a series of symposia and lectures on issues affecting the
design and development of American cities, will provide $50,000 for
three-four
forums.  Program Solicitation PS 97-04 is scheduled for release
approximately
9/2/97.  Proposal Deadline: 10/2/97.  Contact: William Hummel,
202/682-5482.
- - - - - - - - - - - -


DERMATOLOGY FOUNDATION

Funds are provided for the support of research and research training in
cancer
and other diseases of the skin, hair and nails.  The Career Development
Award
in Skin Research is to assist in the transition from fellowship to
established
investigator.  The Clinical Career Development Award is intended to
enhance
the academic career of a clinician-scientist in the early stages of career
development.  The Health Care Policy Clinical Career Development Award is
designed to support establishment and development of health policy careers
for
dermatologists.  The Dermatologists Investigator Research Fellowship Award
and
the Fellowships provide funds for post-doctoral fellows.  Grants are
awarded
to initiate research projects for research in skin cancer, dermatologic
surgery and oncology, and epidermolysis bullosa.  Contact: 847/328-2256;
fax
847/328-0509; dfgen@dermfnd.org; http://www.dermfnd.org.  Deadline:
10/1/97.
- - - - - - - - - - - -


AMERICAN SCHOOLS OF ORIENTAL RESEARCH

Areas of interest are anthropology, archaeology, Biblical studies,
epigraphy,
history, history of art and architecture, literature, philology,
prehistory
and topography, relating in particular to the Middle East.  Funds are
provided
for fellowships, professorships, and visiting scholars at the Albright
Institute of Archaeological Research in Jerusalem or Cyprus American
Archaeological Research Institute in Nicosia.  Mesopotamian Fellowships
are
intended to encourage study and research about Mesopotamia.  The Endowment
for
Biblical Research Summer Research and Travel aims to encourage the study
of
the Biblical world.  Deadlines vary.  Contact: 617/353-6570; fax
617/353-6575;
asor@bu.edu; http://scholar.cc.emory.edu/scripts/ASOR/ASOR-MENU.html.

-- Carl Fox, Director of Research and Program Development.
*******


BILLBOARD

COMPUTER DIALIN PROCEDURES CHANGED

Computer Center Network Services has been working on a project to
implement
additional higher speed remote access dialin facilities. The new
facilities
consist of 184 modems supporting speeds up to 33.6kbs, and utilizes point
to
point protocol (PPP), allowing multi-protocol connectivity. The addition
of
multi-protocol support provides simultaneous connectivity to Web and
Novell
servers, similar to a workstation that is currently connected directly to
the
campus network. PPP will also allow easier more efficient connection setup
procedure and improved security to the UND campus network and the
Internet. 

The new dialin number and procedures for changing to the new dialin
facilities
are available as Computer Center User Notes I1 (PPP dial-up access with
Windows 95), I2 (PPP dial-up access with Windows 3.1), I4 (PPP dial-up
access
with a Macintosh), and I5 (Non-PPP dial-up access). These User Notes are
available at the Computer Center Learning Lab (Memorial Union 201), Upson
II
(basement & third floor documentation racks), and on the Computer Center
Home
Page (http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/CC). 

NOTICE: Users will have to change to the PPP protocol to connect. Dial-up
software must be reconfigured; putting the new phone number in existing
software will not work. To obtain the new dial-up number please refer to
the
appropriate User Note. Macintosh users will need to obtain the Free PPP
software. MacSLIP and InterSLIP do not support PPP connections. FreePPP is
included on the Macintosh Connect software. User Note #I4 includes
instructions on how to obtain a copy of this software. 

Non-PPP connections will also change. This includes Procomm, Windows
terminal, MS-Kermit, or MacKermit type software. Procedures for logging on
using this
type of software is also available as User note I5.

-- Doris Bornhoeft, Computer Center.
*******

DEPARTMENTS, STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS INVITED
TO PLACE INFORMATION ONLINE

Departments, offices, and student organizations are invited to place
entries
on UNDInfo, the University's online menu system. It contains directories,
calendars, academic information, job openings, news and more, and we'd
like to
add your information to the system, which is accessible worldwide. We'll
train
you in placing information online; the only requirement is a computer
hooked
to the Comptuer Center mainframe. There is no charge. Student
organizations
are more than welcome to place information about their groups online;
their
only additional requirement is an advisor's name so we have someone to
contact
when school is not in session. If you're interested, please call me at
777-3621 for more information. -- Jan Orvik (University Relations),
Co-Manager,
UNDInfo. 
*******

NOMINATIONS SOUGHT FOR ADA COMMITTEE

The Affirmative Action Office seeks members for Americans With
Disabilities
Act (ADA) Advisory Committee. The purpose of the committee is to provide
input
to the Affirmative Action Office/ADA Coordinator on disability issues; to
review progress of the University toward making the campus accessible in
terms
of physical access, services, employment, and educational programs; to
undertake special projects related to disability issues; and to assist in
promoting disability concerns as part of the University's diversity
efforts.
Disabled and non-disabled faculty, staff and students are encouraged to
participate. Contact the Affirmative Action Office if you are interested
at
777-4171 voice/TDD, Box 7097 for campus mail, or e-mail
sally_page@mail.und.nodak.edu). -- Sally Page, Affirmative Action
officer/ADA
Coordinator.
*******

FREE COUNSELING OFFERED

The UND Psychological Services Center is offering free confidential crisis
counseling for flood-related issues. Please call 777-3691 for telephone or
on-site appointments. -- Psychological Services Center.
*******

UNIVERSITY LETTER SURVEY RESULTS TALLIED

The results from the February University Letter survey have been tallied.
Of
2,500 surveys mailed out, 998 were returned, with a response rate of 42
percent.  About 60 percent receive University Letter electronically; 64
percent prefer the paper copy, though some do like the environmental
savings
of e-mail.  For a full look at the results and comments received from
respondents, please see last week's issue of University Letter.

Our office (University Relations) is considering the possibility of
offering a
choice between paper and electronic copies of University Letter.  But
first,
the cost of such a move must be estimated before a decision is made.  A
subscription query form was mailed last week. Please fill out the form and
return it to me by Monday, Sept. 15.  -- Jan Orvik, Editor, University
Letter.
*******

DEFENSIVE DRIVING COURSE OFFERED

A free defensive driving course for UND employees and a member of their
family
will be held Wednesday, Sept. 10, from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at 211
Rural
Technology Center, and again on Wednesday, Sept. 24, from 12:30 to 4:30
p.m.
in the State Conference Room, #105, at the Energy and Environmental
Research
Center. This course is required in accordance with a memo received from
Paul
Feyereisen, State Fleet Manager in Bismarck, on Oct. 2, 1996. The
following
criteria was given for any UND employee who is authorized to drive State
Fleet
vehicles:

1. Any individual who operates a State Fleet vehicle daily.

2. Any individual who operates a State Fleet vehicle at least once a
month.

3. Any individual who has received a traffic violation or had an accident
while operating a State Fleet vehicle within the past calendar year.

4. Any operator of seven, 12, and 15 passenger vans transporting four or
more
passengers at least once per month.

This course may reduce your North Dakota insurance premiums and may remove
points from your driving record. We will be holding subsequent classes the
second and fourth Wednesday of each month until Nov. 26. The second
Wednesday
class will be from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., and the fourth Wednesday
course
will be held from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. These will be held at the Rural
Technology Center, room 211, on 42nd Street and University Avenue. Please
call
the Safety Office at 777-3341 to register and get directions. -- Norma
Haley,
Safety Office.
*******


ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

WOMEN'S CENTER LISTS EVENTS

The Wednesday, Sept. 10, Feast and Focus program at noon in the Women's
Center, 305 Hamline Street, is "Tell Them I'm A Mermaid." Women with
disabilities are typically a group that has been overlooked by both
disability
organizations and the feminist movement. We will present a film about
seven
extraordinary women with disabilities who share their experiences through
song, humor, music, and choreography. These women discuss their feelings
about
how society perceives them and how they perceive themselves. The outcome
is an
original, dynamic piece of creative work that grew out of an acting
workshop.

The Thursday, Sept. 11, For Women Only program will be "Dying Machine or
Living Light." Proponents of Aryuveda see the body as a material
expression of
divine intelligence while Western medicine sees the body as a kind of
machine
with parts. Our focus for this program will be on Aryuveda, which
concentrates
on every practical detail of achieving physical, mental and emotional
balance
in order to perfect our individual relationship with the Divine Power. Do
you
know what your dosha is?

Please join us. -- Donna iver Gorge, near Walhalla,
and begin the day with a guided tour of the region's scenic vistas, ideal
for
viewing and photographing the changing leaves. Home to moose, elk, deer
and a
variety of birds, it is a haven for people who appreciate the great
outdoors.

You'll also enjoy experiencing of French cuisine and culture.
Internationally
renowned Master Chef, Daniel Degavrillac, will guide you in  preparing
French
pastries. 

The French language you learn will be appropriate for adults who want to
learn
practical expressions for travel and social situations. This is a
comfortable
setting in which to build confidence and experience in speaking French.

The morning tour and walk  will be led by Kate Stevenson, a native of
Walhalla
who is knowledgeable in the lore and the unique characteristics of the
region.
She teaches French and German at Jamestown College and is a specialist in
French language programming. Degavrillac left the French Pyrenees for
California where he practiced the art of fine cuisine and now lives in
Walhalla. UND French professor, Virgil Benoit, specializes in French
regional
culture and will help you learn through experiencing the language.

The $45 fee includes a bus tour, continental breakfast, lunch,
instruction,
and supplies for the cooking class.  

To register, or for more information, contact me. -- Monique Clifford,
Continuing Education, 777-2663.
*******


CALENDAR OF EVENTS



SEPTEMBER 1997

(Please contact Mavis at the Office of University Relations, Box 7144, or
call
777-4304, if you wish to make changes or have an event included.)


Wed. through Sat., Sept. 3-6 -- FALL FEE PAYMENT AND CHECK DISBURSEMENT
(Sept.
3-5 at Memorial Union Ballroom, Sept. 6 at Business Office, Twamley Hall).

Fri., Sept. 5 -- MEETING, Institutional Review Board, 305 Twamley Hall, 4
p.m.

Fri., Sept. 5 -- CONCERT, Heartland of America Air Force Band, Chester
Fritz
Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

Fri. and Sat., Sept. 5-6 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND at Grand Canyon Tourney.

Mon., Sept. 8 -- GRADUATE COMMITTEE MEETING, 305 Twamley Hall, 3:05 to 6
p.m.

Tues., Sept. 9 -- LAST DAY TO ADD A FULL-TERM COURSE FOR FALL SEMESTER.

Tues., Sept. 9 -- ON TEACHING BOX LUNCH SESSION, "Keeping the Lecture
Alive
and Lively," Memorial Room, Memorial Union, noon; leaders will be Ron Pynn
(Political Science), Bev Uhlenberg (Teaching and Learning), and Frank
White
(Sociology); call the Office of Instructional Development, 777-3325, to
reserve a complimentary box lunch no later than noon Tuesday, Sept. 2.

Tues., Sept. 9 -- COUNSELING COLLOQUIUM, 316 Montgomery Hall, 12:30 to
1:45
p.m.; topic will be announced in the University Letter.

Wed., Sept. 10 -- TELEPHONE DIRECTORY INFORMATION FORMS due in the
President's
Office; call 777-4304 for more information.

Wed., Sept. 10 -- FREE DEFENSIVE DRIVING COURSE for UND employees and a
member
of their family, 211 Rural Technology Center, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.;
call
the Safety Office at 777-3341 to register and get directions; repeated
Wed.,
Sept. 24, from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. in the State Conference Room, #105, at
the
Energy and Environmental Research Center.

Wed., Sept. 10 -- FEAST AND FOCUS PROGRAM, "Tell Them I'm A Mermaid,"
Women's
Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

Wed., Sept. 10 -- LESSONS AT LUNCH, a collection of eight fun and
informative
sessions on various topics, including etiquette, car care, and dressing
well
on a budget held on alternate Wednesdays, Leadership Inspiration Center,
third
floor, Memorial Union, noon to 1 p.m.

Thurs., Sept. 11 -- COMPUTER SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM, "BotWorld: A Cognitively
Engineered Multi-Agent Environment," presented by Henry Hexmoor, 106 CAS
II, 4
p.m.

Thurs., Sept. 11 -- LECTURE, Carl Foster, Director of the Milwaukee Heart
Institute, will present a lecture on the Surgeon General's Report on
Physical
Activity and Health, Reed Keller Auditorium (Room 1350), Wold
Bio-Information
Learning Resource Center, Health Sciences Building, noon to 1 p.m.; all
faculty, staff and students are welcome to attend.

Thurs., Sept. 11 -- LEEPS LECTURE, the first LEEPS (Leading Edge of Earth
and
Planetary Sciences) lecture will be presented by Philip Bennett,
University of
Texas, Austin, "Water Microbes and Rocks: The Geochemical Ecology of
Contaminated Ground Water," Leonard Hall Lecture Bowl, noon.

Thurs., Sept. 11 -- INTERDISCIPLINARY, SLIDE-ILLUSTRATED LECTURE, "The
Gerber
Baby Heads South -- Constructed Identity Across the Century," presented by
Mercedes Lynn de Uriarte, Associate Professor of Journalism and Latin
American
Studies at the University of Texas, Austin, 334 O'Kelly Hall, 2 to 3:15
p.m.

Thurs., Sept. 11 -- IMMUNIZATION UPDATE 1997, a live interactive program,
Memorial Union Lecture Bowl, noon to 2:30 p.m.; registration fee is $5;
call
746-2525 to register.

Thurs., Sept. 11 -- FOR WOMEN ONLY PROGRAM, "Dying Machine or Living
Light,"
Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

Fri., Sept. 12 -- "PRACTICE OPPORTUNITIES IN NORTH DAKOTA," sponsored by
the
School of Medicine and Health Sciences is an event designed to encourage
medical students and residents-in-training to consider establishing their
practices in North Dakota, Fargo Ramada Inn Plaza Suites and Conference
Center.

Fri., Sept. 12 -- 45TH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION DAY, the School of
Communication
will bring together leading journalists from North Dakota, Minnesota and
Manitoba to tell how they covered the 1997 Red River Valley Flood; public
relations practitioners will talk about the task of communicating in a
crisis,
Memorial Union; registration begins at 10 a.m., followed by a panel on
disaster research, "The Social Construction of a Disaster," at 10:30 a.m.
in
the Lecture Bowl; two concurrent panels, "Broadcasting in a Disaster," and
"Analyzing Newspaper Coverage of the Red River Valley Flood," will start
at 2
p.m.

Fri. and Sat., Sept. 12-13 -- VOLLEYBALL, North Central Conference/NSIC,
Marshall, Minn.

Sat., Sept. 13 -- FALL COLORS AND FRENCH CUISINE, a guided tour of the
Pembina
River Gorge in Walhalla will begin the day with internationally renowned
Master Chef Daniel Degavrillac, guiding participants in preparing French
pastries; fee is $45 which includes a bus tour, continental breakfast,
lunch,
instruction, and supplies for the cooking class; call Monique at 777-2663
to
register or for more information.

Sat., Sept. 13 -- CELEBRATE A SEASON OF CHANGE with the Schubert Club
Gamelan
Ensemble, a 20-member orchestra from St. Paul, North Dakota Museum of Art,
UND
campus, 8 p.m.; Gamelan music is a set of mostly percussion instruments
constructed and tuned as a single unified ensemble; the music can be loud
and
exuberant, but just as frequently it is subdued and tranquil -- as music
which
has been described as "flowing water"; event is free and open to everyone.

Sat., Sept. 13 -- FOOTBALL, UND at Moorhead State University, Moorhead,
Minn.,
1:30 p.m.

Sun., Sept. 14 -- CONCERT, Collin Raye, Chester Fritz Auditorium, 4 p.m.

Sun., Sept. 14, through Sat., Sept. 20 -- POTATO BOWL.

Mon., Sept. 15 -- WOMEN IN POLITICS FORUM, featuring Attorney General
Heidi
Heitkamp, State Treasurer Kathi Gilmore, State Senator Judy DeMers, and
State
Representatives Linda Christenson, Lois Delmore, Roxanne Jensen, Amy
Kliniske,
North Dakota Museum of Art, 6 p.m.; call Steve at 772-8616 for more
information.

Mon., Sept. 15 -- LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP SERIES, "Leadership Through
Effective
Interpersonal Skills," presented by Tom Clifford, UND President Emeritus,
Leadership Inspiration Center, third floor, Memorial Union, 3 p.m.;
sessions
are free and open to the public; (series continues every Monday through
Oct.
27).

Mon., Sept. 15, through Thurs., Sept. 25 -- ART EXHIBITION, Diana
Thornycroft,
Photographs, Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center.

Tues., Sept. 16 -- COUNSELING COLLOQUIUM, 316 Montgomery Hall, 12:30 to
1:45
p.m.; topic will be announced in the University Letter.

Wed., Sept. 17 -- DOCTORAL EXAM for Mark A. Kapphahn, a candidate for the
Ph.D. degree with a major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1360
School
of Medicine, 10:30 a.m.; members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to
attend.

Wed., Sept. 17 -- FEAST AND FOCUS PROGRAM, "Creating A Medicine Shield,"
Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.

Wed., Sept. 17 -- RETIREMENT RECEPTION for Tom Robinson (Mathematics),
Alumni
Center, 2:30 to 4:30 p.m.

Wed., Sept. 17 -- ANNUAL BOOK SALE, Chester Fritz Library, outside in
front of
the Library facing University Avenue, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. (in case of rain,
the
sale will be held Sept. 24); free parking available at the Chester Fritz
Auditorium with a free shuttle service to the Library from 9 a.m. to 2:30
p.m.

Thurs., Sept. 18 -- TEST, College-Level Examination Program (CLEP), Room
200,
McCannel Hall, 8:30 a.m.

Thurs., Sept. 18 -- OPEN HOUSE to showcase services, Chester Fritz
Library, 9
a.m. to 3 p.m.; tours will be offered and entertainment is planned.

Thurs., Sept. 18 -- FOR WOMEN ONLY, Rites of Passage, "Warrior Woman:
Finding
the Courage to Face the Challenges," Women's Center, 305 Hamline St.,
noon.

Thurs. and Fri., Sept. 18-19 -- MEETING, North Dakota State Board of
Higher
Education, Grand Forks.

Fri., Sept. 19 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND at Morningside College, Sioux City,
Iowa, 7
p.m.

Sat., Sept. 20 -- TEST, National Board of Certified Occupational
Therapists
(NBCOT), Room 116, Witmer Hall, 8:30 a.m.

Sat., Sept. 20 -- FOOTBALL, UND vs. South Dakota State University (POTATO
BOWL), Memorial Stadium, 2 p.m.

Sat., Sept. 20 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND at South Dakota State University,
Brookings,
S.D., 3 p.m.

Mon., Sept. 22 -- LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP SERIES, "I'm Not a Leader, I'm Just
a
Volunteer," presented by John Marshall, Grand Forks attorney and community
leader, Leadership Inspiration Center, third floor, Memorial Union, 3
p.m.;
sessions are free and open to the public; (series continues every Monday
through Oct. 27).

Tues., Sept. 23 -- LAST DAY ON WHICH CANDIDATES MAY APPLY FOR A DEGREE.

Tues., Sept. 23 -- COUNSELING COLLOQUIUM, 316 Montgomery Hall, 12:30 to
1:45
p.m.; topic will be announced in the University Letter.

Tues., Sept. 23 -- VOLLEYBALL, UND vs. South Dakota State University,
Hyslop
Sports Center, 7 p.m.

Tues., Sept. 23 -- INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARD deadline for proposals
requiring
full board review for Fri., Oct. 3, meeting.

Wed., Sept. 24 -- FREE DEFENSIVE DRIVING COURSE for UND employees and a
member
of their family, State Conference Room, #105, Energy and Environmental
Research Center, 12:30 to 4:30 p.m.; call the Safety Office at 777-3341 to
register and get directions.

Wed., Sept. 24 -- RETIREMENT RECEPTION for Olive Weber who retired June 30
after 18 years of service to UND, the last 15 with TRIO Programs; Alumni
Center, 2 to 4 p.m.

Wed., Sept. 24 -- FEAST AND FOCUS PROGRAM, "I Wish I Could Have Said No,"
Women's Center, 305 Hamline St., noon.
*******


REMINDER! The attachments referred to are not included in the electronic
form of the University Letter. However, you will find the attachments
with the paper copy.
  
UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and
distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is
also available electronically through UNDInfo, the University's menu
system on the Internet. The address is http://www.und.nodak.edu.
  
All articles submitted for publication should be labeled "University
Letter" and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic
submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu. Attachments to
University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number.
University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations,
Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.
  
UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.
  
*******


  





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